Display:

Results

Viewing 22231 to 22260 of 23384
1966-09-01
Standard
J971_196609
The code provides test procedures and methods of calculating a brake rating from the data obtained for brakes used in highway commercial vehicles over 4.5 T (10 000 lbs) GVWR air and hydraulic. Some general correlation may be expected between brake ratings established by this means and those obtained from vehicle tests such as outlined in SAE J880. The brake rating power, kW (hp) calculated by conduct of this code is an arbitrary index of performance of the brake and drum when tested by this procedure and may be appreciably different from the values obtained by other techniques.
1966-08-01
Standard
ARP699C
This Recommended Practice is intended to outline the design, installation, testing, and field maintenance criteria for a high temperature metal pneumatic duct system, for use as a guide in the aircraft industry. These recommendations are to be considered as currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time, as a result of the rapid development of the industry.
1966-08-01
Standard
AIR818A
This Aerospace Information Report, (AIR) is intended to provide the sponsors of Aerospace Standards, (AS), with standard wording, formatting, and minimum environment and design requirements for use in the preparation of their document. The individual shall use only those parts of this AIR which apply to their particular document. The individual sponsor may expand the standard wording, especially under Sections 4, 5, and 6 as required. The paragraphs of this AIR shall be used verbatim wherever possible. Unless otherwise directed by SAE, cross referenced documents shall be called out by specific revision letter, e.g. "shall be in accordance with AS XXXXB." In addition, all non-SAE documents called out shall include the document title when initially identified. However, every effort shall be made to keep cross-referencing to an absolute minimum.
1966-08-01
Standard
J966_196608
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a test procedure for determining passenger car tire revolutions per mile. It is intended to supplement SAE J678.
1966-07-15
Standard
ARP743A
This method describes the procedure for (1) sampling air in contamination controlled spaces for air-borne particulate contamination 5µ or greater in size and for (2) the microscopic determination of the concentration and size range distribution of the particulate material removed from the air sample.
1966-07-01
Standard
J848A_196607
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to fifth wheel kingpins for heavy-duty commercial trailers and semitrailers, used for off highway operation or in hauling heavy loads (see Figure 1.)
1966-06-20
Standard
AIR764A
This technical report documents three surveys to determine realistic vibration requirements for skid control systems specifications and obtain updated vibration information for locations in aircraft where skid control system components are mounted.
1966-06-01
Standard
AS428
This standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for exhaust gas temperature instruments primarily for use with turbine powered, subsonic aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in paragraph 3.3 et seq. The exhaust gas temperature instruments covered by this standard are of the electrical servonull balance type, actuated by varying emf output of one or more parallel connected Chromel-Alumel thermocouples.
1966-06-01
Standard
J575C_196606
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended as a guide toward standard practice and is subject to change to keep pace with experience and technical advances. This document provides standardized laboratory tests, test methods and equipment, and requirements for lighting devices covered by SAE Recommended Practices and Standards. It is intended for devices used on vehicles less than 2032 mm in width. Tests for vehicles larger than 2032 mm in overall width are covered in SAE J2139. Device specific tests and requirements can be found in applicable SAE technical reports.
1966-05-15
Standard
AIR902
A photographic technique is described for determining minimum observer-to-aircraft distances during acoustic "fly-over" tests. Possible sources of error are discussed, and it is shown that with ordinary care results are sufficiently accurate to require no correction.
1966-05-15
Standard
AS793
This standard covers three basic types of total-temperature-measuring instruments used as a means of determining the total temperature developed by adiabatic heating of the air due to motion of the aircraft through the air. This standard establishes essential minimum safe performance requirements for total temperature measuring instruments, primarily for use with turbine-powered subsonic transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in this report.
1966-05-01
Standard
J919_196605
This SAE Standard describes the instrumentation and procedures to be used in measuring sound levels at the operator station for self-propelled sweepers as defined in SAE J2130 and self-propelled off-road work machines in categories 1, 2, 4, and 5, of SAE J1116. This SAE document is applicable to machines that have operator stations where the operator can either stand or sit and will be either transported by, or walk with the machine during its operation. The sound levels obtained using this procedure are repeatable and representative of the higher range of sound levels generated by machines under actual field operating conditions. Due to variability of field operating conditions, this data is not intended to be used for operator noise exposure evaluations. Measurement and calculation of the operator's sound exposure should follow SAE J1116.
