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Viewing 91 to 120 of 19895
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1532
Suad Jakirlic, Lukas Kutej, Peter Unterlechner, Cameron Tropea
Abstract Some widely-used scale-resolving turbulence models are comparatively assessed in simulating the aerodynamic behavior of a full-scale AUDI-A1 car configuration. The presently considered hybrid RANS/LES (RANS – Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes; LES – Large-Eddy Simulation) models include the well-known DDES (Delayed Detached-Eddy Simulation) scheme and two further variable-resolution formulations denoted by PANS (Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes; Basara, 2011) and VLES (Very LES; Chang et al., 2014). Whereas the DDES method represents the originally proposed formulation based on the one-equation Spalart-Almaras model (Spalart et al. 2006), whose RANS/LES interface position is directly correlated to the underlying grid resolution, the other two models represent ‘true’ seamless formulations, providing a smooth transition from Unsteady RANS to LES in terms of a dynamic “resolution parameter” variation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1531
Keiichi Taniguchi, Akiyoshi Shibata, Mikako Murakami, Munehiko Oshima
Abstract This paper describes a study of drag reduction devices for production pick-up trucks with a body-on-frame structure using full-scale wind tunnel testing and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. First, the flow structure around a pick-up truck was investigated and studied, focusing in particular on the flow structure between the cabin and tailgate. It was found that the flow structure around the tailgate was closely related to aerodynamic drag. A low drag flow structure was found by flow analysis, and the separation angle at the roof end was identified as being important to achieve the flow structure. While proceeding with the development of a new production model, a technical issue of the flow structure involving sensitivity to the vehicle velocity was identified in connection with optimization of the roof end shape. (1)A tailgate spoiler was examined for solving this issue.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1537
Ananya Bhardwaj
Abstract Improving brake cooling has commanded substantial research in the automotive sector, as safety remains paramount in vehicles of which brakes are a crucial component. To prevent problems like brake fade and brake judder, heat dissipation should be maximized from the brakes to limit increasing temperatures. This research is a CFD investigation into the impact of existing wheel center designs on brake cooling through increased cross flow through the wheel. The new study brings together the complete wheel and disc geometries in a single CFD study and directly measures the effect on brake cooling, by implementing more accurately modeled boundary conditions like moving ground to replicate real conditions correctly. It also quantifies the improvement in the cooling rate of the brake disc with a change in wheel design, unlike previous studies.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1536
Jeff Howell, David Forbes, Martin Passmore, Gary Page
Abstract In the wind tunnel the effect of a wind input on the aerodynamic characteristics of any road vehicle is simulated by yawing the vehicle. This represents a wind input where the wind velocity is constant with height above the ground. In reality the natural wind is a boundary layer flow and is sheared so that the wind velocity will vary with height. A CFD simulation has been conducted to compare the aerodynamic characteristics of a DrivAer model, in fastback and squareback form, subject to a crosswind flow, with and without shear. The yaw simulation has been carried out at a yaw angle of 10° and with one shear flow exponent. It is shown that the car experiences almost identical forces and moments in the two cases when the mass flow in the crosswind over the height of the car is similar. Load distributions are presented for the two cases. The implications for wind averaged drag are discussed.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1534
Nina Tortosa, David Schroeck, Tony Nagle, Guy Flynt
Abstract The General Motors Reduced Scale Wind Tunnel Facility, which came into operation in the fall of 2015, is a new state-of-the-art scale model aerodynamic test facility that expands GM’s test capabilities. The new facility also increases GM’s aerodynamic testing through-put and provides the resources needed to achieve the growing demand for higher fuel economy requirements for next generation of vehicles. The wind tunnel was designed for a nominal model scale of 40%. The nozzle and test section were sized to keep wind tunnel interference effects to a minimum. Flow quality and other wind tunnel performance parameters are on par with or better than the latest industry standards. A 5-belt system with a long center belt and boundary layer suction and blowing system are used to model underbody flow conditions. An overhead probe traverse system is installed in the test section along with a model positioning robot used to move the model in an out of the test section.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1535
