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Viewing 1 to 30 of 564
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2408
Lei Zhou, Hongxing Zhang, Zhenfeng Zhao, Fujun Zhang
Abstract The Opposed Piston Two-Stroke (OPTS) engine has many advantages on power density, fuel tolerance, fuel flexibility and package space. A type of self-balanced opposed-piston folded-crank train two-stroke engine for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was studied in this paper. AVL BOOST was used for the thermodynamic simulation. It was a quasi-steady, filling-and-emptying flow analysis -- no intake or exhaust dynamics were simulated. The results were validated against experimental data. The effects of high altitude environment on engine performance have been investigated. Moreover, the matching between the engine and turbocharger was designed and optimized for different altitude levels. The results indicated that, while the altitude is above 6000m, a multi-stage turbocharged engine system need to be considered and optimized for the UAV.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2249
Chen Wang, Tianyou Wang, Kai Sun, Zhen Lu, Yong Gui
Abstract Clean combustion is critical for marine engines to meet the Tier III emission regulation. In this paper, the effects of EGR and injection strategies (including injection pressure, injection timing as well as multiple injection technology) on the performance and emissions of a 2-stroke, low speed marine diesel engine were investigated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to reach the IMO Tier III NOx emissions target and reduce the fuel consumption rate. Due to the large length scale of the marine engine, RANS simulation was performed in combination with the CTC-SHELL combustion model. Based on the simulation model, the variation of the cylinder pressure curve, the average temperature in the cylinder, the combustion heat release rate and the emission characteristics were studied.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0167
Enrico Mattarelli, Carlo Rinaldini, Tommaso Savioli, Giuseppe Cantore, Alok Warey, Michael Potter, Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Sandro Balestrino
Abstract This work reports a CFD study on a 2-stroke (2-S) opposed piston high speed direct injection (HSDI) Diesel engine. The engine main features (bore, stroke, port timings, et cetera) are defined in a previous stage of the project, while the current analysis is focused on the assembly made up of scavenge ports, manifold and cylinder. The first step of the study consists in the construction of a parametric mesh on a simplified geometry. Two geometric parameters and three different operating conditions are considered. A CFD-3D simulation by using a customized version of the KIVA-4 code is performed on a set of 243 different cases, sweeping all the most interesting combinations of geometric parameters and operating conditions. The post-processing of this huge amount of data allow us to define the most effective geometric configuration, named baseline.
2017-08-01
Journal Article
2017-01-9283
Peter R. Hooper
Abstract This paper reports on the research and development challenges experienced from dynamometer testing of a spark ignition UAV engine operating on heavy fuel. The engine is a segregated scavenging two stroke engine with air charge delivery by means of integral stepped pistons overcoming durability issues of conventional crankcase scavenged engines. A key element of the experimental study builds upon performance development to address the need for repeatable cold start on low volatility fuel thereby eliminating gasoline from UAV theatres of deployment. Lubrication challenges normally associated with crankcase scavenged two stroke engines are avoided by the integrated re-circulatory lubrication system. The fuel explored in this study is kerosene JET A-1.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1808
Francis Nardella
Abstract In a previous report, it was shown that power transmission through the camshaft reduced the first mode natural frequency of the power train and translated its convergence with dominant engine excitatory harmonics to a lower engine speed resulting in a marked reduction in torsional vibration while achieving 2/1 gear reduction for a 4-stroke 6-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine for aviation. This report describes a sweep though 2 and 4-stroke engines with differing numbers of cylinders configured as standard gear reduction (SGRE) and with power transmission through the camshaft (CDSE) or an equivalent dedicated internal driveshaft (DISE). Four and 6-cylinder 4-stroke engines were modeled as opposed boxer engines. Four and 6-cylinder 2-stroke engines and 8, 10 and 12-cylinder 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines were modeled as 180° V-engines. All 2-stroke engines were considered to be piston ported and configured as SGRE or DISE.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1031
