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Viewing 1 to 30 of 17597
Technical Paper
2014-05-20
Y. Gene Liao, Molly O'Malley, Allen Quail
Fuel consumption reduction on medium-duty tactical truck has and continues to be a significant initiative for the U.S. Army. The Crankshaft-Integrated-Starter-Generator (C-ISG) is one of the parallel hybrid propulsions to improve the fuel economy. The C-ISG configuration is attractive because one electric machine can be used to propel the vehicle, to start the engine, and to be function as a generator. The C-ISG has been implemented in one M1083A1 5-ton tactical cargo truck. This paper presents the experimental assessments of the C-ISG hybrid truck characteristics. The experimental assessments include all electric range for on- and off-road mission cycles and fuel consumption for the high voltage battery charging. Stationary tests related to the charging profile of the battery pack and the silent watch time duration is also conducted.
Technical Paper
2014-05-10
Daogao Wei, Peng Wang, Zhijie Pan, Siming Hu, Huaiyang Xiao
Tie rod end clearance is an important parameter influencing automobile stability under slalom maneuver. In this paper the steering mechanism is simplified into a plane linkage mechanism and an analysis of the effects on vehicle stability exerted by kinematic pair clearance under slalom maneuver is also presented. A 4DOF mathematical model of vehicle maneuvering system is thus being built. On the basis of this model, we adopt the numerical analysis method to conduct a simulated analysis about the stability of prototype vehicle side slip angle as the clearance parameter changes. According to the results, vehicle slalom dynamics behaviors manifest itself in shifting from single cycle to chaos directly. With the increase in clearance, nearly no change is displayed in the upper critical frequency of vehicle slalom instability. However, an increasing rise is shown in the lower critical frequency. The instability frequency bandwidth, accordingly, bears an increase as well and a marked difference manifests itself with regard to the characteristics of window dynamics in chaotic areas.
Technical Paper
2014-05-10
Hyeonu Heo, Jaehyung Ju, Doo Man Kim, Harkbong Kim
An understanding of the flow around a tire in contact with the ground is important when designing fuel-efficient tires as the aerodynamic drag accounts for about one third of an entire vehicle's rolling loss. Recently, non-pneumatic tires (NPTs) have drawn attention mainly due to their low rolling resistance associated with the use of low viscoelastic materials in their construction. However, an NPT's fuel efficiency should be re-evaluated in terms of aerodynamic drag: discrete flexible spokes in an NPT may cause more aerodynamic drag, resulting in greater rolling resistance. In this study, the aerodynamic flow around a non-pneumatic tire in contact with the ground is investigated for i) stationary and ii) rotating cases using the steady state Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) method. A sensitivity analysis was carried out with a varying mesh density. The flow into cavity by the discrete spoke geometry of the NPT does not significantly affect the overall aerodynamic drag.
Technical Paper
2014-05-09
Francisco Soriano, Jesus Alvarez-Florez, Manuel Moreno-Eguilaz
This paper presents a novel methodology to develop and validate fuel consumption models of Refuse Collecting Vehicles (RCVs). The model development is based on the improvement of the classic approach. The validation methodology is based on recording vehicle drive cycles by the use of a low cost data acquisition system and post processing them by the use of GPS and map data. The corrected data are used to feed the mathematical energy models and the fuel consumption is estimated. In order to validate the proposed system, the fuel consumption estimated from these models is compared with real filling station refueling records. This comparison shows that these models are accurate to within 5%.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Robert Golimbioschi, Giampiero Mastinu, Luca Cordioli, Massimiliano Gobbi, Davide Tagliabue, Giorgio Previati, Francesco Braga
Abstract A new electric powertrain and axle for light/medium trucks is presented. The indoor testing and the simulation of the dynamic behavior are performed. The powertrain and axle has been produced by Streparava and tested at the Laboratory for the Safety of Transport of the Politecnico di Milano. The tests were aimed at defining the multi-physics perfomance of the powertrain and axle (efficiency, acceleration and braking, temperature and NVH). The whole system for indoor tests was composed by the powertrain and axle (electric motor, driveline, suspensions, wheels) and by the test rig (drums, driveline and electric motor). The (driving) axle was positioned on a couple of drums, and the drums provided the proper torques to the wheels to reproduce acceleration and braking. Additionally a cleat fixed on one drum excited the vibration of the suspensions and allowed assessing NVH performance. The simulations were based on a special co-simulation between 1D-AMESIM and VIRTUAL.LAB. The contact between the wheels and the drums of the test rig were simulated by means of VIRTUAL.LAB.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dragan Simic, Dominik Dvorak, Hannes Lacher, Helmut Kuehnelt, Elena Paffumi, Michele De Gennaro
