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Viewing 1 to 30 of 17844
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0088
Claudio Annicchiarico, Renzo Capitani
Abstract In a Formula SAE car, as for almost all racecars, suppressing or limiting the action of the differential mechanism is the technique mostly adopted to improve the traction exiting the high lateral acceleration corners. The common Limited Slip Differentials (LSDs) unbalance the traction torque distribution, generating as a secondary effect a yaw torque on the vehicle. If this feature is electronically controlled, these devices can be used to manage the attitude of the car. The yaw torque introduced by an electronically controlled LSD (which can also be called SAD, “Semi-Active Differential”) could suddenly change from oversteering (i.e. pro-yaw) to understeering (i.e. anti-yaw), depending on the driving conditions. Therefore, controlling the vehicle attitude with a SAD could be challenging, and its effectiveness could be low if compared with the common torque vectoring systems, which act on the brake system of the car. In addition, unlike common ESC (“Electronic Stability Control”) systems do, a SAD can modify the vehicle attitude without limiting its traction performance, which is a crucial factor for racecars.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0090
Jeffrey Blair, Glenn Bower
Abstract Operation of snowmobiles in national parks is restricted to vehicles meeting the Best Available Technology standard for exhaust and noise emissions as established by the National Parks Service. An engine exceeding these standards while operating on a blend of gasoline and bio-isobutanol has been developed based on a production four-stroke snowmobile engine. Miller cycle operation was achieved via late intake valve closing and turbocharging. The production Rotax ACE 600cc 2 cylinder engine was modeled using Ricardo WAVE. After this model was validated with physical testing, different valve lift profiles were evaluated for brake specific fuel consumption and brake power. The results from this analysis were used to determine a camshaft profile for Miller cycle operation. This was done to reduce part load pumping losses and increase engine efficiency while maintaining production power density. A catalytic converter was added to reduce exhaust gas emissions, as measured by the EPA 40 CFR Part 1051 5-mode emissions test cycle.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0008
Stefan Krimplstätter, Franz Winkler, Roland Oswald, Roland Kirchberger
Abstract The Institute for Internal Combustion Engines and Thermodynamics, Graz University of Technology, has presented several applications of its 2-stroke LPDI (low pressure direct injection) technology in the previous years ([1], [2], [3]). In order to improve the competitiveness of the 2-stroke LPDI technology, an air cooled 50cm3 scooter application has been developed. All previous applications have been liquid cooled. This air cooled application demonstrates the EURO 4 (2017) ability of the technology and shows that the 2S-LPDI technology can also be applied to low cost air-cooled engines. Hence, the complete scooter and moped fleet can be equipped with this technology in order to fulfil both the emission standards and the COP (conformity of production) requirements of Euro 4 emission stage. The paper presents the Euro 4 Scooter results and describes the efficient conversion process of the existing carburetor engine to the LPDI version. Euro 4 results can be achieved with conventional exhaust system architecture known from the present Euro 2 applications.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0014
Hans-Juergen Schacht, Manuel Leibetseder, Niko Bretterklieber, Stephan Schmidt, Roland Kirchberger
Abstract Due to the small number of two wheelers in Europe and their seasonal use, their contribution to the total emissions has been underestimated for a long time. With the implementation of the new emission regulation 168/2013 [3] for type approval coming into force 2016, the two wheeler sector is facing major changes. The need to fulfil more stringent emission limits and the high demand on the durability of after treatment systems result in an engine control system that is getting more complex and therewith more expensive. Especially the low cost two wheelers with small engine capacities will be affected by increasing costs which cannot be covered by the actual competitive product price. Therefore, new vehicle concepts have to be introduced on the market. A vehicle concept of a plug in hybrid electric city scooter with range extender as well as the range extender itself have already been published in SAE Papers 2011-32-0592 [1] and 2012-32-0083 [2]. The low cost range extender is composed of a simple, throttle-less operated, port controlled two stroke engine and an externally controlled generator.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0016
Sei Takahashi, Hideo Nakamura, Makoto Hasegawa
