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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kevin R. Cooper, Miroslav Mokry
Abstract The solid-wall wind tunnel boundary correction method outlined in this paper is an efficient pressure-signature method that requires few wall-mounted pressures. These pressures are used to determine the strengths of model- and wake-representing singularities that are used with the method of images to calculate the longitudinal and lateral velocity increments induced by the wind tunnel walls. Two force correction models are presented that convert these velocity increments to force and moment corrections. The performances of the correction procedures are demonstrated by their application to data from two sets of four, geometrically identical, differently sized, simplified automotive models.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daichi Katoh, Kensuke Koremoto, Munetsugu Kaneko, Yoshimitsu Hashizume
An air-dam spoiler is commonly used to reduce aerodynamic drag in production vehicles. However, it inexplicably tends to show different performances between wind tunnel and coast-down tests. Neither the reason nor the mechanism has been clarified. We previously reported that an air-dam spoiler contributed to a change in the wake structure behind a vehicle. In this study, to clarify the mechanism, we investigated the coefficient of aerodynamic drag CD reduction effect, wake structure, and underflow under different boundary layer conditions by conducting wind tunnel tests with a rolling road system and constant speed on-road tests. We found that the air-dam spoiler changed the wake structure by deceleration of the underflow under stationary floor conditions. Accordingly, the base pressure was recovered by approximately 30% and, the CD value reduction effect was approximately 10%. The ratio of the base pressure recovery to the CD value reduction effect was approximately 90%, suggesting that the main mechanism is the base pressure recovery produced by changing the wake structure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Pierre-Olivier Santacreu, Laurent Faivre, Antoine Acher
Thermal fatigue of austenitic and ferritic stainless steel grades has been experimentally and numerically investigated. A special test has been developed to determine the thermal fatigue resistance of clamped V-shaped specimens. This test permits to impose thermal cycle by alternating resistance heating and air cooling. The thermal fatigue life of a specimen is expressed as the number of cycles to failure. For a given grade, the fatigue life depends on the maximal and minimal temperature of the cycle, holding time at the maximal temperature and specimen thickness. The advantage of this V-shape test is that it is a simple procedure quite representative of the thermal fatigue process occurring in an exhaust manifold. This test is well suited to perform a study of damage mechanisms and to compare stainless steel grades. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that cracks could be mainly attributed to out-of-phase (OP) thermal fatigue process especially in case of ferritic grades. For austenitic steels (AISI304 EN1.4301, AISI321 EN1.4541 or AISI308 EN1.4828) at a critical temperature or above, an in-phase (IP) thermal fatigue mechanism is coupled with oxidation and creep, which are further significantly reducing the lifetime.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gerhard Wickern
Abstract Open jet wind tunnels are normally tuned to measure “correct” results without any modifications to the raw data. This is an important difference to closed wall wind tunnels, which usually require wind tunnel corrections. The tuning of open jet facilities is typically done experimentally using pilot tunnels and adding final adjustments in the commissioning phase of the full scale tunnel. This approach lacked theoretical background in the past. There is still a common belief outside the small group of people designing and using open jet wind tunnels, that - similar to closed wind tunnels, which generally measure too high aerodynamic forces and moments without correction - open jet wind tunnels measure coefficient too low compared to the real world. The paper will try to show that there is a solid physical foundation underlying the experimental approach and that the expectation to receive self-correcting behavior can be supported by theoretical models. During the past years an improved understanding of test section interference in open jet wind tunnels has been developed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Oliver Mankowski, David Sims-Williams, Robert Dominy
