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Viewing 31 to 60 of 19832
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1189
Tsuyoshi Maruo, Masashi Toida, Tomohiro Ogawa, Yuji Ishikawa, Hiroyuki Imanishi, Nada Mitsuhiro, Yoshihiro Ikogi
Abstract Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) has been developing fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) since 1992. As part of a demonstration program, TMC launched the FCHV-adv in 2008, which established major technical improvements in key performance areas such as efficiency, driving range, durability, and operation in sub-zero conditions. However, to encourage commercialization and widespread adoption of FCVs, further improvements in performance were required. During sub-zero operating conditions, the FC system output power was lower than under normal operating conditions. The FC stack in the FCHV-adv needed to dry the electrolyte membrane to remove unneeded water from the stack. This increased the stack resistance and caused low output power. In December 2014, TMC launched the world’s first commercially available FCV named the Mirai, which greatly improved output power even after start-up in sub-zero conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1188
Daisuke Hayashi, Atsushi Ida, Shota Magome, Takahisa Suzuki, Satoshi Yamaguchi, Ryosuke Hori
Abstract The key challenge in designing a high power density fuel cell is to reduce oxygen transport loss due to liquid water. However, liquid water transport from catalyst layers to channels under operating conditions is not completely understood. Toyota developed a high resolution space and time liquid water visualization technique using synchrotron x-ray (Spring-8) radiography. In addition, a simulation method was created based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to identify the cell performance relationship to water distribution. The relationship among gas diffusion layer (GDL) parameters, water distribution, and fuel cell performance was clarified by combining the techniques Toyota developed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1187
Tatsuya Sugawara, Takuma Kanazawa, Naoki Imai, Yu Tachibana
Abstract This paper describes the motorized turbo compressor, which is a key technology for reducing the size of the fuel cell system for the Clarity Fuel Cell. The oxygen needed for fuel cell power generation is sent into the fuel cell by compressing the air from the atmosphere by a compressor. The conventionally used Lysholm compressor needed numerous sound absorbers, such as silencers and covers, to help achieve quietness when driving. Therefore, changing to a turbo compressor enhanced quietness and helped to eliminate or reduce the size of these auxiliary sound absorbers. Furthermore, a two-stage supercharging structure was used and the air pressure supplied to the fuel cell was increased to 1.7 times the previous air pressure. This increased the fuel cell power, which enabled to reduce the number of cells needed, and reduced the needed humidification amount which enabled to reduce the size of the humidifier. These enhancements helped to reduce the system size.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1186
Chunmei Wang, Shinichi Hirano
Abstract This study investigates a system and a method to enhance fuel cell vehicle robustness during vehicle start/stop cycle by mitigating cathode half-cell potential spikes. Multiple dynamic hydrogen reference electrodes were installed in the fuel cell under test to observe changes of anode and cathode half-cell potentials during simulated system startup and shutdown conditions. Multiple reference electrodes were used to measure localized anode and cathode half-cell potentials in an active area. A 1.4-1.8 V half-cell potential spike at the cathode in the startup condition was observed due to a hydrogen/air boundary formed within the anode flow field. Various system solutions have been studied to contain the cathode half-cell potential spikes, such as purging with inert gas, or inserting a shunt resistor as a shorting component between the anode and the cathode. In this study, a method of connecting an electrical load prior to flowing hydrogen fuel to the cell was tested.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1184
Kiyoshi Handa, Shigehiro Yamaguchi, Kazuya Minowa, Steven Mathison
Abstract A new hydrogen fueling protocol named MC Formula Moto was developed for fuel cell motorcycles (FCM) with a smaller hydrogen storage capacity than those of light duty FC vehicles (FCV) currently covered in the SAE J2601 standard (over than 2kg storage). Building on the MC Formula based protocol from the 2016 SAE J2601 standard, numerous new techniques were developed and tested to accommodate the smaller storage capacity: an initial pressure estimation using the connection pulse, a fueling time counter which begins the main fueling time prior to the connection pulse, a pressure ramp rate fallback control, and other techniques. The MC Formula Moto fueling protocol has the potential to be implemented at current hydrogen stations intended for fueling of FCVs using protocols such as SAE J2601. This will allow FCMs to use the existing and rapidly growing hydrogen infrastructure, precluding the need for exclusive dispensers or stations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1185
