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2017-09-16
Journal Article
2017-01-9180
Johannes Wurm, Eetu Hurtig, Esa Väisänen, Joonas Mähönen, Christoph Hochenauer
Abstract The presented paper focuses on the computation of heat transfer related to continuously variable transmissions (CVTs). High temperatures are critical for the highly loaded rubber belts and reduce their lifetime significantly. Hence, a sufficient cooling system is inevitable. A numerical tool which is capable of predicting surface heat transfer and maximum temperatures is of high importance for concept design studies. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a suitable method to carry out this task. In this work, a time efficient and accurate simulation strategy is developed to model the complexity of a CVT. The validity of the technique used is underlined by field measurements. Tests have been carried out on a snowmobile CVT, where component temperatures, air temperatures in the CVT vicinity and engine data have been monitored. A corresponding CAD model has been created and the boundary conditions were set according to the testing conditions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0041
Daniele Piazzullo, Michela Costa, Luigi Allocca, Alessandro Montanaro, Vittorio ROCCO
In gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines, dynamics of the possible spray-wall interaction are key factors affecting the air-fuel mixture distribution and equivalence ratio at spark timing, hence influencing the development of combustion and the pollutants formation at the exhaust. Gasoline droplets impact may rebound with consequent secondary atomization or deposit in the liquid phase over walls as a wallfilm. This last slowly evaporate with respect to free droplets, leading to local enrichment of the mixture, hence to increased unburned hydrocarbons and particulate matter emissions. In this scenario, complex phenomena characterize the turbulent multi-phase system where heat transfer involves the gaseous mixture (made of air and gasoline vapour), the liquid phase (droplets not yet evaporated and wallfilm) and the solid wall, especially in the so-called wall-guided mixture formation mode.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0032
Gilles Decan, Stijn Broekaert, Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Jan Vierendeels, Sebastian Verhelst
The present work details a study of the heat flux through the walls of an internal combustion engine. The determination of this heat flux is an important aspect in engine optimization, as it influences the power, efficiency and the emissions of the engine. Therefore, a set of simulation tools in the OpenFOAM® software has been developed, that allows the calculation of the heat transfer through engine walls for ICEs. Normal practice in these types of engine simulations is to apply a wall function model to calculate the heat flux, rather than resolving the complete thermo-viscous boundary layer, and perform simulations of the closed engine cycle. When dealing with a complex engine, this methodology will reduce the overall computational cost. It however increases the need to rely on assumptions on both the initial flow field and the behavior in the near-wall region.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0021
Sabino Caputo, Federico Millo, Giancarlo Cifali, Francesco Concetto Pesce
One of the key technologies for the improvement of the diesel engine thermal efficiency is the reduction of the engine heat transfer through the thermal insulation of the combustion chamber. This paper presents a numerical investigation on the effects of the combustion chamber insulation on the heat transfer, thermal efficiency and exhaust temperatures of a 1.6 l passenger car, turbo-charged diesel engine. First, the complete insulation of the engine components, like pistons, liner, firedeck and valves, has been simulated. This analysis has showed that the piston is the component with the greatest potential for the in-cylinder heat transfer reduction (ideally up to 46 %) and for Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) reduction (up to 9 %), while firedeck, liner and valves only contribute respectively to 23 %, 19 % and 15 % in heat transfer decrease.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0016
Morris Langwiesner, Christian Krueger, Sebastian Donath, Michael Bargende
Aiming on the evaluation of SI-engines with extended expansion cycle realized over the crank drive, engine process simulation is an important tool to predict the engine efficiency. One challenge is to consider concept specific effects as best as possible by using appropriate submodels. Particularly the choice of a suitable heat transfer model is crucial due to the significant change in cranktrain kinematics. The usage of the mean piston speed to calculate a heat-transfer-relevant velocity is not sufficient. The heat transfer model according to Bargende combines for its calculation the current piston speed with a simplified k-ε-model. In this paper the eligibility of this model for engines with extended expansion is assessed. Therefore a single-cylinder engine is equipped with fast-response surface-thermocouples in the cylinder head. The surface heat flux is calculated by solving the unsteady heat conduction equation.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0158
Teresa Castiglione, Giuseppe Franzè, Angelo Algieri, Pietropaolo Morrone, Sergio Bova