Abstract ISO 26262 (Road vehicles - Functional safety), a functional safety standard for motor vehicles, was published in November 2011. In this standard, hazardous events associated with each item constituting a safety-related system are assessed according to three criteria, namely, Severity, Exposure, and Controllability, thereby determining ASILs (Automotive Safety Integrity Levels) representing safety levels for motor vehicles. Although motorcycles are not included in the scope of application of the current edition of ISO 26262, it is expected that motorcycles will be included in the next revision. However, it is not appropriate to directly apply ASILs to motorcycles. In the first place, the situation of usage in practice presumably differs between motorcycles and motor vehicles. Accordingly, in this research, we attempted to newly define Motorcycle Safety Integrity Levels (MSILs). We demonstrate in this article that it is to reduce the maximum severity in the Correspondence Diagram between Risk and ASIL (CDRA) and to increase the degree of acceptable risks in view of situations specific to motorcycles.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0040
John Walters, Francois Brun
Abstract Stringent emissions legislation is being applied to small motorcycles and scooters around the world. This is forcing, gradually, the replacement of carburetors by electronic fuel injection (EFI) systems. The integration of this new technology creates new constraints on the engine and also on the vehicle. This study will provide an overview of these constraints and also technical solutions to reduce the impact on engine and vehicle. A special focus will be done on the fuel system, where the development of an advanced technology will be discussed in detail. This technology marks a break with the standard automotive fuel system architecture in order to fulfill the specific requirements of scooters and small motorcycles: low size, low weight, low energy demand, as well as simple integration. The discussion will disclose: the advantages and drawbacks of different fuel system architectures, the detailed description of the technology selected to achieve the requirements, the modelling approach used for the sizing and optimization of the design, and finally the performance achieved on the test bench.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0020
Patrick Falk, Christian Hubmann
Abstract Originally developed for the automotive market, a fully automatic real-time measurement tool AVL-DRIVE is commercially available for analyzing and scoring vehicle drive quality, also known as “Driveability”. This system from AVL uses its own transducers, calibrated to the sensitivity and response of the human body to measure the forces felt by the driver, such as acceleration, shock, surging, vibration, noise, etc. Simultaneously, the vehicle operating conditions are measured, (throttle grip angle, engine speed, gear, vehicle speed, temperature, etc.). Because the software is pre-programmed with the scores from a multitude of different vehicles in each vehicle class via neural networks and fuzzy logic formula, a quality score with reference to similar competitor vehicles is instantly given. This tool is already successfully implemented in the market for years to investigate such driveability parameters for passenger cars. Due to the fact that electronic systems more and more find their way into the 2-wheeler applications, motorcycle manufacturers are facing a lot of challenges and these are increasing from year to year.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0055
Francesco Maiani, Alessio Sisi, Walther Leardini
Abstract In recent years the 2-wheelers engines companies have been focused on increasing the overall engine efficiency, that can be achieved amongst other by engine down-speeding, engine down-sizing and by reducing the frictions; however, to maintain or improve vehicle performance, it is necessary to provide a corresponding increase in specific power. In accordance with these trends, the studied approaches and methodologies have been exploited, during the development of the new Piaggio small scooter engine. In this work a multi-objective analysis has been applied to the valve train system design, in order to optimize the engine performance in terms of friction reduction, power curve and timing system response. Along with this optimization methodology, a robust design has been studied to make the peak cranking compression pressure insensitive to the engine starting device working. These calculation methodologies have been followed using commercial software as GT-SUITE® code and the modeFRONTIER® platform for the multi-objective optimization analysis.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0044
Simone Vezzù, Carlo Cavallini, Silvano Rech, Enrico Vedelago, Alessandro Giorgetti
Abstract The deposition of thick, pore-free, high-performance copper alloy matrix composite coatings is a topic of interest for several industrial applications, including friction materials, high-strength electrical contacts, and welding electrodes, among others. This study investigates the use of cold spray to deposit CuCrZr/Al2O3 cermet coatings on aluminum alloy 6060. The objective is to integrate copper-based materials with aluminum-based materials, ensuring a high degree of mechanical and thermal contact, using a low temperature process that does not adversely affect the properties of the base materials. This technique can be used to produce integral coolers and aluminum-based bearings for automotive and motorcycle applications. Fused and crushed alumina and gas-atomized CuCrZr powder blends have been used as initial feedstocks, with compositional weight ratios of 65/35 and 80/20 (ceramic/metal). The coatings have been characterized in terms of microstructure and morphology, coating microindentation hardness, cohesion strength, and adhesion strength to the aluminum alloy substrate.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0061