Luca Dalessio, Bradley Duncan, Chinwei Chang, Joaquin Ivan Gargoloff, Ed Tate
Abstract The ultimate goal for vehicle aerodynamicists is to develop vehicles that perform well on the road under real-world conditions. One of the most important metrics to evaluate vehicle performance is the drag coefficient. However, vehicle development today is performed mostly under controlled settings using wind tunnels and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with artificially uniform upstream conditions, neglecting real-world effects due to road turbulence from wind and other vehicles. Thus, the drag coefficients computed with these methods might not be representative of the real performance of the car on the road. This might ultimately lead engineers to develop design solutions and aerodynamic devices which, while performing well in idealized conditions, do not perform well on the road. For this reason, it is important to assess the vehicle’s drag as seen in real-world environments. An effort in this direction is represented by using the wind-averaged drag.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1543
Jonathan Jilesen, Adrian Gaylard, Jose Escobar
Abstract Vehicle rear and side body soiling has been a concern since the earliest cars. Traditionally, soiling has been seen to be less importance than vehicle aerodynamics and acoustics. However, increased reliance on sensors and cameras to assist the driver means that there are more surfaces of the vehicle that must be kept clean. Failure to take this into consideration means risking low customer satisfaction with new features. This is because they are likely to fail under normal operating conditions and require constant cleaning. This paper numerically investigates features known to have an influence on side and rear face soiling with a demonstration vehicle. These changes include rim design, diffuser strakes and diffuser sharpening. While an exhaustive investigation of these features is beyond the scope of this study, examples of each feature will be considered.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1540
Yuri M. Lopes, Maxwell R. Taylor, Todd H. Lounsberry, Gregory J. Fadler
Abstract Typical production vehicle development includes road testing of a vehicle towing a trailer to evaluate powertrain thermal performance. In order to correlate tests with simulations, the aerodynamic effects of pulling a trailer behind a vehicle must be estimated. During real world operation a vehicle often encounters cross winds. Therefore, the effects of cross winds on the drag of a vehicle–trailer combination should be taken into account. Improving the accuracy of aerodynamic load prediction for a vehicle-trailer combination should in turn lead to improved simulations and better thermal performance. In order to best simulate conditions for real world trailer towing, a study was performed using reduced scale models of a Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV) and a Pickup Truck (PT) towing a medium size cargo trailer. The scale model vehicle and trailer combinations were tested in a full scale wind tunnel.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1539
Vinh Long Phan, Hiroshi Tanaka, Takaaki Nagatani, Mikio Wakamatsu, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract High frequency wind noise caused by turbulent flow around the front pillars of a vehicle is an important factor for customer perception of ride comfort. In order to reduce undesirable interior wind noise during vehicle development process, a calculation and visualization method for exterior wind noise with an acceptable computational cost and adequate accuracy is required. In this paper an index for prediction of the strength of exterior wind noise, referred to as Exterior Noise Power (ENP), is developed based on an assumption that the acoustic power of exterior wind noise can be approximated by the far field acoustic power radiated from vehicle surface. Using the well-known Curle’s equation, ENP can be represented as a surface integral of an acoustic intensity distribution, referred to as Exterior Noise Power Distribution (ENPD). ENPD is estimated from turbulent surface pressure fluctuation and mean convective velocity in the vicinity of the vehicle surface.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1538
Jiaye Gan, Longxian Li, Gecheng Zha, Craig Czlapinski
Abstract This paper conducts numerical simulation and wind tunnel testing to demonstrate the passive flow control jet boat tail (JBT) drag reduction technique for a heavy duty truck rear view mirror. The JBT passive flow control technique is to introduce a flow jet by opening an inlet in the front of a bluff body, accelerate the jet via a converging duct and eject the jet at an angle toward the center of the base surface. The high speed jet flow entrains the free stream flow to energize the base flow, increase the base pressure, reduces the wake size, and thus reduce the drag. A baseline heavy duty truck rear view mirror is used as reference. The mirror is then redesigned to include the JBT feature without violating any of the variable mirror position geometric constraints and internal control system volume requirement. The wind tunnel testing was conducted at various flow speed and yaw angles.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1511
