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Viewing 1 to 30 of 18382
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2129
Andrea Munzing, Stephane Catris
A lot of research work on icing scaling laws has been done during the last decades resulting in a today commonly accepted definition of similarity parameters and scaling laws. Those icing scaling laws have essentially been developed for fixed wing applications because airplane aerodynamic surfaces are too big to be tested in icing wind tunnels. This problem does not exist for helicopter blade profiles. However, the use of icing scaling laws is a very interesting feature in order to be able to predict ice shapes or icing performance penalty for a future helicopter still in development. Thanks to the long experience of Airbus Helicopters with icing tests a database of several real ice shapes on helicopter main and tail rotor blade sections is available. The comparison of the ice shapes obtained at the same icing similarity parameters allows the assessment of 2D icing scaling laws established for fixed wing aircrafts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2329
Paolo Di Francescantonio, Charles Hirsch, Piergiorgio Ferrante, Katsutomo Isono
The prediction of the broadband noise generated by the flow interaction with solid bodies such as for example side mirror noise, exhaust pipe noise, or ventilation and air conditioning noise require in principle the execution of extremely high demanding unsteady CFD simulations that nowadays cannot be afforded in an industrial environment. Therefore research efforts have been focused on alternative approaches that could permit to obtain engineering accurate results with much reduced computational efforts by stochastically reconstructing the turbulent velocity field starting from a steady RANS analysis. Two main families of methods have been introduced up to now, SNGR [1], and RPM[2], but applications in industrial environment are still limited mainly due to the lack of reliability of these methods and the need to introduce some tuning parameters.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2162
Krzysztof Szilder, Edward Lozowski
Atmospheric icing resulting from freezing rain, freezing drizzle and freezing cloud droplets occurs when airborne supercooled water drops freeze on objects they encounter. This process is especially hazardous to aircraft, when the build-up of ice changes the stability and control characteristics of the aerodynamic surfaces. Ice can also be shed with disastrous consequences, if it is ingested into engines, strikes the aircraft or leads to unbalanced aerodynamics forces. Ice accretion is a complex phenomenon involving 3-D multi-phase flow, heat transfer, and gravitational, viscous, surface tension and shear forces. An ability to predict how ice accretes on engineering structures is essential to the prediction of its associated aerodynamic penalties. We have developed an original icing modelling capability, called the “morphogenetic” approach, based on a discrete formulation and emulation of ice formation physics.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2078
Alric Rothmayer, Hui Hu
Abstract A strong air/water interaction theory is used to develop a fast simplified model for the trapping of water in a film that flows over sub-grid surface roughness. The sub-grid model is used to compute correction factors that can alter mass transport within the film. The sub-grid model is integrated into a covariant film mass transport model of film flow past three-dimensional surfaces in a form that is suitable for use in aircraft icing codes. Sample calculations are presented to illustrate the application of the model.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2079
Colin Hatch, Jason Moller, Eleftherios Kalochristianakis, Ian Roberts
Abstract The introduction of ice-phobic coatings promises to allow passive ice protection systems to be developed particularly for rotating systems such as propellers. The centrifugal force field combined with reduced adhesive strength can produce a self-shed capability limiting the amount of ice build-up. The size and shed time of ice shed from a propeller is predicted using a process that determines ice shape, ice growth rate and both internal and ice-structure interface stresses. A simple failure model is used to predict the onset of local failure and to propagate damage in the ice until local ice shedding is obtained. Recommendations are made on developing the model further.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2080
Roger J. Aubert
Abstract The entire process from ice accretion to ice impact with ice shedding in between still needs refinement. This paper presents key points illustrating the need for improvements in understanding the mechanical properties of ice accretion on helicopter rotor systems.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2088
Richard E. Kreeger, Lakshmi Sankar, Robert Narducci, Robert Kunz
Abstract The formation of ice over lifting surfaces can affect aerodynamic performance. In the case of helicopters, this loss in lift and the increase in sectional drag forces will have a dramatic effect on vehicle performance. The ability to predict ice accumulation and the resulting degradation in rotor performance is essential to determine the limitations of rotorcraft in icing encounters. The consequences of underestimating performance degradation can be serious and so it is important to produce accurate predictions, particularly for severe icing conditions. The simulation of rotorcraft ice accretion is a challenging multidisciplinary problem that until recently has lagged in development over its counterparts in the fixed wing community. But now, several approaches for the robust coupling of a computational fluid dynamics code, a rotorcraft structural dynamics code and an ice accretion code have been demonstrated.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2118
