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Viewing 22231 to 22260 of 23597
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690509
F. S. Vukan, T. P. Kuebler
Tire strength and endurance are two basic tire qualities on which values have been set in various standards as a measure of their performance in actual service. This paper describes the pitfalls in the present methods of measurement and presents data to show the limitations of present equipment and methods.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690510
J. F. Hutchinson, H. D. Becker
A great amount of engineering and development work is under way at the present time on the important subject of tire traction, especially under wet surface conditions. Typical facilities used in the industry for traction testing of tires are described. Tests to date have shown that by far the most important variables affecting tire traction are: 1. Speed. 2. The road surface. 3. Weather conditions as they affect the road surface (wet, dry, icy). 4. The conditions of the tire, particularly whether it is new or worn to the tread wear indicators. By comparing test tires with production tires with known traction qualities, tire manufacturers produce tires which perform satisfactorily for wet traction.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690508
R. H. Spelman
It is necessary to establish separate test procedures that evaluate the many different performance parameters required of pneumatic tires. The ability to operate at high speeds is one of the more important requirements. This paper describes the physical properties needed for various high speed performance potentials. It also shows that, with a relationship established between laboratory and road, laboratory testing permits more accurate evaluation.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690643
F. H. Schubert
TRW, under NASA sponsorship, has developed a water electrolysis module (WEM) designed to provide 3.6 lb/day of oxygen at a current density of 100 amps/sq ft and at a pressure level of 80 psia. Although designed for aircraft application, the concepts employed in the design of the module make its use in other life support systems possible. One of the ten-cell water electrolysis modules fabricated, and designated as WEM No. 1, has been successfully operated for 7525 hr. These hours consist of 300 hr of parametric, 180 hr of cyclic, and 7045 hr of endurance testing, to date. The endurance test program is being conducted at a current density of 80 amps/sq ft, a temperature of 175 F, and a pressure level of 30 psia. This paper describes the cell and module configurations and the materials of construction selected. Results of the parametric and cyclic test programs are presented and cell performance and servicing and maintenance requirements discussed.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690784
J. R. Griffin
Laboratory engine testing for motor oil performance evaluation is a major element of the total cost of motor oil development. Rising test costs and more exacting performance requirements led to the introduction of automated equipment to achieve operational simplicity, better data, and lower costs. This paper describes the design and construction of an automated test stand which provides mechanical and operational reliability at lower cost.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690785
J. J. Gile, R. C. Hercules
This paper describes the application of an automatic control system to the Ford 5B test. A sequence timer and pneumatic controllers are used to accomplish more than 100 changes in engine speed, load, and temperatures throughout the 192 hr of test. Flexibility of the system, its cost, and maintenance are also discussed.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690727
Ronald W. Orme, Garn F. Penfold, Kenneth R. Thomas
A 16 channel, 5 mile range telemetry system has been constructed. This equipment can be easily adapted to a wide variety of vehicle measurement tasks. A modular signal conditioning concept has minimized the time required for initial setup on each measurement project. “Calibrating through” the system on all channels avoids some of the alignment pitfalls present in the day-to-day operation of a complex multichannel system.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690779
J. P. Frederick, P. R. Kahlenbeck
This paper presents the design philosophy and the technical capabilities of a new technical center built by Cummins Engine Co. The center was built primarily for development of diesel and similar engines, but also has broad capability for development of a variety of advanced power systems. The facility includes 88 instrumented test cells for testing power units up to 2000 hp under a complete range of environmental and special test conditions. Additional research laboratories support development activity and perform advanced studies in analytical techniques, materials development, and basic engine mechanisms.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690780
J. G. Huffman, A. W. Percy
An all-electric, weatherized chassis dynamometer has been built utilizing solid state control circuits. The facility allows operation up to 120 mph and can handle all passenger cars (front or rear wheel drive) and single drive axle truck units. Air conditioning allows operation from 40 F up with humidity control as well. Unique instrumentation allows digital readout of all important variables.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690781
T. M. Franklin
A new engine test facility constructed within an existing research complex is described. This paper discusses the structure and its architectural integration into the research center; the various utilities to service the facility; the ventilation system for personnel and test area; the engine stands for present and future test installations; the fuel handling system for laboratory tests; and instrumentation and control systems used in the engine test laboratory.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690782
S. E. Shields, W. M. Herring, E. J. Bourne