This paper outlines the creation of a facility for simulating on-road transients in a model scale, ¾ open jet, wind tunnel. Aerodynamic transients experienced on-road can be important in relation to a number of attributes including vehicle handling and aeroacoustics. The objective is to develop vehicles which are robust to the range of conditions that they will experience. In general it is cross wind transients that are of greatest significance for road vehicles. On-road transients include a range of length scales but the most important scales are in the in the 2-20 vehicle length range where there are significant levels of unsteadiness experienced, the admittance is likely to be high, and the reduced frequencies are in a band where a dynamic test is required to correctly determine vehicle response. Based on measurements of on-road conditions, the aim was for the turbulence generation system to achieve yaw angles up to 6-8°, equating to a lateral turbulence intensity of 8-10% with a frequency range extending up to 10 Hz.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dirk Wieser, Hanns-Joachim Schmidt, Stefan Müller, Christoph Strangfeld, Christian Nayeri, Christian Paschereit
The experimental investigation was conducted with a 25%-scaled realistic car model called “DrivAer” mounted in a wind tunnel. This model includes geometric elements of a BMW 3 series and an Audi A4, accommodating modular, rear-end geometries so that it represents a generalized modern production car. The measurements were done with two different DrivAer rear end configurations (fastback and notchback) at varying side-wind conditions and a Reynolds number of up to Re=3.2·106. An array of more than 300 pressure ports distributed over the entire rear section measured the temporal pressure distribution. Additionally, extensive flow visualizations were conducted. The combination of flow visualization, and spatially and temporally resolved surface pressure measurements enables a deep insight into the flow field characteristics and underlying mechanisms. Moreover, static pressure fluctuations indicate regions with a high turbulence level due to flow separation and interaction between different vortical structures.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sofie Koitrand, Lennart Lofdahl, Sven Rehnberg, Adrian Gaylard
Automotive aerodynamics measurements and simulations now routinely use a moving ground and rotating wheels (MVG&RW), which is more representative of on-road conditions than the fixed ground-fixed wheel (FG&FW) alternative. This can be understood as a combination of three elements: (a) moving ground (MVG), (b) rotating front wheels (RWF) and (c) rotating rear wheels (RWR). The interaction of these elements with the flow field has been explored to date by mainly experimental means. This paper presents a mainly computational (CFD) investigation of the effect of RWF and RWR, in combination with MVG, on the flow field around a saloon vehicle. The influence of MVG&RW is presented both in terms of a combined change from a FG&FW baseline and the incremental effects seen by the addition of each element separately. For this vehicle, noticeable decrease in both drag and rear lift is shown when adding MVG&RW, whereas front lift shows little change. The same trends are seen in both CFD and experimental data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Austin Hausmann, Christopher Depcik
This study investigates the practicality of vehicle coast down testing as a suitable replacement to moving floor wind tunnel experimentation. The recent implementation of full-scale moving floor wind tunnels is forcing a re-estimation of previous coefficient of drag determinations. Moreover, these wind tunnels are relatively expensive to build and operate and may not capture concepts such as linear and quadratic velocity dependency along with the influence of tire pressure on rolling resistance. As a result, the method elucidated here improves the accuracy of the fundamental vehicle modeling equations while remaining relatively affordable. The trends produced by incorporating on road test data into the model fit the values indicated by laboratory tests. This research chose equipment based on a balance between affordability and accuracy while illustrating that higher resolution frequency equipment would further enhance the model accuracy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bryan Randles, Daniel Voss, Isaac Ikram, Christopher Furbish, Judson Welcher, Thomas Szabo
Determination of vehicle speed at the time of impact is frequently an important factor in accident reconstruction. In many cases some evidence may indicate that the brake pedal of a striking vehicle was disengaged, and the vehicle was permitted to idle forward prior to impacting the target vehicle. This study was undertaken to analyze the kinematic response of various vehicles equipped with automatic transmissions while idling, with the transmissions in drive and the brake pedals disengaged. An array of sedans, SUV's and pickup trucks were tested under 3 roadway conditions (flat, medium slope and high slope). The vehicle responses are reported and mathematical relationships were developed to model the idle velocity profiles for flat and sloped roadway surfaces.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Olof Lindgarde, Rune Prytz
