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Viewing 19861 to 19890 of 19895
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160033
Arthur J. Slade
The paper opens with a number of quotations from publications issued by the Army War College and showing the bearing of motor transport on a proper military policy for the United States. The author then describes two experimental trips recently made by motor-truck owners near New York in an effort to determine proper motor-transport operating conditions. A statistical summary is given for these two experimental trips. The Army War College has issued in compliance with instructions of the Secretary of War a “Statement of a Proper Military Policy for the United States,” supplemented by a number of pamphlets dealing with particular features of this military policy in considerable detail. In many of these supplementary pamphlets there appears a considerable amount of material bearing upon the subject of motor transport and from them the brief quotations in the following paragraphs are taken.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160034
C. M. EASON
Inasmuch as horses cannot meet the demand for increased farm power, the tractor must come at once. So far the supply of tractors has been entirely inadequate to meet the demand. The author specifiies some of the problems that confront designers of farm tractors. To make the tractor immediately available for farm work, it must be adaptable to practically all of the existing types of horse-drawn implements, besides furnishing belt power for a wide variety of present power-driven farm machinery. In designing tractors it must be remembered that the horse is a very flexible unit, capable of a wide variation in power output. Designing a tractor to furnish the necessary power for the majority of farm conditions, requires an intimate knowledge of crops, soils and farm management. These must be analyzed carefully so as to make the machine have as wide a range of usefulness as possible.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160032
W. F. BRADLEY
The author outlines the constructions that have performed cially that four-cylinder engines carried under a hood are the most satisfactory. The defects revealed by war service are given in considerable detail, the author finding that all of the trucks used had developed some weak point. Radiators and springs are specified as a general source of trouble. The author outlines a number of operating troubles developed under the existing conditions of operation and gives examples of the way these have been remedied. Considerable attention is paid to the methods of operating trucks away from made roads. The methods of fitting chains to the wheels, and the use of caterpillar attachments are described. Dimensions are given for bodies and a number of suggestions made as to their proper construction.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160009
J. G. VINCENT
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160012
CHARLES S. CRAWFORD
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160025
NEIL MACCOULL
The author gives a brief review of developments during the past year in the construction of aeroplanes, particularly as affected by the European War. He takes as an example the Renault twelve-cylinder engine, citing the respects in which the present differs from previous models. Such factors as the changes in cooling systems, method of drive, valve construction and starting devices are considered. The requirements of aeroplane engines, such as constant service, high speeds (of aeroplanes) and stream-line form of engines and radiators, are outlined. Propeller requirements are dealt with at length, curves being given by which the efficiency and diameter of the propeller can be obtained. In conclusion a number of different engine installations are illustrated and compared.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160020
D. L. GALLUP
The author points out the diversity of opinion on what constitutes desirable car performance in the minds of engineers and of the public generally. He believes this is largely due to the great diversity of claims which have been made in advertising literature and decries the sort of tests which have been made the basis of this publicity, pointing out that a majority of them are conducted under such conditions as make it practically impossible for the car owner ever to duplicate or confirm them. The kind of an expression or test which will inform the buying public most is one which will tell what the car will do in the hands of the average owner, and define the conditions under which a demonstration of this ability can be made, such conditions to be relatively simple and easy of fulfillment.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160017
L. GOLDMERSTEIN
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150021
JOHN O. HEINZE
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150040
JERRY W. DE COU
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150039
FRANK H. TREGO
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140049
FINLEY R. PORTER
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140005
DAVID L. GALLUP
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140032
CORNELIUS T. MYERS
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140023
ALDEN L. McMURTRY
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140016
JOSEPH A. ANGLADA
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130031
CLAUDE E. COX
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130032
HERBERT CHASE
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130024
T. B. BROWNE
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130022
F. R. HUTTON, HERBERT CHASE
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120017
A. B. CUMNER
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120025
EUGENE P. BATZELL
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110022
JUSTUS B. ENTZ
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110014
CHESTER S. RICKER
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110017
ARTHUR J. SLADE
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100004
B. D. GRAY
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100017
T. V. BUCKWALTER
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090012
Alex Churchward
Viewing 19861 to 19890 of 19895