The paper shows how specific requirements of the cooling system of an ICE can be met by actuating the coolant flow rate independently of engine speed, by means of an electric pump and of an ad-hoc developed control system. Given that the proposed methodology is valid for each condition, in the present paper the focus is on the engine operating under fully warmed conditions, with the aim to keep the wall temperature into the prescribed limits, with the lowest possible coolant flow rates. This goal is achieved by properly defining the controller parameters. The developed controller is based on the Robust Model Predictive Control approach, which makes use of a lumped parameter model of the engine cooling system. The model also includes the radiator-thermostatic valve-fan block and incorporates the nucleate boiling heat transfer regime.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0161
Noboru Uchida, Hideaki Osada
It can’t be avoided reducing heat loss from in-cylinder wall for further improvement in brake thermal efficiency (BTE). Especially for diesel engines, spray flame interference on the cavity and piston top wall during combustion period could be a major cause of the heat loss. To reduce heat transfer between hot gas and cavity wall, thin Zirconia layer (0.5mm) on the cavity surface of the forged steel piston was firstly formed by thermal spray coating aiming higher surface temperature swing precisely synchronized with flame temperature near the wall resulting in the reduction of temperature difference. However, no apparent difference in the heat loss was observed. On the contrary, BTE was deteriorated by the increase in other energy losses. To find out the reason why heat loss was not so improved, direct observation of flame impingement to the cavity wall was carried out with the top view visualization technique, for which one of the exhaust valves was modified to a sapphire window.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0107
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Vittorio Rocco, Michela Costa, Daniele Piazzullo
Enhancement of i.c. engine performances in terms of fuel economy and environment and human health preservation is an increasing key factor of the research in recent times. Mainly, that is due to the more and more stringent European and worldwide regulations tending to limit pollutant emissions to carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, and particulate matter. Development of direct injection strategy (DI) in spark ignition (SI) engines partially fulfilled these tasks, as they run at higher compression ratios, with respect to port fuel injection (PFI), and operating with different injection strategies, so a greatest control over the air-to-fuel ratio is achieved. However, today the engines’ complexity and the number of sub-systems have increased, so the traditional techniques used for their optimization are often inadequate for the required challenges of high power output and low environmental impact.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0076
Mark A. Hoffman, Ryan O'Donnell, Zoran Filipi
The proven impact of combustion chamber deposits on advanced compression ignition combustion strategies has steered recent works toward the development of thermal barrier coatings, which can mimic their benefits on combustion efficiency and operational range expansion. However, recent work based on statistical thermodynamics has indicated that inter-molecular radiation during the combustion event may subject the combustion chamber walls to non-negligible radiation heat transfer, regardless of the relatively low soot formation within the well-mixed and lean charge. In the present paper, the impact of radiation heat transfer on combustion chamber deposits and thermal barrier coatings is studied. The morphological construction of the combustion chamber deposit layer is shown to be partially transparent to radiation heat transfer, drawing corollaries with ceramic based thermal barrier coatings.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1951
K Nantha Gopal, B. Ashok, Rishabh Bahuguna, Tanmay Prasad
Abstract Thermal management is one of the most challenging and innovative aspects of the automotive industry. The efficiency of the vehicle cooling framework unequivocally relies upon the air stream through the radiator core. Significant advances in thermal management are being embraced in the field of radiator material and coolant. The radiator shouldn't be exclusively credited for the reliable cooling of the engine. There are other auto parts that play an essential role in keeping engine temperature at a manageable level. The fan-shroud assembly is an important component of the cooling system. While the fan is responsible for drawing in air, the fan shroud's job is to ensure uniform air distribution to the radiator core. By assisting airflow in the engine compartment the fan shroud helps in dismissing excess heat from the engine. This assembly also prevents the recirculation of heated air through the cooling fan.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1958
Jyothivel Giridharan, Gokul Kumar
Bio-fuels potentially represent a more environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels as they produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions when burned. Ethanol is one such bio-fuel alternative to the conventional fossil fuels. Towards the initiative of sustainable transportation using alternative fuels, it is attempted to develop an ethanol powered engine for commercial vehicles and this paper attempts to explain the 1D thermodynamic simulation carried out for predicting the engine performance and combustion characteristics, as a part of the engine development program. Engine simulation is becoming an increasingly important engineering tool for reducing the development cost and time and also helps in carrying out various DOE iterations which are rather difficult to be conducted experimentally in any internal combustion engine development program. AVL Boost software is used for modeling and simulation.
