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Viewing 1 to 30 of 5178
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1592
Jingdong Cai, Saurabh Kapoor, Tushita Sikder, Yuping He
In this paper, active aerodynamic wings are investigated using numerical simulation in order to improve vehicle handling performance under high-speed cornering maneuvers. Air foils are selected and analyzed to determine the basic features of aerodynamic wings. Built upon the airfoil analysis, the 3D aerodynamic wing model is developed using a commercial software package, Siemens NX®. Then the virtual aerodynamic wings are assembled with the 3D vehicle model designed also using Siemens NX®. The resulting 3-D geometry model is used for aerodynamic analysis based on numerical simulation using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, ANSYS FLUENT®. The CFD-based simulation data and the multibody dynamic vehicle model generated CarSim®are combined to study the effects of active aerodynamic wings on handling performance of high-speed vehicles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1304
Alejandro Rosas Vazquez, Fernando Paisano, Diego Santillan Gutierrez
For many years the use of in-mold fasteners has been avoided for various reasons including: not fully understand the load cases in the part, the fear for quality issues to occur, the need for servicing, or the lack of understanding the complexity of all failure modes. The most common solution has been the use of secondary operations to provide attachments, such as, screws, metal clips, heat staking, sonic welding or other methods which are ultimately a waste in the process and increase manufacturing costs. The purpose of this paper is to take the reader through a design process which allows for the design of in-molded attachment clips on plastic parts. The paper explores the design process for in-molded attachment clips starting with a design concept idea, testing the basic concept using a personal 3D printer, optimizing the design with physical tests and CAE analysis, and finally producing high resolution 3D prototypes for validation and tuning.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1352
David Gardiner
Abstract This paper presents an experimental study of the vapour space flammability of Fuel Ethanol (a high-ethanol fuel for Flexible Fuel Vehicles, commonly known as “E85”) and gasoline containing up to 10% ethanol (commonly known as “E10”). The seasonal minimum vapour pressure limits in specifications for automotive spark ignition fuels are intended, in part, to minimize the formation of flammable mixtures in the headspace of vehicle fuel tanks. This is particularly important at subzero temperatures, where the headspace mixture may not be rich enough to prevent combustion in the presence of an ignition source such as a faulty electrical fuel pump. In the current study, the upper temperature limits of flammability were measured for field samples of “E85” and “E10”, and a series of laboratory-prepared blends of denatured ethanol, Before Oxygenate Blending (BOB) gasoline, and n-butane.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1512
Fuliang Wang, Zhangshun Yin, Shi Yan, Jia Zhan, Heinz Friz, Bo Li, Weiliang Xie
The validation of vehicle aerodynamic simulation results to wind tunnel test results and simulation accuracy improvement attract considerable attention of many automotive manufacturers. In order to improve the simulation accuracy, we build a simulation model of the ground effects simulation system of the aerodynamic wind tunnel of the Shanghai Automotive Wind Tunnel Center. The model includes the scoop, the distributed suction, the tangential blowing, the moving belt and the wheel belts. The simulated boundary layer profile and the pressure distribution agree well with test results. The baseline model and multiple design changes of the new Buick Excelle GT are simulated. The simulation results agree very well with test results.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1521
Levon Larson, Sudesh Woodiga, Ronald Gin, Robert Lietz
The resultant drag from airflow that enters the front grille of a ground vehicle for the purpose of component cooling (engine airflow drag) has a significant effect on total aerodynamic drag. Furthermore, engine airflow is known to be capable of influencing upstream external airflow (interference drag) and the combined effect of these phenomena is commonly referred to as cooling drag, which generally contributes up to 10% of total vehicle drag. Due to this coupled nature, cooling drag is difficult to understand as it contains influences from multiple locations around the vehicle. A good understanding of sources of cooling drag is paramount to drive vehicle design to a low cooling drag configuration. In this work, a production level Lincoln MKZ was modified so that a number of variables could be tested in both static ground and moving ground wind tunnel conditions. All tests were conducted at 80 MPH.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1528
