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Viewing 151 to 180 of 19895
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0249
Jia Mi, Hu Jie, Hao Zhu, Hao Liu, Yuzhou Zhang
Abstract With the development of the Internet for vehicles, the Car-sharing has been developed rapidly in recent years. This paper focuses on the network programming and distribution for Car-sharing, which helps to clarify the characteristics and basic law of Car-sharing network development, as well as the main approaches to construct it. Firstly, by analyzing the effect factors and expanding ways of Car-sharing network, characteristics of the development of Car-sharing industry and its network, as well as main Car-sharing users and services, the influence factors of Car-sharing demand and the main demand points in a city are summarized. Secondly, in order to better evaluate the network programming and distribution for Car-sharing, this paper proposes an optimization decision method of the car-sharing network planning by evaluating the possible alternatives in a same scale. The assessment index of Car-sharing network planning is constructed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0257
Liang Wu, Fangwu Ma, Yongfeng Pu, HongBin Yin
Abstract This research focuses on an integration of two optimal tracking controllers, the active suspension controller and the rear-wheel steering controller, with the objective of improving vehicle performances in terms of maneuverability and safety by enhancing road holding capability and lateral stability. The active suspension controller adjusts the vehicle roll angle and utilizes the vertical force at each active suspension to boost road holding capability. On the other hand, the rear-wheel steering controller adjusts rear steering angles to use lateral force at each ground-tire contact point and amplify the vehicle’s ability to follow the desired yaw rate and sideslip angle during cornering maneuvers. Though the active attitude motion and mass shifting of car body may seem to hold relationship with lateral stability, its ability to evenly distribute vertical tire forces benefits the rear-wheel steering controller by enhancing the road holding capability.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0256
Xianhe Wu, Yudong Fang, Zhenfei Zhan, Xu Liu, Gang Guo
Abstract Vehicle weight reduction has become one of the most crucial problems in the automotive industry because that increasingly stringent regulatory requirements, such as fuel economy and environmental protection, must be met. The lightweight design needs to consider various vehicle attributes, including crashworthiness and stiffness. Therefore, in essence, the vehicle weight reduction is a typical Multidisciplinary Design Optimization problem. To improve the computational efficiency, meta-models have been widely used as the surrogate of FE model in the multidisciplinary optimization of large structures. However, these surrogate models introduce additional sources of uncertainties, such as model uncertainty, which may lead to the poor accuracy in prediction. In this paper, a method of corrected surrogate model based multidisciplinary design optimization under uncertainty is proposed to incorporate the uncertainties introduced by both meta-models and design variables.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0258
Mark Brudnak, James Walsh, Igor Baseski, Bryan LaRose
Abstract Laboratory based durability simulation has become an increasingly important component of vehicle system design validation and production release. It offers several advantages over field testing which has driven its adoption in the automotive and military sectors. Among these advantages are 1) repeatability, 2) earlier testing, 3) isolation of subsystems or components and 4) ability to compress and/or accelerate the testing. In this paper we present time-domain methods and techniques adapted, implemented and used at TARDEC to reduce the time required to perform a laboratory durability test of a full vehicle system, subsystem or component. Specifically, these methods approach a durability schedule holistically by considering all events/surfaces, repeats and channels of interest. They employ the standard Generic Stress Life (GSL) approach, utilizing rain flow cycle counting and a minimum-average method of identifying segments of the events which are less severe.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0259
Xinran Tao, John R. Wagner
Abstract Heat rejection in ground vehicle propulsion systems remains a challenge given variations in powertrain configurations, driving cycles, and ambient conditions as well as space constraints and available power budgets. An optimization strategy is proposed for engine radiator geometry size scaling to minimize the cooling system power consumption while satisfying both the heat removal rate requirement and the radiator dimension size limitation. A finite difference method (FDM) based on a heat exchanger model is introduced and utilized in the optimization design. The optimization technique searches for the best radiator core dimension solution over the design space, subject to different constraints. To validate the proposed heat exchanger model and optimization algorithm, a heavy duty military truck engine cooling system is investigated.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0260
