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Viewing 1621 to 1650 of 1650
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370030
LACEY V MURROW
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370078
Clarence P. Taylor
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370077
Wallace L. Braun
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370072
Fred Grumm,
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360052
Maxwell Halsey
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350105
Austin M. Wolf
UNJUST legislation in the middle of the 19th Century retarded the introduction of road locomotion. The Motor Carrier Act, 1935, calls for extreme regulation, patterned after railroad control. The many differences between the two services prevent like treatment without strangling the virtues and economies of motor transportation. The difficulty of attempting to regulate it is due to the fact that most “fleets” consist of one truck which is owner-operated and only 9 per cent of all trucks are of the For-Hire type. The present predicament of the railroads is due chiefly to general conditions brought about by the depression, the result of over-regulation, and in not keeping in step with the advancement of other industries. The passenger automobile accounts for some loss of revenue, but its use is taken for granted. It therefore seems strange that the other forms of rubber-tired vehicle are not accepted in the march of progress.
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340064
W. J. Sloan
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340060
H. B. Markham
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340062
G. E. Clinton
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340058
ROY F. BRITTON
1933-01-01
Technical Paper
330068
Frederick C. Horner
1933-01-01
Technical Paper
330023
William B. Stout
“DON'T let any industry kid itself that it is not in the midst of an absolute change, and particularly if it be a transportation industry. “This will not be a mere slight improvement or an addition of attachments and gadgets, but an absolute fundamental metamorphosis. “Industry, after its bristling period in the market, went into a coma and disappeared entirely into the chrysalis of the experimental laboratory where it has been for four years. Now, under the impetus of the new day, it is emerging from this cocoon of experimentation no longer a narrow short-sighted, crawling creature, but a butterfly with wings, preening itself in the sun and ready to take off almost any time for far more distant flights of progress than ever before in the history of mankind.” Mr.
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320019
Thomas H. MacDonald, J. T. Thompson
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290076
T. H. MACDONALD
TWO distinct phases of the subject are the physical and the economic, both of which are included in the conclusions stated in the paper, based on investigations made by the Bureau of Public Roads. It is as pertinent to inquire what effect the highways have on the motor-vehicle as to inquire what effect the motor-vehicle has on the highways. Mutual adjustment must be made if real economy is to result. Two general conclusions that may be drawn from the observations presented are that the six-wheel vehicle offers a desirable and effective answer to (a) the problem of the load in excess of the normal desirable limit of weight for the four-wheel truck, and (b) the problem of the load equal to the heavier four-wheel truck in areas where road conditions do not permit the maximum wheel-load concentration.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290083
R. E. PLIMPTON
EXTENSION of motorcoach services over routes of 100 miles or more in length in all parts of the Country is shown by a map, and figures are given of the number of routes, the miles of highway over which the services are operated, running time, rates of fare charged and like data. Facilities and operating methods differentiating long-distance from suburban services are mentioned and the similarity to railroad practice pointed out. A characteristic of routes ranging from several hundred to nearly 1500 miles is that service is afforded continuously for 24 hr. per day seven days per week and many passengers ride day and night. Such long runs are broken into stages so that a driver does not work more than 8 to 10 hr. as a rule and vehicles are changed at the end of a run of a certain distance, which may vary from about 200 to nearly 750 miles.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290084
W. E. TRAVIS
THE creation of additional operating divisions and maintenance units, based on the California Transit Co. system originally operated by the author, which had proved successful in long-haul passenger transportation on the Pacific Coast, expanded the business so that the Yelloway Pioneer Stages, Inc., now includes about 9000 miles of route. The design of the equipment for the service was developed to meet the severe operating conditions, which demand that the same vehicle run satisfactorily over a sea-level desert and through mountainous country having an average altitude of more than 5000 ft. and, at the same time, that safety and comfort be provided for the passengers. This requires factors of strength and safety that are greatly in excess of those possessed by the ordinary commercial motorcoach.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290081
W. F. BANKS
MANY FACTORS gradually forced a recognition of motor-vehicles as necessary adjuncts to business, and now the motor-vehicle is being called upon more than ever before to serve also as a labor-saving device. The author believes that present-day business will demand further development of this nature. The groups interested in establishing and developing the motor-vehicle in business are the manufacturers thereof, the commercial organizations operating vehicles for their individual needs, the commercial operators supplying service for a variety of customers, and the railroads. The author pays tribute to the manufacturers for the present dependability of motor-vehicles and comments upon the extension of motor-vehicle service in the respective fields of the three other groups. Present competition in all forms of business makes the problem of cost accounting equally serious for all users of commercial vehicles, in the author's opinion.