Levon Larson, Ronald Gin, Robert Lietz
Cooling Drag is a metric that measures the influence of airflow travelling through the open grille of a ground vehicle on overall vehicle drag, both internally (engine airflow) and externally (interference airflow). With the interference effects considered, a vehicles Cooling Drag can be influenced by various flow fields around the vehicle, not just the airflow directly entering or leaving the engine bay. For this reason, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are particularly difficult. With insights gained from a previously conducted set of experimental studies a CFD validation effort was undergone to understand which flow field characteristics contribute to CFD/test discrepancies. A Lattice-Boltzmann LES method was used to validate several test points and comparison using integral drag values, surface pressures, underbody velocities and cooling pack mass flows is presented herein.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1525
Kosuke Nakasato, Makoto Tsubokura, Jun Ikeda, Keiji Onishi, Shoya Ota, Hiroki Takase, Kei Akasaka, Hisashi Ihara, Munehiko Oshima, Toshihiro Araki
Because of rising demands to improve aerodynamic performance owing to its impact on vehicle dynamics, efforts were previously made to reduce aerodynamic lift and yawing moment based on steady-state measurements of aerodynamic forces and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. In recent years, increased research on dynamic aerodynamics has partially explicated the impact of aerodynamic forces on vehicle dynamics. However, it is difficult to measure aerodynamic forces while a vehicle is in motion, and also analyzing the effect on vehicle dynamics requires measurement of vehicle behavior, movement, amount of steering and other quantities noiselessly, as well as an explication of the mutual influence with aerodynamic forces. Consequently, the related phenomena occurring in the real world are still not fully understood.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1549
Taro Yamashita, Takafumi Makihara, Kazuhiro Maeda, Kenji Tadakuma
In recent years, the automotive manufacturers have been working to reduce fuel consumption in order to cut down on CO2 emissions, promoting weight reduction as one of the fuel saving countermeasures. On the other hand, this trend of weight reduction is well known to reduce vehicle stability in response to disturbances. Thus, automotive aerodynamic development is required not only to reduce aerodynamic drag, which contributes directly to lower fuel consumption, but also to develop technology for controlling unstable vehicle behavior caused by natural wind. In order to control the unstable vehicle motion by external contour modification, it is necessary to understand unsteady aerodynamic forces that fluctuating natural wind in real-world environments exerts on vehicles. In the past, some studies have reported the characteristics of unsteady aerodynamic forces induced by natural winds, comparing to steady aerodynamic forces obtained from conventional wind tunnel tests.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1546
Joshua Newbon, David Sims-Williams, Robert Dominy
Abstract The effect of the upstream wake of a Formula 1 car on a following vehicle has been investigated using experimental and computational methods. Multiple vehicle studies in conventional length wind tunnels pose challenges in achieving a realistic vehicle separation and the use of a short axial length wake generator provides an advantage here. Aerodynamic downforce and drag were seen to reduce, with greater force reductions experienced at shorter axial spacings. With lateral offsets, downforce recovers at a greater rate than drag, returning to the level for a vehicle in isolation for offsets greater than half a car width. The effect of the wake was investigated in CFD using multiple vehicle simulations and non-uniform inlet boundary conditions to recreate the wake. Results closely matched those for a full two-vehicle simulation provided the inlet condition included unsteady components of the onset wake.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0336
Ganesh Liladhar Yewale, Abhishek Tapkire, D Radhakrishna, Popat Shejwal, Kaushal Singh, Gaurav Panchal
Abstract VRDE has developed Wankel type rotary engine to achieve high power output & fuel efficiency for indigenization programme of UAVs. This engine is meeting all performance parameters needed for intended aerial vehicle. This paper describes the testing methodology followed by development engineers to prove the endurance and reliability of UAV engine for airworthiness certification. This paper gives the brief about testing carried out on the Wankel engine, failures faced during endurance testing and their rectification to enhance the life of the engine to achieve hundred test cycle mark. This paper also briefs about the test set up, endurance test cycles simulating the practical operating conditions.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0045