Abstract This contribution deals with the modeling and validation of multi-physical battery-models, by using the programming language Modelica. The article presents a battery model which can be used to simulate the electric, thermal and aging behavior of a lithium-ion traction battery of an EV in different load conditions. The model is calibrated with experimental data of an electric vehicle tested on a chassis dynamometer. The calibration parameters, that are the open circuit voltage, the serial resistance and the resistance and capacitance of two serially connected RC-circuits, are used to configure the electric equivalent circuit model of the battery. The calibration process is based on a best-fit of the measured data from one test, while the validation is made by comparing measured and simulated battery voltages of a different battery load cycle. The comparison between simulations and experiments shows that this model is capable to accurately reproduce the real-world behavior of the battery, providing the scientific community with a novel approach for design and optimization purposes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Swanand S. Kulkarni, Nikita Gandhi, Naga Chaithanya, Srinivasan Govindarajan
Abstract In a Mild hybrid electric vehicle, a battery serves as a continuous source of energy but is inefficient in supplying peak power demands required during torque assists for short duration. Moreover, the random charging and discharging that result due to varying drive cycle of the vehicle affects the life of the battery. In this paper, an Ultra-capacitor based hybrid energy storage system (HESS) has been developed for mild hybrid vehicle which aims at utilizing the advantages of ultracapacitors by combining them with lead-acid batteries, to improve the overall performance of the battery, and to increase their useful life. Active current-sharing is achieved by interfacing ultracapacitor to the battery through a bi-directional boost dc-dc converter. Furthermore, an energy management system (EMS) is developed that controls the power flow between the two sources and the load and determines the amount of charging of ultracapacitor either from the battery or during regeneration depending on the predictions based on the drive-cycle and the remaining energy of the ultracapacitor.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ming Chen, Dong Wang, Huiqiang Lee, Chao Jiang, Jun Xin
This paper describes the application of CAE tools in the design optimization of a DCT and driveline system of a passenger vehicle, with emphasis on NVH performance. The multi-body dynamics simulation tools are employed for driveline system analysis. The MBD model consists of the engine, transmission, clutch, drive shafts, tires and vehicle. The wheel slip effects are considered in the calculation of shuffle frequencies. In the analysis of gear whine, the transmission housing, gears and shafts are modeled by detailed 3-D finite element models, so that the mesh stiffness of the gears and the housing support stiffness are described more accurately. The calculated velocity spectra of the housing are presented. The prediction of gear rattle in the transmission is carried out. The loose gear acceleration index and the averaged impact power of free gears are calculated to assess the rattle generation potential and the level of rattle severity. The influence of the clutch spring rate and the gear backlash on rattle behavior is investigated.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mirko Schulze, Rashad Mustafa, Benjamin Tilch, Peter Eilts, Ferit Küçükay
Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are facing increased challenges of optimizing the energy flow through a vehicle system, to enhance both the fuel economy and emissions. Energy management of HEVs is a difficult task due to complexity of total system, considering the electrical, mechanical and thermal behavior. Innovative thermal management is one of the solutions for reaching these targets. In this paper, the potential of thermal management for a parallel HEV with a baseline control strategy under different driving cycles and ambient temperatures is presented. The focus of the investigations is on reducing fuel consumption and increasing comfort for passengers. In the first part of this paper, the developed HEV-model including the validation with measurements is presented. In the second part, the combined thermal management measures, for example the recuperation of exhaust-gas energy, engine compartment encapsulation and the effect on the target functions are discussed. Simulation results show potential of reduction fuel consumption together with increasing the comfort for the passenger cabin.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shawn Hawkins, Alan Holmes, David Ames, Khwaja Rahman, Rodney Malone