Rama Subbu, Baskar Anthony Samy, Piyush Mani Sharma, Prasanna Mahendiran
Abstract Ride comfort, driving stability and drivability are vital factors in terms of vehicle performance and customer satisfaction. Crankshaft unbalance is a source for the vibration that reduces the vehicle performance and it needs to be controlled to some extent such that the vehicle performance will be improved. The IC engine is made up of reciprocating and rotating parts. They produce unbalance forces during their operation and produces vibration in Vehicle. The vibration reduction will be possible by minimizing these unbalance forces and by optimizing the crankshaft of the two wheeled vehicle engine design. Many researches were made to find the causes for the vibration and to reduce it. But still there is a research gap on the testing and simulation of engine components (crankshaft, connecting rod and piston assembly). In this study, an attempt is made to represent the engine vibrations and its isolation to provide a gate way for the future work on it. This study shows the various steps carried out on the multibody modeling of the IC engine components including engine crankshaft and their orientations.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0069
Ken Fosaaen
Abstract Global concerns over pollution have led to increasingly strict emissions legislation targeting small engines, which currently pollute at a much greater level than modern multi-cylinder automotive engines. Closed-loop control may be required to meet many future legislation requirements; however, such systems can be impractical due to high added component costs. A necessary component for closed-loop engine control is an oxygen sensor. Existing automotive oxygen sensors are too large, require too much power, and are far too expensive to be suitable for the vast majority of the global small engine applications; therefore, some manufacturers have developed smaller and/or unheated versions based on their existing sensors to meet this emerging need. The ability to miniaturize resistive based sensors well below that of traditional Nernst (zirconia based) oxygen sensors affords the opportunity to meet future emissions standards with less of an impact on cost. The performance of a novel low-cost, low-power, narrow-band resistive-based oxygen sensor was compared with the stock oxygen sensor and several other commercially available oxygen sensors on a 2014 Honda Grom 125E motorcycle.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0136
Thomas Metzinger, Christoph Raber, Christoph Wittmann
Abstract This paper discusses the design elements for a wet clutch system to successfully meet the requirements of today's motorcycle market. You can find new design ideas regarding how to realize important and critical clutch performance features such as torque boost, coast torque reduction (anti-hopping function), reduced actuation force, reduced drag torque, optimized weight, and/or optimized product cost. Most of these functions and features can be implemented in a modular clutch kit in which many of the parameters can be adapted with a minor design change of just a few components.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0022
Federico Giovannini, Niccolò Baldanzini, Marco Pierini
Abstract Powered Two-Wheelers (PTW) control is more complex than any other motorized vehicle control, in particular during emergency events, such as panic braking or last second swerving. For standard PTW, a common cause of accident in these situations is the loss of stability due to braking maneuvers. It is worth noting that for PTW the loss of stability means a high probability of fall, especially while cornering. Accordingly, the aim of this study is to propose a fall detection algorithm for PTW performing maneuvers leading to potential instability. The algorithm is composed of a number of parameters, named RISKi, able to detect potential fall events, critical for PTW safety. This fall detection methodology was developed to alert an advanced riding assistance system in order to produce proper counteractions against the imminent fall. The parameters designed for the fall detection process take into account the vehicle destabilization due to the braking intensity and due to heavy oscillations of the vehicle body and the steering bar.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0023
Daniele Barbani, Niccolò Baldanzini, Marco Pierini
Abstract In the study of new solutions for motorcycle passive safety, FE models of full-scale crash tests play a strategic role. The most important issue in the development process of FE models is their reliability to reproduce real crash tests. To help the engineering in the validation phase, a sensitivity analysis of a FE model for motorcycle-car crash tests is carried-out. The aim of this study is to investigate the model response subjected to variations of specific input parameters. The DOE is performed generating a list of simulations (each one composed by a unique combination of 8 parameters) through Latin Hypercube Sampling. The outputs monitored are the Head Injury Criterion (HIC) and Neck Injury Criteria (Nij). The analysis of the results is performed using scatter plots and linear regression curves to identify the parameters that have major impact on the outputs and to assess the type of dependency (linear or non-linear).