Xinyan Wang, Jun Ma, Hua Zhao
Abstract In this study, the effect of the intake plenum design on the scavenging process in a newly proposed 2-stroke Boosted Uniflow Scavenged Direct Injection Gasoline (BUSDIG) engine was studied in detail by three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. In the BUSDIG engine, the intake scavenge ports are integrated into the cylinder liner and their opening and closure are controlled by the movement of piston top while exhaust valves are placed in the cylinder head. In order to accommodate the optimized scavenge ports in the real engine application, the intake plenum with an inlet pipe and a scavenge chamber was designed and connected to the 12 evenly distributed scavenge ports in a single cylinder BUSDIG engine.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1026
Richard Morton, Romain Riviere, Stephen Geyer
Abstract A study of the crank and gear-train dynamics of a two-stroke opposed piston diesel engine design uncovered a disconnect between the thermodynamic process and its conversion to mechanical work. The classic two-stroke opposed piston design phases the intake piston to lag the exhaust piston in order to achieve favorable gas exchange, overcoming the disadvantage of piston-controlled ports. One result of this is that significantly more of the engine torque is delivered by the leading crank than from the trailing one. This paper will examine why this torque difference occurs showing that it is not simply a proportioning of the available thermodynamic work but a result of a fundamental mechanical loss mechanism that limits the achievable brake efficiency of this engine architecture. This analysis will provide a basis for developing effective design solutions to overcome the mechanical loss by providing an understanding of this loss mechanism.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0558
Lei Cui, Tianyou Wang, Kai Sun, Zhen Lu, Zhizhao Che, Yanzhe Sun
Abstract The scavenging process in two-stroke marine engines not only transports burnt gas out of the cylinder but also provides fresh air for the next cycle, thereby significantly affecting the engine performance. In order to enhance fuel-air mixing, the scavenging process usually generates swirling flow in uniflow-type scavenging engines. The scavenging stability directly determines the scavenging efficiency and even influences fuel-air mixing, combustion, and emission of the engine. In the present study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the scavenging process in a steady-state scavenging flow test is conducted. A precession phenomenon is found in the high swirl model, and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) method is used to analyze the reason and the multi-scale characteristics of the precession phenomenon.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2017-01-9276
Joseph K. Ausserer, Marc D. Polanka, Jacob A. Baranski, Keith D. Grinstead, Paul J. Litke
Abstract The rapid expansion of the market for remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) includes a particular interest in 10-25 kg vehicles for monitoring, surveillance, and reconnaissance. Power-plant options for these aircraft are often 10-100 cm3 internal combustion engines. Both power and fuel conversion efficiency decrease with increasing rapidity in the aforementioned size range. Fuel conversion efficiency decreases from ∼30% for conventional-scale engines (>100 cm3 displacement) to <5% for micro glow-fuel engines (<10 cm3 displacement), while brake mean effective pressure decreases from >10 bar (>100 cm3) to <4 bar (<10 cm3). Based on research documented in the literature, the losses responsible for the increase in the rate of decreasing performance cannot be clearly defined.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0034
Enrico Mattarelli, Carlo Alberto Rinaldini, Paolo Patroncini
Abstract The paper presents a numerical investigation, aimed to explore the potential of 2-stroke Diesel engines, able to meet Euro VI requirements, for application to medium size commercial vehicles (power rate: 80 kW at 2600 rpm, max. torque 420 Nm from 1200 to 1400 rpm). The study is based on experimental performance of a highly developed 4-stroke engine. Two different designs are considered: Loop and Uniflow scavenging, the latter obtained through an opposed piston configuration. In both cases, no poppet valves are used, and the lubrication is provided by a 4-stroke-like oil sump. The study started with the development of a 4-stroke EURO VI engine, on the basis of a previous EURO IV version. A prototype of the new engine (named 430) was built and tested.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0046
Stephan Schneider, Marco Chiodi, Horst Friedrich, Michael Bargende