Yuanying Wang, Heath Hofmann, Denise Rizzo, Scott Shurin
Abstract This paper presents a computationally-efficient model of heat convection due to air circulation produced by rotor motion in the air gap of an electric machine. The model calculates heat flux at the boundaries of the rotor and stator as a function of the rotor and stator temperatures and rotor speed. It is shown that, under certain assumptions, this mapping has the homogeneity property. This property, among others, is used to pose a structure for the proposed model. The coefficients of the model are then determined by fitting the model to the results of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation program. The accuracy of the new model is compared to the CFD results, shown an error of less than 0.3% over the studied operating range.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0264
Venkatesh Babu, Ravi Thyagarajan, Jaisankar Ramalingam
Abstract In this paper, the capability of three methods of modelling detonation of high explosives (HE) buried in soil viz., (1) coupled discrete element & particle gas methods (DEM-PGM) (2) Structured - Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (S-ALE), and (3) Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), are investigated. The ALE method of modeling the effects of buried charges in soil is well known and widely used in blast simulations today [1]. Due to high computational costs, inconsistent robustness and long run times, alternate modeling methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) [2, 9] and DEM are gaining more traction. In all these methods, accuracy of the analysis relies not only on the fidelity of the soil and high explosive models but also on the robustness of fluid-structure interaction. These high-fidelity models are also useful in generating fast running models (FRM) useful for rapid generation of blast simulation results of acceptable accuracy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0261
Randolph Jones, Robert Marinier III, Frank Koss, Robert Bechtel, John A. Sauter
Abstract When evaluating new vehicle designs, modeling and simulation offer techniques to predict parameters such as maximum speed, fuel efficiency, turning radius, and the like. However, the measure of greatest interest is the likelihood of mission success. One approach to assessing the likelihood of mission success in simulation is to build behavior models, operating at the human decision-making level, that can execute realistic missions in simulation. This approach makes it possible to not only measure changes in mission success rates, but also to analyze the causes of mission failures. Layering behavior modeling and simulation on underlying models of equipment and components enables measurement of more conventional parameters such as time, fuel efficiency under realistic conditions, distance traveled, equipment used, and survivability.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0263
Krishnaraj Udayachalam, Manan Trivedi, Ziliang Zheng, Amit Shrestha, Naeim Henein
Abstract SASOL IPK is a low cetane number synthetic fuel formed from coal by the Fischer-Tropsch process which can be used as an extender to JP8, currently used in military ground vehicles. This paper presents two surrogates developed considering the following criteria: (a) availability of kinetic combustion models for each component, (b) smallest number of components to reduce computation time and cost, (c) matching the following properties of target fuel DCN, distillation curve, density, LHV, MW and H/C ratio. The autoignition and combustion characteristics of the surrogates were validated in IQT according to ASTM D6890-10a. Surrogate formulation strategy involves an equation to calculate DCN of the surrogate mixture from the DCN of each component. The linear equation commonly used for such calculations was modified to include a multiplier, based on regression analysis, for each component to produces DCN values that agree well with the measured DCN in the IQT.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0267
Tomasz Haupt, Gregory Henley, Angela Card, Michael S. Mazzola, Matthew Doude, Scott Shurin, Christopher Goodin
Abstract The Powertrain Analysis and Computational Environment (PACE) is a powertrain simulation tool that provides an advanced behavioral modeling capability for the powertrain subsystems of conventional or hybrid-electric vehicles. Due to its origins in Argonne National Lab’s Autonomie, PACE benefits from the reputation of Autonomie as a validated modeling tool capable of simulating the advanced hardware and control features of modern vehicle powertrains. However, unlike Autonomie that is developed and executed in Mathwork’s MATLAB/Simulink environment, PACE is developed in C++ and is targeted for High-Performance Computing (HPC) platforms. Indeed, PACE is used as one of several actors within a comprehensive ground vehicle co-simulation system (CRES-GV MERCURY): during a single MERCURY run, thousands of concurrent PACE instances interact with other high-performance, distributed MERCURY components.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0269
