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Viewing 1 to 30 of 1242
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2454
Yiqi Jia, Gangfeng Tan, Cenyi Liu, Shengguang Xiong, Zehao Yang, Xingmang Zheng
Abstract In these years, the advantages of using phase change material (PCM) in the thermal management of electric power battery has been wide spread. Because of the thermal conductivity of most phase change material (eg.wax) is low, many researchers choose to add high conductivity materials (such as black lead). However, the solid-liquid change material has large mass, poor flow-ability and corrosively. Therefore, it still stays on experiential stage. In this paper, the Thermal characteristics of power battery firstly be invested and the requirements of thermal management system also be discussed. Then a new PCM thermal management has been designed which uses pure water as liquid phase change material, adopts PCM with a reflux device for thermal management.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2141
Fengmei Li, Peng Ke
Abstract For the ice protection of the engine air induction part manufactured with low thermal conductivity composite material, the combined heating method using interior impingement and exterior air film has certain advantages. To study the influence of the external jet air film on the impingement characteristics of droplets, the numerical simulation method of three dimensional water droplet impingement based on Eulerian method was developed and verified by experimental data from references. The droplets impingement characteristics under three different blowing ratios and two different velocities were then investigated based on the configuration of 3D cylinder with two parallel jet holes.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0034
Michele Battistoni, Carlo N. Grimaldi, Valentino Cruccolini, Gabriele Discepoli, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract Water injection in highly boosted gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines has become an attractive area over the last few years as a way of increasing efficiency, enhancing performance and reducing emissions. The technology and its effects are not new, but current gasoline engine trends for passenger vehicles have several motivations for adopting this technology today. Water injection enables higher compression ratios, optimal spark timing and elimination of fuel enrichment at high load, and possibly replacement of EGR. Physically, water reduces charge temperature by evaporation, dilutes combustion, and varies the specific heat ratio of the working fluid, with complex effects. Several of these mutually intertwined aspects are investigated in this paper through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, focusing on a turbo-charged GDI engine with port water injection (PWI). Different strategies for water injection timing, pressure and spray targeting are investigated.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0052
Nicolo Cavina, Nahuel Rojo, Andrea Businaro, Alessandro Brusa, Enrico Corti, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract This paper presents simulation and experimental results of the effects of intake water injection on the main combustion parameters of a turbo-charged, direct injection spark ignition engine. Water injection is more and more considered as a viable technology to further increase specific output power of modern spark ignition engines, enabling extreme downsizing concepts and the associated efficiency increase benefits. The paper initially presents the main results of a one-dimensional simulation analysis carried out to highlight the key parameters (injection position, water-to-fuel ratio and water temperature) and their effects on combustion (in-cylinder and exhaust temperature reduction and knock tendency suppression). The main results of such study have then been used to design and conduct preliminary experimental tests on a prototype direct-injection, turbocharged spark ignition engine, modified to incorporate a new multi-point water injection system in the intake runners.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0062
Cinzia Tornatore, Daniela Siano, Luca Marchitto, Arturo Iacobacci, Gerardo Valentino, Fabio Bozza
Abstract Knock occurrence and fuel enrichment, which is required at high engine speed and load to limit the turbine inlet temperature, are the major obstacles to further increase performance and efficiency of down-sized turbocharged spark ignited engines. A technique that has the potential to overcome these restrictions is based on the injection of a precise amount of water within the mixture charge that can allow to achieve important benefits on knock mitigation, engine efficiency, gaseous and noise emissions. One of the main objectives of this investigation is to demonstrate that water injection (WI) could be a reliable solution to advance the spark timing and make the engine run at leaner mixture ratios with strong benefits on knock tendency and important improvement on fuel efficiency.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0149
Fabian Hoppe, Matthias Thewes, Joerg Seibel, Andreas Balazs, Johannes Scharf
Abstract Gasoline engine powertrain development for 2025 and beyond is focusing on finding cost optimal solutions by balancing electrification and combustion engine efficiency measures. Besides Miller cycle application, cooled exhaust gas recirculation and variable compression ratio, the injection of water has recently gained increased attention as a promising technology for significant CO2 reduction. This paper gives deep insight into the fuel consumption reduction potential of direct water injection. Single cylinder investigations were performed in order to investigate the influence of water injection in the entire engine map. In addition, different engine configurations were tested to evaluate the influence of the altering compression ratios and Miller timings on the fuel consumption reduction potential with water injection.