The General Motors (GM) 1ET35 drive unit is designed for an optimum combination of efficiency, performance, reliability, and cost as part of the propulsion system for the 2014 Chevrolet Spark Electric Vehicle (EV) [1]. The 1ET35 drive unit is a coaxial transaxle arrangement which includes a permanent-magnet (PM) electric motor and a low loss single-planetary transmission and is the sole source of propulsion for the battery-only electric vehicle (BEV) Spark. The 1ET35 is designed with experience gained from the first modern production BEV, the 1996 GM EV1. This paper describes the design optimization and development of the 1ET35 and its electric motor that will be made in the United States by GM. The high torque density electric motor design is based on high-energy permanent magnets that were originally developed by GM in connection with the EV1 and GM bar-wound stator technology introduced in the 2Mode Hybrid electric transmission, used in the Chevrolet Volt and in GM eAssist systems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Walid Oraby, Mahmoud Atef Aly, Samir El-demerdash, M. El-Nashar
Abstract Integral Control strategy for vehicle chassis systems had been of great interest for vehicle designers in the last decade. This paper represents the interaction of longitudinal control and lateral control. In other words the traction control system and handling control system. Definitely, tire properties are playing a vital role in such interaction as it is responsible for the generated forces in both directions. A seven degrees of freedom half vehicle model is derived and used to investigate this interaction. The vehicle body is represented as a rigid body with three degrees of freedom, lateral and longitudinal, and yaw motions. The other four degrees are the two rotation motion of the front wheel and the rear wheel. This two motions for each wheel are spin motion and the steering motion. The traction controller is designed to modulate engine torque through adjusting the throttle angle of the engine upon utilized adhesion condition at the driving road wheels. The active four steering (4WS) control system is designed to enhance vehicle lateral dynamics through controlling rear steer angle.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vijay Antony John Britto, Kalyankumar Sidram Hatti, Sai Sankaranarayana, Sivasankaran Sadasivam, Ekambaram Loganathan
Abstract Commercial vehicle NVH attributes primarily focus on interior noise for driver's comfort and exterior noise for environmental legislation. Major sources for both the interior and exterior noise are power train unit, exhaust and air intake system. This paper focuses on development of Air Intake System (AIS) for better interior and exterior NVH performance for medium and heavy commercial vehicles. For air intake system, structural radiations from its panels and nozzle noise are significant contributors on overall vehicle NVH. Noise generation mechanism in air intake system occurs due to opening and closing of the valves and inlet air column oscillation by sharp pressure pulse from cylinder. Based on benchmarking, vehicle level targets have been arrived, and then cascaded to system and sub-system level targets. For air intake system, targets for nozzle noise at wide open throttle condition have been set for exterior NVH performance. These targets are further cascaded down to transmission loss (TL), snorkel breathing mode, isolation & dynamic stiffness attributed for improvement in interior/exterior noise and sound quality.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiaomin Lin, Nenggen Ding, Guoyan Xu, Feng Gao
Abstract Most tractor-semitrailers are fitted with multi-axle trailers which cannot be actively steered, and such vehicles with an articulated configuration are inclined to exhibit instability such as trailer swing, jack-knifing, and rollover at high speed. Proposed in this paper is an optimal control of the yaw stability of tractor-semitrailers at high speed by applying an active trailer's steering angle. An optimal control algorithm is designed by employing a 3-DOF vehicle model in the yaw plane. The optimal linear quadratic regulator (LQR) approach is used with a cost function including sideslip angles, yaw rates of both tractor and trailer, and trailer's steering angle. The yaw stability at the high speed is also quantified by the dynamic performance measurements of lateral path deviation, hitch angle and rearward amplification (RA). The algorithm is evaluated by co-simulations using TruckSim and Matlab/Simulink softwares. Simulation results under double lane change maneuvers show that trailer swing and jack-knifing are suppressed with a small path-tracking error and it is concluded that the optimal control of semi-trailer steering can improve the yaw stability at high speed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Luciano Lukacs, Mahendra Dassanayake, Iuri Pepe