1966-05-01
Standard
AS1043A
No scope available.
1966-04-01
Standard
AIR512
This document covers the general recommendations for cabin lighting in order to provide satisfactory illumination for, but not limited to: a. Boarding and deplaning b. Movement about the cabin c. Reading d. Use of lavatories e. Use of work areas f. Exiting under emergency conditions g. Using stowage compartments, coat rooms, and closets h. Using interior stairways and elevators (lifts)
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660391
G. R. Smith, D. R. Dunlop, D. M. Finch
This report describes equipment designed and built in the Motor Vehicle Devices Testing Facility of the California Highway Patrol, and used to increase laboratory capacity for testing of automotive signal flashers. The new durability test apparatus is capable of handling two or three terminal flashers in groups of 80 at one time, and uses two electronically regulated, solid state power supplies as sources of stable d-c power. The performance test apparatus makes it possible to obtain the operating characteristics of 10 flashers in quick succession through use of a switching control unit and a strip chart recorder.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660384
E. Eugene Larrabee
This paper describes a three component strain gage balance designed to measure aerodynamic forces exerted on small automobile models when subjected to turbulence in an experimental wind tunnel. The instrument is described and the details of obtaining values with it are fully explained. Although tests were conducted on these models at quarter-scale Reynolds number, results agree closely with similar tests on larger models. The balance makes practical some unusual preliminary investigations before developing full-scale prototypes.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660381
John M. Brown
The Sealometer is used for evaluating the performance of lip type oil seals and provides a dimensionless number derived from measuring the increase in temperature of a test shaft operating in a lip seal for a given time interval. With the Sealometer it is possible to study parameters that affect seal performance. As a quality control instrument, the machine provides accurate data for design. Sealometer evaluation offers a quick method of determining the life expectancy of a particular design for a particular application and eliminates the need for long life test programs.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660694
R. W. Gray
Automation of high production, high complexity, and high speed testing is often of obvious worth. The use of automation by the “popular” space programs has developed techniques that warrant consideration of systems previously considered to be incompatible with automatic testing, either because of testing difficulty or cost. Manual testing is still a requirement in the developmental testing phase of many programs. It is also an established requirement in many factory level tests. The complete systems approach involving the total mission requirements for factory through launch (or other use) sequence will enable the logical selection of the correct testing elements, both automatic and manual.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660690
K. R. Dungan
The facilities required to test and launch the Agena vehicle are discussed in this paper. The principal tests and facilities at Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, and launch bases are described in detail; to avoid obsolesence in the near future and to provide flexibility, extensive advanced planning went into the design of these facilities.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660751
Kurt Melcher
The dynamometer evaluation of internal combustion engines has involved a great deal of tedious interpretation and presentation of results. In the past, engine test cells have not been fully utilized, and skilled test engineers have been occupied with routine work, time which could better be spent in actual development work. This paper describes steps taken by Robert Bosch GmbH in its new engine test laboratory, to streamline procedures for observation, computation, plotting, and presentation of results. Measurements from the engine test cell are delivered electrically to a central data processing center. These data are recorded, computed electronically, and plotted on an electric plotting machine functioning from punched paper tape.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660787
Richard W. Armstrong
Abstract In line with the need for a suitable dynamic test procedure to determine the reaction of seat belt hardware and overall effectiveness of the seat belt or harness in constraining the vehicle occupant at various crash angles, a dynamic seat belt tester has been developed by the National Bureau of Standards. This tester was designed to provide a motion as stipulated by the proposed SAE dynamic specifications, and to reduce the cost, size, and power required in previously designed testers based on the sled principle. A progress report on the performance of this test device to date is given, including a description of its major components and general operation.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660774
W. W. Clingan, R. W. Burchell
