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1969-10-01
Standard
AS968A
No scope available.
1969-10-01
Standard
AS972A
No scope available.
1969-09-01
Magazine
1969-09-01
Standard
AS930
No scope available.
1969-08-01
Magazine
1969-07-01
Standard
J108_196907
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes a uniform procedure for the level road test of the brake systems of all classes of motorcycles intended for highway use.
1969-05-19
Technical Paper
690524
ALLAN P. WHITTEMORE
This paper is concerned with the measurement and prediction of dynamic tire/road interface forces of heavy trucks. The development of equipment to provide continuous, accurate measurement of these forces is discussed. Pavement loads of three test vehicle sunder a variety of speed, load, and road conditions were measured. A time-domain analog simulation technique for predicting dynamic pavement loads based on measured road profiles and known vehicle characteristics is discussed. The simulation was also used to indicate the relative importance of vehicle parameters on dynamic pavement loading.
1969-05-01
Standard
ARP1135
The purpose of this recommended practice is to provide recommendations for the design of a series of components which, when used as prescribed, will provide a wrench capable of producing up to 500,000 in.-lb of torque. This recommended practice covers the dimensions of an inside splined driver-wrench adapter, envelope of the housing-wrench reaction, the mechanical method of adapting the driver-wrench adapter to the wrench adapter driven end, and the housing-wrench reaction to the holder-counter torque.
1969-05-01
Magazine
1969-05-01
Standard
AMS2645G
This specification has been declared 'SUPERSEDED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of February 1995. The requirements of this specification are embodied in the latest issue of ASTM E 1417.
1969-05-01
Standard
AMS2646B
Detection of discontinuities such as cracks, laps, porosity, cold shuts, lack of bond, and similar defects. Because inspection can be performed in normal light, this method can be used when fluorescent penetrant inspection is impracticable.
1969-05-01
Standard
AMS2640H
This specification has been declared 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division SAE, as of April 1996. and has been superseded ASTM E 1444.
1969-05-01
Standard
AMS2370
null, null
This specification covers quality assurance sampling and testing procedures used to determine conformance to applicable specification requirements of wrought carbon and low-alloy steel products and of forging stock.
1969-04-01
Standard
ARP1109
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) recommends performance requirements for test equipment used in dynamic testing of aviation oxygen breathing equipment. This document describes test equipment and methods used for testing continuous flow, demand and pressure demand regulators and their associated masks as well as filtered protective breathing devices; such articles of oxygen breathing or protective breathing equipment may be tested as individual components or as a complete system.
1969-04-01
Magazine
1969-04-01
Standard
ARP1070
This document recommends minimum requirements for antiskid brake control to provide total aircraft systems compatibility. Design and operational goals, general theory, and functions, which should be considered by the aircraft brake system engineer to attain the most effective skid control performance, are covered in detail. Methods of determining and evaluating antiskid system performance are discussed. While this document specifically addresses antiskid systems which are a part of a hydraulically actuated brake system, the recommended practices are equally applicable to brakes actuated by other means, such as electrically actuated brakes.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690803
Leonard M. Cook, Raymond G. Rieser, Arnold W. Siegel, Alan M. Nahum
Abstract By duplication of glass fracture patterns, the feasibility of relating 22 lb headform impacts to head injuries sustained by occupants contacting the windshield in crashed vehicles has been established. For each suitable windshield sample selected from available 1966 to 1969 crashed automobiles, a vehicle analysis was performed. The unbroken sections of 33 selected windshields were subjected to dynamic loads using the 22 lb portable headform. This portable device mounted in a van is described. At impact, the deceleration and velocity were measured and lacerations rated on the basis of damage to simulated tissue and moist chamois. Achievement of duplication between headform and occupant head impacts permits a numerical assessment of windshield lacerative injuries and presents a tentative method for future programs involving correlation between laboratory and service performance.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690760
F. G. Schwartz, C. S. Allbright, C. C. Ward
A test procedure and correlations were developed for predicting the amounts of gum and lead precipitate that will form in a gasoline during storage for periods up to 32 weeks at 110 F. The amounts of gum and lead precipitate formed in 24 commercial and military gasolines during a 16-hr oven test at 200 F were compared with the amounts formed in the same gasolines stored at 110 F and analyzed following 8-, 16-, and 32-week storage periods. A direct relationship was found between the amounts of lead precipitate formed during the oven test and those formed during long-term storage. The gum relationship, however, needed adjusting in proportion to the amount of oxygen consumed in the gum-forming reaction. The storage performance of gasoline at temperatures below 110 F for periods as long as 5 years can be estimated with a modified Arrhenius equation which is presented.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690758
A. A. Johnston, L. L. Stavinoha
The tendency of motor gasolines to form deposits on the intake valve and port surfaces of spark-ignition engines can be evaluated by a bench apparatus developed for the U.S. Army. The apparatus consists of a carbureted fuel-air system which sprays the test fluid on a heated deposit collecting tube at a 2.0 ml/minute rate. Combat gasoline (MIL-G-3056C), commercial (or VV-G-76) gasolines, and special solvents can be evaluated, using a sample volume of 150 ml. The results obtained by this technique have been correlated with data obtained during a military vehicle fleet test. The procedure has also been used to study effects of gasoline additives, storage conditions, and storage duration on fuel degradation, and as an aid in the development of deterioration predictive tests. The results of a round-robin tests for reproducibility initiated at Army petroleum testing laboratories within the United States, are provided.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690775
B. W. Turnquest, P. G. Culliney, R. J. Danehy, R. D. Fullman