Anton Kabanovs, Graham Hodgson, Andrew Garmory, Martin Passmore, Adrian Gaylard
Abstract The motivation for this paper is to consider the effect of rear end geometry on rear soiling using a representative generic SUV body. In particular the effect of varying the top slant angle is considered using both experiment and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Previous work has shown that slant angle has a significant effect on wake shape and drag and the work here extends this to investigate the effect on rear soiling. It is hoped that this work can provide an insight into the likely effect of such geometry changes on the soiling of similarly shaped road vehicles. To increase the generality of results, and to allow comparison with previously obtained aerodynamic data, a 25% scale generic SUV model is used in the Loughborough University Large Wind Tunnel. UV doped water is sprayed from a position located at the bottom of the left rear tyre to simulate the creation of spray from this tyre.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1512
Fuliang Wang, Zhangshun Yin, Shi Yan, Jia Zhan, Heinz Friz, Bo Li, Weiliang Xie
Abstract The validation of vehicle aerodynamic simulation results to wind tunnel test results and simulation accuracy improvement attract considerable attention of many automotive manufacturers. In order to improve the simulation accuracy, a simulation model of the ground effects simulation system of the aerodynamic wind tunnel of the Shanghai Automotive Wind Tunnel Center was built. The model includes the scoop, the distributed suction, the tangential blowing, the moving belt and the wheel belts. The simulated boundary layer profile and the pressure distribution agree well with test results. The baseline model and multiple design changes of the new Buick Excelle GT are simulated. The simulation results agree very well with test results.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1510
Kisun Song, Kyung Hak Choo, Dimitri Mavris
Abstract In early phases of conceptual design stages for developing a new car in the modern automobile industry, the lack of systematic methodology to efficiently converge to an agreement between the aesthetics and aerodynamic performance tremendously increases budget and time. During these procedures, one of the most important tasks is to create geometric information which is versatilely morphable upon the demands of both of stylists and engineers. In this perspective, this paper proposes a Spline-based Modeling Algorithm (SMA) to implement into performing aerodynamic design optimization research based on CFD analysis. Once a 3-perspective schematic of a car is given, SMA regresses the backbone boundary lines by using optimum polynomial interpolation methods with the best goodness of fit, eventually reconstructing the 3D shape by linearly interpolating from the extracted boundaries minimizing loss of important geometric features.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1515
Neil Lewington, Lauri Ohra-aho, Olav Lange, Klaus Rudnik
Abstract Industry trends towards lighter, more aerodynamically efficient road vehicles have the potential to degrade a vehicle’s response to crosswinds. In this paper, a methodology is outlined that indirectly couples a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the vehicle’s aerodynamic characteristics with a multi-body dynamics simulation (MBD) to determine yaw, roll and pitch response characteristics during a severe crosswind event. This one-way coupling approach mimics physical test conditions outlined in open loop test procedure ISO 12021:2010 that forms part of the vehicle sign-off criterion at Ford Motor Company. The methodology uses an overset mesh CFD method to drive the vehicle through a prescribed crosswind event, providing unfiltered predictions of vehicle force and moment responses that are used as applied forces in the MBD model. The method does not account for changes in vehicle attitude due to applied aerodynamic forces and moments.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1516
Daniel B. Honeycutt, Mesbah Uddin
Abstract Although, the implementation of lift-off prevention devices such as the NASCAR roof flaps have greatly reduced the frequency and severity of race vehicle aerodynamic lift-off incidents, airborne incidents still occur occasionally in motorsports. The effectiveness of existing lift-off prevention measures and future trends in lift-off prevention are addressed in this paper. The results and analysis presented in this paper will be of paramount interest to race vehicle designers and sanctioning bodies because the effects of aerodynamics on vehicle lift-off need to be comprehended, but there exists a scarcity of reliable data in this area.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1513