Sergey Alekseyenko, Michael Sinapius, Martin Schulz, Oleksandr Prykhodko
Abstract The results of experimental investigation of the icing processes of NACA 0015 airfoil are presented. The experiments have been carried out with the help of a high-speed camera at the icing/deicing facility at the Institute of Adaptronic and Functional Integration of the Technical University of Braunschweig. The investigation objective is the study of interaction between supercooled large droplets and the icing airfoil surface as well as physical phenomena occurring during the icing process. Evolution of the initial phase of ice growth process over time is observed, the general structure of ice accretion and its alteration along the airfoil is examined. Experiments have been carried out within a wide temperature range. Photos of the specific moments of the icing process have been analyzed. Splashing events and water movement on the icing surface have been observed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2238
Marina Roche, Marco Mammetti, Claudi Crifaci
Emissions and fuel consumption reduction for the year 2020 have lead to development of complex powertrain solutions, namely powersplit, electric and hybrid. The development of new concepts presents challenges for the integration in the vehicle, involving NVH among others. Electric energy flow to AC motors is controlled indeed by inverters that transform the energy from DC to AC working at frequencies around 10 kHz. Furthermore, the control of the energy flow can abruptly switch the operating strategy, inducing phenomena that are not present in combustion vehicles. Continuous wavelet transform is a relatively recent mathematical tool which allows signal decomposition into both time and frequency by convolution. On the contrary to windowed Fourier transform, it presents a minimized time support suited to the duration of the phenomena at each frequency. This characteristic makes it well-suited to for identifying transient information in non-stationary signals.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2121
Yong Chen, Liang Fu
Abstract In helicopter, the icing rotor blades will decrease the effectiveness of the helicopter and endanger the lives of the pilots. The asymmetrical ice break-up and shedding could also lead to severe vibrations of the rotor blade. Ice break-up from the main rotor may strike the fuselage and tail rotor, even worse, find its way into the engine, which may cause serious aircraft accidents. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for ice shedding process is necessary in order to optimize the helicopter rotor blade design and de-icing system to avoid hazardous ice shedding. In this paper, the ice shedding model is improved by introducing a bilinear cohesive zone model (CZM) to simulate the initiation and propagation of ice/blade interface crack. A maximum stress criterion is used to describe the failure occurred in the ice.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2124
Amanda Gounou, Jean-Marc Moisselin, Frédéric Autones, Dominique Levaillant, Jean-Louis Brenguier, Eric Défer, Michael Faivre, Alice Grandin, Fabien Dezitter, Sandra Turner
Abstract Glaciated icing conditions potentially leading to in-service event are often encountered in the vicinity of deep convective clouds. Nowcasting of these conditions with space-borne observations would be of a great help for improving flight safety and air-traffic management but still remains challenging. In the framework of the HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals) project, methods to detect and track regions of high ice water content from space-based geostationary and low orbit mission are investigated. A first HAIC/HIWC field campaign has been carried out in Australia in January-March 2014 to sample meteorological conditions potentially leading to glaciated icing conditions. During the campaign, several nowcasting tools were successfully operated such as the Rapid Development Thunderstorm (RDT) product that detects the convective areas from infrared geostationary imagery.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2148
Erdem Ayan, Serkan Ozgen, Canibek Murat, Erhan Tarhan
Abstract Ice crystal ingestion to aircraft engines may cause ice to accrete on internal components, leading to flameout, mechanical damage, rollback, etc. Many in-flight incidents have occurred in the last decades due to engine failures especially at high altitude convective weather conditions [1]. Thus, in the framework of HAIC FP7 European project, the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystals and mixed-phase conditions are investigated. Within the HAIC FP7 European project, TAI will implement models related to the ice crystal accretion calculation to the existing ice accumulation prediction program for droplets, namely TAICE. Considered models include heat transfer & phase change model, drag model and impact model. Moreover, trajectory model and Extended Messinger Model require some modifications to be used for ice crystal accretion predictions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2225
Peng Yu, Tong Zhang, Jing Li, Shiyang Chen, Rong Guo
Faced on transient vibration of EV, considering the characteristics of the electric drive system, active and passive integrated transient vibration control method of power train mounting system was proposed. First, models of power train system and mounting system were established, modal characteristics were grasped by simulation and experiment; a feed-forward controller was constructed from the active control perspective, mounting system transient vibration and power train torsion vibration were reduced; based on this, further optimization of mounting system was conducted from a passive control perspective. Results show that the active and passive integrated control method can effectively reduce the dynamic reaction force of mounting points, improve the vibration conditions of power train and body as well.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2301