Abstract The proposed paper deals with the development process and initial measurement results of an opposed-piston combustion engine for application in a Free-Piston Linear Generator (FPLG). The FPLG, which is being developed at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), is an innovative internal combustion engine for a fuel based electrical power supply. With its arrangement, the pistons freely oscillate between the compression chamber of the combustion unit and a gas spring with no mechanical coupling like a crank shaft. Linear alternators convert the kinetic energy of the moving pistons into electric energy. The virtual development of the novel combustion system is divided into two stages: On the one hand, the combustion system including e.g. a cylinder liner, pistons, cooling and lubrication concepts has to be developed.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0049
Kuniyoshi Eto, Masaru Nozawa, Masato Nara, Buhei Kobayashi, Daiki Shibasaki, Ken Shirai
Abstract A new air-cooled SI two-stroke gasoline engine has been developed for an arborist-chainsaw. This engine has a displacement of 25 cm3 and generates about 1.1 kW and complies with the latest CARB and EPA exhaust regulations by optimizing scavenging flows and the use of a catalytic converter. Characteristics of lightweight, compact and high power-to-weight ratio are required for handheld chainsaws, especially for arborist chainsaws. As a matter of course, these characteristics are needed for engine itself in order to satisfy such market requirements for hand-held power equipment. To realize lightweight and compact design, the placement of catalytic converter is optimized for the engine and a two-piece crankshaft is adopted.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0001
Franz Winkler, Roland Oswald, Oliver Schoegl, Nigel Foxhall
Abstract High performance engines are used in many different powersports applications. In several of these applications 2-stroke engines play an important role. The direct injection technology is a key technology for 2-stroke engines to fulfill both the customers’ request for high power and the environmental requirements concerning emissions and efficiency. As the load spectrum differs from one application to the other, it was interesting to find out if different injection technologies can answer the needs for different applications more efficiently regarding performance but also economic targets. Therefore, the results of the BRP Rotax 600 cm3 E-TEC (direct injection system) engine are compared to the same base engine but adopted with the LPDI (low pressure direct injection) technology developed by IVT at Graz University of Technology. The systems were compared on the engine testbench over 17 rpm / load points representing different product usage profiles.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0077
Roland Baar, Valerius Boxberger, Maike Sophie Gern
Abstract Two-cylinder engines not only have special demands concerning uniformity and dynamics of oscillating masses and firing order, but also place very different demands on the turbocharger. With two-cylinder engines, the pulsating influence grows and changes the operation of the turbine. In this paper different boosting technologies are compared in small engine applications. Besides turbochargers the potentials and limits of superchargers and electric chargers are compared as well as their combinations. These technologies show differences concerning power supply, operation range and efficiency, and these effects have different implications in small engines. The efficiency of a turbo compressor, for example decreases, rapidly for small dimensions. Results from experiments and engine process simulations are shown based on a two-cylinder engine of 0.8l displacement. The operating condition of a turbocharger turbine in a two-cylinder engine is very specific due to exhaust pulsations.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0048
Garrett Parker, Stuart Bartley, Michael Nicholls
Abstract Two-stroke engine keep-clean data is presented to demonstrate the deposit removal capabilities of a premium fuel additive. In this testing, the fuel additive was added as a top-treatment to a 50:1 blended fuel-oil mixture. Engine testing was conducted on an EchoTM SRM-265 (25.4 cc) string trimmer run under a standardized test cycle. Test measurements included piston deposits, ring deposits, and exhaust port blockage. In addition, a more complete data set was analyzed and several variables were investigated including: different base gasoline fuels, ethanol level (E0 and E10), additive dose (none, low, and high), and fuel stabilizer dose (none and high). Post-test inspection of engine parts using fuel additives showed a high level of clean surfaces, which maintained the engine at its original performance.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0028
Pascal Piecha, Philipp Bruckner, Stephan Schmidt, Roland Kirchberger, Florian Schumann, Stephan Meyer, Tim Gegg, Stefan Leiber