Young-Chang Cho, Chin-Wei Chang, Andrea Shestopalov, Edward Tate
Abstract The airflow into the engine bay of a passenger car is used for cooling down essential components of the vehicle, such as powertrain, air-conditioning compressor, intake charge air, batteries, and brake systems, before it returns back to the external flow. When the intake ram pressure becomes high enough to supply surplus cooling air flow, this flow can be actively regulated by using arrays of grille shutters, namely active grille shutters (AGS), in order to reduce the drag penalty due to excessive cooling. In this study, the operation of AGS for a generic SUV-type model vehicle is optimized for improved fuel economy on a highway drive cycle (part of SFTP-US06) by using surrogate models. Both vehicle aerodynamic power consumption and under-hood cooling performance are assessed by using PowerFLOW, a high-fidelity flow solver that is fully coupled with powertrain heat exchanger models.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1514
Renan F. Soares, Kevin P. Garry, Jennifer Holt
Abstract The flow field and body aerodynamic loads on the DrivAer reference model have been extensively investigated since its introduction in 2012. However, there is a relative lack of information relating to the models wake development resulting from the different rear-body configurations, particularly in the far-field. Given current interest in the aerodynamic interaction between two or more vehicles, the results from a preliminary CFD study are presented to address the development of the wake from the Fastback, Notchback, and Estateback DrivAer configurations. The primary focus is on the differences in the far-field wake and simulations are assessed in the range up to three vehicle lengths downstream, at Reynolds and Mach numbers of 5.2×106 and 0.13, respectively. Wake development is modelled using the results from a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation within a computational mesh having nominally 1.0×107 cells.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1519
Arturo Guzman, Young-Chang Cho, John Tripp, Kumar Srinivasan
Abstract Pickup trucks are designed with a taller ride height and a larger tire envelope compared to other vehicle types given the duty cycle and environment they operate in. These differences play an important role in the flow field around spinning wheels and tires and their interactions with the vehicle body. From an aerodynamics perspective, understanding and managing this flow field are critical for drag reduction, wheel design, and brake cooling. Furthermore, the validation of numerical simulation methodology is essential for a systematic approach to aerodynamically efficient wheel design as a standard practice of vehicle design. This paper presents a correlation the near-wheel flow field for both front and rear spinning wheels with two different wheel designs for a Ram Quad Cab pick-up truck with moving ground. Twelve-hole probe experimental data obtained in a wind tunnel with a full width belt system are compared to the predictions of numerical simulations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1520
Teddy Hobeika, Peter Gullberg, Simone Sebben, Lennart Lofdahl
Abstract Quantification of heat exchanger performance in its operative environment is in many engineering applications an essential task, and the air flow rate through the heat exchanger core is an important optimizing parameter. This paper explores an alternative method for quantifying the air flow rate through compact heat exchangers positioned in the underhood of a passenger car. Unlike conventional methods, typically relying on measurements of direct flow characteristics at discrete probe locations, the proposed method is based on the use of load-cells for direct measurement of the total force acting on the heat exchanger. The air flow rate is then calculated from the force measurement. A direct comparison with a conventional pressure based method is presented as both methods are applied on a passenger car’s radiator tested in a full scale wind tunnel using six different grill configurations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1517
Haidong Yuan, Zhigang Yang, Qiliang Li
Abstract External rear view mirror is attached at the side of the vehicle which is to permit clear vision for the driver to the rear of the vehicle. When the vehicle is running, the flow field around external rear view mirror is highly three-dimensional, unsteady, separated and turbulent which is known to be a significant source of aerodynamic noise and a contributor to the total drag force on the vehicle. While among all the researches on the flow field around external rear view mirror, different installation environment were employed. The external rear view mirror is mounted on a production car in most researches which presents the real condition and it can also be mounted on the ground of a wind tunnel, a specially designed table, or a generic vehicle model based on the SAE model. While, the relationship between the flow field around external rear view mirror and the installation environment is not very clear.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1518