Joseph K. Ausserer, Marc D. Polanka, Jacob Baranski, Paul Litke
Abstract Small remotely piloted aircraft (10-25 kg) powered by internal combustion engines typically operate on motor gasoline, which has an anti-knock index (AKI) of >80. To comply with the single-battlefield-fuel initiative in DoD Directive 4140.25, interest has been increasing in converting the 1-10 kW power plants in the aforementioned size class to run on lower AKI fuels such as diesel and JP-8, which have AKIs of ∼20. It has been speculated that the higher losses (short circuiting, incomplete combustion, heat transfer) that cause these engines to have lower efficiencies than their conventional-scale counterparts may also relax the fuel-AKI requirements of the engines. To investigate that idea, the fuel-AKI requirement of a 3W-55i engine was mapped and compared to that of the engine on the manufacturer-recommended 98 (octane number) ON fuel.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0078
Mark R. Mataczynski, Paul Litke, Benjamin Naguy, Jacob Baranski
Abstract Aircraft engine power is degraded with increasing altitude according to the resultant reduction in air pressure, temperature, and density. One way to mitigate this problem is through turbo-normalization of the air being supplied to the engine. Supercharger and turbocharger components suffer from a well-recognized loss in efficiency as they are scaled down in order to match the reduced mass flow demands of small-scale Internal Combustion Engines. This is due in large part to problems related to machining tolerance limitations, such as the increase in relative operating clearances, and increased blade thickness relative to the flow area. As Internal Combustion Engines decrease in size, they also suffer from efficiency losses owing primarily to thermal loss. This amplifies the importance of maximizing the efficiency of all sub-systems in order to minimize specific fuel consumption and enhance overall aircraft performance.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0006
John R. Humm, Narayan Yoganandan, Frank A. Pintar, Richard L. DeWeese, David M. Moorcroft, Amanda M. Taylor, Brian Peterson
The objective of the present exploratory study is to understand occupant responses in oblique and side-facing seats in the aviation environment, which are increasingly installed in modern aircrafts. Sled tests were conducted using intact Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) seated in custom seats approximating standard aircraft geometry. End conditions were selected to represent candidate aviation seat and restraint configurations. Three-dimensional head center-of-gravity linear accelerations, head angular velocities, and linear accelerations of the T1, T6, and T12 spinous processes, and sacrum were obtained. Three-dimensional kinematics relative to the seat were obtained from retroreflective targets attached to the head, T1, T6, T12, and sacrum. All specimens sustained spinal injuries, although variations existed by vertebral level.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0377
Alain Giacobini Souza, Luiz Carlos Gadelha Souza
Abstract In designing of the Attitude Control System (ACS) is important take into account the influence of the structure’s flexibility, since they can interact with the satellite rigid motion, mainly, during translational and/or rotational maneuver, damaging the ACS pointing accuracy. In the linearization and reduction of the rigid-flexible satellite mathematic model, usually one loses some important information associated with the satellite true dynamical behavior. One way to recovery this information is include to the ACS design parametric and not parametric uncertainties of the system. The H infinity control method is able to take into account the parametric uncertainty in the control law design, so the controller becomes more robust. This paper presents the design of a robust controller using the H infinity control technique to control the attitude of a rigid-flexible satellite.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0437
Gustavo de Carvalho Bertoli, Geraldo José Adabo, Gefeson Mendes Pacheco
Abstract A method for conceptual design of Solar Powered Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) is presented. This method is based on traditional design methodology - wing loading estimation for preliminary sizing - modified for Solar Powered UAS case. Based on past works on Solar Powered UAS design, proposes a method that considers payload power consumption and therefore its impact on battery sizing. This battery sizing composes vehicle conceptual sizing equation. This method is useful for an assessment of Solar Powered UAS use in specific missions and serving as a start point for a more detailed design. A user interface was developed to automate the design process based on this method proposed.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8143
Jerry Syms, Theresia Manns, Björn Bergqvist