Maxwell Hill, Dan Luo, Mark Moeller
Wind noise can be a significant event for automotive design engineers. The greenhouse glass plays an important role in the wind noise process. Robust estimates of the greenhouse glass damping are necessary for both understanding and modeling the role of the glass in the wind noise process. One unanswered question is whether the aerodynamic loads affect the window glass damping. To make this determination a method to assess the operational damping is required. The civil engineering community uses the random decrement technique to assess operational damping due wind loads. The random decrement technique has been shown to be a normalized autocorrelation function. In this paper the damping is estimated directly from the autocorrelation function. In the first section the relationship between the damping and autocorrelation function is examined for white noise excitation. A single oscillator is examined as the first case. Extension to higher modal densities is discussed.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2349
Jiantie Zhen, David Copley, Niranjan Londhe, Scott Fredrickson
Structure-borne inputs to hybrid FEA/SEA models could have significant effects on the model prediction accuracy. The purpose of this work was to obtain the structure-borne inputs using a simplified transfer path analysis and identify the significance of the structure-borne and airborne contributions to the spectator sound power of an engine with enclosure for future modeling references. Force inputs to the enclosure from the engine were obtained and used as inputs to a hybrid engine enclosure model for sound prediction.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2102
Guilin Lei, Wei Dong, Jianjun Zhu, Mei Zheng
Abstract The numerical simulation of ice melting process on an iced helicopter rotor blade is presented. The ice melting model uses an enthalpy-porosity formulation, and treats the liquid-solid mushy zone as a porous zone with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The ice shape on the blade section is obtained by the icing code with a dynamic mesh module. Both of the temperature change and the ice-melting process on the rotor blade section surface are analyzed. The phenomenon of ice melting is analyzed through the change of temperature and liquid fraction on the abrasion/ice interface. The liquid fraction change as with time on the abrasion/ice surface is observed, which describes the ice-melting process well. The numerical results show that the ice melting process can be simulated effectively by the melting model. The de-icing process can be monitored by observing the change of the liquid fraction of the area around the abrasion/ice interface.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2240
Gong Cheng, David W. Herrin
The theory of patch (or panel) contribution analysis is first reviewed and then applied to a motorcycle engine on a test stand. The approach is used to predict the sound pressure in the far field and the contribution from different engine components to the sound pressure at a point. First, the engine is divided into a number of patches. The transfer function between the sound pressure in the field and the volume velocity of a patch is determined by taking advantage of vibro-acoustic reciprocity. An inexpensive monopole source is placed at the receiver point and the sound pressure is measured at the center of each patch. With the engine idling, a P-U probe was used to measure particle velocity and sound intensity simultaneously on each patch. The contribution from each patch to the target point is the multiplication of the transfer function and the volume velocity, which can be calculated from particle velocity or sound intensity. There were two target points considered.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2211
Michael J. Santora, Dillon Savage
In the present study by the University of Idaho Clean Snowmobile Challenge (UICSC) team, the necessity, history, and research of noise reduction strategies in two-stroke snowmobile exhaust is presented. Testing and design is discussed to show the decision making process of College Design Series (CDS) teams. The UICSC CDS team is comprised of mechanical, electrical, and computer engineers. The development from static to dynamic noise cancellation is explained as a proof of concept and to further demonstrate CDS design. The study presents math models that validate each noise reduction technique. The noise reduction includes both a mechanically active quarter-wave resonator (MAQR) and mechanically active Helmholtz resonator (MAHR). Viability is given for both design types. These are presented with supporting implementation data. Control for both resonator platforms is discussed. The relative effect of each technology is compared based off cost and packaging.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2261
Joseph Plattenburg, Jason Dreyer, Rajendra Singh