Emil Ljungskog, Simone Sebben, Alexander Broniewicz, Christoffer Landström
Abstract Many aerodynamic wind tunnels used for testing of ground vehicles have advanced ground simulation systems to account for the relative motion between the ground and the vehicle. One commonly used approach for ground simulation is a five belt system, where moving belts are used, often in conjunction with distributed suction and tangential blowing that reduces the displacement thickness of the boundary layer along the wind tunnel floor. This paper investigates the effects from aft-belt tangential blowing in the Volvo Cars Aerodynamic wind tunnel. First the uniformity of the boundary layer thickness downstream of the blowing slots is examined in the empty tunnel. This is followed by investigations of how the measured performance of different vehicle types in several configurations, typically tested in routine aerodynamic development work, depends on whether the tangential blowing system is active or not.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1523
Robert Maduta, Suad Jakirlic
Abstract The present work is concerned with the Steady RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes) computations of inherently unsteady separating flow configurations. The focus is on the flow past the well-known Ahmed body (Ahmed et al., 1984), the rear slant angle of which corresponds to 25°. Unlike all (near-wall) RANS models, independent of modelling level, predicting a massive flow detachment occupying the entire slanted region, the present RANS model reproduces correctly the mean flow topology characterized by a thin separation bubble reattaching already at the slanted surface. It is achieved by intensifying appropriately the turbulence activity at the region of boundary layer separation by introducing an correspondingly formulated sink term (PΔU) into the relevant scale-supplying equation. The latter negative production term is modelled in terms of the second derivative of the mean velocity field (ΔU), as proposed originally by Rotta (1972).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1524
Robert Lietz, Levon Larson, Peter Bachant, John Goldstein, Rafael Silveira, Mehrdad Shademan, Pete Ireland, Kyle Mooney
Abstract The number of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed during the vehicle aerodynamic development process continues to expand at a rapid rate. One key contributor to this trend is the number of analytically based designed experiments performed to support vehicle aerodynamic shape development. A second contributor is the number of aerodynamic optimization studies performed for vehicle exterior components such as mirrors, underbody shields, spoilers, etc. A third contributor is the increasing number of “what if” exploratory studies performed early in the design process when the design is relatively fluid. Licensing costs for commercial CFD solutions can become a significant constraint as the number of simulations expands.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1521
Levon Larson, Sudesh Woodiga, Ronald Gin, Robert Lietz
Abstract The airflow that enters the front grille of a ground vehicle for the purpose of component cooling has a significant effect on aerodynamic drag (engine airflow drag). Furthermore, engine airflow is known to be capable of influencing upstream external airflow (interference drag). The combined effect of these phenomena is commonly referred to as cooling drag, which generally contributes up to 10% of total vehicle drag. Due to this coupled nature, cooling drag is difficult to understand as it contains influences from multiple locations around the vehicle. A good understanding of the sources of cooling drag is paramount to drive vehicle design to a low cooling drag configuration. In this work, a production level Lincoln MKZ was modified so that a number of variables could be tested in both static ground and moving ground wind tunnel conditions. All tests were conducted at 80 MPH.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1522
Thomas Blacha, Moni Islam
Abstract The aerodynamic development of the new Audi Q5 (released in 2017) is described. In the course of the optimization process a number of different tools has been applied depending on the chronological progress in the project. During the early design phase, wind tunnel experiments at 1:4 scale were performed accompanied by transient DES and stationary adjoint simulations. At this stage the model contained a detailed underbody but no detailed engine bay for underhood flow. Later, a full scale Q5 model was built up for the aerodynamic optimization in the 1:1 wind tunnel at Audi AG. The model featured a detailed underbody and engine bay including original parts for radiators, engine, axles and brakes from similar vehicles. Also the 1:1 experiments were accompanied by transient DES and stationary adjoint simulations in order to predict optimization potential and to better understand the governing flow.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1563
Abhijeet Behera, Murugan Sivalingam