Patrick Salman, Eva Wallnöfer-Ogris, Markus Sartory, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Helfried Müller, Axel-Oscar Bernt, Michael Martin, Knut Schiefer, Manfred Limbrunner, Johannes Höflinger, Peter Hofmann
Abstract The continuous increasingly stringent regulations for CO2 fleet targets request the introduction of zero-emission solutions in the near future. Moreover, additional customer benefits have to be generated in order to increase customer acceptance of zero-emission technologies. Actually high costs, reduced driving ranges and lack of infrastructures are some aggregative facts for end-customer acceptance thus also for a broad market launch. Plug-in hybrids as intermediate step towards zero-emission vehicles are meanwhile in series production with partly “zero-emission” operation mode and are well accepted by customers. The project partners HyCentA Research GmbH, Magna Steyr Engineering AG & Co KG, Proton Motor Fuel Cell GmbH and the Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Powertrains and Automotive Technology, have developed a hydrogen-powered zero-emission vehicle within a national funded research project.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1182
Xin Guo, Xu Peng, Sichuan Xu
Abstract Startup from subzero temperature is one of the major challenges for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to realize commercialization. Below the freezing point (0°C), water will freeze easily, which blocks the reactant gases into the reaction sites, thus leading to the start failure and material degradation. Therefore, for PEMFC in vehicle application, finding suitable ways to reach successful startup from subfreezing environment is a prerequisite. As it’s difficult and complex for experimental studies to measure the internal quantities, mathematical models are the effective ways to study the detailed transport process and physical phenomenon, which make it possible to achieve detailed prediction of the inner life of the cell. However, review papers only on cold start numerical models are not available. In this study, an extensive review on cold start models is summarized featuring the states and phase changes of water, heat and mass transfer.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1180
Stefan Brandstätter, Michael Striednig, David Aldrian, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Tomas Dehne, Christoph Kügele, Michael Paulweber
Abstract The limitation of global warming to less than 2 °C till the end of the century is regarded as the main challenge of our time. In order to meet COP21 objectives, a clear transition from carbon-based energy sources towards renewable and carbon-free energy carriers is mandatory. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) allow an energy-efficient, resource-efficient and emission-free conversion of regenerative produced hydrogen. For these reasons fuel cell technologies emerge in stationary, mobile and logistic applications with acceptable cruising ranges as well as short refueling times. In order to perform applied research in the area of PEMFC systems, a highly integrated fuel cell analysis infrastructure for systems up to 150 kW electric power was developed and established within a cooperative research project by HyCentA Research GmbH and AVL List GmbH in Graz, Austria. A novel open testing facility with hardware in the loop (HiL) capability is presented.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1179
Tatsuya Arai, Ozaki Takashi, Kazuki Amemiya, Tsuyoshi Takahashi
Abstract Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEFC) systems for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) require both performance and durability. Carbon is the typical support material used for PEFC catalysts. However, hydrogen starvation at the anode causes high electrode potential states (e.g., 1.3 V with respect to the reversible hydrogen electrode) that result in severe carbon support corrosion. Serious damage to the carbon support due to hydrogen starvation can lead to irreversible performance loss in PEFC systems. To avoid such high electrode potentials, FCV PEFC systems often utilize cell voltage monitor systems (CVMs) that are expensive to use and install. Simplifying PEFC systems by removing these CVMs would help reduce costs, which is a vital part of popularizing FCVs. However, one precondition for removing CVMs is the adoption of a durable support material to replace carbon.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1396
Sarah S. Sharpe, Robyn Brinkerhoff, Caroline Crump, Douglas Young