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0027
T Manikandan, S Sarmadh Ameer, A Sivakumar, Samaraj Dhinagar
Abstract The proposed paper is on electrical energy conservation in a two wheeler. Electrical energy generation adds a 12% load torque on an engine and hence saving electrical energy would ultimately reduce the consumption of fuel. Load Control Module (LCM) is a single intelligent device which is placed in between electrical energy generation and consumption. The module controls and distributes energy to the corresponding loads depending on parameters like battery voltage, engine RPM, overhead light illumination levels and load usage time. The module prioritizes battery charging for prolonging the life of the battery. The Module has a microcontroller and load drivers and it is programmed with a novel algorithm for prioritization and energy distribution with respect to input conditions. A vehicle fitted with the Load Control Module was tested in city driving cycle (CDC) condition as per ARAI (Automotive Research Association of India) standard and it was found that the electrical loading decreased to about 30% when compared to vehicle with uncontrolled loading.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0025
Maki Kawakoshi, Takashi Kobayashi, Makoto Hasegawa
Abstract ISO26262 was intended only for passenger cars but can be applied to motorcycles if the Controllability (C) is subjectively evaluated by expert riders. Expert riders evaluate motorcycle performance from the viewpoint of ordinary riders. However, riding maneuvers of ordinary riders have not been confirmed by objective data. For this reason, it is important to understand the basic characteristics of riding maneuvers of both expert and ordinary riders. This study seeks to confirm the compatibility between the riding maneuvers of expert riders and those of ordinary riders. The riding maneuvers and vehicle behavior of four expert riders and 16 ordinary riders were compared using the results of a test assuming normal running. Referring to the UN regulations and Japanese Automotive Standards Organization (JASO) that define test methods for objectively measuring the behavioral characteristics of two-wheeled vehicles in Japan, three tests (steady-state circular test, lane-change test, and braking test) were performed.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0028
T Manikandan, S Sarmadh Ameer, A Sivakumar, Davinder Kumar, R Venkatesan, VenkataKalyana Kumar
Abstract The Instant Mileage Assistance (IMA), as the name indicates, is a system to guide the vehicle users to realize maximum fuel economy (mileage). This system is targeted to provide users with instantaneous mileage indication depending on the current driving pattern, correct gear operating zone (in case of a geared vehicle) through gear up/down shift assist indication and the accurate distance the vehicle can travel before the fuel tank is empty, thereby assisting the user in harnessing maximum fuel economy the vehicle can deliver and also safely reach the next refilling station. The instantaneous mileage is calculated by mapping the distance travelled by the vehicle and the respective amount of fuel consumed, during a particular period of time, and is displayed using an instrument cluster. When the fuel level in the tank reaches a known threshold, the distance to empty is in turn calculated from the instantaneous mileage value hence providing a more accurate and realistic indication to the user.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0029
Marcus Bonifer, Rainer Kiemel
Abstract Current catalytic formulations for motorcycles consist of so called three way catalysts (TWC) that are able to reduce the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrous oxides (NOx) and hydrocarbons (THC) below the regulatory emission limit. These catalysts mostly contain platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh), also called platinum group metals (PGM) in different ratios and concentrations. Another important component is the so-called oxygen storage material (OSC) that is compensating fluctuations in lambda during acceleration and deceleration. Currently existing catalyst formulations must be modified to fulfill the more stringent emission limits with simultaneous consideration of a more realistic test cycle. In this paper we will present the modification of an existing catalytic formulation for a 690 cm3 motorcycle from model year 2012. The motorcycle is equipped with a quick-change muffler to be able to compare different formulations in a simple way. The motorcycle was used off-shelf, during our tests no modifications of the ECU or the engine mapping haven taken place.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0031
Juergen Tromayer, Gerd Neumann, Marcus Bonifer, Rainer Kiemel