Abstract Two and three wheeler vehicles are largely used in many developing and under developing countries because of their lower cost, better fuel economy and easy handling. Although, the construction of them is simpler than the four wheeler vehicle, they pose some problems related to instability. Wobbling is the main cause of instabilities in two wheeler and three wheeler vehicles. In this study, a mathematical model was proposed and developed to determine wobble instability of a two wheeler. Nonlinear equations were formulated by using kinematics and the D’Alembert’s principle with the help of multi body formalism. The non-linear equations found in the study were linearized with respect to rectilinear and upright motion, considering no rolling. It led to formation of matrix. The real part of the Eigen value of the matrix was found to be negative, implication of whose was an asymptotic stable motion.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1566
Willibald Brems, Nico Kruithof, Richard Uhlmann, Andreas Wagner, Werner Krantz, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract In recent years, driving simulators have become a valuable tool in the automotive design and testing process. Yet, in the field of vehicle dynamics, most decisions are still based on test drives in real cars. One reason for this situation can be found in the fact that many driving simulators do not allow the driver to evaluate the handling qualities of a simulated vehicle. In a driving simulator, the motion cueing algorithm tries to represent the vehicle motion within the constrained motion envelope of the motion platform. By nature, this process leads to so called false cues where the motion of the platform is not in phase or moving in a different direction with respect to the vehicle motion. In a driving simulator with classical filter-based motion cueing, false cues make it considerably more difficult for the driver to rate vehicle dynamics.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1565
Xiangkun He, Kaiming Yang, Xuewu Ji, Yahui Liu, Weiwen Deng
Abstract A vehicle dynamics stability control system based on integrated-electro-hydraulic brake (I-EHB) system with hierarchical control architecture and nonlinear control method is designed to improve the vehicle dynamics stability under extreme conditions in this paper. The I-EHB system is a novel brake-by-wire system, and is suitable to the development demands of intelligent vehicle technology and new energy vehicle technology. Four inlet valves and four outlet valves are added to the layout of a conventional four-channel hydraulic control unit. A permanent-magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) provides a stabilized high-pressure source in the master cylinder, and the four-channel hydraulic control unit ensures that the pressures in each wheel cylinder can be modulated separately at a high precision. Besides, the functions of Anti-lock Braking System, Traction Control System and Regenerative Braking System, Autonomous Emergency Braking can be integrated in this brake-by-wire system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1568
Sriharsha Bhat, Mohammad Mehdi Davari, Mikael Nybacka
Abstract As vehicles become electrified and more intelligent in terms of sensing, actuation and processing; a number of interesting possibilities arise in controlling vehicle dynamics and driving behavior. Over-actuation with in- wheel motors, all wheel steering and active camber is one such possibility, which facilitate the control strategies that push boundaries in energy consumption and safety. Optimal control can be used to investigate the best combinations of control inputs to an over-actuated system. This paper shows how an optimal control problem can be formulated and solved for an over-actuated vehicle case, and highlights the translation of this optimal solution to a real-world scenario, enabling intelligent means to improve vehicle efficiency. This paper gives an insight into Dynamic Programming (DP) as an offline optimal control method that guarantees the global optimum.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1571
Kevin McLaughlin, Jonah Shapiro, HyungJu Kwon
Abstract An approach to electric steering control and tuning is developed using vehicle dynamics and quantitative steering objectives. The steering objective chosen is the torque vs. lateral acceleration target for the driver termed the “steering gain”. Two parameters are derived using vehicle dynamics that substantially determine driver feel: the vehicle’s “manual gain” (total steering torque divided by lateral acceleration) and the vehicle’s lateral acceleration gain (lateral acceleration divided by steering angle). Lateral acceleration gain is a well-known quantity in the literature but “manual gain” is a nonstandard point of view for steering control systems. The total gain inside the controller is the loop gain; generally, the higher the loop gain, the better the controller rejects unwanted effects such as friction. For a typical torque-input electric steering topology, it is shown that the relationship between loop gain and steering gain is unique.
Viewing 91 to 120 of 19895