Computerized automation has been designed and installed on to two laboratory engine stands in a pilot project aimed at improving repeatability and efficiency of motor oil testing via ASTM MS sequence VB. Although testing experience is limited, practice of operating the stands automatically has been confirmed; compliance with test specifications has been tightened; and potentials for reducing operating and clerical support have been demonstrated. Impact on improving repeatability of engine deposits is still inconclusive. The computer-aided capabilities are proving highly useful in evaluating the adequacy of the test itself.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690783
Robert A. Otcasek
Accurate and timely recording of data is essential for the operation of an engine testing laboratory. A computerized automatic data acquisition system is described in detail. It is pointed out that setting up specifications and modes of operation for a system such as this are best arrived at by mutual discussions between the purchaser and supplier after the purchaser has gained a basic understanding of the operation and limitations of the equipment he is going to buy. System functions, operations, hardware, software, measurement methods, etc., are described. Measurement problems with solutions to these problems, along with operational experiences, use factor, operator acceptance and training over a 1-1/2 year period are presented. A closed loop system for automatically controlling the speed of an engine is illustrated.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690542
N. E. Cafarelli, R. J. Zanic
This paper presents the results of a survey made concerning modern test equipment as it is related to various fleet PM programs in the Chicago area. The survey explains how a profitable and satisfying fleet operation is made possible, from a maintenance standpoint, through the utilization of modern electronic test equipment and proper test procedures. Included are the areas of testing, types of test equipment needed, and fleet shop maintenance procedures.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690055
Gerhard H. Junker
The theory of self-loosening of preloaded bolted connections when subjected to vibration is discussed. The significance of self-loosening as a cause of failure is explained, and design guidance to avoid self-loosening is given. The test methods are described and discussed in connection with a newly designed testing machine that yields quantitative data for evaluating locking properties. These methods can be applied to all types of locking elements. Finally, a simplified method for broad scale testing and inspection is proposed.
1969-01-01
Standard
ARP1067A
ABSTRACT
1969-01-01
Standard
J843B_196901
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes a uniform procedure for the level road test of the brake systems of new light-duty trucks and new multipurpose passenger vehicles up to and including 2700 kg (6000 lb) GVW and all classes of new passenger cars. The purpose of the test code is to establish brake system capabilities with regard to: a. Deceleration versus input, as affected by vehicle speed, brake temperature, and usage; b. brake system integrity; c. Stopping ability during emergency or inoperative power assist conditions; d. Water recovery characteristics.
1969-01-01
Standard
J379_196901
Gogan hardness, a nondestructive (a penetrator causes shallow surface deformation) method of measuring compressibility, is used as a quality control check of the consistency of formulation and processing of brake lining. Gogan hardness alone shows nothing about a lining's ability to develop friction or to resist fade when used as a friction element in brakes. Gogan hardness varies with formulation, contour, and thickness of the lining. The Gogan hardness and the range of Gogan hardness are peculiar to each formulation, thickness, and contour and, therefore, the acceptable values or range must be established for each formulation and part configuration by the manufacturer.
1968-12-15
Standard
ARP794
This Aerospace Recommended Practice recommends the industry standards for an Airstream Deviation Instrument primarily for use with turbine-powered, subsonic transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in this report.
1968-12-01
Standard
AIR1054
1.1 Increasing attention is being given to measuring trainee performance in synthetic training devices, as evidenced by the recent Air Force, NTDC, and NASA-sponsored efforts in this area cited in the bibliography. A fair summary of well-informed opinions in this area would be: a) Such measurement can be most useful (see par 2). b) Subjective measures, such as the traditional instructor ratings, do not meet the current requirements for reliable, valid, and practical measurement. c) Synthetic training equipment, especially of the digital variety, makes feasible the achievement of needed measures more expeditiously than in operational equipment. 1.2 This report intends to acquaint the non-technical reader with the potentialities and limitations of measuring trainee performance in synthetic training devices, and outline the steps needed to achieve these measures.
1968-12-01
Standard
AIR1054A
1.1 Increasing attention is being given to measuring trainee performance in synthetic training devices, as evidenced by the recent Air Force, NTDC, and NASA-sponsored efforts in this area cited in the bibliography. A fair summary of well-informed opinions in this area would be: a) Such measurement can be most useful (see par 2). b) Subjective measures, such as the traditional instructor ratings, do not meet the current requirements for reliable, valid, and practical measurement. c) Synthetic training equipment, especially of the digital variety, makes feasible the achievement of needed measures more expeditiously than in operational equipment. 1.2 This report intends to acquaint the non-technical reader with the potentialities and limitations of measuring trainee performance in synthetic training devices, and outline the steps needed to achieve these measures.