Abstract Nighttime driving behavior differs from that during the day because of unique scenarios presented in a driver's field of vision. At night drivers have to rely on their vehicle headlamps to illuminate the road to be able to see the environment and road conditions in front of him. In recent decades car illumination systems have undergone considerable technological advances such as the use of a Light Emitting Diode (LED) in Adaptive Front-lighting Systems (AFS), a breakthrough in lighting technology. This is rapidly becoming one of the most important innovative technologies around the world within the lighting community. This paper discusses driver's needs given the environment and road conditions using a survey applied to compare the needs of both truck and car drivers under different road conditions. The results show the potential and suitability of the methodology proposed for controlling truck-related lighting in any emergent market.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kesav Kumar Sridharan, Ravish Masti, Ravi Kumar, Jiancheng Xin, Wendong Wang, Henry Kong
Abstract In hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and full electric vehicles (EVs), efficient electrical power management with proper supply of power at the required voltage levels is essential. A DC (Direct Current)-DC converter is one of the key electrical units in a HEV/EV. The DC-DC converter dealt in the present work is intended to create the DC voltages necessary to power the accessories. The electronic circuit in this DC-DC converter consists of high power devices like Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), inductors, transformers, etc. mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB). The DC-DC converter interacts with a high voltage battery pack and supplies a low voltage power to the accessory battery. Due to this power handling operation, the devices in the convertor experience high temperatures. The temperature rise of the devices beyond the permissible limits could be detrimental to an efficient and safe operation of the converter. This paper deals with a robust and optimal thermal design of an air-cooled DC-DC Converter in order that the temperature (primary design parameter) of each of the devices is at a minimum and below the corresponding permissible limit of the device.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sunit Kumar Chanana, Arpit Kapila, Sanjay Haldar, Naman Joshi, Dinesh N Dave
Abstract Plastics nowadays are playing a vital role in the ongoing innovation that is driving the automotive industry to higher performance, safety and sustainability levels. Plastics have allowed automotive designers to meet stringent carbon emission targets and fulfill consumer demands for highly fuel efficient vehicles by reducing vehicle weight while also reducing cost. The next step in weight reduction is to decrease the plastic part thickness further to the minimum possible. But with such reduction in part thickness, it becomes very difficult to meet the side impact crash regulations, and thus it becomes imperative to increase the Impact properties of such light weight materials. Keeping in line with the above, this paper describes the development of a new blend of Polypropylene which has high impact characteristics to meet crash compliance, high MFR to reduce cycle time and allow for easy filling of low thickness parts and keeping specific gravity in check to reduce weight. This is achieved through usage of high rubber content in Base PP itself in addition to conventional usage of rubber during compounding stage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xueyu Zhang, Andrej Ivanco, Xinran Tao, John Wagner, Zoran Filipi
This paper investigates the impact of battery cooling ancillary losses on fuel economy, and optimal control strategy for a series hybrid electric truck with consideration of cooling losses. Battery thermal model and its refrigeration-based cooling system are integrated into vehicle model, and the parasitic power consumption from cooling auxiliaries is considered in power management problem. Two supervisory control strategies are compared. First, a rule-based control strategy is coupled with a thermal management strategy; it controls power system and cooling system separately. The second is optimal control strategy developed using Dynamic Programming; it optimizes power flow with consideration of both propulsion and cooling requirement. The result shows that battery cooling consumption could cause fuel economy loss as high as 5%. When dynamic programming coordinates control of the powertrain and the cooling system in an optimal way, the fuel consumption penalty due to cooling losses is reduced to 3.7%, and battery duty cycle becomes milder.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Simon Huber, Thomas Indinger, Nikolaus Adams, Thomas Schuetz