2017-06-29
Journal Article
2017-01-9281
Nuria Garrido Gonzalez, Roland Baar, Jens Drueckhammer, Christoph Kaeppner
Water vapor is, aside from carbon dioxide, the major fossil fuel combustion by-product. Depending on its concentration in the exhaust gas mixture as well as on the exhaust gas pressure, its condensation temperature can be derived. For typical gasoline engine stoichiometric operating conditions, the water vapor dew point lies at about 53 °C. The exhaust gas mixture does however contain some pollutants coming from the fuel, engine oil, and charge air, which can react with the water vapor and affect the condensation process. For instance, sulfur trioxide present in the exhaust, reacts with water vapor forming sulfuric acid. This acid builds a binary system with water vapor, which presents a dew point often above 100 °C. Exhaust composition after leaving the combustion chamber strongly depends on fuel type, engine concept and operation point. Furthermore, the exhaust undergoes several chemical after treatments.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0123
Saiful Bari
Abstract In general, diesel engines have an efficiency of about 35% and hence, a considerable amount of energy is expelled to the ambient air. In water-cooled engines, about 25%, 33% and 7% of the input energy are wasted in the coolant, exhaust gas, and friction, respectively. The heat from the exhaust gas of diesel engines can be an important heat source to provide additional power and improve overall engine efficiency. Studies related to the application of recoverable heat to produce additional power in medium capacity diesel engines (< 100 kW) using separate Rankine cycle are scarce. To recover heat from the exhaust of the engine, an efficient heat exchanger is necessary. For this type of application, the heat exchangers are needed to be designed in such a way that it can handle the heat load with reasonable size, weight and pressure drop. This paper describes the study of a diesel generator-set attached with an exhaust heat recovery system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1552
Mehriar Dianat, Maciej Skarysz, Graham Hodgson, Andrew Garmory, Martin Passmore
Abstract The motivation for this paper is to predict the flow of water over exterior surfaces of road vehicles. We present simulations of liquid flows on solid surfaces under the influence of gravity with and without the addition of aerodynamic forces on the liquid. This is done using an implementation of a Coupled Level Set Volume of Fluid method (CLSVOF) multiphase approach implemented in the open source OpenFOAM CFD code. This is a high fidelity interface-resolving method that solves for the velocity field in both phases without restrictions on the flow regime. In the current paper the suitability of the approach to Exterior Water Management (EWM) is demonstrated using the representative test cases of a continuous liquid rivulet flowing along an inclined surface with a channel located downstream perpendicular to the oncoming flow.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1328
Yoshiteru Tanaka, Jun Yamamura, Atsushi Murakawa, Hiroshi Tanaka, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract When vehicles run on the flooded road, water enters to the engine compartment and sometimes reaches the position of the air intake duct and electrical parts and causes the reliability problems. Numerical simulation is an effective tool for this phenomenon because it can not only evaluate the water level before experiment but also identify the intrusion route. Recently, the gap around the engine cooling modules tends to become smaller and the undercover tends to become bigger than before in order to enhance the vehicle performance (e.g., aerodynamics, exterior noise). Leakage tightness around the engine compartment becomes higher and causes an increase of the buoyancy force from the water. Therefore the vehicle attitude change is causing a greater impact on the water level. This paper describes the development of a water level prediction method in engine compartment while running on the flooded road by using the coupled multibody and fluid dynamics.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1327
Prashant Khapane, Vivek Chavan, Uday Ganeshwade
Abstract Physical testing of a vehicle wading through water is performed to gauge its capability to traverse through shallow to deep levels of water, wherein various vehicle performance parameters are observed, recorded and analysed. Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has instigated and established a comprehensive CAE test procedure for assessing the same, which makes use of overset mesh (in a CFD environment) for a non-traditional approach to vehicle motion. The paper presents investigations made into the established wading physics, in order to optimise the splashing and water jet modelling. Large Scale Interface model was implemented instead of the previously standardised VOF-VOF fluid phase interaction model, and a comparison is made between the two. The implemented wheel rotation approach was scrutinised as well and appropriate inferences are drawn.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0540
Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza, Luigi Teodosio, Gerardo Valentino
Abstract In this work, a promising technique, consisting of a liquid Water Injection (WI) at the intake ports, is investigated to overcome over-fueling and delayed combustions typical of downsized boosted engines, operating at high loads. In a first stage, experimental tests are carried out in a spark-ignition twin-cylinder turbocharged engine at a fixed rotational speed and medium-high loads. In particular, a spark timing and a water-to-fuel ratio sweep are both specified, to analyze the WI capability in increasing the knock-limited spark advance. In a second stage, the considered engine is schematized in a 1D framework. The model, developed in the GT-Power™ environment, includes user defined procedures for the description of combustion and knock phenomena. Computed results are compared with collected data for all the considered operating conditions, in terms of average performance parameters, in-cylinder pressure cycles, burn rate profiles, and knock propensity, as well.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0538
ROBERTO TETSUO FUJIYAMA, CESAR TADEU NASSER MEDEIROS BRANCO, CARLINDO LINS PEREIRA FILHO, BERNARDO BORGES POMPEU NETO, PAULO SÉRGIO MAGALHÃES FERREIR DE SOUZA, DENILSON DA SILVA COSTA
Abstract Composite materials are alternative materials that come rising fast at last decades. With a view to the use of lighter and stronger materials that can replace ferrous materials, arise composites reinforced by synthetic fibers. Moreover, natural fibers emerge as an alternative reinforcement for the synthetic fibers because they are costly. Thus the present study aims to evaluate the behavior of particulate composite reinforced by sisal fibers in the size of 15 mm emerged in fluids such as water, salt water, and lubricating oil. The specimens were made according to ASTM D638M and aging it period of sixty days. After two months, the specimens were subjected to tensile tests, and determined the tensile strength results and deformation of the maximum load and the modulus of elasticity. In general, it was observed a reduction in tensile strength of the particulate sisal composite when immersed into the lubricant oil.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2187
Haifeng Liu, Huixiang Zhang, Hu Wang, Xian Zou, Mingfa Yao
Abstract The combustion in low-speed two-stroke marine diesel engines can be characterized as large spatial and temporal scales combustion. One of the most effective measures to reduce NOx emissions is to reduce the local maximum combustion temperature. In the current study, multi-dimensional numerical simulations have been conducted to explore the potential of Miller cycle, high compression ratio coupled with EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) and WEF (water emulsified fuel) to improve the trade-off relationship of NOx-ISFC (indicated specific fuel consumption) in a low-speed two-stroke marine engine. The results show that the EGR ratio could be reduced combined with WEF to meet the Tier III emission regulation. The penalty on fuel consumption with EGR and WEF could be offset by Miller cycle and high geometric compression ratio.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8155
Devaraj Dasarathan, Jonathan Jilesen, David Croteau, Ray Ayala
Abstract Side window clarity and its effect on side mirror visibility plays a major role in driver comfort. Driving in inclement weather conditions such as rain can be stressful, and having optimal visibility under these conditions is ideal. However, extreme conditions can overwhelm exterior water management devices, resulting in rivulets of water flowing over the a-pillar and onto the vehicle’s side glass. Once on the side glass, these rivulets and the pooling of water they feed, can significantly impair the driver’s ability to see the side mirror and to see outwardly when in situations such as changing lanes. Designing exterior water management features of a vehicle is a challenging exercise, as traditionally, physical testing methods first require a full-scale vehicle for evaluations to be possible. Additionally, common water management devices such as grooves and channels often have undesirable aesthetic, drag, and wind noise implications.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2004
M. Parvez Alam, Dinesh Manoharan