1968-11-01
Standard
ARP1048
The desired system for general aviation aircraft instrument panel and cockpit lighting should furnish light of adequate intensity and distribution under all conditions of external illumination so that the crew may read instrumentation, placards, check lists, manuals, maps, instrument color coding, and distinguish controls without undue interference with their vision outside of the aircraft. Heretofore, considerable effort has been made to insure night vision adaptation at all costs. Efforts to maintain this adaptation have been based on certain military requirements, night flight involving pilotage and takeoffs or landings using only moonlight or less light intensity. With present navigational methods, adequate airport lighting and aircraft landing lights, night vision adaptation is rarely necessary.
1968-11-01
Standard
AMS3623
null, null
This specification covers an irradiated, thermally-stabilized, flame-resistant modified-polychloroprene rubber in the form of thin-wall tubing. This tubing has been used typically as a flexible, electrical insulation tubing whose diameter can be reduced to a predetermined size by heating to 135 degrees C (275 degrees F) or higher, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1968-11-01
Standard
AMS3625
null, null
This specification covers an irradiated, thermally-stabilized, flame-resistant, modified silicone rubber in the form of heat shrinkable tubing. Primarily for use as a flexible, electrical insulation tubing whose diameter can be reduced to a predetermined size by heating to 175 degrees C (347 degrees F) or higher. This tubing is stable under the following conditions: -70 to +180 degrees C (-94 to +356 degrees F) Continuous; -70 to +300 degrees C (-94 to +572 degrees F) 4 hours.
1968-11-01
Standard
AMS5837
This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc or gas-metal-arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar or dissimilar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.
1968-11-01
Standard
ARP986
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines test to be performed on hydraulically, electrically, pneumatically, and mechanically actuated air valves. They may be further defined as those values that function in response to externally applied forces or in response to variations in upstream and/or downstream duct air conditions in order to maintain a calibrated duct air condition (e.g., air flow, air pressure, air temperature, air pressure ratio, or air shutoff). The purpose of this ARP is to provide the aircraft industry with a guide for laboratory qualification testing of aircraft air valves.
1968-10-01
Standard
AIR999
For several years there has been increasing demand for self-contained, light-weight electrical and hydraulic power systems for various missile and other aerospace vehicle applications. This Aerospace Information Report intends to discuss one particular category known as Cryogenically Fueled Dynamic Power Systems. In this report, "Cryogenically Fueled Dynamic Power Systems" include all open cycle, chemically fueled, dynamic engine power systems which utilize cryogenic fuels and oxidizers. For nearly all practical present day systems, this category is limited to cryogenic hydrogen or hydrogen-oxygen fueled cycles with potential in future, more advanced systems for replacement of oxygen by fluorine. Excluded from the category are static cryogenic systems (e.g., fuel cells) and chemical dynamic power systems which utilize earth storable propellants.
1968-10-01
Standard
AS968
No scope available.
1968-10-01
Standard
ARP920
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) covers the design and installation requirements for pitot-static systems. The purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice is to present recommendations for the design and installation of pitot and static systems for transport type aircraft. This document also makes recommendations for several system configurations and sets forth the acceptable quality control requirements and the means by which they are to be controlled.
1968-09-01
Standard
J360_196809
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes methods to determine grade parking performance with respect to: a. Ability of the parking brake system to lock the braked wheels. b. The vehicle holding or sliding on the grade, fully loaded or unloaded. c. Applied manual effort. d. Unburnished or burnished brake lining friction conditions. e. Down and up grade directions.
1968-08-01
Standard
J551A_196808
This SAE Standard covers the measurement of broadband electromagnetic radiation over the frequency range of 30 to 1000 MHz from a vehicle or other device powered by an internal combustion engine or electric motor. Operation of all engines (main and auxiliary) of a vehicle or device is included. All equipment normally operating when the engine is running is also included except operator-controlled equipment, which is excluded. The recommended level applies only to complete vehicles or devices in their final manufactured form. Vehicle mounted rectifiers used for battery charging in electric vehicles are included in this document when operated in their charging mode.
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