Abstract Unintended acceleration events due to pedal misapplication have been shown to occur more frequently in older vs. younger drivers. While such occurrences are well documented, the nature of these movement errors is not well-characterized in common pedal error scenarios: namely, on-road, non-emergency stopping or slowing maneuvers. It is commonly assumed that drivers move in a ballistic or “direct hit” trajectory from the accelerator to the brake pedal. However, recent simulator studies show that drivers do not always move directly between pedals, with older drivers displaying more variable foot trajectories than younger drivers. Our study investigated pedal movement trajectories in older drivers ages 67.9 ± 5.2 years (7 males, 8 females) during on-road driving in response to variable traffic light conditions. Three different sedans and a pick-up truck were utilized.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1406
Changliu Liu, Jianyu Chen, Trong-Duy Nguyen, Masayoshi Tomizuka
Abstract Road safety is one of the major concerns for automated vehicles. In order for these vehicles to interact safely and efficiently with the other road participants, the behavior of the automated vehicles should be carefully designed. Liu and Tomizuka proposed the Robustly-safe Automated Driving system (ROAD) which prevents or minimizes occurrences of collisions of the automated vehicle with other road participants while maintaining efficiency. In this paper, a set of design principles are elaborated as an extension of the previous work, including robust perception and cognition algorithms for environment monitoring and high level decision making and low level control algorithms for safe maneuvering of the automated vehicle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1400
Keyu Qian, Gangfeng Tan, Renjie Zhou, Binyu Mei, Wanyang XIA
Abstract Downhill mountain roads are the accident prone sections because of their complexity and variety. Drivers rely more on driving experience and it is very easy to cause traffic accidents due to the negligence or the judgment failure. Traditional active safety systems, such as ABS, having subjecting to the driver's visual feedback, can’t fully guarantee the downhill driving safety in complex terrain environments. To enhance the safety of vehicles in the downhill, this study combines the characteristics of vehicle dynamics and the geographic information. Thus, through which the drivers could obtain the safety speed specified for his/her vehicle in the given downhill terrains and operate in advance to reduce traffic accidents due to driver's judgment failure and avoid the brake overheating and enhance the safety of vehicles in the downhill.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1401
Trong-Duy Nguyen, Joseph Lull, Satish Vaishnav
Abstract In this paper, a method of improving the automated vehicle’s perception using a multi-pose camera system (MPCS) is presented. The proposed MPCS is composed of two identical colored and high frame-rate cameras: one installed in the driver side and the other in the passenger side. Perspective of MPCS varies depending on the width of vehicle type in which MPCS is installed. To increase perspective, we use the maximum width of the host vehicle as camera to camera distance for the MPCS. In addition, angular positions of the two cameras in MPCS are controlled by two separate electric motor-based actuators. Steering wheel angle, which is available from the vehicle Controller Area Network (CAN) messages, is used to supply information to the actuators to synchronize MPCS camera positions with the host vehicle steering wheel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1355
Paul H. DeMarois, Bill Pappas, William G. Ballard, Jeffrey R. Williams, Gregory West
Abstract Four full scale burn tests on aluminum body Ford F-150’s were conducted with four unique origins. The purpose of these burn tests was to determine if the origin of the fire could be accurately identified after the vehicle fires progressed to near complete burn (with near absence of the aluminum body panels). The points of origin for the four burn tests were: 1) Engine Compartment - driver’s side front of engine compartment, 2) Passenger Compartment - Instrument panel, driver’s side near the headlamp switch, 3) Passenger Compartment - passenger side rear seat, 4) Outside of Vehicle - passenger side front tire. Photographic, video, and temperature data was recorded to document the burn process from initiation to extinguishment. Post-fire analysis was conducted in an attempt to determine the origin of the fire based solely on the burn damage.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1358
Hyunbin Park
Abstract This paper presents a novel rear-view side mirror constructed with an external lens and a planar mirror to improve aerodynamics and minimize the blind spot of drivers. To resolve the drawback of the conventional side mirror, some vehicle manufacturers have lately attempted to develop a camera-based solution to replace traditional protruding side mirrors. However, driving vehicles on public roads without such side mirrors is illegal in most countries including the USA. The United States Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) specifies that the mirror installed on the driver side should be flat and should have unit magnification. The proposed system avoids the large, protruding, external side-mirror that is currently used in present-day vehicles. Instead, it integrates this external element into the interior of the vehicle to improve aerodynamic resistance, safety, and styling.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1351
