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1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670613
Dean Edgerton
The objectives of Category II and III Test Programs, particularly with relation to reliability demonstration, are described. Data is presented and analyzed from the Category II and III tests of two different systems, one a missile, the other an airborne radar fire control system. Examples are given of reliability improvements that were introduced during the Programs, with emphasis on coordination between factory and field. The importance of proper organization and control of the Test Program is discussed, and attendant problems are illustrated. It is concluded that even though limitations exist, Category II and III tests come the closest to allowing the total system to be exercised under operational conditions; and that from the test results, assessments can be made of demonstrated reliability, and significant reliability improvements can be achieved.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670642
W. B. Rossnagel
Governmental assurance documentation bibliography updated; new tabulation effective as of April 1, 1967. Latest revision indicated in all instances, but no attempt was made to list supplements or amendments. Department of Defense Index of Specifications and Standards (DODISS) published annually in three parts (alphabetic, numerical, and listing of Federal Supply Classification following unclassified documents.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670704
H. W. Van Gerpen
A punched paper tape system offers a relatively inexpensive and speedy mean for recording, reading, and storage of data. The recorded data is visible, will withstand rough handling, and if torn, can usually be reconstructed. The equipment used in the John Deere Waterloo Product Engineering Center is described fully.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670479
D. N. Kapadia, G. L. Borman
A study was made to determine the effect of heat transfer from the backface of a poppet intake valve on the flow rate through the valve. All tests were made under steady flow conditions. The results show that for the same lift and same pressure drop across the valve, the flow rate through a hot valve is less than through a cold valve. This effect increases almost linearly with the heat transfer rate and decreases rapidly with lift. The results also show that the effective flow area is independent of pressure drop through the valve. A correlation of heat transfer from the back of the valve surface to the flowing air shows that the Nusselt number varies as the 1.27 power of the Reynolds number.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670876
Terry D. Scharton, Thomas M. Yang
Random vibration transmission from a vibrating source into an instrument package is analyzed using statistical energy analysis techniques. A general outline of these techniques, followed by a specific application to an instrument box attached to a vibrating plate, is presented. Consideration is also given to vibration isolation of the instrument box and to a novel method of performing vibration tests of small instrument packages and components. The experimental results presented agree well with theoretical results and indicate that these new analysis techniques offer new insight into practical high-frequency vibration problems.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670537
George Mechlin, C. Robert Brown
Testing the underwater launching of Polaris had to be done from an unmanned and remotely operated underwater facility before test missile launchings from a submarine could be safely and reliably accomplished. The development and operation of equipment to perform these tests rivaled and perhaps surpassed the technical problems of the tactical missile launcher. It was necessary to duplicate the undersea environment of the submarine, including water depth and relative ship-water motion from the effect of surface waves and from the way of the submarine. Further, it was necessary to arrest the fallback of inert test vehicles after launch to avoid damage to the launcher and to allow postlaunch evaluation of the structural integrity of the test vehicle. The servicing of the surfaced launch vessel was accomplished at a catamaran type work barge, and the operation of the submerged launch vessel was accomplished from a monitor barge.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670583
David R. Reese
A description of the largest Acoustic and Vibration Test Facilities in existence for the simulation of major launch vehicle dynamic environment is given and the operational characteristics of both are discussed. Sinusoidal and random excitation techniques are described and unique vibration control methods presented. A comparison of the effects of vibration and acoustic excitation on major space vehicle structures is made.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670339
H. G. Bogart
New developments in nondestructive testing for turbojet engines and aircraft are illustrated and current problem areas are outlined. Development work now underway in this field is described. Future requirements, related to such aircraft as the 747 and SST and their engines are anticipated.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670332
Albert A. Martino, Gaetan J. Mangano
The Aeronautical Engine Laboratory's Containment Evaluation Facility (AELCEF), featuring the government's largest spin chamber, high speed photographic equipment, and impact instrumentation, has been created and has recently become operational. This unique installation is described in detail. The first successful photographs ever taken of the interaction of rotor fragments and a containment ring are presented. Testing techniques and results are discussed. The ultimate goal of the AEL, NASA sponsored, integrated program of theoretical and experimental research work is to provide lightweight containment/control devices that will prevent the fragments of failed turbomachines from injuring personnel and minimize aircraft damage.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670454