Combined active and passive damping is an emerging trend as it should be an effective solution to challenging NVH problems, especially for lightweight vehicle components that demand advanced noise and vibration treatments. Compact patches are of particular interest due to their small size and cost; however, improved modeling techniques are needed for such methods. This paper presents a refined modeling procedure for side-by-side active and passive damping patches applied to thin, plate-like powertrain casing structures. As an example, a plate with fixed boundaries is modeled as this is representative of real-life transmission covers which often require damping treatments. Further scientific studies include a bench experiment that determines frequency dependent properties of the viscoelastic damping material. The proposed model is then utilized to examine several cases of active and passive patch location, and vibration reduction is determined in terms of insertion loss for each case.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2243
Yang Liu, Pingjian Ming, Wenping Zhang, Xinyu Zhang
Turbocharger is an important part of the turbocharged diesel engine. Due to the increase of mass flow rate and pressure ratio the turbocharger, aerodynamic noise of turbocharger has become more apparent. And turbocharger noise becomes one of the major noise sources of the main engine system of the ship. In the paper, Based on Lighthill acoustic analogy theory, by using Computational fluid mechanics(CFD) and indirect boundary element method(IBEM), the aerodynamic noise prediction of marine turbocharger compressor is developed. On the basis of finite volume method, using the single stator and rotor blade passages, unsteady viscous flow in the centrifugal Compressor was simulated. The compressor’s flow characteristic was predicted and agree well with the experimental value. The flow field characteristics and frequency spectrum of the fluctuating pressure which agree well with the theoretical value were analysed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2244
Ulhas Mohite, Niket Bhatia, Prashant Bhavsar
Noise radiated from motorcycle engine is gaining significance not only to meet regulations but also to fulfil customer demands of quiet products. In IC engines, combustion pressure is one of the major excitations which is transmitted through powertrain to the casings and radiate noise. Early identification and correction of the casing critical areas contributing to noise will lead to substantial cost and development time reduction. In this paper the approach to predict engine noise under combustion forces is presented. This Methodology is divided into three stages: 1. Multi body dynamic (MBD) Simulation to determine excitation forces 2. Vibration analysis of engine under combustion load 3. Acoustic analysis of engine to predict Sound Pressure Level (SPL). Important parts of motorcycle engine with single cylinder are considered as flexible bodies for MBD simulation.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2191
Peng Yu, Tong Zhang, Shiyang Chen, Jing Li, Rong Guo
Abstract In view of the problem of low-frequency (less than 10Hz, such as 0.5Hz, 1.15Hz, 8Hz in this paper) longitudinal vibration exists in a pure electric vehicle, modeling methods of drive-line torsion vibration system are conducted. Firstly, dynamometer test is performed, signals of motor speed and seat rail acceleration are obtained, the frequency characteristics of flutter is determined using the order analysis and time frequency analysis. Then four types of modeling and analysis are investigated facing the drive-line torsion vibration problem, including single model without electromagnetic stiffness, branch model without electromagnetic stiffness, single model considering electromagnetic stiffness and branch model considering electromagnetic stiffness.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2214
Shuguang Zuo, Guo Long, Xudong Wu, Jiajie Hu, Longyang Xiang, Jun Zhang
Abstract In order to reduce high-frequency harmonic noise produced by the blower in the auxiliary system of a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), a narrowband active noise control (ANC) method instead of conventional passive mufflers is adopted since the blower demands clean air condition and expects good acoustic performance. However, in ANC practical applications, the frequency difference between reference signal and actual primary signal, i.e., frequency mismatch (FM), can significantly degrade the high-frequency performance of narrowband ANC system. In this paper, a new narrowband ANC system is proposed to compensate for the performance degeneration due to the existence of FM and improve noise reduction at high frequencies. The proposed system consists of two parts: the Filtered Error Least Mean Square (FELMS) algorithm filtering the primary signals at wide frequency range other than those at the targeted frequencies, and the FM removal algorithm proposed by Yegui Xiao.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2127
Andrea Munzing, Franck Hervy, Stephane Catris
Abstract A helicopter blade profile was tested in the DGA Aero-engine Testing's icing altitude test facility S1 in Saclay, France during the winter of 2013/2014. The airfoil was a helicopter main rotor OA312 blade profile made out of composite material and with a metallic erosion shield. Dry air and ice accretion tests have been performed in order to assess the iced airfoil's aerodynamic behaviour. Several icing conditions were tested up through Mach numbers around 0.6. This paper presents the test setup, the test model and some of the test results. The test results presented in this paper include the ice shapes generated as well as dry air and iced airfoil lift and drag curves (polars) which were obtained with the real ice shapes on the airfoil.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2128
Enrico Bellussi