The optimization of the flow field around new vehicle concepts is driven by aerodynamic and thermal demands. Even though aerodynamics and thermodynamics interact, the corresponding design processes are still decoupled. Objective of this study is to include a thermal model into the aerodynamic design process. Thus, thermal concepts can be evaluated at a considerably earlier design stage of new vehicles, resulting in earlier market entry. In a first step, an incompressible CFD code is extended with a passive scalar transport equation for temperature. The next step also accounts for buoyancy effects. The simulated development of the thermal boundary layer is validated on a hot flat plate without pressure gradient. Subsequently, the solvers are validated for a heated block with ground clearance: The flow pattern in the wake and integral heat transfer coefficients are compared to wind tunnel simulations. The main section of this report covers the validation on a full-scale production car. A specially developed heated electronic component dummy mounted to the underbody of the car introduces heat into the flow field.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Wei Yang, Xuemao Zhou, Jing Peng, Bo Li, Long Wu, Heinz Friz
Abstract The Wuling Rongguang is a small van which uses a mid-engine layout where the engine is located underneath the floor panel in-between front and rear wheels. A particular challenge for this kind of layout is the protection of the engine against soiling. Typical protective measures consist of large mudguards in combination with an engine cover. While needed for soiling protection, these parts can have a strongly adverse effect on aerodynamic drag. This paper describes process and the results of the aerodynamic optimization of the underbody of the Wuling Rongguang. Because design changes had to be evaluated for aerodynamics performance as well as for their effect on the soiling, a digital approach was used which allowed to do the soiling analysis as a post processing to the flow simulation. As a first step, a baseline model was built and analyzed. This included the development of a soiling model taking into account wheel spray and splashing effects. The soiling model used available best practices where available and was also calibrated against some road test results to ensure a proper reproduction of the soiling effect.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tetsuhiro Kawamura, Atsushi Ogawa
Abstract The change in the aerodynamic lift force (henceforth CL) by heave motion is discussed in this paper in order to clarify the effect of aerodynamic characteristics on the vehicle dynamic performance. We considered that phenomenon in actual car running at 160km/h and 1Hz heave frequency. Using a towing tank to change its water from the air to the working fluid to more easily observe this phenomenon. That makes possible to observe the same phenomenon with reduced velocity and small models under same Strouhal number condition. This method can be reducing vehicle speed to 3m/s (1/15 actual) and frequency to 0.2Hz (1/5 actual) in case using 40% scaled model. The results of these tests showed that unsteady CL is proportional to heave motion. These results showed the proportional relationship between unsteady CL and heave motion. The formularization of unsteady CL made it possible to introduce shape coefficients to vehicle dynamics simulations as functions of heave velocity. This makes it possible to consider the effect of unsteady CL on dynamic performance at the initial stages of the development process.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daniel Wood, Martin A. Passmore, Anna-Kristina Perry
The use of simulation tools by vehicle manufacturers to design, optimize and validate their vehicles is essential if they are to respond to the demands of their customers, to meet legislative requirements and deliver new vehicles ever more quickly. The use of such tools in the aerodynamics community is already widespread, but they remain some way from replacing physical testing completely. Further advances in simulation capabilities depend on the availability of high quality validation data so that simulation code developers can ensure that they are capturing the physics of the problems in all the important areas of the flow-field. This paper reports on an experimental program to generate such high quality validation data for a SAE 20 degree backlight angle notchback reference model. This geometry is selected as a particularly powerful test case for the development and validation of numerical tools because the flow exhibits a realistic impingement and A pillar regime, significant three dimensional structures and the backlight/boot-deck exhibits a local separation and reattachment.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jianlei Wang, William Bartow, Andres Moreyra, Gregory Woyczynski, Alexis Lefebvre, Edward Carrington, Gecheng Zha