In this paper we discuss about the design and development of an “Autonomous Amphibious Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (AAUAV)” that can fly autonomously to the polluted water areas where human accessibility is formidable to test the water quality. The AAUAV system is an integrated multi-copter with tilt rotor capability to facilitate easy landing, navigation and maneuver on water. A 3D CAD model has been designed and analyzed. A specific propulsion system has been devised and lab tested. A proof of concept model has been made and tested in the field with its instruments to ascertain its technical/ operational feasibility. This system can also be tailored to collect and store the water samples from the polluted sites for further comprehensive research at the laboratory. AAUAV system is the novel solution to the polluted environment through a complete integrated system. This will be an effective alternative for the conventional water sampling techniques.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1960
Yukihisa Takayama
Recently, vehicle production volumes have been increasing, particularly in newly developing countries that often lack adequate infrastructure. These regions utilize many unimproved roads and frequently experience heavy rainfall, requiring robust product features. In contrast, developed countries, with well-maintained infrastructure, have emphasized protection of the environment, requiring automobile manufacturers to target reductions in carbon dioxide emissions. Hub unit bearings, which enable smooth wheel rotation, are mounted at the wheel center. The hub bearing is a critical part which supports the automotive body and requires high reliability. To make environmental progress, hub unit bearings have increasing requirements for low friction. NSK has developed effective grease technologies to meet the diverse requirements of hub unit bearings, such as high reliability and low friction under severe environmental conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1191
Saher Al Shakhshir, Torsten Berning
Abstract Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste heat. One critical technical problem of these fuel cells is still the water management: the proton exchange membrane in the center of these fuel cells has to be hydrated in order to stay proton-conductive while on the other hand excessive liquid water can lead to cell flooding and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0678
Haifeng Lu, Jun Deng, Zongjie Hu, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li, Fangen Yuan, Degang Xie, Shuang Yuan, Yuan Shen
Abstract This research was concerned with the use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) improving the fuel economy over a wide operating range in a downsized boosted gasoline engine. The experiments were performed in a 1.3-Litre turbocharged PFI gasoline engine, equipped with a Low Pressure (LP) water-cooled EGR system. The operating conditions varied from 1500rpm to 4000rpm and BMEP from 2bar to 17bar. Meanwhile, the engine’s typical operating points in NEDC cycle were tested separately. The compression ratio was also changed from 9.5 to 10.5 to pursue a higher thermal efficiency. A pre-compressor throttle was used in the experiment working together with the EGR loop to keep enough EGR rate over a large area of the engine speed and load map. The results indicated that, combined with a higher compression ratio, the LP-EGR could help to reduce the BSFC by 9∼12% at high-load region and 3∼5% at low-load region.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0224
Robin Y. Cash, Edward Lumsdaine, Apoorv Talekar, Bashar AbdulNour
Abstract To address the need of increasing fuel economy requirements, automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are increasing the number of turbocharged engines in their powertrain line-ups. The turbine-driven technology uses a forced induction device, which increases engine performance by increasing the density of the air charge being drawn into the cylinder. Denser air allows more fuel to be introduced into the combustion chamber, thus increasing engine performance. During the inlet air compression process, the air is heated to temperatures that can result in pre-ignition resulting and reduced engine functionality. The introduction of the charge air cooler (CAC) is therefore, necessary to extract heat created during the compression process. The present research describes the physics and develops the optimized simulation method that defines the process and gives insight into the development of CACs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0664
Ahmed E. Hassaneen, Wael I. A. Aly, Gamal Bedair, Mohammed Abdussalam