Abstract Looking at upcoming emission legislations for two-wheelers, it is quite obvious that the fulfilment of these targets will become one of the biggest challenges within the engine development process. The gradual harmonization of emission limits for two-wheelers with existing automotive standards will subsequently lead to new approaches regarding mixture preparation and exhaust gas aftertreatment. Referring to these future scenarios, a state-of-the-art in development of catalytic converters for two- or three-wheeler applications should be presented. After choosing a suitable test carrier, which has already been equipped with EFI components including an oxygen sensor for λ=1 operation mode, a basic injection system calibration was used to optimize the combustion process. Based on this setup, a variable exhaust system was manufactured to be able to integrate different catalyst configurations. To improve cold start characteristics, the position of the lambda probe and the catalyst were optimized to achieve short light-off times.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0032
Luiz Carlos Daemme, Renato Penteado, Fatima Zotin, Marcelo Errera
Abstract Motorcycle sales have increased consistently during the last decade mostly in developing countries, especially in the BRICS. Low cost and less fuel consumption comparing to cars associated to the economic growth are the main reason for such trend. Emission limits have become stricter and the use of gas after treatment devices is widely present in new models. Flex fuel motorcycles have now become available, but effects of the combination of diverse gasoline/ethanol blends on the emissions are still an open issue that requires further understanding. This paper presents the most recent results regarding regulated and unregulated emissions from a Flex Fuel motorcycle fuelled with 4 different gasoline/ethanol blends: E22, E61, E85 and 100% ethanol. Both regulated (CO, THC, NOx) and unregulated emissions (Aldehydes, NMHC, NH3, N2O) were studied. The main conclusion is that motorcycles equipped with three-way catalytic converters presented significant ammonia emissions in the tailpipe when compared to pre catalyst emissions.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0117
Matthew Smeeth
Abstract Rolling contact fatigue is a particular type of fatigue that occurs in heavily loaded, non-conformal contacts, such as gears and rolling element bearings. It is primarily a failure mode associated with repeated cyclic loading that generates high local Hertzian pressures, leading to local plastic deformation and substantial surface or sub surface stress. This in turn leads to crack formation and propagation. In some instances this results in sudden and often critical mechanical failure of contacting parts. This failure mode can, to a certain degree, be controlled by the appropriate choice of lubricant; in terms of both the physical and chemical properties of the films formed at the surface. A three contact disc machine has been used to examine the rolling contact fatigue of motorcycle lubricants in such heavily loaded contacts. Three counterface test rings of equal diameter (54mm) are mounted 120° apart with a smaller (12mm diameter) test roller in the centre. Using this configuration, a large number of contact cycles are possible in a short period of time (up to one million per hour), which greatly accelerates the testing test.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0026
Alessandro Franceschini, Emanuele Pellegrini, Raffaele Squarcini
Nowadays the challenge in design auxiliary device for automotive small engine is focused on the packaging reduction and on the increase of the performances. This requirements are in contrast to each other and in order to fulfil the project specifications, new and more refined design tools and procedures need to be developed. This paper presents a calculation loop developed by Pierburg Pump Technology Italy S.p.a. (PPT). It supports the design of a variable displacement oil pump component for engine applications. The work is focused on the fatigue life evaluation of a joint, which transmits the drive torque from the engine to the oil pump. The aim of the procedure is to calculate the onset of the surface fatigue phenomenon in the hexagonal joint which drives the oil pump, taking into account the axes misalignment and the flat to flat clearance. The study has involved several matters, experimental measures, CFD, MBA and FEM analyses. A calculation procedure has been set up in order to consider all the necessary loads applied on the joint.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0018
Kenichi Morimoto, Kenichi Tanaka