Abstract The noise generated by the flow of air past a transport truck is a key design factor for the manufacturers of these vehicles as the sound levels in the cabin are a significant component of driver comfort. This paper describes a collaboration between Volvo GTT and the National Research Council Canada to measure the in-cabin aeroacoustics of a full-scale cab-over tractor in the NRC 9 m Wind Tunnel. Acoustic instrumentation was installed inside the tractor to record cabin noise levels and externally to acquire tunnel background noise data. Using a microphone mounted on the driver’s-side tunnel wall as a reference to remove variations in background noise levels between data points, differences in cabin noise levels were able to be detected when comparing the tractor with different configurations. The good repeatability of the data allowed for differences of as little as 0.5 dB to be measured.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2095
Agata Suwala, Lucy Agyepong, Andrew Silcox
Abstract Reduction of overall drag to improve aircraft performance has always been one of the goals for aircraft manufacturers. One of the key contributors to decreasing drag is achieving laminar flow on a large proportion of the wing. Laminar flow requires parts to be manufactured and assembled within tighter tolerance bands than current build processes. Drilling of aircraft wings to the tolerances demanded by laminar flow requires machines with the stiffness and accuracy of a CNC machine while having the flexibility and envelope of an articulated arm. This paper describes the development and evaluation of high accuracy automated processes to enable the assembly of a one-off innovative laminar flow wing concept. This project is a continuation of a previously published SAE paper related to the development of advanced thermally stable and lightweight assembly fixture required to maintain laminar flow tolerances.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2109
Michael Morgan, Caroline McClory, Colm Higgins, Yan Jin, Adrian Murphy
Aerospace structures are typically joined to form larger assemblies using screw lock or swage lock fasteners or rivets. Countersunk fasteners are used widely in the aerospace industry on flying surfaces to reduce excrescence drag and increase aircraft performance. These fasteners are typically installed to a nominal countersink value which leaves them flush to the surface before being locked into position. The Northern Ireland Technology Centre (NITC) at Queen’s University Belfast has developed and demonstrated two processes which enable high tolerance flush fastening of countersunk fasteners: The ‘Flush Install’ process produces countersunk holes based on the specific geometry of each individual fastener; The ‘Fettle Flush’ process accurately machines fasteners to match the surrounding surface. Flushness values well within the allowable tolerances have been demonstrated for both Flush Install and Fettle Flush processes.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2098
Christophe Vandaele, Didier Friot, Simon Marry, Etienne Gueydon
Abstract With more than 10 000 aircrafts in their order backlog Aircraft manufacturers focus on automated assembly is of critical importance for the future of efficient production assembly. Moreover to obtain maximum benefit from automation, it is necessary to achieve not only an automated assembly cell, but also a real breakthrough in fastener technology. The optimum solution, known as “One Side Assembly”, performs the whole assembly sequence from one side of the structure using an accurate robot arm equipped with a multifunction end effector and high performance fasteners. This configuration provides an efficient and flexible automated installation process, superior to current solutions which are typically, large scale, capital intensive systems, which still require operators to complete or control the fastener installation. The search for a technological breakthrough in this domain has been targeted for more than 15 years by many aircraft manufacturers.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2119
Gergis W. William, Samir N. Shoukry, Jacky C. Prucz, Mariana M. William
Abstract Air cargo containers are used to load freight on various types of aircrafts to expedite their handling. Fuel cost is the largest contributor to the total cost of ownership of an air cargo container. Therefore, a better fuel economy could be achieved by reducing the weight of such containers. This paper aims at developing innovative, lightweight design concepts for air cargo containers that would allow for weight reduction in the air cargo transportation industry. For this purpose, innovative design and assembly concepts of lightweight design configurations of air cargo containers have been developed through the applications of lightweight composites. A scaled model prototype of a typical air cargo container was built to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of creating such a container from fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The paper is the authoritative source for the abstract.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-2112