Doohyun Kim, Jason Martz, Angela Violi
Abstract The ignition delay time for direct injection compression ignition engines is determined by complex physical and chemical phenomena that prepare the injected liquid fuel for gas phase ignition. In this work, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a reacting spray within a constant volume spray chamber are conducted to investigate the relative importance of liquid fuel physical properties and oxidation chemistry on the ignition delay time. The simulations use multi-component surrogates that emulate the physical and chemical properties of petroleum-derived (Jet-A) and natural-gas-derived (S-8) jet fuels. Results from numerical experiments isolating the fuel physical property and chemistry effects show that fuel chemistry is significantly more important to ignition delay than fuel physical properties under the conditions studied.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0268
Venkatesh Babu, Richard Gerth
Abstract The aim of this analysis was to model the effect of adding stiffening ribs in structural aluminum components by friction stir processing (FSP) Nano material into the aluminum matrix. These stiffening ribs could dampen, redirect, or otherwise alter the transmission of energy waves created from automotive, ballistic, or blast shocks to improve noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) and structural integrity (reduced joint stress) response. Since the ribs are not created by geometry changes they can be space efficient and deflect blast / ballistic energy better than geometry ribbing, resulting in a lighter weight solution. The blast and ballistic performance of different FSP rib patterns in AL 5182 and AL 7075 were simulated and compared to the performance of an equivalent weight of RHA plate FSP helps to increase localized strength and stiffness of the base metal, while achieving light weighting of the base metal.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0271
Robert Jane, Gordon G. Parker, Wayne Weaver, Ronald Matthews, Denise Rizzo, Michael Cook
Abstract This paper considers optimal power management during the establishment of an expeditionary outpost using battery and vehicle assets for electrical generation. The first step in creating a new outpost is implementing the physical protection and barrier system. Afterwards, facilities that provide communications, fires, meals, and moral boosts are implemented that steadily increase the electrical load while dynamic events, such as patrols, can cause abrupt changes in the electrical load profile. Being able to create a fully functioning outpost within 72 hours is a typical objective where the electrical power generation starts with batteries, transitions to gasoline generators and is eventually replaced by diesel generators as the outpost matures.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0270
Richard Gerth, Ryan Howell
Abstract The recently published Lightweight Combat Vehicle Science and Technology Campaign [1] recommended the Army develop a quantitative understanding of the operational impact that weight reduction has to the Army and create appropriate metrics that would better reflect the performance trade with regards to weight. That paper raised the question of what a ton of weight is worth in operational effectiveness and cost. This paper is an attempt to clarify this complex topic. The impact of select programmatic considerations, operational considerations, and financial considerations are discussed. Throughout, the paper provides example analyses based on vehicle weight, performance, and cost data. The paper closes with a discussion of the issues presented, research recommendations, and closing comments.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0273
Chris Goodin, Jeremy Mange, Sara Pace, Thomas Skorupa, Daniel Kedziorek, Jody Priddy, Larry Lynch
Abstract Mercury is a high-fidelity, physics-based object-oriented software for conducting simulations of vehicle performance evaluations for requirements and engineering metrics. Integrating cutting-edge, massively parallel modeling techniques for soft, cohesive and dry granular soil that will integrate state-of-the-art soil simulation with high-fidelity multi-body dynamics and powertrain modeling to provide a comprehensive mobility simulator for ground vehicles. The Mercury implements the Chrono::Vehicle dynamics library for vehicle dynamics, which provides multi-body dynamic simulation of wheeled and tracked vehicles. The powertrain is modeled using the Powertrain Analysis Computational Environment (PACE), a behavior-based powertrain analysis based on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Autonomie software. Vehicle -terrain interaction (VTI) is simulated with the Ground Contact Element (GCE), which provides forces to the Chrono-vehicle solver.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0184