Abstract This paper presents an approach to fault detection and isolation that is based on off-board 1D simulation tools such as GT-power or AVL Boost. The proposed method enables engineers to develop diagnostic functions early on in a development project. The proposed algorithm is evaluated based on measurements from the air path system of the new Volvo FH truck. The results are encouraging. The paper discusses pros and cons of the method and concludes that it has clear potential to be used for on-board diagnostics.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tobias Schmidt, Shan Jin, Jens Rogalli, Thorsten Rogier, Hartmut Pohlheim, Ingo Stürmer
Requirements-based functional testing of model-based embedded software is a crucial requirement of the ISO 26262 safety standard for passenger cars [1]. Test assessment of requirements-based test cases is a laborious task and checking test results manually is prone to error. The intent of this paper is as follows: We introduce a method for requirements-based testing, which allows testing and automatic evaluation of single as well as several (grouped) requirements with one test sequence. Within a large-scale industrial project we have already shown that our new approach reduces testing expenditures and susceptibility to errors. Within this paper we shall present a method which facilitates the fulfillment of requirements traceability stipulated by ISO 26262. This method supports automated test case generation from test specifications, which then can be executed and assessed by a test tool automatically. The combination of these two methods in an efficient testing framework results in a significant reduction of testing expenditures and considerable increase in test coverage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Roger Bortolin, Matthew Arbour, James Hrycay
Abstract Whether large or small, a truck fleet operator has to know the locations of its vehicles in order to best manage its business. On a day to day basis loads need to be delivered or picked up from customers, and other activities such as vehicle maintenance or repairs have to be routinely accommodated. Some fleets use aftermarket electronic systems for keeping track of vehicle locations, driver hours of service and for wirelessly text messaging drivers via cellular or satellite networks. Such aftermarket systems include GPS (Global Positioning System) technology, which in part uses a network of satellites in orbit. This makes it possible for the fleet manager to remotely view the location of a vehicle and view a map of its past route. These systems can obtain data directly from vehicle sensors or from the vehicle network, and therefore report other information such as fuel economy. The fleet manager can receive alerts when high-level brake applications occur, which could be an indication of tailgating or aggressive driving behavior.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Derek R. Braden, David M. Harvey
Abstract There is a continual growth of test and validation in high reliability product applications such as automotive, military and avionics. Principally this is driven by the increased use and complexity of electronic systems deployed in vehicles, in addition to end user reliability expectations. Higher reliability expectations consequently driving increased test durations. Furthermore product development cycles continue to reduce, resulting in less available time to perform accelerated life tests. The challenge for automotive electronic suppliers is performing life tests in a shorter period of time whilst reducing the overall associated costs of validation testing. In this paper, the application of prognostic and health monitoring techniques are examined and a novel approach to the validation and testing of automotive electronics proposed which it is suggested may be more cost effective and efficient than traditional testing. The holistic method explored in this paper fuses real time test data obtained during the monitoring of products throughout an environmental exposure with key factors from manufacturing and product design.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Guerrero, Kapil Butala, Ravi Tangirala, Amy Klinkenberger
NHTSA has been investigating a new test mode in which a research moving deformable barrier (RMDB) impacts a stationary vehicle at 90.1 kph, a 15 degree angle, and a 35% vehicle overlap. The test utilizes the THOR NT with modification kit (THOR) dummy positioned in both the driver and passenger seats. This paper compares the behavior of the THOR and Hybrid III dummies during this oblique research test mode. A series of four full vehicle oblique impact crash tests were performed. Two tests were equipped with THOR dummies and two tests were equipped with Hybrid III dummies. All dummies represent 50th percentile males and were positioned in the vehicle according to the FMVSS208 procedure. The Hybrid III dummies were instrumented with the Nine Accelerometer Package (NAP) to calculate brain injury criteria (BrIC) as well as THOR-Lx lower legs. Injury responses were recorded for each dummy during the event. High speed cameras were used to capture vehicle and dummy kinematics. The vehicle restraint devices and their associated deployment times remained the same for each test.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