Abstract There have been a number of attempts to clarify the relationship between motorcycle specifications and shimmy phenomenon. Some of such efforts are based on equations of motion. The methods used in those efforts are suitable for analyzing motions in a fundamental structure. However, when the degree of freedom is large, it is extremely difficult to deliver an equation of motion. Therefore, a practical method cannot be found generally when applying the methods employing equations of motion. We also conducted the analysis of shimmy using multi-body dynamics simulation. The yielded results were useful only for clarifying the differences in shimmy levels among motorcycles. However, they were not helpful to understand the relationships between specifications and shimmy phenomenon. In this study, we focused clarifying these relationships and we took four study steps shown below: 1 Narrowing down the motorcycle specifications affecting shimmy2 Determining physical parameters influential to shimmy3 Investigating how a change of physical parameters affects shimmy using simplified model4 Analyzing how the changes of motorcycle specifications affect the shimmy Following these steps, we clarified the relationships between motorcycle's specifications and shimmy by using only three physical parameters.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0053
Yoshihiro Nakagawa, Shinya Takahashi, Mikihito Masaki, Ranju Imao
Abstract In brake squeal analyses using FE models, minimizing the discrepancies in vibration characteristics between the measurement and the simulation is a key issue for improving its reproducibility. The discrepancies are generally adjusted by the shape parameters and/or material properties applied to the model. However, the discrepancy cannot be easily adjusted, especially, for the vibration characteristic of the disc model of a motorcycle. One of the factors that give a large impact on this discrepancy is a thermal history of the disc. That thermal history includes the one experienced in manufacturing process. In this paper, we examine the effects of residual stress on the natural frequency of motorcycle discs. The residual stress on the disc surface was measured by X-ray stress measurement method. It was followed by an eigenvalue analysis. In this analysis, we developed a unique method in which the residual stress was substituted by thermal stress. Using this method, the discrepancy between measurement and calculation of the natural frequency was reduced from ±5.2% to ±1.3%.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0021
Kazuhiro Ito, Yoshitaka Tezuka, Atsushi Hoshino, Keita Sakurada
Abstract In this study, we developed a simulation method for rough road running condition to reproduce the behaviors of a vehicle body and to precisely estimate the input loads to the frame. We designed the simulation method focusing on a front fork model and a rider model optimized for this type of analysis. In the suspension model development, we conducted detailed measurement of the suspension characteristics on a test bench. Based on the yielded results, the friction force, as well as the spring reaction force and the damping force, was reproduced in the suspension model. The friction of the suspension varies depending on the magnitude of the reaction force associated with bending and this effect was also implemented in the model. Regarding the rider model, the actual behavior of a rider was investigated through the recorded motion video data and used to define the necessary degrees of freedom. Based on this investigation, the degree of freedom of three, i.e. vertical, longitudinal and forward leaning motions, was adopted to the rider model.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0012
Yoshimoto Matsuda
Abstract As for automobile, the mass production period of Electric Vehicle(EV) has begun by the rapid progress of the battery performance. But for EV- Motorcycle(MC), it is limited for the venture companies' releases. The design and evaluation methodologies are not yet established or standardized so far. This paper provides the practical and the experimental examples. To study the feasibility of EV-MC, we developed the prototypes in the present technical and suppliers' parts environments, and evaluated them by the practical view of the MC usage. The developed EV-MC has the equivalent driving performance of the 250cc internal combustion engine(ICE)-MC and a cruising range of 100km in normal use. In the prototype development, the reliability and the ability of protection design of the battery in the whole vehicle against the environmental loads are mainly studied, especially, heat and cold, water, shock, and the accident impact. In addition, it is carried out the performance improvement by the heat management design of the motor to meet the practical use condition.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0017
R Varunprabhu, Himadri Bushan Das, S Jabez Dhinagar