Miyoko Oiwake, Ozeki Yoshiichi, Sogo Obata, Hideaki Nagano, Itsuhei Kohri
Abstract In order to develop various parts and components for hybrid electric vehicles, understanding the effect of their structure and thermal performance on their fuel consumption and cruising distance is essential. However, this essential information is generally not available to suppliers of vehicle parts and components. In this report, following a previous study of electric vehicles, a simple method is proposed as the first step to estimate the algorithm of the energy transmission and then the cruising performance for hybrid electric vehicles. The proposed method estimates the cruising performance using only the published information given to suppliers, who, in general, are not supplied with more detailed information. Further, an actual case study demonstrating application of the proposed method is also discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0171
Quansheng Zhang, Yan Meng, Christopher Greiner, Ciro Soto, William Schwartz, Mark Jennings
Abstract In this paper, the tradeoff relationship between the Air Conditioning (A/C) system performance and vehicle fuel economy for a hybrid electric vehicle during the SC03 drive cycle is presented. First, an A/C system model was integrated into Ford’s HEV simulation environment. Then, a system-level sensitivity study was performed on a stand-alone A/C system simulator, by formulating a static optimization problem which minimizes the total energy use of actuators, and maintains an identical cooling capacity. Afterwards, a vehicle-level sensitivity study was conducted with all controllers incorporated in sensitivity analysis software, under three types of formulations of cooling capacity constraints. Finally, the common observation from both studies, that the compressor speed dominates the cooling capacity and the EDF fan has a marginal influence, is explained using the thermodynamics of a vapor compression cycle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0153
Dipankar Sahoo, Adam Kotrba, Tom Steiner, Greg Swift
Abstract Nearly a third of the fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust of a vehicle. An efficient waste heat recovery process will undoubtedly lead to improved fuel efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Currently, there are multiple waste heat recovery technologies that are being investigated in the auto industry. One innovative waste heat recovery approach uses Thermoacoustic Converter (TAC) technology. Thermoacoustics is the field of physics related to the interaction of acoustic waves (sonic power) with heat flows. As in a heat engine, the TAC produces electric power where a temperature differential exists, which can be generated with engine exhaust (hot side) and coolant (cold side). Essentially, the TAC converts exhaust waste heat into electricity in two steps: 1) the exhaust waste heat is converted to acoustic energy (mechanical) and 2) the acoustic energy is converted to electrical energy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0136
Apostolos Karvountzis-Kontakiotis, Apostolos Pesiridis, Hua Zhao, Fuhaid Alshammari, Benjamin Franchetti, Ioannis Pesmazoglou, Lorenzo Tocci
Abstract Modern heavy duty diesel engines can well extend the goal of 50% brake thermal efficiency by utilizing waste heat recovery (WHR) technologies. The effect of an ORC WHR system on engine brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) is a compromise between the fuel penalty due to the higher exhaust backpressure and the additional power from the WHR system that is not attributed to fuel consumption. This work focuses on the fuel efficiency benefits of installing an ORC WHR system on a heavy duty diesel engine. A six cylinder, 7.25ℓ heavy duty diesel engine is employed to experimentally explore the effect of backpressure on fuel consumption. A zero-dimensional, detailed physical ORC model is utilized to predict ORC performance under design and off-design conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0137
Akira Ando, Koichi Hamashima, Shinji Kato, Noriyuki Tomita, Takahiro Uejima
Abstract In respect to the present large refrigerator trucks, sub-engine type is the main product, but the basic structure does not change greatly since the introduction for around 50 years. A sub-engine type uses an industrial engine to drive the compressor, and the environmental correspondence such as the fuel consumption, the emission is late remarkably. In addition, most of trucks carry the truck equipment including the refrigerator which consumes fuel about 20% of whole vehicle. Focusing on this point, the following are the reports about the system development plan for fuel consumption reduction of the large size refrigerator truck. New concept is to utilize electrical power from HV system to power the electric-driven refrigerator. We have developed a fully electric-driven refrigerator system, which uses regenerated energy that is dedicated for our refrigerator system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0133