Terence G. Kirkland, Ralph E. Hopkins
This paper summarizes the present state-of-the-art in U. S. Army research in electrical vehicular propulsion systems. The powerplants discussed are: compression ignition and spark ignition engine generators, hybrid engines, turbine generators, Stirling engines, Rankine cycle engines, fuel cells, and batteries. The liquid hydrogen fuel cell offers the greatest potential for military applications because of the compatibility of the fuel. Also covered are the power conditioning units and drive units. The authors discuss in detail the five electric propulsion test beds being used at USAERDL: the BEST, ultra high speed, a-c electric wheel, d-c brushless and fuel cell.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670079
A. E. Anderson, Serge Gratch, Hayden P. Hayes
A compact new laboratory friction and wear test machine has been developed. Test procedures have been established for this machine in a constant output (that is, constant friction force) mode of operation. These procedures have been shown to be particularly well suited for quality control of brake lining materials. The test, designated Friction Assessment Screening Test (FAST), has been shown to yield highly reproducible results which correlate well with vehicle performance. The results are highly sensitive to those variations in brake lining properties which are most significant in brake performance.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670081
A. R. Spencer, W. M. Spurgeon
Establishment of a new quality control (QC) test involves four phases. Development of an integrated set of QC tests for automotive brake linings (Phase I) was reported earlier. In a continuation of Phase I on differential thermal analysis (DTA), it was found that temperatures of some DTA peaks for linings are pressure-sensitive. Hence, good pressure control is necessary in using this test. It was also found that DTA gives useful information on the state of lining binder cure. A statistical test plan for rapid estimation of natural process limits (Phase II) is described and illustrated with DTA data.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670209
Stephen N. Bobo
The need for positive and definitive identification of questionable microwelds is not due to the high number of poor welds made in any production. The need stems from the fact that visual inspection criteria are neither sufficiently uniform nor dependable to guarantee 100% reliability where absolute reliability is a real requirement. At Raytheon, a Weld Research Program has used the technique of IR monitoring to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of welding inspectors. An experimental program has verified that infrared can be useful, not only in welding control, but as a good monitor of weld quality without the necessity of using it to control. The concept of IR monitoring can be extrapolated into structural welding for purposes of continuous 100% quality determination, control, and flaw detection.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670215
Andor J. Kraut
Acceptance of the flat pack as a standard configuration for integrated circuits has stimulated development of new interconnection techniques which necessitated development of new criteria and controls for these techniques. One method being utilized at Martin-Denver is a hot gas soldering process in which the solder joints are made by passing the printed circuit board containing the flat packs under hot gas jets. Specification of this process for a possible space application necessitated development of inspection criteria and controls to ensure the required joint reliability. This was accomplished concurrently with development of the soldering process and qualification method.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670280
R. L Wann
Testing techniques involving tires and tire components are discussed. New developments such as Super Deep tread design, improved repairs, and portable scale are covered as they relate to improved off-the-road tire performance. These new techniques and developments are the result of extensive investigation and testing in both laboratory and field. The weighing device described here is an effective tool in selecting type, load, and air pressure of high performance tires.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670269
Raymond Kerner
An all-mechanical flight control system is potentially adaptable for high-temperature operation, high structural stiffness, lighter weight, and increased reliability. As part of a continued development program of new control system concepts, a mechanical cascade toroidal servo was tested on the North American Aviation, Inc/Los Angeles Division F-100 flight control simulator. This was the second toroidal servo tested. The improvement over its predecessor was primarily the reduction of pilot operating forces. This mechanical servo incorporated a miniature servo into the input control linkage of the original servo configuration. In this way, the pilot controlled the miniature command or pilot servo and subsequently controlled the power servo with reduced input force.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670304
Frank H. Borlace
This paper deals with concepts of motion systems which have not been fully utilized for training flight simulators, and which promise to provide a more accurate motion system representation. An examination of the vestibular system is made and the information it gives to the pilot is shown to be of a “phase advance nature” Some programming considerations of motion systems are presented. The desirability of custom designing the motion system to aid in training the pilot for specific tasks is also discussed.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670305
James D. Goff
The methodology employed in the derivation of simulation equipment requirements for a Deep Submergence Vehicle DS/V is described, together with an outline of the hardware design concepts adopted or considered. The parallel is drawn between methodology and equipment used for a DS/V simulator, and that found in most aircraft or spacecraft simulators. In order to understand better the parallel, a brief discussion of the history and operation of a DS/V is included.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670303