Abstract This paper describes the AgustaWestland (AW) experience in the use of the results obtained with the HISS flight tests to support the civil ice clearance for rotorcraft. The use of the HISS, a US Army CH-47D Chinook fitted with a spray bar system providing a cloud where the helicopter can fly in icing conditions, allows stable and prolonged flight data, conditions extremely difficult to encounter during natural ice flights. The paper analyses the definition of the HISS test matrix, to optimize the points needed for system development and the points possibly usable during certification, in both normal and failure mode conditions. It is also shown how the HISS ice campaigns results can be assessed, and how they can be compared to the natural ice flights to validate them. Finally it is explained how the HISS results can be used, in addition to natural ice flights results, to support the certification.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2123
Eric Defer, Jean-Louis Brenguier, Jos De Laat, Julien Delanoe, Fabien Dezitter, Michael Faivre, Amanda Gounou, Alice Grandin, Anthony Guignard, Jan Fokke Meirink, Jean-Marc Moisselin, Frederic Parol, Alain Protat, Claudine Vanbauce
Abstract The High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) Sub-Project 3 (SP3) focuses on the detection of cloud regions with high ice water content (IWC) from current available remote sensing observations of space-based geostationary and low-orbit missions. The SP3 activities are aimed at supporting operationally the two up-coming HAIC flight campaigns (the first one in May 2015 in Cayenne, French Guyana; the second one in January 2016 in Darwin, Australia) and ultimately provide near real-time cloud monitoring to Air Traffic Management. More in detail the SP3 activities focus on the detection of high IWC from space-borne geostationary Meteosat daytime imagery, explore the synergy of concurrent multi-spectral multiple-technique observations from the low-orbit A-Train mission to identify specific signatures in high IWC cloud regions, and finally develop a satellite-based nowcasting tool to track and monitor convective systems over the Tropical Atlantic.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2172
Xuan Li, Bingkui Chen, Yawen Wang, Guohua Sun, Teik Lim
Abstract Cycloid drives are widely used in the in-wheel motor for electric vehicles due to the advantages of large ratio, compact size and light weight. To improve the transmission efficiency and the load capability and reduce the manufacturing cost, a novel cycloid drive with non-pin design for the application in the in-wheel motor is proposed. Firstly, the generation of the gear pair is presented based on the gearing of theory. Secondly, the meshing characteristics, such as the contact zones, curvature difference, contact ratio and sliding coefficients are derived for performance evaluation. Then, the loaded tooth contact analysis (LTCA) is performed by establishing a mathematical model based on the Hertz contact theory to calculate the contact stress and deformation.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2185
Simon Eicke, Steffen Zemke, Ahmed Trabelsi, Matthias Dagen, Tobias Ortmaier
Abstract In this paper the power hop phenomenon is analyzed and important influencing factors are investigated. The results of driving tests on various road surfaces with different types of cars with longitudinal and transversal mounted engines as well as with front and rear wheel drive are presented. In order to understand and quantify the power hop effect the rotational speed of the individual wheels and the engine are measured. Additionally, the drive shaft torque, the engine movement in its bearings and the vertical deflection of the wheel with respect to the chassis are determined to get detailed knowledge about physical dependencies. It is shown that the rotational speed of the driven wheels is not a sufficient indicator to assess the occurrence of power hop by measurements. Alternatively, the measured longitudinal acceleration at the seat rail provides a good quantification.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2264
Rama Subbu, Baskar Anthonysamy, Piyush Mani Sharma
Abstract In India, demand for motorcycle with good comfort is increasing among the customers thereby the vibration reduction of two wheelers is key parameter for motorcycle manufacturers. In order to overcome the demand in the market, manufacturers are giving more importance to cost of the product by reducing the material. This results in the reduction of the life cycle of the vehicle models and drives the manufacturers to different product design philosophies and design tools, as one would expect. One of the performance factors that continue to challenge designers is that of vehicle vertical acceleration experienced by the motorcycle components. An essential tool in the motorcycle development process is the ability to quantify the durability of the component. This paper main objective is to increase the life of the motorcycle front fender through virtual simulation, on road testing and laboratory testing using NVH tool.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2218
Shuguang Zuo, Jun Zhang, Xudong Wu, Jiajie Hu, Guo Long
Abstract Blower is one of the main noise sources of fuel cell vehicle. In this paper, a narrowband active noise control (ANC) model is established based on adaptive notch filter (ANF) to control the high-frequency noise produced by the blower. Under transient conditions, in order to reduce the frequency mismatch (FM) of ANC for blower, a new Frequency Mismatch Filtered-Error Least Mean Square algorithm (FM-FELMS) is proposed to attenuate blower noise under transient conditions. According to the theoretical analysis and simulation, the proposed algorithm has an excellent noise reduction performance at relatively high blower speed. While for the low speed working condition, the Normalized Least Mean Square (NLMS) algorithm is applied to attenuate noise. The two algorithms could be jointly utilized to control the blower noise actively.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 18382