Hilmar Apmann
Abstract As a new material FML, made by aluminum foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg, is a real alternative to common materials for fuselages of aircrafts like monolithic aluminum or CFRP. Since experiences within A380 this material has some really good advantages and develops to the status as alternative to aluminum and composite structures. To become FML as a real alternative to aluminum and carbon structures there are many things to improve: design, material, costs and process chain. So following one of the main goals for an industrial application for high production rates of aircrafts is the automation of production processes inside the process chain for FML-parts like skins and panels for fuselages. To reach this goal for high production rates first steps of automation inside this new process chain have been developed in the last two years. Main steps is the automated lay-up of metallic foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2130
Enkhsaikhan Boldsaikhan, Shintaro fukada, Mitsuo Fujimoto, Kenichi Kamimuki, Hideki Okada, Brent Duncan, Phuonghanh Bui, Michael Yeshiambel, Brian Brown, Alan Handyside
Abstract The Refill Friction Spot Joining (RFSJ) is an emerging solid-state spot welding technology that thermo-mechanically creates a molecular-level bond between the work-pieces. RFSJ does not consume any filler or foreign materials so that no additional weight is introduced to the assembly. As the solid-to-liquid phase transition is not involved in RFSJ in general, there is no lack of fusion or material deterioration caused by liquefaction and solidification. Unlike the conventional friction stir spot welding, RFSJ produces a spot joint with a perfectly flush surface finish without a key or exit hole. Currently, the aerospace industry employs solid rivets for fastening the primary structures as they meet the baseline requirements and have well-established standards and specifications.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1979
William D. Bertelsen
Abstract Technology to create a VTOL for general aviation that is fast, efficient, easy to fly, and affordable, has proven elusive. Bertelsen Design LLC has built a large research model to investigate the potential of the arc wing VTOL to fulfill these attributes. The aircraft that is the subject of this paper weighs approximately 145 kg (320 lbs) and features coaxial, dual-rotating propellers, diameter 1.91 m (75 inches). Power is from an MZ 202 two-cycle, two-cylinder engine. Wingspan is 1.82 m (72 inches). The arc wing differentiates this aircraft from previous deflected-slipstream prototypes, which suffered from pitch-trim issues during transition. This paper will present configuration details of the Bertelsen model, showing how it is possible to generate high lift from a short-span wing system. The Bertelsen model can hover out of ground effect using just two arc-wing elements: a main wing and a “slat”.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1980
Syama M. Rao, Dineshkumar M
Abstract This paper studies admissible state trajectories for an unmanned aerial vehicle(UAV) by performing dynamic soaring technique in the wind gradient. An optimization problem is formulated by employing direct optimal piece wise control. A 3-DOF point mass model system dynamics of UAV is considered. The bank angle and lift co-efficient are identified as control variables. A UAV of mass 5.44kg is considered for this study. Performance measures considered are maximization of specific energy and maximization of specific energy rate extracted by the vehicle, and minimization of the control effort. The effects of linear and parabolic wind gradient on maximizing the specific energy of an autonomous dynamic soaring UAV is also studied and minimum linear gradient required is found. The loop radius of the loiter pattern is maximized for applications like surveillance and patrolling of a localized area along with energy maximization as objective function.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1984
Michael Krenz
Abstract This paper proposes a method of optimizing aircraft system architectures by considering the efficiencies of each energy conversion step necessary to fulfill the intended function. In addition, these conversion efficiencies need to be evaluated at all critical operating points for the systems involved (e.g. engine, generator, loads, etc.). The methodology starts with examining the energy sources on the aircraft, the energy loads and the energy transfer efficiencies between the sources and the loads. Modern aircraft architecture trends are broadly addressed along with a framework for applying this methodology, but specific aircraft are not analyzed due to the proprietary nature of some of the conversion efficiency data.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1985
Fei Gao, Serhiy Bozhko, Patrick Wheeler
