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2017-04-14
WIP Standard
STD0016A
This document defines the requirements for developing a DMSMS Management Plan, hereinafter also called the Plan, to assure customers that the Plan owner is using a proactive DMSMS process for minimizing the cost and impact that part and material obsolescence will have on equipment delivered by the Plan owner. The technical requirements detailed in clause 5 ensure that the Plan owner can meet the requirement of having a process to address obsolescence as required by Industry Standards such as EIA-4899 "Standard for Preparing an Electronic Components Management Plan" and DoD Programs as required by MIL-STD-3018 "Parts Management". Owners of DMSMS Management Plans include System Integrators, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM), and logistics support providers.
CURRENT
2017-01-04
Standard
AIR1839D
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
CURRENT
2016-12-13
Standard
AIR6212
This document collates the ways and means that existing sensors can identify the platform’s exposure to volcanic ash. The capabilities include real-time detection and estimation, and post flight determinations of exposure and intensity. The document includes results of initiatives with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Transport Canada, various research organizations, Industry and other subject matter experts. The document illustrates the ways that an aircraft can use existing sensors to act as health monitoring tools so as to assess the operational and maintenance effects related to volcanic ash incidents and possibly help determine what remedial action to take after encountering a volcanic ash (VA) event.
CURRENT
2016-11-29
Standard
AIR1873A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes a Limited Engine Monitoring System that can be used by the flight crew or the maintenance staff, or both, to monitor the health of gas turbine engines in aircraft. This AIR considers monitoring of gas path performance and mechanical parameters, and systems such as low cycle fatigue counters and engine history recorders. It also considers typical measurement system accuracies and their impact. This AIR is intended as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. AIR 1873 supplements ARP 1587, Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring System Guide.
CURRENT
2016-11-12
Standard
AIR4175B
An effective GSS is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design, including asset management. Unlike the on-board part of the EMS which principally uses real time data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, a GSS can offer much greater processing power to comprehensively analyze and manipulate EMS data for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements used to determine the basis design of a GSS, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistic systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in GSS technology that have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines.
CURRENT
2016-11-12
Standard
AIR5120A
For Engine Monitoring Systems to meet their potential for improved safety and reduced operation and support costs, significant attention must be focused on their reliability and validity throughout the life cycle. This AIR will provide program managers, designers, developers and customers a concise reference of the activities, approaches and considerations for the development and verification of a highly reliable engine monitoring system. When applying the guidelines of this AIR it should be noted that engine monitoring systems physically or functionally integrated with the engine control system and/or performing functions that affect engine safety or are used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions shall be subject to the Type Investigation of the product in which they'll be incorporated and have to show compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements as defined by the responsible Aviation Authority.
CURRENT
2016-11-12
Standard
AIR4061C
SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 4061 provides best practice guidelines for the integration of Engine Health Management (EHM) system functions within aircraft systems to include both its main engine(s) and any Auxiliary Power Unit(s) (APU). This document provides an overview of some of the functions EHM typically integrates, offers some system variations encountered with different aircraft, and suggests general considerations involved with integration. It presents a sample EHM parameter coverage matrix to show the types of parameters with which a typical EHM system might interface, offers insight into signal and data processing and retrieval, and offers a view of typical EHM parameter requirements by function. Where practical, this document delineates between military and commercial practices.
CURRENT
2016-06-16
Standard
AS5391A
Accelerometers are transducers, or sensors, that convert acceleration into an electrical signal that can be used for airframe, drive, and propulsion system vibration monitoring and analysis within vehicle health and usage monitoring systems. This document defines interface requirements for accelerometers and associated interfacing electronics for use in a helicopter Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS). The purpose is to standardize the accelerometer-to-electronics interface with the intent of increasing interchangeability among HUMS sensors/systems and reducing the cost of HUMS accelerometers. Although this interface was specified with an internally amplified piezoelectric accelerometer in mind for Airframe and Drive Train accelerometers, this does not preclude the use of piezoelectric accelerometer with remote charge amplifier or any other sensor technology that meets the requirements given in this specification.
CURRENT
2016-03-16
Standard
ARP6803
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) examines a comprehensive construct of an Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) capability. This document provides a top-level view of the concepts, technology, and implementation practices associated with IVHM. This keystone document of the SAE HM-1 Committee is not intended as a legal document and does not provide detailed implementation steps, but does address general implementation concerns and potential benefits. Figure 1 provides a document flow map of the documents currently in work or planned by the Committee. The documents shown below will provide the recommended practices for IVHM implementation. This document map reflects the current SAE IVHM document configuration as of the date of publication. Future documents that are released will be included in the flow map in future updates of this document. An indication of the scope of IVHM is diagrammed in Figure 2.
CURRENT
2015-12-06
Standard
ARP6338
This document is intended for use by designers, reliability engineers, and others associated with the design, production, and support of electronic sub-assemblies, assemblies, and equipment used in ADHP applications to conduct lifetime assessments of microcircuits with the potential for early wearout; and to implement mitigations when required; and by the users of the ADHP equipment to assess those designs and mitigations. This document focuses on the LLM wearout assessment process. It acknowledges that the ADHP system design process also includes related risk mitigation and management; however, this document includes only high-level reference and discussion of those topics, in order to show their relationship to the LLM assessment process.