Vamshi Korivi, Steven McCormick, Steven Hodges
Abstract The US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) has developed a unique physics based modeling & simulation (M&S) capability using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques to optimize automatic fire extinguishing system (AFES) designs and complement vehicle testing for both occupied and unoccupied spaces of military ground vehicles. The modeling techniques developed are based on reduced global kinetics for computational efficiency and are applicable to fire suppressants that are being used in Army vehicles namely, bromotrifluoromethane (Halon 1301), heptafluoropropane (HFC-227ea, trade name FM200), sodium-bicarbonate (SBC) powder, water + potassium acetate mixture, and pentafluoroethane (HFC-125, trade name, FE-25). These CFD simulations are performed using High Performance Computers (HPC) that enable the Army to assess AFES designs in a virtual world at far less cost than physical-fire tests.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1352
David Gardiner
Abstract This paper presents an experimental study of the vapour space flammability of Fuel Ethanol (a high-ethanol fuel for Flexible Fuel Vehicles, commonly known as “E85”) and gasoline containing up to 10% ethanol (commonly known as “E10”). The seasonal minimum vapour pressure limits in specifications for automotive spark ignition fuels are intended, in part, to minimize the formation of flammable mixtures in the headspace of vehicle fuel tanks. This is particularly important at subzero temperatures, where the headspace mixture may not be rich enough to prevent combustion in the presence of an ignition source such as a faulty electrical fuel pump. In the current study, the upper temperature limits of flammability were measured for field samples of “E85” and “E10”, and a series of laboratory-prepared blends of denatured ethanol, Before Oxygenate Blending (BOB) gasoline, and n-butane.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1353
Michael G. Leffert
Abstract This paper compares the material consumption and fire patterns which developed on four nearly identical compact sedans when each was burned for exactly the same amount of time, but with different wind speed and direction during the burns. This paper will also compare the effects of environmental exposure to the fire patterns on the vehicles. The burn demonstrations were completed at an outdoor facility in southeast Michigan on four late model compact sedans. The wind direction was controlled by placing the subject vehicle with either the front facing into the wind, or rear facing into the wind. Two of the burns were conducted when the average observed wind speed was 5-6kph and two of the burns were conducted at an average observed wind speed of 19kph.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1371
Hao Pan, Xuexun Guo, Xiaofei Pei, Xingzhi Dong
Abstract Brake pedal feel plays an important role in the driver's comprehensive subjective feeling when braking, which directly affects the active safety and riding comfort of passenger car. A systematical mathematical model of the vehicle brake system is built in according with the structure and system characteristics of hydraulic servo brake system. A complete hydraulic servo brake system simulation model composed of brake pedal, vacuum booster, brake master cylinder, brake pipe, brake wheel cylinders, brake calipers is established in AMESim. The effects of rubber reaction plate stiffness, rubber valve opening, brake master cylinder piston, brake caliper, brake pipe deformation and friction liner deformation on brake pedal feel are considered in this model. The accuracy of this model is verified by real road vehicle tests under static and dynamic two different conditions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1432
Tadasuke Katsuhara, Yoshiki Takahira, Shigeki Hayashi, Yuichi Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract This study used finite element (FE) simulations to analyze the injury mechanisms of driver spine fracture during frontal crashes in the World Endurance Championship (WEC) series and possible countermeasures are suggested to help reduce spine fracture risk. This FE model incorporated the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) scaled to a driver, a model of the detailed racecar cockpit and a model of the seat/restraint systems. A frontal impact deceleration pulse was applied to the cockpit model. In the simulation, the driver chest moved forward under the shoulder belt and the pelvis was restrained by the crotch belt and the leg hump. The simulation predicted spine fracture at T11 and T12. It was found that a combination of axial compression force and bending moment at the spine caused the fractures. The axial compression force and bending moment were generated by the shoulder belt down force as the driver’s chest moved forward.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1433