2017-06-27
Journal Article
2017-01-9179
Mike Liebers, Dzmitry Tretsiak, Sebastian Klement, Bernard Bäker, Peter Wiemann
Abstract A vital contribution for the development of an environmental friendly society is improved energy efficiency in public transport systems. Increased electrification of these systems is essential to achieve the high objectives stated. Since the operating range of an electrical vehicle is heavily influenced of the available energy, which primarily is used for propulsion and thermal passenger comfort, all heat losses in the vehicle systems must be minimized. Especially for urban buses, the unwanted heat losses through open doors while passengers are boarding, have to be controlled. These energy fluxes are due to the large temperature gradients generated between in- and outdoor conditions and to install air-walls in the door opening areas have turned out to be a promising technical solution. Based on air-wall technologies used for climate control in buildings, this paper presents an experimental investigation on the reduction of heat losses in the door opening of urban buses.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0722
Pablo Olmeda, Jaime Martin, Antonio Garcia, David Villalta, Alok Warey, Vicent Domenech
Abstract Growing awareness about CO2 emissions and their environmental implications are leading to an increase in the importance of thermal efficiency as criteria to design internal combustion engines (ICE). Heat transfer to the combustion chamber walls contributes to a decrease in the indicated efficiency. A strategy explored in this study to mitigate this efficiency loss is to promote low swirl conditions in the combustion chamber by using low swirl ratios. A decrease in swirl ratio leads to a reduction in heat transfer, but unfortunately, it can also lead to worsening of combustion development and a decrease in the gross indicated efficiency. Moreover, pumping work plays also an important role due to the effect of reduced intake restriction to generate the swirl motion. Current research evaluates the effect of a dedicated injection strategy to enhance combustion process when low swirl is used.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0730
Jose M Desantes, J. Javier Lopez, Jose M Garcia-Oliver, Dario Lopez-Pintor
Abstract In this work, a 5-zone model has been applied to replicate the in-cylinder conditions evolution of a Rapid Compression-Expansion Machine (RCEM) in order to improve the chemical kinetic analyses by obtaining more accurate simulation results. To do so, CFD simulations under motoring conditions have been performed in order to identify the proper number of zones and their relative volume, walls surface and temperature. Furthermore, experiments have been carried out in an RCEM with different Primary Reference Fuels (PRF) blends under homogeneous conditions to obtain a database of ignition delays and in-cylinder pressure and temperature evolution profiles. Such experiments have been replicated in CHEMKIN by imposing the heat losses and volume profiles of the experimental facility using a 0-D 1-zone model. Then, the 5-zone model has been analogously solved and both results have been compared to the experimental ones.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0732
Stijn Broekaert, Thomas De Cuyper, Michel De Paepe, Sebastian Verhelst
Abstract Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines can achieve both a high thermal efficiency and near-zero emissions of NOx and soot. However, their maximum attainable load is limited by the occurrence of a ringing combustion. At high loads, the fast combustion rate gives rise to pressure oscillations in the combustion chamber accompanied by a ringing or knocking sound. In this work, it is investigated how these pressure oscillations affect the in-cylinder heat transfer and what the best approach is to model the heat transfer during ringing combustion. The heat transfer is measured with a thermopile heat flux sensor inside a CFR engine converted to HCCI operation. A variation of the mass fuel rate at different compression ratios is performed to measure the heat transfer during three different operating conditions: no, light and severe ringing. The occurrence of ringing increases both the peak heat flux and the total heat loss.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1737
Piyapong Premvaranon, Jenwit Soparat, Apichart Teralapsuwan, Sutee Olarnrithinun