Six diesel engine crankcase oils, varying widely in additive type, were tested in diesel field service as well as several standardized laboratory diesel engine tests. The 150,000 mile field test was run in urban buses powered by a popular make of United States two-stroke cycle diesel engine. It was found that the best field deposit control was obtained with an oil containing a high level of succinimide (ashless dispersant). The parallel program showed that the laboratory engine tests did not predict relative field performance regarding ring sticking or sludge and varnish deposit control.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660121
E. J. Hughes, G. O. Boston, P. A. Diddens
A new method of testing Automatic Transmission Main Control Assemblies has been developed which provides increased reliability in transmission valve body testing. This method employs an electro-hydraulic test stand sequenced by an IBM 1710 computer system. The computer controls the test cycle, accurately compares test values against test specification parameters, records all test values, and determines whether the transmission Main Control meets all specifications.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660095
Jose L. Bascunana, Lewis D. Conta
Research on charge stratification of spark ignition engines has been under way at the University of Rochester for some time. Most recently the successful propane burning engine previously reported before the SAE has been converted to liquid fuel operation. This paper discusses some of the problems involved in the conversion and presents the results of tests on the liquid fuel version of the engine.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660315
W. S. Longhurst
A limited test program is being conducted on a prototype of the Canadair CL-84 tilt-wing V/STOL aircraft to evaluate its stability and control design objectives. The results to date indicate that only very minor modifications were necessary with regard to the flying control criteria previously established through analysis, fixed-base simulator studies, and variable-stability helicopter tests. In general, the qualitative assessment made thus far of the handling qualities of the CL-84 has proven the adequacy of the established criteria for stability and control performance for systems as complex as that of the CL-84.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660540
C. C. Colyer
The MS Sequences were introduced in 1958 to give the automotive and the oil industries a common basis for predicting field performance of motor oils. The sequences have been revised periodically to reflect changes in field conditions. Comparisons of laboratory with field data show that the sequences are generally successful in predicting motor-oil performance. Sequences IIA IIIA, adopted in 1965, give better repeatability, reproducibility, and field-test correlations than original Sequences I, II, III. Proposed Sequence VB, which uses an engine with a PCV valve, is being evaluated. The reliability of the antiwear evaluation in the sequences is questionable and indicates need for further revisions. Military qualification tests have been revised to include many of the motor-oil performance parameters evaluated by MS Sequences. However, different policies regarding test engines have thwarted any movement to consolidate the two series of tests.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660546
G. C. Hass, M. P. Sweeney, J. N. Pattison
A study of driving conditions in the central Los Angeles area has led to the formulation of a new chassis dynamometer test cycle for exhaust emissions testing. A single vehicle was used to develop a street route representing a variety of morning peak hour commute trips. A cycle was then compared against the street route with seven vehicles of varying size to assess the validity of the cycle in terms of mode pattern and exhaust emissions.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660464
Jay C. Kessler, Stanley B. Wallis
Contained in this paper are detailed explanations and criticisms of aerodynamic tests conducted for the automotive industry. Using 1/10, 3/8, and full scale vehicles, tests were conducted for aerodynamic drag and lift, stability and control, pressure distribution, and flow visualization. Tests were conducted in wind tunnels and on the road. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and explained at length.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660163
J.M. CHANDLER, J.H. STRUCK, W.J. VOORHIES
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660165
Enzo Franchini
A description is given of the technique used by FIAT, where three simple and economical methods for testing the complete car have been set up, namely, a static compression test, a dynamic test on catapult, and collision road tests of radio guided cars (controlled from other cars or from helicopters). The results are reciprocally integrating so as to give a thorough understanding of the behavior of several car models in collisions occurring in different ways and at different speeds. About 200 full-scale tests have been run so far and the results are in fair agreement with findings from actual road accidents. The information obtained has permitted progressive design refinements, and has shown the way towards constructional improvements likely to increase car safety.
Viewing 22231 to 22260 of 23384

Filter

  • Article
    886
  • Book
    44
  • Collection
    5
  • Magazine
    432
  • Technical Paper
    15217
  • Standard
    6800