1 This paper introduces and proves a novel automotive mirror base drag reduction method using passive jet flow control. The new concept is to open an inlet at the front part of the mirror, introduces the airflow via a converging duct, and ejects the jet surrounding the mirror surface at an angle toward the center of the mirror. The jet harnesses the energy from the free stream by jet mixing with the main flow via large coherent structures, entrains the main flow to energize the base flow, reduces the wake size and turbulence fluctuation, and ultimately significantly decreases the drag. Above phenomena are proved by wind tunnel testing with PIV and drag force measurement and CFD large eddy simulation (LES) calculation. Two jet mirrors with different inlet areas are studied. The jet mirror tunnel 1 has a smaller inlet area, and the jet mirror tunnel 2 has a 4.7 times larger inlet area. The wind tunnel testing is only done for the baseline and jet mirror tunnel 1. LES is used to study all the three mirror configurations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Georgios Fontaras, Panagiota Dilara, Michael Berner, Theo Volkers, Antonius Kies, Martin Rexeis, Stefan Hausberger
Due to the diversity of Heavy Duty Vehicles (HDV), the European CO2 and fuel consumption monitoring methodology for HDVs will be based on a combination of component testing and vehicle simulation. In this context, one of the key input parameters that need to be accurately defined for achieving a representative and accurate fuel consumption simulation is the vehicle's aerodynamic drag. A highly repeatable, accurate and sensitive measurement methodology was needed, in order to capture small differences in the aerodynamic characteristics of different vehicle bodies. A measurement methodology is proposed which is based on constant speed measurements on a test track, the use of torque measurement systems and wind speed measurement. In order to support the development and evaluation of the proposed approach, a series of experiments were conducted on 2 different trucks, a Daimler 40 ton truck with a semi-trailer and a DAF 18 ton rigid truck. Two different torque measurement systems (wheel rim torque sensors and half shaft torque sensors) were used for the measurements and two different vehicle tracking approaches were investigated (high precision GPS and opto-electronic barriers).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nicholas Oettle, David Sims-Williams, Robert Dominy
On-road, a vehicle experiences unsteady flow conditions due to turbulence in the natural wind, moving through the unsteady wakes of other road vehicles and travelling through the stationary wakes generated by roadside obstacles. Separated flow structures in the sideglass region of a vehicle are particularly sensitive to unsteadiness in the onset flow. These regions are also areas where strong aeroacoustic effects can exist, in a region close to the passengers of a vehicle. The resulting aeroacoustic response to unsteadiness can lead to fluctuations and modulation at frequencies that a passenger is particularly sensitive towards. Results presented by this paper combine on-road measurement campaigns using instrumented vehicles in a range of different wind environments and aeroacoustic wind tunnel tests. A new cabin noise simulation technique was developed to predict the time-varying wind noise in a vehicle using the cabin noise measured in the steady environment of the wind tunnel, and a record of the unsteady onset conditions on the road, considering each third-octave band individually.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kenji Tadakuma, Takashi Sugiyama, Kazuhiro Maeda, Masashi Iyota, Masahiro Ohta, Yoshinao Komatsu
A new wind tunnel was developed and adopted by Toyota Motor Corporation in March 2013. This wind tunnel is equipped with a 5-belt rolling road system with a platform balance that enables the flow simulation under the floor and around the tires in on-road conditions. It also minimizes the characteristic pulsation that occurs in wind tunnels to enable the evaluation of unsteady aerodynamic performance aspects. This paper describes the technology developed for this new wind tunnel and its performance verification results. In addition, after verifying the stand-alone performance of the wind tunnel, a vehicle was placed in the tunnel to verify the utility of the wind tunnel performance. Tests simulated flow fields around the vehicle in on-road conditions and confirmed that the wind tunnel is capable of evaluating unsteady flows.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Andrew D'Hooge, Robert Palin, Luke Rebbeck, Joaquin Gargoloff, Bradley Duncan
The focus of evaluating yaw characteristics in automotive aerodynamics has been primarily with regards to the effects of crosswind on vehicle handling. However, changes to drag that the vehicle experiences due to prevalent on-road crosswind can also be significant, even at low yaw angles. Using wind tunnel testing, it is possible to quickly determine the static yaw performance of the vehicle by rotating the vehicle on a turntable to different yaw angles during a single wind tunnel run. However, this kind of testing does not account for dynamic crosswind effects or non-uniform crosswind such as with natural on-road turbulence. Alternatively, numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to evaluate yaw performance. In this paper, Exa's PowerFLOW is used to examine two alternative methods of simulating aerodynamic performance in the presence of realistic on-road crosswind for the Tesla Model S sedan. These methods provide reduced computational cost compared to simulating a full range of static yaw angles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Christopher Craig, Martin A. Passmore