Abstract The thermal performance of an ammonia-water-hydrogen absorption refrigeration system using the waste exhaust gases of an internal combustion diesel engine as energy source was investigated experimentally. An automotive engine was tested in a bench test dynamometer, with the absorption refrigeration system adapted to the exhaust pipe via a heat exchanger. The engine was tested for different torques (15 N.m, 30 N.m, and 45 N.m). The exhaust gas flow to the heat exchanger built on the generator was controlled manually using two control valves. The refrigerator reached a steady state temperature between 10 and 14.5°C about 3.5 hours after system start up, depending on engine load. The maximum coefficient of performance was 0.10 obtained for the controlled exhaust mass flow case at torque 30 Nm after 3hrs from system startup.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0962
Sadashiva Prabhu S, Nagaraj S Nayak, N. Kapilan
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is a most promising technique for reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from the exhaust of diesel engines. Urea Water Solution (UWS) is injected to hot exhaust gas stream to generate reducing agent ammonia. The droplet evaporation of Urea Water Solution (UWS) is investigated for single droplet in heated environment ranging temperatures 373K-873K theoretically. The theoretical methods which are implemented into CFD code Fire 8.3 from AVL Corp. involve Rapid Mixing model and Diffusion Limit model which consider stationary droplet and variable properties of the UWS. The UWS droplet revealed different evaporation characteristics depending on its ambient temperatures which are numerically predicted by simulated results. The simulated results are validated with experimental values of Wang et al. [9] which are helpful in predicting the evaporation and UWS dosing strategy at different exhaust gas temperatures in real SCR system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0651
Masaki Harada, Takashi Yasuda, Shota Terachi, Sergio Pujols, Jason R. Spenny
Abstract Due to the recent trend emphasizing on environmental friendly, engine supercharger downsizing technology has been under development globally. In this report, the technical knowledge for high performance and high quality water-cooled CAC development is provided. For higher cooling performance, the optimum fin and tube core matrix water-cooled CAC, delivering best performance and quality have been developed. For higher reliability against thermal stress, the detail specifications of water-cooled CAC based on the transient analysis and the simulation technology have been established.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0830
Takashi Nomura, Shigehiko Sato, Jumpei Takahashi, Masayuki Ichiyanagi
Port fuel injection (PFI) injector and direct fuel injection (DI) injector clogging from deposits caused by poor fuel quality, is a concern in emerging countries. Then DI injector deposits are sometimes cleaned by injector cleaners in such situation. However deposit cleaners for PFI injectors have not been developed, because of the lack of research of PFI injector deposits. Through chemical analysis, this study showed them to be water-soluble deposits. Subsequently success was achieved in developing a new gasoline injector cleaner applicable to injector deposits in both types of injectors, through optimization of a surface active agent.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0072
Mohan Makana, Gaurav Kumar, Felix Regin
Abstract Water Wading refers to the situation where a car is moving through relatively deep water at low speed. The challenges of an automotive Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) is to integrate the functional parts like bumper, bumper grille, engine undercover, intake system etc., to enhance the vehicle quality and performance. One of the challenges in vehicle front end and engine room design is to prevent water entry into the air intake system during wading. If significant amount of water enter the air intake, some of the water could subsequently enter the engine cylinder, which would damage the critical components within the engine beyond repair. In general practice wading tests have been carried out during proto stage of vehicle development program to ensure vehicle performance. However a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method for carrying out water wading calculations early during the development phase offers reduction in development cost and time for a new vehicle.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2795
Jayesh Mutyal, Sourabh Shrivastava, Rana Faltsi, Markus Braun
