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Standard
2014-01-14
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is intended to provide guidelines to tightening methods and torque values as applied to electrical connectors, related hardware and switches, relays, circuit breakers and A-A-59125 type terminal boards. The connectors and associated hardware discussed herein, are typically manufactured from aluminum alloy, high grade engineering thermoplastics or corrosion resistant steel and typically plated with a protective/conductive coating. These guidelines may be used where no rules have been mandated either contractually or otherwise.
Standard
2014-01-14
This section presents the basic equations for computing ice protection requirements for nontransparent and transparent surfaces and for fog and frost protection of windshields. Simplified graphical presentations suitable for preliminary design and a description of various types of ice, fog, frost, and rain protection systems are also presented.
WIP Standard
2014-01-13
This document establishes standard gland dimensions for low pressure static radial O-ring seal applications and provides recommendations for modifying these glands in special applications. No provisions are made in this document for anti-extrusion devices. The purpose of this document is to provide the aerospace industry with standardized dimensional criteria for static radial elastomeric O-ring seal glands for a service pressure of 800 psi maximu. This document supplements ARP1231.
WIP Standard
2014-01-13
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS)/Minimum Operational Performance Specification (MOPS) specifies the minimum performance requirements of Remote On-Ground Ice Detection Systems (ROGIDS). These systems are ground-based. They provide information that indicates whether frozen contamination is present on aircraft surfaces.
WIP Standard
2014-01-13
No scope available.
Standard
2014-01-10
This SAE Standard has been adopted to provide a basis for dynamometer determination of gross engine power and torque under reference conditions. It is intended for use primarily by engine manufacturers who supply engines for installation by others in applications where the engine manufacturer may not control the induction and exhaust system design or the speed at which the engine is run.
Standard
2014-01-09
Scope is unavailable.
Standard
2014-01-07
This document covers the general recommendations for cabin lighting in order to provide satisfactory illumination for, but not limited to: a. Boarding and deplaning b. Movement about the cabin c. Reading d. Use of lavatories e. Use of work areas f. Using stowage compartments, coat rooms, and closets g. Using interior stairways and elevators (lifts)
Standard
2014-01-07
This specification covers the installation of aircraft interior lighting for military aircraft.
Standard
2014-01-03
Scope is unavailable.
Standard
2014-01-03
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) establishes guidance for the specification of formulated lubricant properties which contribute to the lubricating function in bearings, gears, clutches and seals of aviation propulsion and drive systems.
Standard
2014-01-03
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides performance station designation and nomenclature systems for aircraft propulsion systems and their derivatives. The systems presented herein are for use in all communications concerning propulsion system performance such as computer programs, data reduction, design activities, and published documents. They are intended to facilitate calculations by the program user without unduly restricting the method of calculation used by the program supplier. The list of symbols presented herein will be used for identification of input and output parameters. These symbols are not required to be used as internal parameter names within the engine subprogram.
Standard
2014-01-03
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the general requirements for and the listing of manufacturers identification that appear on electrical/electronic wiring devices and accessories as required by individual product specifications. Supplier markings from previous submitted listings are maintained for component traceability.
Standard
2014-01-02
This method is designed to evaluate the coking propensity of synthetic ester-based aviation lubricants under single phase flow conditions found in certain parts of gas turbine engines, for instance in bearing feed tubes. This method is applicable to lubricants with a coking propensity, as determined by this method, falling in the range 0.01 to 3.00 mg.
Book
2014-01-01
James E. Duffy
Modern Automotive Technology details the construction, operation, diagnosis, service, and repair of late-model automobiles and light trucks. This comprehensive book uses a building-block approach that starts with the fundamental principles of system operation and progresses gradually to complex diagnostic and service procedures. Short sentences, concise definitions, and thousands of color illustrations help readers learn quickly and easily. The new edition of Modern Automotive Technology provides coverage of the latest developments in the automotive field and is correlated to the 2012 NATEF Task List. A new Fundamentals of Electricity and Electronics section provides the background needed to troubleshoot and repair the complex electrical/electronic systems found on today’s vehicles. Updated information on hybrid drive systems has been integrated throughout the book, and a new hybrid drive system service chapter details the diagnosis and repair of these important systems.
Technical Paper
2013-12-20
Matthew Spencer, Timothy Shepherd, Richard Greenwood, Mark Simmons
In the development of a more accurate laboratory scale method, the ability to replicate the thermal oxidative degradation mechanisms seen in gas turbine lubricants, is an essential requirement. This work describes an investigation into the influence of key reaction parameters and the equipment set up upon extent and mechanism of oil degradation. The air flow rate through the equipment was found to be critical to both degradation rate and extent of volatilization loss from the system. As these volatile species can participate in further reactions, it is important that the extent to which they are allowed to leave the test system is matched, where possible, to the conditions in the gas turbine. The presence of metal specimens was shown to have a small influence on the rate of degradation of the lubricant. Loss of metal from the copper and silver specimens due to the mild corrosive effect of the lubricant was seen. The Total Acid Number and viscosity of a series of oil samples from two service gas turbines are discussed.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 22272

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