Abstract Small displacement two-stroke engines are widely used as affordable and low-maintenance propulsion systems for motorcycles, scooters, hand-held power tools and others. In recent years, considerable progress regarding emission reduction has been reached. Nevertheless, a further improvement of two-stroke engines is necessary to cover protection of health and environment. In addition, the shortage of fossil fuel resources and the anthropogenic climate change call for a sensual use of natural resources and therefore, the fuel consumption and engine efficiency needs to be improved. With the application of suitable analyses methods it is possible to find improving potential of the working processes of these engines. The thermodynamic loss analysis is a frequently applied method to examine the working process and is universally adaptable.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0050
Francesco Testa, Vincenzo Gagliardi, Marco Ferrari, Stefano Fontanesi, Andrea Bertani
Abstract It is well known that 3D CFD simulations can give detailed information about fluid and flow properties in complex 3D domains while 1D CFD simulation can provide important information at a system level, i.e. about the performance of the entire engine. The drawbacks of the two simulation methods are that the former requires high computational cost while the latter is not able to capture complex local 3D features of the flow. Therefore, the two simulation methods are to be seen as complementary, indeed a coupling of the two approaches can benefit from the pros of the two methods while minimizing the cons. In particular, with a multi-scale modeling approach (1D-3D) it is possible to simulate large and complex domains by modeling the complex part with a 3D approach and the rest of the domain with a 1D approach.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0153
Bernardo Luiz Harry Diniz Lemos, Eduardo Abreu Salomão, Matheus Philipe Ribeiro Viana, Rogério Jorge Amorim
Abstract Two-stroke engines are used in several purposes, such as lawn mowers, chainsaws, power generators and for motorcycles in some dirt tracks competitions. In addition, small Wankel engines are used in snowmobiles, motorized paragliders and range extenders. Both types of engines are known for the great power produced per displacement, ideal for the purposes aforementioned, but its bigger emissions due to lubricating oil mixed with fossil fuels, such as gasoline, do not pass legislation's standards, which limits their use. In order to reduce emissions, tests with ethanol and castor oil, eco-friendly fuel and lubricant, respectively, will be presented to adequate these organic compounds to the engine's operation.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2332
He Changming, Xu Sichuan
Abstract For an innovative opposed-piston diesel engine (OPE) with two-stroke operation mode, it attracted even more attentions than ever in some developed countries all around the world, attributed to the unique advantages of higher power density that conducive to downsize IC engine, as well as the potential of further reducing fuel consumption for outstanding thermal efficiency. To achieve fast practical application and ensure the feasibility in concept design stage, the performance characteristic of OPE crankshaft system was investigated, and thus a theoretical analytic model of crankshaft system in an OP2S (Opposed-piston two stroke) engine was established. The effects of all structural design variables on averaged output torque of OPE crankshaft were analyzed, respectively. It was found that the initial crank angle difference between inner crank web and outer crank web was considered as a most critical contributor to boost the averaged torque output than other design variables.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8061
Thomas Howell, Bruce Swanbon, Justin Baltrucki, Alan Steines, Nancy Neff, Biao Lu
Abstract Heavy duty valvetrains have evolved over the last 20 years with the integration of engine braking into the valvetrain. Jacobs Vehicle Systems have developed the High Power Density (HPD) engine brake that increases retarding powe, especially at low engine speed. The system works by converting the engine from a 4 stroke during positive power into a 2 stroke for retarding power. This more than doubles the retarding power at cruise engine speeds reducing the need to downshift in order to control the vehicle, compensates for reduction in natural vehicle retarding due to aerodynamic and friction enhancements, and enables the same vehicle retarding power with a smaller displacement engine as engine downsizing becomes prevalent.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1841
Peter R. Hooper