Abstract Stringent diesel emission regulations have been forcing constant reduction in the discharge of particulate matter and nitrogen oxide (NOx). Current state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions are falling short of achieving these limits. For this reason engine manufacturers are looking at different ways to meet the emission regulations. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of oxides of nitrogen with ammonia gas is emerging as preferred technology for meeting stringent NOx emission standards across the world. SCR system designers face several technical challenges, such as avoiding ammonia slip, urea crystallization, low temperature deposits and other potential pitfalls. Simulation can help to develop a deep understanding of these technical challenges and issues, identify root causes of problems and help develop better designs. This paper describes the modeling approach for Urea Water Solution (UWS) spray and its interaction with canister walls and exhaust gases.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2563
Alberto Charro, Solange Baena, Joseph K-W Lam
Abstract The paper presents an extensive assessment of the hygroscopic characteristics of a number of alternative jet fuel blends. These are blended with conventional Jet A-1 to conform with current aviation standards at a 50:50 ratio by volume, except for DSHC (Direct Sugar to Hydrocarbon), which is blended at 10% DSHC and 90% Jet A-1. Given the lack of information available on the water solubility of alternative jet fuels, an effective analysis of experimental data about this characteristic in six different alternatives was performed. These included four ASTM approved alternatives (two Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetics from coal and natural gas, one HEFA (Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids) derived from camelina and DSHC. An extra two alternatives currently under consideration for ASTM approval were also tested; ReadiJet and an ATJ (Alcohol to Jet).
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2499
Fabio Berni, Sebastiano Breda, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Giuseppe Cantore
Abstract A new generation of highly downsized SI engines with specific power output around or above 150 HP/liter is emerging in the sport car market sector. Technologies such as high-boosting, direct injection and downsizing are adopted to increase power density and reduce fuel consumption. To counterbalance the increased risks of pre-ignition, knock or mega-knock, currently made turbocharged SI engines usually operate with high fuel enrichments and delayed (sometimes negative) spark advances. The former is responsible for high fuel consumption levels, while the latter induce an even lower A/F ratio (below 11), to limit the turbine inlet temperature, with huge negative effects on BSFC. A possible solution to increase knock resistance is investigated in the paper by means of 3D-CFD analyses: water/methanol emulsion is port-fuel injected to replace mixture enrichment while preserving, if not improving, indicated mean effective pressure and knock safety margins.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2500
Nic van Vuuren, Gabriele Brizi, Giacomo Buitoni, Lucio Postrioti, Carmine Ungaro
One of the favored automotive exhaust aftertreatment solutions used for nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions reductions is referred to as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), which comprises a catalyst that facilitates the reactions of ammonia (NH3) with the exhaust nitrogen oxides (NOx). It is customary with these systems to generate the NH3 by injecting a liquid aqueous urea solution (AUS-32) into the exhaust. The urea solution is injected into the exhaust and transformed to NH3 by various mechanisms for the SCR reactions. Understanding the spray performance of the AUS-32 injector is critical to proper optimization of the SCR injection system. Results were previously presented from imaging of an AUS-32 injector spray under hot exhaust conditions at the injector spray exit for an exhaust injection application.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1968
Raphael Gukelberger, Gordon J. Bartley, Jess Gingrich, Terrence Alger, Steven Almaraz, Janet Buckingham, Cary Henry
Dedicated Exhaust Gas Recirculation (D-EGR®) technology provides a novel means for fuel efficiency improvement through efficient, on-board generation of H2 and CO reformate [1, 2]. In the simplest form of the D-EGR configuration, reformate is produced in-cylinder through rich combustion of the gasoline-air charge mixture. It is also possible to produce more H2 by means of a Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst, thereby resulting in further combustion improvements and overall fuel consumption reduction. In industrial applications, the WGS reaction has been used successfully for many years. Previous engine applications of this technology, however, have only proven successful to a limited degree. The motivation for this work was to develop and optimize a WGS catalyst which can be employed to a D-EGR configuration of an internal combustion engine. This study consists of two parts.
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