1928-01-01
Technical Paper
280031
H. E. MAHAN
1928-01-01
Technical Paper
280069
E. G. E. BEAUMONT
AMONG the manifold activities of the present age, the transport of men and materials of all kinds occupies, as it ever has, a predominant position affecting very intimately the lives of all. Moreover, the author points out that it is recognized that so far as we are informed by surviving historical records, there has been no previous era involving present methods, the multiplicity of apparatus and the complexity of system with which we are now concerned, whether considering land, water, or air transport. It is therefore not surprising that the subject represents the major current of activity of technical associations, conferences, and congresses in different parts of the world. It is not strange that, as a result of the rapid development occurring in our own time, there has been much attendant inconvenience, disturbance of the industries immediately concerned, and considerable commercial risk.
1928-01-01
Technical Paper
280072
MILLER MCCLINTOCK
1927-01-01
Technical Paper
270051
THOMAS R. AGG
AN impetus to more scientific highway-construction was given by the World War, and, while it is necessary to limit the weight and size of motor-vehicles to safeguard the existing investment in highways, these limitations are being made as liberal as conditions permit. It is necessary for highway engineers to obtain a clear understanding of the interrelation of the highway and the vehicle. The author explains briefly the effects each has on the other and discusses these in connection with the problems of road location, grades, safety of users, cross-section of concrete slabs, the design of non-rigid road-surfaces, classes of highway and their cost to the public, and the economics of highway improvement and transportation. It is believed to be possible, the author states, to show that, under certain conditions, road improvement creates wealth, either in the form of lowered transportation costs or as improved social and educational conditions, or both.
1923-01-01
Technical Paper
230027
F C HORNER
The author discusses the factors that must be considered in solving the transportation problems and then describes the operation of the English-railway cartage-system in some detail under the two main divisions of delivery and collection. An important feature of the system is that of the control afforded by locating a controller, or dispatcher, in a central office and holding him responsible for the movements of the carmen, or drivers. The details of this control are explained. The field for the motor truck in railway-terminal service is outlined and a presentation is made of the merits and demerits of unit containers, together with an illustrated description of the English “fiats,” or demountable bodies. Other subjects treated include cartage costs, tonnage hauled, unified control of cartage and expressions of opinion quoted from numerous English trade organizations.
1922-01-01
Technical Paper
220028
Merrill C Horine
The author states that motor transport today is threatened with arrested progress due to the lack of economic coordination between motor-vehicle operation, highway construction and legislative regulation. Highways constructed at considerable cost to the public have gone to pieces in many places, sometimes years before their bond issues have matured. Efforts to preserve these roads have been confined principally to heavy taxation and restriction of motor transport; they have not been made upon a sound economic basis, largely because principles of highway-transport economics are not only imperfectly understood, but have hardly been studied sufficiently to provide any definite basis of understanding.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210025
W E WILLIAMS
Stating that asphalt, brick and concrete-slab road-surfaces are the only pavements that have given satisfaction for automobile traffic, the author believes further that thus far the concrete-slab surface is the only one worthy of consideration for such traffic. He discusses the merits and demerits of these surfaces and includes an enumeration of the factors that combine to produce a thoroughly satisfactory road surface. Passing to a detailed review of the bearing value of soils and the correction of road failures, the author presents data and illustrations in substantiation of his statements and follows this with a consideration of the reinforcing of a concrete road-slab with steel.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210001
H W Alden
The author brings to attention very emphatically the responsibility of the automotive industry for some things besides the actual building and selling of motor cars. The progress of civilization can be measured very largely by advances in means of communication. The transfer of messages by wire and wireless has made wonderful advances of a fundamental nature in recent years, but the transportation of commodities from place to place has not made such strides. The automotive industry has been concerned mostly with the actual development and production of the motor car and, as an industry, has stopped there without developing those allied activities which are vital to the long-time success of the business. The railroads afford a good example to follow in principle.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210058
B B BACHMAN
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210057
A T GOLDBECK
The aim of this paper is to stimulate thought on how to accomplish the greatest possible economy in transportation over highways. The fundamental thought is that the expense of highway transportation involves a large number of items that can be grouped into those directly concerned with motor-truck operation and those involving the highway, and that highways and motor vehicles should be adapted mutually so that the greatest economy of transportation will result. Urging that the automotive and the road engineer cooperate in gathering information that will give them a more definite basis upon which to design the truck and the road, the present rapid destruction of roads is discussed and remedial measures suggested. The designing of motor trucks to conserve the roads is treated at some length and a plea for cooperation between the Society and the highway officials is made.
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140015
L. P. PROSSEN
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