Powertrain system duplication for hybrid electric vehicles and range-extenders presents serious cost challenges. Cost increase can be mitigated by reducing the number of cylinders but this usually has a negative impact on noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) of the vehicle system. This paper considers a novel form of two-stroke cycle engine offering potential for low emissions, reduced production cost and high potential vehicle efficiency. The engine uses segregated pump charging via the use of stepped pistons offering potential for low emissions. Installation as a power plant for automotive hybrid electric vehicles or as a range-extender for electric vehicles could present a low mass solution addressing the drive for vehicle fleet CO2 reduction. Operation on the two-stroke cycle enables NVH advantages over comparable four-stroke cycle units, however the durability of conventional crankcase scavenged engines can present significant challenges.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0177
Edward G. Groff
During the late 1980’s and early 1990’s the two-stroke-cycle engine was an extremely popular and highly publicized automotive powertrain technology globally. Active development programs existed at many OEMs during that period, including GM, where the author was involved, and production seemed eminent. Autoweek stated on the cover of its March 12, 1990 issue, “Revolution for the millennium or Wankel of the ‘90s?” This paper covers the new technologies that led to the generation of so much excitement in the industry and press, the advantages and disadvantages of the engine concept, R&D tools developed at that time that are still in use today, and various engine concepts pursued in the industry. The story is not only interesting from engineering and technology perspectives but illustrates how innovations in certain subsystems become enablers to revive a system technology by eliminating issues that prevented it from making it to production in the past.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1052
Adwitiya Dube, A Ramesh
Abstract Direct injection of fuel has been seen as a potential method to reduce fuel short circuiting in two stroke engines. However, most work has been on low pressure injection. In this work, which employed high pressure direct injection in a small two stroke engine (2S-GDI), a detailed study of injection parameters affecting performance and combustion has been presented based on experiments for evaluating its potential. Influences of injection pressure (IP), injection timing (end of injection - EOI) and location of the spark plug at different operating conditions in a 199.3 cm3 automotive two stroke engine using a real time open engine controller were studied. Experiments were conducted at different throttle positions and equivalence ratios at a speed of 3000 rpm with various sets of injection parameters and spark plug locations. The same engine was also run in the manifold injection (2S-MI) mode under similar conditions for comparison.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1049
Xinyan Wang, Jun Ma, Hua Zhao
Abstract The 2-stroke engine has great potential for aggressive engine downsizing due to its double firing frequency which allows lower indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and peak in-cylinder pressure with the same output toque compared to the 4-stroke engine. With the aid of new engine technologies, e.g. direct injection, boost and variable valve trains, the drawbacks of traditional 2-stroke engine, e.g. low durability and high emissions, can be resolved in a Boosted Uniflow Scavenged Direct Injection Gasoline (BUSDIG) engine. Compared to the loop-flow or cross-flow engines, the BUSDIG engine, where intake ports are integrated to the cylinder liner and controlled by the movement of piston top while exhaust valves are placed in the cylinder head, can achieve excellent scavenging performance and be operated with high boost.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1054
Jorge Martins, Carlos Pereira, F.P. Brito
Abstract One way to increase efficiency and performance of 2-stroke engines is the addition of an exhaust valve to control the opening/closure of the exhaust port. With this implementation it is possible to change the exhaust timing for different conditions. However, conventional systems cannot change the exhaust opening and closure timings independently. The work herein presented shows the development of a new exhaust rotary valve enabling the control of the opening independently from the control of the closure of the exhaust port. The study is based on kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. Some manufacturers use exhaust rotary valves but none of them performs a fully rotary motion. This kind of motion has various benefits such as smoothness and most notably the ability to control both the opening and the closure timing of the exhaust independently. Regarding the kinematic analysis, a simple model was created to determine the most suitable valve angles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0770
Filip Cernik, Jan Macek, Christoph Dahnz, Sebastian Hensel