Abstract Beyond the modern design and illumination quality of automotive lamps, thermal management plays a crucial role and must be fulfilled in the early stages of the design process. An excessive thermal radiation from incandescent bulb can cause a severe thermal degradation of plastic parts such as housing or optical lens. Hence, to assess such impact of heat on the plastic parts, thermal analysis of a license plate lamp was investigated by a proposed technique combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and ray tracing mapping method. Then, the accuracy and computational cost of the method were compared with thermal results obtained by a thermal radiation model using Monte Carlo (MC) technique for calculating radiation effect coupled with CFD in heat transfer analysis. Finally, a comparison of temperature results from both techniques were validated with practical thermal measurements of license plate lamp prototype.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1520
Teddy Hobeika, Peter Gullberg, Simone Sebben, Lennart Lofdahl
Abstract Quantification of heat exchanger performance in its operative environment is in many engineering applications an essential task, and the air flow rate through the heat exchanger core is an important optimizing parameter. This paper explores an alternative method for quantifying the air flow rate through compact heat exchangers positioned in the underhood of a passenger car. Unlike conventional methods, typically relying on measurements of direct flow characteristics at discrete probe locations, the proposed method is based on the use of load-cells for direct measurement of the total force acting on the heat exchanger. The air flow rate is then calculated from the force measurement. A direct comparison with a conventional pressure based method is presented as both methods are applied on a passenger car’s radiator tested in a full scale wind tunnel using six different grill configurations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0388
Haeyoon Jung, MiYeon Song, Sanghak Kim
Abstract CO2 emission is more serious in recent years and automobile manufacturers are interested in developing technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. Among various environmental-technologies, the use of solar roof as an electric energy source has been studied extensively. For example, in order to reduce the cabin ambient temperature, automotive manufacturers offer the option of mounting a solar cell on the roof of the vehicle [1]. In this paper, we introduce the semi-transparent solar cell mounted on a curved roof glass and we propose a solar energy management system to efficiently integrate the electricity generated from the solar roof into internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. In order to achieve a high efficiency solar system in different driving, we improve the usable power other than peak power of solar roof. Peak power or rated power is measured power (W) in standard test condition (@ 25°C, light intensity of 1000W/m2(=1Sun)).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0266
Shervin Shoai Naini, Junkui (Allen) Huang, Richard Miller, John R. Wagner, Denise Rizzo, Scott Shurin, Katherine Sebeck
Designing an efficient cooling system with low power consumption is of high interest in the automotive engineering community. Heat generated due to the propulsion system and the on-board electronics in ground vehicles must be dissipated to avoid exceeding component temperature limits. In addition, proper thermal management will offer improved system durability and efficiency while providing a flexible, modular, and reduced weight structure. Traditional cooling systems are effective but they typically require high energy consumption which provides motivation for a paradigm shift. This study will examine the integration of passive heat rejection pathways in ground vehicle cooling systems using a “thermal bus”. Potential solutions include heat pipes and composite fibers with high thermal properties and light weight properties to move heat from the source to ambient surroundings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0184
Miyoko Oiwake, Ozeki Yoshiichi, Sogo Obata, Hideaki Nagano, Itsuhei Kohri
Abstract In order to develop various parts and components for hybrid electric vehicles, understanding the effect of their structure and thermal performance on their fuel consumption and cruising distance is essential. However, this essential information is generally not available to suppliers of vehicle parts and components. In this report, following a previous study of electric vehicles, a simple method is proposed as the first step to estimate the algorithm of the energy transmission and then the cruising performance for hybrid electric vehicles. The proposed method estimates the cruising performance using only the published information given to suppliers, who, in general, are not supplied with more detailed information. Further, an actual case study demonstrating application of the proposed method is also discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0175
Jing He, Bill Johnston, Debasish Dhar, Loren Lohmeyer