Enrique Bonugli, Joseph Cormier, Matthew Reilly, Lars Reinhart
The purpose of this study was to determine the frictional properties between the exterior surface of a motorcycle helmet and ‘typical’ roadway surfaces. Motorcycle helmet impacts into asphalt and concrete surfaces were compared to abrasive papers currently recommended by government helmet safety standards and widely used by researchers in the field of oblique motorcycle helmet impact testing. A guided freefall test fixture was utilized to obtain nominal impact velocities of 5, 7 and 9 m/s. The impacting surfaces were mounted to an angled anvil to simulate an off-centered oblique collision. Helmeted Hybrid III ATD head accelerations and impact forces were measured for each test. The study was limited to a single helmet model and impact angle (30 degrees). Analysis of the normal and tangential forces imparted to the contact surface indicated that the frictional properties of abrasive papers differ from asphalt and concrete in magnitude, duration and onset.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1441
Heungseok Chae, Kyong Chan Min, Kyongsu Yi
Abstract This paper describes design and evaluation of a driving mode decision and lane change control algorithm of automated vehicle in merge situations on highway intersection. For the development of a highly automated driving control algorithm in merge situation, driving mode change from lane keeping to lane change is necessary to merge appropriately. In a merge situation, the driving objective is slightly different to general driving situation. Unlike general situation, the lane change should be completed in a limited travel distance in a merge situation. Merge mode decision is determined based on surrounding vehicles states and remained distance of merge lane. In merge mode decision algorithm, merge availability and desired merge position are decided to change lane safely and quickly. Merge availability and desired merge position are based on the safety distance that considers relative velocity and relative position of subject and surrounding vehicles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1533
Kathleen DeMarco, James Stratton, Kevin Chinavare, Garry VanHouten
Abstract The introduction of Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedures (WLTP) in Europe and increased Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards in the United States for fuel economy and emissions reductions are going to have a larger role in vehicle development. Two major ways to increase fuel economy and reduce emissions are by reducing mass and improving aerodynamics. In the wheel segment, these two possible means to improve fuel economy compete against each other. Most lightweight wheel designs are detrimental to aerodynamics and aerodynamic wheels are seen as unstylish and with a high mass penalty. One solution is through the use of composite wheel technology which replaces non-structural aluminum with lighter weight materials. This study used SAE J2263 and SAE J2264 procedures to establish baseline fuel economy numbers and to evaluate various mass, inertial and aerodynamic differences between wheel concepts.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1597
Christoforos Chatzikomis, Aldo Sorniotti, Patrick Gruber, Matthew Bastin, Raja Mazuir Shah, Yuri Orlov
Abstract Electric vehicles with multiple motors permit continuous direct yaw moment control, also called torque-vectoring. This allows to significantly enhance the cornering response, e.g., by extending the linear region of the vehicle understeer characteristic, and by increasing the maximum achievable lateral acceleration. These benefits are well documented for human-driven cars, yet limited information is available for autonomous/driverless vehicles. In particular, over the last few years, steering controllers for automated driving at the cornering limit have considerably advanced, but it is unclear how these controllers should be integrated alongside a torque-vectoring system. This contribution discusses the integration of torque-vectoring control and automated driving, including the design and implementation of the torque-vectoring controller of an autonomous electric vehicle for a novel racing competition.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1593
Sunil kumar Pathak, Yograj Singh, Vineet Sood, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
Abstract A drive cycle is a time series of vehicle speed pattern developed to simulate real world driving conditions. These driving cycles are used for estimating vehicle on-road energy consumption, vehicle emissions, and traffic impact. Vehicle operating on fossil fuels are a significant source of air pollution, and these are being replaced by a small electrical vehicle in congested road traffic conditions, such as densely populated residential areas, near hospitals and market places, etc. The electrical vehicle run quieter and does not produce emissions like combustion engines. So far, there is no existing drive cycle officially developed for electric three wheelers which can represent real world driving pattern in India. In this study, 15 electrical auto rickshaws were driven by different drivers in various routes of a Tier II city of India and vehicle speed and time pattern were recorded using onboard Global Positioning System (GPS).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1596