Bin Xu, Adamu Yebi, Simona Onori, Zoran Filipi, Xiaobing Liu, John Shutty, Paul Anschel, Mark Hoffman
Abstract This paper presents the transient power optimization of an organic Rankine cycle waste heat recovery (ORC-WHR) system operating on a heavy-duty diesel (HDD). The optimization process is carried on an experimentally validated, physics-based, high fidelity ORC-WHR model, which consists of parallel tail pipe and EGR evaporators, a high pressure working fluid pump, a turbine expander, etc. Three different ORC-WHR mixed vapor temperature (MVT) operational strategies are evaluated to optimize the ORC system net power: (i) constant MVT; (ii) constant superheat temperature; (iii) fuzzy logic superheat temperature based on waste power level. Transient engine conditions are considered in the optimization. Optimization results reveal that adaptation of the vapor temperature setpoint based on evaporation pressure strategy (ii) provides 1.1% mean net power (MNP) improvement relative to a fixed setpoint strategy (i).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0126
Joshua W. Finn, John R. Wagner
Abstract Hybrid vehicle embedded systems and payloads require progressively more accurate and versatile thermal control mechanisms and strategies capable of withstanding harsh environments and increasing power density. The division of the cargo and passenger compartments into convective thermal zones which are independently managed can lead to a manageable temperature control problem. This study investigates the performance of a Peltier-effect thermoelectric zone cooling system to regulate the temperature of target objects (e.g., electronic controllers, auxiliary computer equipment, etc) within ground vehicles. Multiple thermoelectric cooling modules (TEC) are integrated with convective cooling fans to provide chilled air for convective heat transfer from a robust, compact, and solid state device. A series of control strategies have been designed and evaluated to track a prescribed time-varying temperature profile while minimizing power consumption.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0114
Jorge De-J. Lozoya Santos, J. C. Tudon-Martinez
Abstract The project consists on the mechanical and electronic instrumentation of an existing vehicle (built at Universidad de Monterrey for the SAE Supermileage Competition) to be able to control its steering, braking and throttle systems “by wire”. Insight to the stages of turning the vehicle into an autonomous one is presented. This includes identification of the current mechanical properties, choosing adequate components and the use of a simulation to allow early work on the software involving cameras and motors to provide autonomy to the vehicle. Using software in the loop methodology mathematical models of the dynamics of the vehicle are run in Simulink and update the position and orientation of the 3D model of the vehicle in V-REP, a robot simulator.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0118
Yang Wang, Ankit Goila, Rahul Shetty, Mahdi Heydari, Ambarish Desai, Hanlong Yang
Regarding safety, obstacle avoidance has been considered as one of the most important features among ADAS systems for ground vehicles. However, the implementation of obstacle avoidance functions to commercial vehicles are still under progress. In this paper, we demonstrate a complete process of obstacle avoidance strategy for unmanned ground vehicle and implement the strategy on the self-developed Arduino based RC Car. In this process, the sensor LIDAR was used to detect the obstacles on the fore-path. Based on the measured LIDAR data, an optimized path is automatically generated with accommodation of current car position, obstacle locations, car operation capability and global environmental restrictions. The path planning is updated in real time while new or changing obstacles being detected. This algorithm is validated by the simulation results with the RC car. The comparison will be discussed at the end of this paper.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0117
Raja Sekhar Dheekonda, Sampad Panda, Md Nazmuzzaman khan, Mohammad Hasan, Sohel Anwar
Accuracy in detecting a moving object is critical to autonomous driving or advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). By including the object classification from multiple sensor detections, the model of the object or environment can be identified more accurately. The critical parameters involved in improving the accuracy are the size and the speed of the moving object. All sensor data are to be used in defining a composite object representation so that it could be used for the class information in the core object’s description. This composite data can then be used by a deep learning network for complete perception fusion in order to solve the detection and tracking of moving objects problem. Camera image data from subsequent frames along the time axis in conjunction with the speed and size of the object will further contribute in developing better recognition algorithms.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0107