The natural refrigerant, R744 (CO2), remains a viable solution to replace the high GWP refrigerant R134a which is to be phased out in light-duty vehicles in EU and US market. In this study, thermodynamic analysis is performed on a R744 parallel compression system to evaluate its potential in automotive climate control. The model adopts a correlation of isentropic efficiency as a function of compression ratio based on a prototype R744 MAC compressor and accounts for the operating limits defined in the latest DIN specifications. Optimization is run over typical MAC operating conditions which covers both transcritical and subcritical domain. Comparing to the conventional single compression cycle, effectiveness of parallel compression is found most pronounced in low evaporating temperature and high ambient conditions, with up to 21% increase in COP and 5.3 bar reduction in discharge pressure observed over the considered parametric range.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0170
Aditya Velivelli, Daniel Guerithault, Stefan Stöwe
Abstract Seat cooling and heating strategies have enhanced human thermal comfort in automotive environments. Cooling/heating strategies also need to focus on the distribution of the seat cooling/heating power across the seat and the effect of such distributions on human thermal comfort. This paper studies the effect of active cooling combined with ventilation only strategy on thermal comfort. As part of the study, heat flux between the occupant and seat is mapped and is correlated to a step increase in the occupant’s local thermal comfort of body segments in contact with seat. A human physiological model and the Berkeley comfort model were combined to determine power and optimum placement of cooling to effectively cool an occupant using a climate control seat in a warm environment. This leads to a new approach using asymmetric seat cooling to distribute cooling power resulting in improved and balanced subjective comfort than traditional climate seat and ventilation technologies.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0159
Peng Liu, Ge-Qun Shu, Hua Tian, Xuan Wang, Dongzhan Jing
Abstract The environmental issues combined with the rising of crude oil price have attracted more interest in waste heat recovery of marine engine. Currently, the thermal efficiency of marine diesels only reaches 48~51%, and the rest energy is rejected to the environment. Meanwhile, energy is required when generating electricity and cooling that are necessary for vessels. Hence, the cogeneration system is treated as the promising technology to conform the strict environment regulation while offering a high energy utilization ratio. In this paper, an electricity and cooling cogeneration system combined of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and Absorption Refrigeration Cycle (ARC) is proposed to recover waste heat from marine engine. ORC is applied to recover exhaust waste heat to provide electricity while ARC is used to utilize condensation heat of ORC to produce additional cooling.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0160
Longjie Xiao, Tianming He, Gangfeng Tan, Bo Huang, Xianyao Ping
Abstract While the car ownership increasing all over the world, the unutilized thermal energy in automobile exhaust system is gradually being realized and valued by researchers around the world for better driving energy efficiency. For the unexpected urban traffic, the frequent start and stop processes as well as the acceleration and deceleration lead to the temperature fluctuation of the exhaust gas, which means the unstable hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module generator (TEG). By arranging the heat conduction oil circulation at the hot end, the hot-end temperature’s fluctuation of the TEG can be effectively reduced, at the expense of larger system size and additional energy supply for the circulation. This research improves the TEG hot-end temperature stability by installing solid heat capacity material(SHCM) to the area between the outer wall of the exhaust pipe and the TEG, which has the merits of simple structure, none energy consumption and light weight.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0162
Jun Li, Lili Feng, Pega Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents the results of an experimental study to determine the effect of vapor-liquid refrigerant separation in a microchannel condenser of a MAC system. R134a is used as the working fluid. A condenser with separation and a baseline condenser identical on the air side have been tested to evaluate the difference in the performance due to separation. Two categories of experiments have been conducted: the heat exchanger-level test and the system-level test. In the heat exchanger-level test it is found that the separation condenser condenses from 1.6% to 7.4% more mass flow than the baseline at the same inlet and outlet temperature (enthalpy); the separation condenser condenses the same mass flow to a lower temperature than the baseline condenser does. In the system-level test, COP is compared under the same superheat, subcooling and refrigerating capacity. Separation condenser shows up to 6.6% a higher COP than the baseline condenser.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0156