Amar Penta, Rohit Gaidhani, Sampath Kumar Sathiaseelan, Prasad Warule
Abstract Electrical and Series Hybrid Vehicles are generally provided with single speed reduction gearbox. To improve performance and drive range, a two-speed gearbox with coordinated control of traction motor and gearshift actuator is proposed. For a two-speed gearbox, gearshift without clutch would increase the shifting effort. Active Synchronization is introduced for a smoother gearshift even without clutch. The quality of gearshift is considered as a function of applied shift force and time taken. To enhance the quality of the gearshift further, the location of the synchronizer in the transmission system is optimized. To validate the improvement in the quality of the gearshift, a mathematical model of the two-speed gearbox incorporating proposed location of synchronizer assembly along with active synchronization is developed. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the results achieved is presented.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1595
Mustafa Ali Arat, Hans-Martin Duringhof, Johan Hagnander, Eduardo L. Simoes
Abstract This paper presents a brake control strategy with a novel approach to the allocation of actuator effort in an electric vehicle. The proposed strategy relies on a combination of the conventional hydraulic braking system and the electric machine in order to improve braking performance. The higher response frequency of the electric machine is paired with the additional braking torque employed by the hydraulic brakes using an integrated control allocation strategy, which allows for a constant availability of a faster and more accurate modulation of both wheel torque and wheel speed. Therefore, the availability of an electric machine as a fast longitudinal actuator yields to an improved tracking of the desired wheel slip, especially when compared to the hydraulic actuators used in traditional braking applications.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0441
Zhenyu Wang, Mei Zhuang
Abstract A numerical study on sunroof noise reduction is carried out. One of the strategies to suppress the noise is to break down the strong vortices impinging upon the trailing edge of the sunroof into smaller eddies. In the current study, a serrated sunroof trailing edge with sinusoidal profiles of wavelengths is investigated for the buffeting noise reduction. A number of combinations of wavelengths and amplitudes of sinusoidal profiles is employed to examine the effects of trailing edge serrations on the noise reduction. A generic vehicle model is used in the study and a straight trailing edge is considered as a baseline. The results indicate that the trailing edge serration has a significant impact on the sound pressure level (SPL) in the vehicle cabin and it can reduce the SPL by up to 10~15 dB for the buffeting frequency.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0427
Yue Shi, Qingwei Liu, Fan Yu
Abstract An EV prototype, with all the wheels respectively driven by 4 inwheel motors, is developed, and undergoes a series of practical measurements and road tests. Based on the obtained vehicle parameters, a multi-body dynamics model is built by using SolidWorks and Adams/Car, and then validated by track test data. The virtual prototype is served as the control plant in simulation. An adaptive fractional order PID (A-FO-PID) controller is designed to enhance the handling and stability performance of the EV. Considering the model uncertainties, e.g. the variation in body mass distribution and the consequent change in yaw moment of inertial, a Parameter Self-Adjusting Differential Evolution (PSA-DE) algorithm is adopted for tuning the controller parameters, i.e. KP, KI, KD, λ and μ. As a modification of traditional DE algorithm, the so-called Variance of Population’s Fitness is utilized to evaluate the diversity of the population.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0428
Tianqi Lv, Yan Wang, Xingxing Feng, Yunqing Zhang
Abstract Steering returnability is an important index for evaluating vehicle handling performance. A systematic method is presented in this paper to reduce the high yaw rate residue and the steering response time for a light duty truck in the steering return test. The vehicle multibody model is established in ADAMS, which takes into consideration of the frictional loss torque and hydraulically assisted steering property in the steering mechanism, since the friction, which exists in steering column, spherical joint, steering universal joint, and steering gear, plays an important role in vehicle returnability performance. The accuracy of the vehicle model is validated by road test and the key parameters are determined by executing the sensitivity analysis, which shows the effect of each design parameter upon returnability performance.
Viewing 31 to 60 of 19832