Abstract The paper will deal with the problem of establishing a desirable power sharing in multi-feed electric power system for future more-electric aircraft (MEA) platforms. The MEA is one of the major trends in modern aerospace engineering aiming for reduction of the overall aircraft weight, operation cost and environmental impact. Electrical systems are employed to replace existing hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical loads. Hence the onboard installed electrical power increases significantly and this results in challenges in the design of electrical power systems (EPS). One of the key paradigms for future MEA EPS architectures assumes high-voltage dc distribution with multiple sources, possibly of different physical nature, feeding the same bus(es). In our study we investigate control approaches to guarantee that the total electric load is shared between the sources in a desirable manner. A novel communication channel based secondary control method is proposed in this paper.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1986
Qian Li, Balakrishnan Devarajan, Xuning Zhang, Rolando Burgos, Dushan Boroyevich, Pradeep Raj
Abstract The more electric aircraft (MEA) concept has gained popularity in recent years. As the main building blocks of advanced aircraft power systems, multi-converter power electronic systems have advantages in reliability, efficiency and weight reduction. The pulsed power load has been increasingly adopted--especially in military applications--and has demonstrated highly nonlinear characteristics. Consequently, more design effort needs to be placed on power conversion units and energy storage systems dealing with this challenging mission profile: when the load is on, a large amount of power is fed from the power supply system, and this is followed by periods of low power consumption, during which time the energy storage devices get charged.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1989
Qiong Wang, Rolando Burgos, Xuning Zhang, Dushan Boroyevich, Adam White, Mustansir Kheraluwala
Abstract In modern aircraft power systems, active power converters are promising replacements for transformer rectifier units concerning efficiency and weight. To assess the benefits of active power converters, converter design and optimization should be carefully done under the operation requirements of aircraft applications: electromagnetic interference (EMI) standards, power quality standards, etc. Moreover, certain applications may have strict limits on other converter specifications: weight, size, converter loss, etc. This paper presents the methodology for performance optimization of different active power converters (active front-ends, isolated DC/DC converters and three-phase isolated converters) for aircraft applications. Key methods for power converter component (e.g. inductors, semiconductor devices, etc.) performance optimization and loss calculation are introduced along with the converter optimization procedure.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1991
Syed J. Khalid
Abstract Aircraft subsystems essential for flight safety and airworthiness, including flight controls, environmental control system (ECS), anti-icing, electricity generation, and starting, require engine bleed and power extraction. Predictions of the resulting impacts on maximum altitude net thrust(>8%), range, and fuel burn, and quantification of turbofan performance sensitivities with compressor bleed, and with both high pressure(HP) rotor power extraction and low pressure(LP) rotor power extraction were obtained from simulation. These sensitivities indicated the judicious extraction options which would result in the least impact. The “No Bleed” system in Boeing 787 was a major step forward toward More Electric Aircraft (MEA) and analysis in this paper substantiates the claimed benefits.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1994
Wei Wu, Yeong-Ren Lin, Louis Chow, Edmund Gyasi, John P. Kizito, Quinn Leland
Abstract For aircraft electromechanical actuator (EMA) cooling applications using forced air produced by axial fans, the main objective in fan design is to generate high static pressure head, high volumetric flow rate, and high efficiency over a wide operating range of rotational speed (1x∼3x) and ambient pressure (0.2∼1 atm). In this paper, a fan design based on a fan diameter of 86 mm, fan depth (thickness) of 25.4 mm, and hub diameter of 48 mm is presented. The blade setting angle and the chord lengths at the leading and trailing edges are varied in their suitable ranges to determine the optimal blade profiles. The fan static pressure head, volumetric flow rate, and flow velocity are calculated at various ambient pressures and rotational speeds. The optimal blade design in terms of maximum total-to-total pressure ratio and efficiency at the design point is obtained via CFD simulation.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 5178

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