2015-10-16
WIP Standard
AS6347
This document applies to the development of Plans for integrating and managing electronic materials and processes in equipment for the military and commercial aerospace markets; as well as other ADHP markets that wish to use this document.
HISTORICAL
2015-08-28
Standard
J1939/73_201508
SAE J1939-73 Diagnostics Application Layer defines the SAE J1939 messages to accomplish diagnostic services and identifies the diagnostic connector to be used for the vehicle service tool interface. Diagnostic messages (DMs) provide the utility needed when the vehicle is being repaired. Diagnostic messages are also used during vehicle operation by the networked electronic control modules to allow them to report diagnostic information and self-compensate as appropriate, based on information received. Diagnostic messages include services such as periodically broadcasting active diagnostic trouble codes, identifying operator diagnostic lamp status, reading or clearing diagnostic trouble codes, reading or writing control module memory, providing a security function, stopping/starting message broadcasts, reporting diagnostic readiness, monitoring engine parametric data, etc.
CURRENT
2015-03-29
Standard
AIR4176A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information that would be useful to potential users/operators and decision makers for evaluating and quantifying the benefits of an Engine Monitoring Systems (EMS) versus its cost of implementation. This document presents excerpts from reports developed to analyze "actual aircraft cost/benefits results". These are presented as follows: a. First, to outline the benefits and cost elements pertaining to EMS that may be used in performing a cost versus benefits analysis. b. Second, to present considerations for use in conducting the analysis. c. Third, to provide examples of analyses and results as they relate to the user/operator and decision-maker community. The document encompasses helicopters and fixed wing aircraft and distinguishes between civilian and military considerations.
CURRENT
2015-03-17
Standard
J2970_201503
This standard provides the testing and functional requirements guidance necessary for a leak detection device that uses any non-A/C refrigerant tracer gas, such as helium or a nitrogen-hydrogen blend, to provide functional performance equivalent to a refrigerant electronic leak detector. It explains how a non- refrigerant leak detector’s calibration can be established to provide levels of detection equal to electronic leak detectors that meet SAE J2791 for R-134a and SAE J2913 for R-1234yf.
CURRENT
2015-03-09
Standard
GEIASTD0002_1A
This Standard applies to integrated circuits and semiconductors exhibiting the following attributes: A minimum set of requirements, or information provided by the part manufacturer, which will allow a standard COTS component to be designated AQEC by the manufacturer. As a minimum, each COTS component (designated AQEC) will have been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested in accordance with the component manufacturer’s requirements for standard data book components. Qualification of, and quality systems for, the COTS components to be designated as AQEC shall include the manufacturer’s standards, operating procedures, and technical specifications. Components manufactured before the manufacturer has addressed AQEC requirements, but utilizing the same processes, are also considered AQEC compliant. Additional desired attributes of a device designated AQEC (that will support AQEC users) are found in Appendix B of this standard.
HISTORICAL
2015-02-17
Standard
EIASTD4899B
This document applies to the development of Plans for integrating and managing electronic components in equipment for the military and commercial aerospace markets; as well as other ADHP markets that wish to use this document. Examples of electronic components, as described in this document, include resistors, capacitors, diodes, integrated circuits, hybrids, application specific integrated circuits, wound components, and relays. It is critical for the Plan owner to review and understand the design, materials, configuration control, and qualification methods of all “as-received” electronic components, and their capabilities with respect to the application; identify risks, and where necessary, take additional action to mitigate the risks. The technical requirements are in Clause 3 of this standard, and the administrative requirements are in Clause 4.
CURRENT
2014-10-08
Standard
AIR6226
Most of the Trimmable Horizontal Stabilizer Actuators (THSA) feature a dual structural load path, the primary load path being loaded, the secondary load path being normally unloaded, or both load paths sharing in parallel the Horizontal Stabilizer load. This document describes existing methods for detecting rupture or disconnection of loaded load paths as an overview for those specifying or designing Horizontal Stabilizer Trim Actuators in order to compare existing solutions as reference for implementation in new aircraft programs.
HISTORICAL
2011-08-01
Standard
EIA933A
This document applies to the development of plans for the integration and management of COTS assemblies in electronic systems used in the commercial, military and space markets. COTS assemblies include items such as VPX circuit cards/modules (single board computers, etc.), servers, printers, laptop computers, printed wiring assemblies, disk drives, etc. This publication is not intended to preclude or discourage other approaches that similarly represent good engineering practice, or that may be acceptable to, or have been accepted by, appropriate bodies. Parties who wish to bring other approaches to the attention of the formulating committee to be considered for inclusion in future drafts of this publication are encouraged to do so. It is the intention of the formulating committee to revise and update this publication from time to time as may be occasioned by changes in technology, industry practice, or government regulations, or for other appropriate reasons.
HISTORICAL
2007-11-01
Standard
EIASTD4899A
This document defines the requirements for developing an Electronic Components Management Plan (ECMP), hereinafter also called the Plan, to assure customers and regulatory agencies that all of the electronic components in the equipment of the Plan owner are selected and applied in controlled processes compatible with the end application; and that the Technical Requirements detailed in clause 5.0 are accomplished. In general the owners of a complete Electronic Components Management Plan are avionics equipment manufacturers.
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