A pin and disc machine has been modified for the evaluation of silver-steel lubrication characteristics of railroad diesel oils. Use of silver pins on polished steel discs at selected loads and rubbing speeds allows good correlation with known engine behavior. In comparison with wear and friction data obtained by the four ball method, this pin and disc test gives better correlation with engine tests than the Modified Four Ball Test.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690777
Robert Bee Lewis
The outstanding dry friction characteristics of Teflon TFE can be imparted to a variety of filled and reinforced compositions, many of which offer superior unlubricated wear performance. A logical extension is the application of filled TFE as marginally lubricated or thin film lubricated bearings. Under conditions of very thin film lubrication, some filled compositions of Teflon outperform conventional materials, such as babbitt and bronze. Guidelines for using filled compositions of Teflon with water lubrication are explored. Comparative test results are examined in light of theoretical relationships between thin film lubricated friction and wear performance.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690057
H. W. Ellison, G. L. Van Ermen
One of the functions of the Fastener Technical Section at GM Engineering Staff is to investigate the basic variables which affect fastener torque-tension relationships. The primary tool used for these investigations is the FTS Torque-Tension Test Machine. This machine has the capability of applying and measuring the torque to tighten, the resulting tension, the shank torque in the bolt, the number of degrees of rotation, and driver speed and air line pressure. In typical torque-tension testing, the tension in the fastener, the total tightening torque, and the torque in the bolt shank are measured using strain gaged load cells. In order to minimize test, and particularly, data reduction and analysis time, a computerized recording system is used. As a test is run, electrical signals from the load cells are stored and then automatically read into an IBM 1800 computer.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690049
Raymond A. Cellitti, Clarence J. Carter
An automatic computerized ultrasonic cleanliness rating system for measuring nonmetallic inclusion content of semifinished materials such as steel billets is described and discussed with regard to its function and reliability. Correlative studies relating inclusion areas as measured by light microscopy and magnetic particle inspection were within reasonable agreement with inclusion areas assessed ultrasonically. To further provide design engineers with material quality acceptance standards that are related to mechanical behavior, mechanical tests were performed on high strength (280 ksi ultimate) steel exemplifying various ultrasonic cleanliness levels. A significant impairment in ductility (percent reduction of area) is encountered with increasing ultrasonic inclusion severity. Uniaxial fatigue under unidirectional and reversed loading conditions is markedly influenced in proportion to the ultrasonic signature number.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690051
R. M. Grant, G. M. Brown
Holographic interferometry -- a unique and versatile new method of nondestructive testing (HNDT) -- is now available for industrial design and quality-control purposes. Coherent laser light is used in recording and reconstructing three-dimensional images and interference fringe patterns. HNDT can quickly, accurately, and reliably detect hidden flaws in tires, rubber-to-metal bonds, metal-to-metal bonds, and other objects of interest to automotive engineers responsible for design and testing. Through mild stressing (heat, pressure, creep, vacuum, vibration, etc.) of the test object, well below its elastic limit, subsurface anomalies are manifested in the form of minute surface displacements. These displacements, as small as a few microinches, are easily apparent in holographic interferograms, clearly indicating the location, size, and shape of a variety of common anomalies.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690225
Donald G. Koepsell
Advances in computer design and applications have brought about an increased use of electronic transmission systems for conveying information. Discussed in this paper are the components of the system (terminals, channels, multiplexor, computers). Data communications applications are of two major types - intraplant and interplant. Examples of the former are data collection, quality control, assembly line broadcase, process control, and conversation programming. Examples of interplant communications are order entry, scheduling, and remote job processing. Each of these applications is discussed in detail.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690212
F. Beckley Smith, W. A. P. Meyer, R. U. Ayres
Characterization of a vehicular driving cycle in terms of a joint density function for three variables -- vehicle acceleration, vehicle speed, and road gradient -- is presented. Application of this density function to determine the energy requirements associated with propelling a vehicle around a 47-mile city-suburban driving cycle is demonstrated.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690227
Roger Wellington
Engine development entails about equal measures of performance testing and durability, or life testing. The differing requirements of these two types of testing have resulted in separate data acquisition systems. For performance work the system design reflects the needs for flexibility, accuracy, considerable calculation of data, and for the printing and plotting of results. For a durability facility, where the output is test hours instead of data, the data system design stresses test monitoring and control. This system has not yet gone on line, although a hand wired system has been in service for ten years.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690181
John W. Alyea, O. A. Uyehara, P. S. Myers
A complete electronic system for accurately and continuously measuring the indicated power of a reciprocating engine is presented in this paper. This includes an analog switching technique for separating the pumping power of a four-stroke cycle engine from the net cycle output. An analysis and evaluation of the individual components and circuits composing the complete instrument is made to determine the accuracy and limitations of the system and techniques used. The measurement of cylinder pressure, the weakest link in the entire system, is analyzed in detail to determine the pressure measuring requirements for the measurement of indicated power and the ability of some commercially available analog pressure transducers to meet these requirements. Data from a single cylinder, CFR, spark ignition engine are presented and used both as a means of evaluating the instrument and pressure transducers as well as to supply information on engine friction.
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