Recent changes to the rules regarding aerodynamics within Formula SAE, combined with faster circuits at the European FSAE events, have made the implementation of aerodynamic devices, to add down-force, a more relevant topic. As with any race series it is essential that a detailed analysis is completed to establish the costs and benefits of including an aerodynamic package on the vehicle. The aim of the work reported here was to create a methodology that would fully evaluate all aspects of the package and conclude with an estimate of the likely gain in points at a typical FSAE event. The paper limits the analysis to a front and rear wing combination, but the approach taken can be applied to more complex aerodynamic packages. An initial wind tunnel investigation of the potential flow interactions between the driver's helmet and rear wing using a multi-hole pressure probe is reported and the data used in a two-dimensional CFD calculation to provide an accurate prediction of the likely down-force from the wing package.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Itsuhei Kohri, Teppei Yamanashi, Takayoshi Nasu, Yoshimitsu Hashizume, Daichi Katoh
On a bluff body which has a slant surface on the rear upper part, it is well known that the drastic change of a wake structure behind the rear body occurs at 30°of the slant angle. Originally, this critical phenomenon was pointed out by L.J. Janssen, W.H. Hucho, and H.J. Emmelmann in the middle of the 1970s. In 1984, S.R. Ahmed conducted systematic measurements by changing the rear slant angle of the bluff body, called the “Ahmed Body”, to find the critical phenomenon. In the 2000s, D.B. Sims-Williams found that the Ahmed Body had vortex structures which had specific frequencies. However, the relationship between the critical phenomenon and the unsteady behaviour has not been clarified yet. Therefore, as the first step of this study, we measured the unsteady wake behaviour for various slant angles to find the relationship between the Strouhal number and the angle. The characteristics of the fluctuation were captured with two hot-wires. By analysing the coherence and difference of the phases of their signals, the behaviour of the trailing vortices and the vortex shedding of the wake was investigated.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bharadwaj Sathiamoorthy, Matthew C. Robinson, Evan Fedorko, Nigel Clark
Abstract Heavy duty tractor-trailers under freeway operations consume about 65% of the total engine shaft energy to overcome aerodynamic drag force. Vehicles are exposed to on-road crosswinds which cause change in pressure distribution with a relative wind speed and yaw angle. The objective of this study was to analyze the drag losses as a function of on-road wind conditions, on-road vehicle position and trajectory. Using coefficient of drag (CD) data available from a study conducted at NASA Ames, Geographical Information Systems model, time-varying weather data and road data, a generic model was built to identify the yaw angles and the relative magnitude of wind speed on a given route over a given time period. A region-based analysis was conducted for a study on interstate trucking operation by employing I-79 running through West Virginia as a case study by initiating a run starting at 12am, 03/03/2012 out to 12am, 03/05/2012. Results showed that vehicles which travelled the route on 03/04/2012 after 2pm were subjected to higher yaw angles (9 - 14 degrees) compared to vehicles travelling between 12am and 2pm on the same day.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Emmanuel Guilmineau
This paper focuses on the numerical simulations of flow around a realistic generic car model called the DrivAer body. This new open-source model is based on the geometries of two medium sized cars, the Audi A4 and the BMW 3 series, and possesses more representative car features as the well-known generic Ahmed body. In this paper, only the fastback geometry is investigated. The flow solver used is ISIS-CFD developed by CNRS and Ecole Centrale de Nantes. This solver is based on a finite-volume method, and two turbulence modelizations are used: the Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model (EARSM) and a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES). Two meshes are used. For one, the walls are described with a wall function and the mesh contains 19 million cells. This mesh is called “Mesh 1”. For the second mesh, a low-Reynolds number turbulence model for the walls is used. In this case, the mesh contains 39 million cells, and is called “Mesh 2”. For the simulation with the EARSM model, the drag coefficient is well predicted while the lift coefficient is over-predicted with however a value lower with the “Mesh 2”.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 17597