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Viewing 19831 to 19860 of 20019
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350028
A. F. McDonald
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350030
W. W. CHURCHILL
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350003
T. L. Preble
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350005
Karl K. Probst
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350010
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350034
Pierre Schon
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350032
C.F. Becker
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350040
J. F. Winchester
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350046
H. D. Allee
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340020
R. N. Janeway, L. R. Baker
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340023
H. W. Drake
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340013
E. L. TIRRELL
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340014
Lowell H. Brown, Herbert Chase
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340043
A. C. Staley
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340046
W. C. Thee
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340044
S. H. McCrory
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340039
Eugene L. Vidal
ABSTRACT
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340031
Martin Schreiber
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340085
John B. Wheatley
THIS paper contains a brief discussion of the advantages inherent in a rotating-wing aircraft in regard to its performance and safety as compared to the conventional airplane. An arbitrary criterion is set up that presents the different characteristics which must be possessed by the rotating-wing aircraft in order that it be considered successful and practical, and the criterion is then used to evaluate the merit of the helicopter, the cyclogiro, the autogiro, and the gyroplane. According to the criterion, the autogiro and gyroplane will be superior to the airplane when their pronounced possibilities for high-speed performance are materialized, these possibilities consisting of the inherent ability of the autogiro and gyroplane rotors to attain their maximum lift-drag ratio at any desired forward speed. The cyclogiro is approximately equal in merit to the airplane, while the helicopter is quite definitely inferior.
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340086
E. S. Hall
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340081
Eastman N. Jacobs
THIS paper, which has been awarded the Wright Brothers Medal for 1933, considers first the air forces acting on airfoil sections, their origin, and the nature of the differences between the air forces acting on an ideal airfoil section and on an actual one. These differences, which are due primarily to the action of viscosity, are considered in detail because they distinguish the desirable from the undesirable sections. The effects of viscosity are discussed in relation to the air-flow about the section as affected by a variation of the dynamic scale or Reynolds Number of the flow. Separation of the flow from the airfoil surface, which produces the most marked deviations from the ideal flow, is discussed in detail, considering the effects of varying the Reynolds Number and the initial turbulence of the air. Finally, the paper considers the variation of the aerodynamic properties of sections with changes in the section shape.
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340075
L. V. Newton
OPERATING, or so-called variable charges, are considered in this paper, and comments are offered on the subject of fixed charges. Because economies effected since about 1929 have brought fleet-operation costs to a very low level, the difficult problem of how they can be further reduced and yet maintain the same quality of service is facing all fleet operators; but it is not insurmountable. Through adequate study of each item of operating expense, and with proper treatment of each item of cost, Mr. Newton believes that reductions will be effected. Itemizing the charges, Mr. Newton says that gasoline purchase is primarily the buying of heat units. Gasoline should not deteriorate in storage, must be clean, have low sulphur content and should not vapor lock. Using a higher antiknock gasoline than necessary increases fuel cost. Correct and effective lubrication lengthens vehicle life and reduces repair costs; as few different grades as will assure good lubrication should be used. Mr.
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340065
MERRILL C. HORINE
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340061
E. P. Lott
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340062
G. E. Clinton
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340057
Henry S. Debbink
Viewing 19831 to 19860 of 20019