A quasi-dimensional dual fuel combustion model is proposed for a large 2-stroke marine engine. The introduced concept accounts for both diffusion combustion of the liquid pilot fuel and the flame front propagation throughout the gaseous premixed charge. For the pilot fuel case a common integral formulation defines the ignition delay whereas a time scale approach is incorporated for the combustion progress modeling. In order to capture spatial differences given by the scavenging process and the admission of the gaseous fuel, the cylinder volume is discretized into a number of zones. The laws of conservation are applied to calculate the thermodynamic conditions and the fuel concentration distribution. Subsequently, the ignition delay of the gaseous fuel-air mixture is determined by the use of tabulated kinetics and the ensuing oxidation is described by a flame velocity correlation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0659
Alok Warey, Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Michael Potter, Enrico Mattarelli, Carlo Alberto Rinaldini
Abstract Two-stroke diesel engines could be a promising solution for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from light-duty vehicles. The main objective of this study was to assess the potential of two-stroke engines in achieving a substantial reduction in CO2 emissions compared to four-stroke diesel baselines. As part of this study 1-D models were developed for loop scavenged two-stroke and opposed piston two-stroke diesel engine concepts. Based on the engine models and an in-house vehicle model, projections were made for the CO2 emissions for a representative light-duty vehicle over the New European Driving Cycle and the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure. The loop scavenged two-stroke engine had about 5-6% lower CO2 emissions over the two driving cycles compared to a state of the art four-stroke diesel engine, while the opposed piston diesel engine had about 13-15% potential benefit.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0610
Enrico Mattarelli, Carlo Alberto Rinaldini, Tommaso Savioli
Abstract Interest in 2-stroke engines has been recently renewed by several prototypes, developed for the automotive and/or the aircraft field. Loop scavenging, with piston controlled ports is particularly attractive, but the configurations successfully developed in the past for motorbike racing (in particular, the 125cc unit displacement, crankcase pump engines), are not suitable for automotive applications. Therefore, new criteria are necessary to address the scavenging system design of the new generation of 2-stroke automobile/aircraft engines. The paper reviews the transfer ports optimization of a loop scavenged 2-stroke cylinder, whose main parameters were defined in a previous study. The optimization has been carried by means of a parametric grid, considering 3 parameters (2 tilt angles, and the focus distance), and 3 different engine speeds (2000-3000-4000 rpm, assuming a Diesel engine).
2015-11-17
Journal Article
2015-32-0702
Manish Garg, Davinder Kumar, Madani Syed, Siva Nageswara
One of the major reason for lower efficiency and higher unburned hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emission for two stroke engine is short circuit losses during the scavenging process. An attempt has been made in this study to understand and improve this phenomenon. A three dimensional transient CFD model is developed for a loop scavenged, Schnullar type, 70 cc two stroke engine. Three major processes, namely, blow down (expansion); scavenging and compression have been modelled. The model is validated with PIV measurement done in motoring mode. Model is also validated with experimental data for trapping efficiency with Watson method and for in-cylinder pressure during expansion, blow down and intake events. A good correlation is observed between experimental and simulation results. CFD model is used to quantify various parameters, such as, delivery ratio, trapping efficiency, scavenging efficiency, and amount of fresh mass short circuit at different load and speed points.
2015-11-17
Journal Article
2015-32-0706
Stephan Schneider, Horst E. Friedrich
The present paper deals with the experimental investigation of homogeneous charge compression ignition in a free-oscillating two-stroke free-piston engine. The Free Piston Linear Generator (FPLG), which is being developed at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), is an innovative internal combustion engine for the generation of electrical power. This concept can for example be used in hybrid electric vehicles, as an auxiliary power unit or in combined heat and power units. The FPLG consists of three main components. In the two-stroke combustion unit, heat is released by burning a fuel-air mixture and a piston is accelerated. This energy is then converted into electric energy in the second component, the linear generator. This subsystem consists of electromagnetic coils as a stator and permanent magnets as a mover. The mover is rigidly coupled to the combustion piston.
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