John May, Dirk Bosteels, Cecile Favre
From 1 September 2014 new car types in the EU must meet ‘Euro 6’ emissions requirements. The ‘New European Driving Cycle’ (NEDC) is currently the main test for this, but the European Commission intends to also introduce PEMS (Portable Emissions Measurement Systems)-based procedures to ensure that emissions are well controlled in real use. ‘Random Cycles’ have also been considered and remain a possible option for ‘real world’ particle number measurement. At the same time, the UN Working Party on Pollution and Energy (GRPE) has developed the new Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP) that is expected to be adopted in the EU in the near future. To identify and understand the differences in emissions that may arise between these various methodologies, AECC has conducted some initial tests on two modern light-duty vehicles. Chassis dynamometer emissions tests were conducted over the NEDC, the Common Artemis suite of test cycles (CADC), the new Worldwide Light-duty Test Cycle (WLTC - the test cycle for WLTP) and a set of cycles produced by a Random Cycle Generator based on ‘short trip’ segments from the EU database used to construct WLTC.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lokanath Mohanta, Suresh Iyer, Partha Mishra, David Klinikowski
Abstract This paper illustrates a method to determine the experimental uncertainties in the measurement of tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and particulates of medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles when tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer and full-scale dilution tunnel. Tests are performed for different chassis dynamometer driving cycles intended to simulate a wide range of operating conditions. Vehicle exhaust is diluted in the dilution tunnel by mixing with conditioned air. Samples are drawn through probes for raw exhaust, diluted exhaust and particulates and measured using laboratory grade emission analyzers and a microbalance. At the end of a driving cycle, results are reported for the above emissions in grams/mile for raw continuous, dilute continuous, dilute bag, and particulate measurements. An analytical method is developed in the present study to estimate the measurement uncertainties in emissions for a test cycle, due to the buildup of measurement uncertainties as they propagate through the system.
WIP Standard
2014-03-31
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides a method for gas turbine engine performance computer programs to be written using FORTRAN COMMON blocks. If a "function-call application program interface" (API) is to be used, then ARP4868 and ARP5571 are recommended as alternatives to that described in this document. When it is agreed between the program user and supplier that a particular program shall be supplied in FORTRAN, this document shall be used in conjunction with AS681 for steady-state and transient programs. This document also describes how to take advantage of the FORTRAN CHARACTER storage to extend the information interface between the calling program and the engine subroutine.
Standard
2014-03-31
This document provides design guidelines, test procedure references, and performance requirements for directional, single color, flashing optical warning devices used on authorized emergency, maintenance and service vehicles. It is intended to apply to, but not limited to, surface land vehicles.
Standard
2014-03-31
This recommended practice outlines a series of performance recommendations, which concern the whole data channel. These recommendations are not subject to any variation and all of them shall be adhered to by any agency conducting tests to this practice. However, the method of demonstrating compliance with the recommendations is flexible and can be adapted to suit the needs of the particular equipment the agency is using. It is not intended that each recommendation be taken in a literal sense, as necessitating a single test to demonstrate that the recommendation is met. Rather, it is intended that any agency proposing to conduct tests to this practice shall be able to demonstrate that if such a single test could be and were carried out, then their equipment would meet the recommendations. This demonstration shall be undertaken on the basis of reasonable deductions from evidence in their possession, such as the results of partial tests. In some systems it may be necessary to divide the whole channel into subsystems, for calibration and checking purposes.