Abstract The steering system of a 3-wheeler vehicle comprises a single column steering tube. The steering inclination at handle bar end is converted to wheel slip or inclination by the steering column. A compromise in either ride or handling is considered in the functional requirement of the 3-wheeler vehicle. The 3- wheeler vehicle under study is designed for ride comfort and the handling levels are compromised. Variants of the vehicle under study are meant for public passenger transport requirements. Drivers' ride comfort is considered as the primary functional requirement during design and driver's steering fatigue is not given importance. For the comfort of driver, steering effort has to be less without compromise in handling characteristics. The driver of this type of vehicle drives the vehicle for 15-18 hours a day. Driver's feedback suggests high steering effort as a human fatigue failure mode and also a cause of shoulder pain. In the present work, a DC motor assisted steering mechanism with an electronic control module has been designed.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0076
Christian Steinbrecher, Bastian Reineke, Wolfgang Fischer, Henning Heikes, Thorsten Raatz
Abstract Equipping low cost two-wheelers with engine management systems (EMS) enables not only a reduction of emissions but also an improvement in fuel consumption and system robustness. These benefits are accompanied by initially higher system costs compared to carburetor systems. Therefore, intelligent software solutions are developed by Bosch, which enable a reduction of the necessary sensors for a port fuel injection system (PFI) and furthermore provide new possibilities for combustion control. One example for these intelligent software solutions is a model based evaluation of the engine speed. By use of the information contained in the engine speed signal, characteristic features like air charge, indicated mean effective pressure (imep) and combustion phasing are derivable. The present paper illustrates how these features could be used to reduce the system costs and to improve fuel consumption and system robustness. Especially in the low cost segment there are significant bike-to-bike variations e.g. compression ratio or valve timing deviations.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0067
Henning Heikes, Christian Steinbrecher, Bastian Reineke, Jürgen Berkemer, Thorsten Raatz, Wolfgang Fischer
Abstract Cost reduction of engine management systems (EMS) for two-wheeler applications is the key to utilize their potentials compared to carburetor bikes regarding emissions, fuel economy and system robustness. In order to reduce the costs of a system with port fuel injection (PFI) Bosch is developing an EMS without a manifold air pressure (MAP) sensor. The pressure sensor is usually used to compensate for different influences on the air mass, which cannot be detected via the throttle position sensor (TPS) and mean engine speed. Such influences are different leakage rates of the throttle body and changing ambient conditions like air pressure. Bosch has shown in the past that a virtual sensor relying on model based evaluation of engine speed can be used for a detection of leakage air mass in idling to improve the pre-control of the air-fuel ratio. This provides a functionality which so far was only possible with an intake pressure sensor. In this paper the air mass calculated from the model based engine speed evaluation is used to adapt the influence of ambient pressure changes e.g. because of different altitudes.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0112
Christian Zinner, Reinhard Stelzl, Stephan Schmidt, Stefan Leiber, Thomas Schabetsberger
Abstract There are several reasons for equipping an internal combustion engine with a turbo-charger. The most important motivation for motorcycle use is to increase the power to weight ratio. Focusing on the special boundary conditions of motorcycles, like the wide engine speed range or the extraordinarily high demands on response behavior, automotive downsizing technologies cannot be transferred directly to this field of application. This led to the main question: Is it possible to design a turbo-charged motorcycle engine with satisfactory drivability and response behavior? The layout of the charged motorcycle engine was derived by simulation and had to be verified by experimental investigations. Main components, like the turbo charger or the waste gate control as well as the influence of the increasing back pressure on the combustion, were verified by test bench measurements. Afterwards the operation strategy in general was investigated and applied to the prototype engine. The importance of the response behavior led to frequent transient measurements on the engine test bench to allow for changes.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 17844