Olaf Erik Herrmann, Matteo Biglia, Takashi YASUDA, Sebastian Visser
Abstract The coming Diesel powertrains will remain as key technology in Europe to achieve the stringent 2025 CO2 emission targets. Especially for applications which are unlikely to be powered by pure EV technology like Light Duty vehicles and C/D segment vehicles which require a long driving range this is the case. To cope with these low CO2 targets the amount of electrification e.g. in form of 48V Belt-driven integrated Starter Generator (BSG) systems will increase. On the other hand the efficiency of the Diesel engine will increase which will result in lower exhaust gas temperatures resulting in a challenge to keep the required NOx reduction system efficiencies under Real Drive Emissions (RDE) driving conditions. In order to comply with the RDE legislation down to -7 °C ambient an efficient thermal management is one potential approach.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0157
Forrest Jehlik, Simeon Iliev, Eric Wood, Jeff Gonder
Abstract This work details two approaches for evaluating transmission warming technology: experimental dynamometer testing and development of a simplified transmission efficiency model to quantify effects under varied real world ambient and driving conditions. Two vehicles were used for this investigation: a 2013 Ford Taurus and a highly instrumented 2011 Ford Fusion (Taurus and Fusion). The Taurus included a production transmission warming system and was tested over hot and cold ambient temperatures with the transmission warming system enabled and disabled. A robot driver was used to minimize driver variability and increase repeatability. Additionally the instrumented Fusion was tested cold and with the transmission pre-heated prior to completing the test cycles. These data were used to develop a simplified thermally responsive transmission model to estimate effects of transmission warming in real world conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0158
Masaaki Nakamura, Koichi Machida, Kiyohiro Shimokawa
Abstract A diesel engine is advantageous in its high thermal efficiency, however it still wastes about 50% of total input energy to exhaust and cooling losses. A feasibility study of thermoacoustic refrigerator was carried out as one of the means to recuperate waste heat. The thermoacoustic refrigerator prototyped for this study showed a capability to achieve cooling temperature lower than -20 degree C, which indicated that the system has a potential to be used in refrigerator trucks not only for cargo compartment cooling but also for cabin cooling.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0150
Ankit Kumar Shukla, Raj Dhami, Aashish Bhargava, Sanjay Tiwari
Abstract In the current landscape of commercial vehicle industry, fuel economy is one of the major parameter for fleet owner’s profitability as well as greenhouse gasses emission. Less fuel efficiency results in more fuel consumption; use of conventional fuel in engines also makes environment polluted. The rapid growth in fuel prices has led to the demand for technologies that can improve the fuel efficiency of the vehicle. Phase change material (PCMs) for Thermal energy storage system (TES) is one of the specific technologies that not only can conserve energy to a large extent but also can reduce emission as well as the dependency on convention fuel. There is a great variety of PCMs that can be used for the extensive range of temperatures, making them attractive in a number of applications in automobiles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0152
Gang Liu, Zheng Zhao, Hao Guan, Chunhui Zhang, Dingwei Gao, Yongwei Cao
Abstract Advanced technology of thermal management is an effective method to reduce fuel consumption. There are several different technologies for coolant control, for example, electric water pump, split cooling and coolant control module. Through 1D thermal management simulation, coolant control module was chose for the test due to the best benefit for fuel consumption under NEDC cycle. 1D thermal management simulation model includes vehicle, cooling system, lubrication system and detailed engine model with all friction components. Coolant control module is designed to fix on 2.0L turbocharger GDI gasoline and to control 5 coolant ways, including radiator, by-pass, engine oil cooler, cabin heater and transmission oil cooler. The prototype is designed and made. The function and strategy is verified on designed test-bed. The vehicle with coolant control module is running under NEDC cycle.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2614

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