Douglas Wilson
Visual simulation has added a new dimension to flight training simulators. Monochrome T.V. projection preceded the early colour displays which are, in turn, superseded by high definition colour systems incorporating features such as full runway and approach lighting. The paper outlines the progress in visual simulation and high definition colour systems which we have today. The requirements of all-weather operation are detailed. New developments are discussed which will further advance the art of visual simulation.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670301
John M. Hunt
A very large increase in the ratio of digital computer capabilities (memory capacity and operating speed) to computer cost is forecast in the next decade. This paper considers a number of aspects of the design, construction and use of modern digital flight and space trainers with the thought of exploitation of presently unobtainable computer capacity to maximize simulator usefulness and to minimize total simulator costs. New methods of visual and radar simulation made feasible only through the use of super computers are discussed.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670300
Laurence E. Fogarty
A historical review of developments in flight simulator computation methods indicates that the computation load has been increasing by about a factor of ten every ten years for the last thirty years. From a brief analysis of computation methods used on a typical modern digital flight simulator it is concluded that these methods are more than adequate for the simulation task as presently defined. Additional new simulation requirements such as computer-aided instruction methods and computer-based navigation techniques apparently will require very large additional simulator computer capacity in the near future.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670307
John J. Carroll, Raymond Ziesmer
The Supersonic Transport Training Program is being defined through engineering, experimental and operations research and analysis programs. Dynamic simulation of future environment and performance parameters--to be updated later with flight test experience--are developing tomorrow's skills, procedures, and equipment essential to the safe and efficient operation of the SST as a total system.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670297
John Rhodes
Training requirements of the current commercial subsonic jet programs and those of the manned space flight projects have dictated rapid expansion in the state of the art of simulation development. A concept of flight realism, before unknown, is being developed into our future simulators. These concepts are being formulated using past experience as a foundation to determine our needs; and technology developed in the space age to be our tools. The realization of training transfer to the high degree required will come with the further development of simulation environment, instrument presentation, motion systems with 6 degrees of freedom for “g” force inputs, and real world visual presentation. Many of these are already realized; the rest are in advanced development stages.
1967-01-31
Standard
AS439
This standard covers stall warning instruments to provide positive warning to the pilot of an impending stall. Stall, as defined for the purpose of this standard, is the minimum steady flight speed at which the airplane is controllable.
1967-01-01
Standard
ARP891
This recommended practice establishes a procedure for checking the tempers of aluminum alloys through eddy current conductivity measurements and defines criteria for acceptance or rejection.
1966-11-01
Standard
J575D_196611
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended as a guide toward standard practice and is subject to change to keep pace with experience and technical advances. This document provides standardized laboratory tests, test methods and equipment, and requirements for lighting devices covered by SAE Recommended Practices and Standards. It is intended for devices used on vehicles less than 2032 mm in width. Tests for vehicles larger than 2032 mm in overall width are covered in SAE J2139. Device specific tests and requirements can be found in applicable SAE technical reports.
1966-10-01
Standard
ARP907
This recommended practice covers the requirements and qualification tests for two types of flexible all-metal hose assemblies intended for hydraulic use on missile and rocket applications at rated pressures of 4000 psi. Type I -65° to +650°F service temperature range Type II -65° to +1000°F service temperature range
1966-09-30
Standard
AMS6372D
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of mechanical tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, 0.75 inch (19 mm) and under in section thickness at time of heat treatment, requiring a through-hardening steel capable of developing hardness as high as 40 HRC when properly hardened and tempered and for parts of greater thickness but requiring proportionately lower hardness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1966-09-01
Standard
AMS3159B
This specification covers a liquid oxygen compatible gas-leak deteching compound in the form of a liquid.
1966-09-01
Standard
J971_196609
The code provides test procedures and methods of calculating a brake rating from the data obtained for brakes used in highway commercial vehicles over 4.5 T (10 000 lbs) GVWR air and hydraulic. Some general correlation may be expected between brake ratings established by this means and those obtained from vehicle tests such as outlined in SAE J880. The brake rating power, kW (hp) calculated by conduct of this code is an arbitrary index of performance of the brake and drum when tested by this procedure and may be appreciably different from the values obtained by other techniques.
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