Arvind Jayaraman, Ashley Micks, Ethan Gross
Abstract Recreating traffic scenarios for testing autonomous driving in the real world requires significant time, resources and expense, and can present a safety risk if hazardous scenarios are tested. Using a 3D virtual environment to enable testing of many of these traffic scenarios on the desktop or cluster significantly reduces the amount of required road tests. In order to facilitate the development of perception and control algorithms for level 4 autonomy, a shared memory interface between MATLAB, Simulink, and Unreal Engine 4 can send information (such as vehicle control signals) back to the virtual environment. The shared memory interface conveys arbitrary numerical data, RGB image data, and point cloud data for the simulation of LiDAR sensors.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0104
Maryam Moosaei, Yi Zhang, Ashley Micks, Simon Smith, Madeline J. Goh, Vidya Nariyambut Murali
Abstract In this work, we outline a process for traffic light detection in the context of autonomous vehicles and driver assistance technology features. For our approach, we leverage the automatic annotations from virtually generated data of road scenes. Using the automatically generated bounding boxes around the illuminated traffic lights themselves, we trained an 8-layer deep neural network, without pre-training, for classification of traffic light signals (green, amber, red). After training on virtual data, we tested the network on real world data collected from a forward facing camera on a vehicle. Our new region proposal technique uses color space conversion and contour extraction to identify candidate regions to feed to the deep neural network classifier. Depending on time of day, we convert our RGB images in order to more accurately extract the appropriate regions of interest and filter them based on color, shape and size.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0103
Thomas Beyerl, Bernard Ibru, Charvi Popat, Deborah Ojo, Alexander Bakus, Jessica Elder, Valentin Soloiu
Abstract Autonomous vehicles must possess the capability to navigate complex intersections, which do not conform to typical models. Such intersections may have multiple roadways of different classes, highly acute angles, or unique multi-modal combinations. These may include railway grade crossings, bicycle lanes, or unique signal arrangements. Conventional navigation systems, which gather data from the surrounding area then plan a path through the collected data require faultless and complex analysis of extremely unstructured environments. The vehicle must then avoid obstacles as well as successfully navigate the intersection with extremely low tolerance for error. Computer decision making challenges can arise from this method of navigation, especially when interacting with non-autonomous vehicles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0102
Mahdi Heydari, Feng Dang, Ankit Goila, Yang Wang, Hanlong Yang
In this paper, a sensor fusion approach is introduced to estimate lane departure. The proposed algorithm combines the camera, inertial navigation sensor, and GPS data with the vehicle dynamics to estimate the vehicle path and the lane departure time. The lane path and vehicle path are estimated by using Kalman filters. This algorithm can be used to provide early warning for lane departure in order to increase driving safety. By integrating inertial navigation sensor and GPS data, the inertial sensor biases can be estimated and the vehicle path can be estimated where the GPS data is not available or is poor. Additionally, the algorithm can be used to reduce the latency of information embedded in the controls, so that the vehicle lateral control performance can be significantly improved during lane keeping in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) or autonomous vehicles. Furthermore, it improves lane detection reliability in situations when camera fails to detect lanes.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0111
Santhosh Tamilarasan, Levent Guvenc
Abstract As the development of autonomous vehicles rapidly advances, the use of convoying/platooning becomes a more widely explored technology option for saving fuel and increasing the efficiency of traffic. In cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC), the vehicles in a convoy follow each other under adaptive cruise control (ACC) that is augmented by the sharing of preceding vehicle acceleration through the vehicle to vehicle communication in a feedforward control path. In general, the desired velocity optimization for vehicles in the convoy is based on fuel economy optimization, rather than driveability. This paper is a preliminary study on the impact of the desired velocity profile on the driveability characteristics of a convoy of vehicles and the controller gain impact on the driveability. A simple low-level longitudinal model of the vehicle has been used along with a PD type cruise controller and a generic spacing policy for ACC/CACC.
Viewing 151 to 180 of 19895