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Viewing 19831 to 19860 of 20059
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370126
F. W. Caldwell, E. Martin, T. B. Rhines
VARIOUS types of automatic controllable propellers are discussed to show that constant-speed operation will, in general, give the most satisfactory airplane performance. Some attention is given to the aerodynamics of the constant-speed propeller, and its effects on performance are described, with reference to the usual characteristics such as cruising speed and rate of climb. Certain new performance possibilities that result from this type of operation are discussed.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370015
Harry G. Davis
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370024
George McCarroll
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370023
Thomas H. Henkle
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370028
H. C. REYNOLDS
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370039
Alex de Sakhnoffsky
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370053
JOHN H. PLOEHN
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370047
J. G. SWAIN
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370059
H. O. Mathews
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370055
J. A. HARVEY
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370068
F. C. Patton
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370074
R. M. Ahrens
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370073
Francis S. Weaver
ABSTRACT
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370071
R. H. Stalnaker, F. E. Burnside
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370088
Jean Y. Ray
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370106
Francis B. Flahive
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370177
George J. Mead
THE rapid increase in the size of our air transports, as well as the requirements for higher cruising speeds, forewarn of the need of powerplants of decidedly greater power. The further development of the existing standard types may be relied upon to ultimately provide at least 50 per cent greater output. There is, however, definite evidence now of the need of engines of even greater power in the period immediately ahead, which need has focused attention on other types in which additional displacement may be provided through the employment of a greater number of cylinders. Studies indicate that there is an opportunity of reducing the powerplant drag sufficiently to effect a saving in fuel at least as great as is promised by further improvement in specific consumption. For this reason the form and location of the new powerplants, as well as the method chosen for cooling them, will be dictated largely by the resulting effect on operating costs.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370109
Joseph T. Morris
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360065
Joe Banzi
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360064
MURRAY AITKEN
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360098
A. J. Scaife
MANY organizations and individuals have been trying to get a simple formula for measuring the economy of motor trucking from a load-carrying standpoint; that is to say, is it more economical to buy a low-priced truck, load it to the limit for a few thousand miles, discard it and buy a new one, instead of buying a higher-priced truck, and run it three or four times farther, even up to the point of obsolescence, before buying a new one? To make an intelligent analysis, it is well to consider first the type of truck that should be used to do the work required in the most efficient manner and then compare it with a vehicle that will do the work after a fashion. In making a study of this subject, we often find that all the factors have not been taken into consideration. When actual operating records are compared in the same organization, doing the same kind of work, the results are most interesting.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360090
E. P. WOOTEN
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360102
O. M. Brede
THIS paper centers attention on operating cost control, which is stated to be the most difficult of all the service problems to solve. Until the scientific as well as the mechanical phase of maintenance is recognized, until repairs are made from facts rather than guesswork, and until the question: Why this failure? takes precedence over “repairing,” the author states that this serious service problem cannot be solved. The danger of confusing cost records with maintenance factual information is emphasized. Only a maintenance history, a chronological array of facts embracing repairs, repeat work, road failures and the like, can answer the question: What caused this cost? Preventive maintenance has as its fundamentals regularity, uniformity and thoroughness, and can be applied to any single vehicle or fleet regardless of whether self-maintenance or service-station maintenance is practised.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360123
H. Wood
THIS paper gives a brief resumé of the development of the Rolls-Royce Kestrel engine and then analyzes the requirements of the high-performance engine of the future, developing at least 1500 b.hp. and operating on fuels of high knock ratings. The problems investigated include those of engine form, fuels, detonation, waste-heat disposal, cooling drag, cooling medium, and the mechanical and operational features. Conclusions deduced from the arguments are: (a) Compression ratios, charge density, and rotational speeds will need to increase and, therefore, cylinder bores and strokes will decrease; it may be necessary to adopt the sleeve-valve type. (b) The arrangement of the engine will tend to multithrow crankshafts with more than two pistons per crankpin.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360053
Lessiter C. Milburn
Viewing 19831 to 19860 of 20059