WIP Standard
2014-03-26
1.1 This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides performance station designation and nomenclature systems for aircraft propulsion systems and their derivatives. 1.2 The parameter naming conventions presented herein are for use in all communications concerning propulsion system performance such as computer programs, data reduction, design activities, and published documents. They are intended to facilitate calculations by the program user without unduly restricting the method of calculation used by the program supplier. 1.3 The list of symbols presented herein will be used for identification of input and output parameters. These symbols are not required to be used as internal parameter names within the engine subprogram
WIP Standard
2014-03-26
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides performance station designation and nomenclature systems for aircraft propulsion systems and their derivatives. The systems presented herein are for use in all communications concerning propulsion system performance such as computer programs, data reduction, design activities, and published documents. They are intended to facilitate calculations by the program user without unduly restricting the method of calculation used by the program supplier. The list of symbols presented herein will be used for identification of input and output parameters. These symbols are not required to be used as internal parameter names within the engine subprogram.
Standard
2014-03-25
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes the requirements for self-aligning, self-lubricating plain spherical bearings incorporating polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in a liner between the ball and the outer race for use in a temperature range of -65 to +250 °F (-54 to +121 °C).
WIP Standard
2014-03-25
Various SAE vehicle sound level measurement procedures require use of a sound level meter which meets the Type 1 or Type 2 requirements of ANSI S1.4-1983 (see 2.1.1.1), or an alternative system which can be proved to provide equivalent test data. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide a procedure for determining if a sound data acquisition system (SDAS) has electro-acoustical performance equivalent to such a meter. By assuring equivalent performance of the test instrumentation, the equivalence of test data is assured. Two general configurations of sound data acquisition systems will be encompassed (see Figure 1). The first configuration consists of instrument sections which perform as a sound level meter. The second configuration is a system which records data for later processing. The intent of this document is to establish guidelines which permit the test engineer to insure equivalence of sound data acquisition systems to a sound level meter. It requires that the test engineer have a working knowledge of the characteristics of the sound data being measured.
WIP Standard
2014-03-25
This procedure provides for the measurement of the sound generated by a test tire, mounted on a single-axle trailer, operated at multiple speeds. The procedure describes test practices for both United States and International practices. Specifications for the instrumentation, the test site, and the operation of the test apparatus are set forth to minimize the effects of extraneous sound sources and to define the basis of reported sound levels.
WIP Standard
2014-03-18
This SAE Standard provides general, dimensional and performance specifications for the most common hoses used in hydraulic systems on mobile and stationary equipment. The general specifications contained in Sections 1 through 12 are applicable to all hydraulic hoses and supplement the detailed specifications for the 100R-series hoses contained in the later sections of this document. (See Tables 1A and 1B). This document shall be utilized as a procurement document only to the extent as agreed upon by the manufacturer and user. The maximum working pressure of a hose assembly comprising SAE J517 hose and hose connectors per SAE J516, SAE J518, SAE J1453, etc., shall not exceed the lower of the respective SAE maximum working pressure values. When using SAE J517 hose for marine applications, see SAE J1475, SAE J1942 and SAE J1942-1. The SAE J517 100R9, 100R10 and 100R11 hoses are discontinued due to lack of demand. For DOD orders see Appendix C. The SAE J517 100R1A, 100R2A, 100R2B and 100R 2BT are discontinued due to lack of demand.
WIP Standard
2014-03-18
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for testing of manual slack adjusters as they are used in service, emergency, or parking brake systems for vehicles that can be licensed for on-road use. Purpose This document establishes an accelerated laboratory test procedure for manual slack adjusters to determine their integrity and durability in various functional modes and environmental conditions.
WIP Standard
2014-03-17
This specification establishes the requirements for various types and colors of electrical insulating sleeving that will shrink to a predetermined size upon the application of heat. This specification includes provisions for demonstrating compliance with qualification by certification requirements (see 4. and 7.6), in process inspection, and statistical process control inspections (See 4.4). The continuous operating temperature ratings range from -112 °F to +482 °F (-80 °C to +250 °C). The continuous operating temperature range for each sleeving class is given in the applicable detail specification.
WIP Standard
2014-03-17
This specification covers the general requirements for aircraft tank mounted, centrifugal type, fuel booster pumps, used for engine fuel feed and / or fuel transfer.
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