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Viewing 271 to 300 of 24159
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1614
Edward Duell, Amir Kharazi, Paul Nagle, Per Elofsson, David Söderblom, Christer Michael Ramden
Abstract Scania AB has opened the new CD7 climatic wind tunnel test facility, located at the Scania Technical Center in Södertälje, Sweden. This facility is designed for product development testing of heavy trucks and buses in a range of controllable environments. Having this unique test environment at the main development center enables Scania to test its vehicles in a controlled repeatable environment year round, improving lead times from design to production, producing higher quality and more reliable vehicles, and significantly improves the capability for large vehicle performance research. This state-of-the-art facility provides environmental conditions from -35°C to 50°C with humidity control from 5 to 95 percent. The 13 m2 nozzle wind tunnel can produce wind speeds up to 100 km/h. The dynamometer is rated at 800 kW for the rear axle and 150 kW for the front axle, which also has ±10° yaw capability.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0278
Philipp Bergmeir, Christof Nitsche, Jürgen Nonnast, Michael Bargende
Abstract In order to achieve high customer satisfaction and to avoid high warranty costs caused by component failures of the power-train of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), car manufacturers have to optimize the dimensioning of these elements. Hence, it is obligatory for them to gain knowledge about the different types of vehicle usage being predominant all over the world. Therefore, in this paper we present a Data Mining system that employs a Random Forest (RF) based dissimilarity measure in the dimensionality reduction technique t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE) to automatically identify and visualize different types of vehicle usage by applying these methods to aggregated logged on-board data, i.e., load spectrum data. This kind of data is calculated and recorded directly on the control units of the vehicles and consists of aggregated numerical data, like the histogram of the velocity signal or the traveled distance of a vehicle.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1310
Yitian Zhang, David W. Herrin, T. Wu, Xin Hua
Abstract Prior research on assessing multiple inlet and outlet mufflers is limited, and only recently have researchers begun to consider suitable metrics for multiple inlet and outlet mufflers. In this paper, transmission loss and insertion loss are defined for multiple inlet and outlet mufflers using a superposition method that can be extended to any m-inlet n-outlet muffler. Transmission loss is determined assuming that the sources and terminations are anechoic. On the other hand, insertion loss considers reflections. For both metrics, the amplitude and phase relationship between the sources should be known a priori. This paper explains both metrics, and measurement of transmission and insertion loss are demonstrated for a 2-inlet 2-outlet muffler with good agreement.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1191
Saher Al Shakhshir, Torsten Berning
Abstract Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste heat. One critical technical problem of these fuel cells is still the water management: the proton exchange membrane in the center of these fuel cells has to be hydrated in order to stay proton-conductive while on the other hand excessive liquid water can lead to cell flooding and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1495
Motomi Iyoda, Tom Trisdale, Rini Sherony, Daniel Mikat, William Rose
Abstract An event data recorder (EDR) records the vehicle status at the timing of an accident. Toyota Motor Corporation began the sequential introduction of EDRs onto its vehicles from August 2000. Currently, about 70% of all Toyota’s vehicles in North America are equipped with an EDR, which is more than the average rate of EDR installation in vehicles in North America (around 50%). The U.S. has introduced regulations for EDRs. Toyota regards these as minimum requirements and also records additional data for accident analysis, including the following: (1) pre-crash data, (2) side crash data, (3) rollover data, (4) pedestrian protection pop-up hood (PUH) data, and (5) vehicle control history (VCH) data from a non-crash triggered recording system. The regulations stipulate that EDR data retrieval must be possible using a commercially available tool. The developed system uses the Crash Data Retrieval (CDR) tool manufactured by Bosch.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0459
Jian Zhao, Jing Su, Bing Zhu, Jingwei Shan
Abstract Proper tire pressure is very important for multiple driving performance of a car, and it is necessary to monitor and warn the abnormal tire pressure online. Indirect Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) monitors the tire pressure based on the wheel speed signals of Anti-lock Braking System (ABS). In this paper, an indirect TPMS method is proposed to estimate the tire pressure according to its resonance frequency of circumferential vibration. Firstly, the errors of ABS wheel speed sensor system caused by the machining tolerance of the tooth ring are estimated based on the measured wheel speed using Recursive Least Squares (RLS) algorithm and the measuring errors are eliminated from the wheel speed signal. Then, the data segments with drive train torsional vibration are found out and eliminated by the methods of correlation analysis.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0894
Kenji Matsumoto, Hironori Harada, Yuki Ono, Yuji Mihara
Abstract A simple method is frequently used to calculate a reciprocating engine’s bearing load from the measured cylinder pressure. However, it has become apparent that engine downsizing and weight reduction cannot be achieved easily if an engine is designed based on the simple method. Because of this, an actual load on a bearing was measured, and the measured load values were compared with a bearing load distribution calculated from cylinder pressure. As a result, it was found that some of actual loads were about half of the calculated ones at certain crank angles. The connecting rod’s elastic deformation was focused on as a factor behind such differences, and the rod’s deformation due to the engine’s explosion load was studied. As a result, it was found that the rod part of the engine’s connecting rod was bent by 0.2 mm and became doglegged. Additional investigation regarding these findings would allow further engine downsizing.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0889
Chuang Fan, Sunyu Tong, Xiaohong Xu, Jing Li, Xiao Yu He, Jun Deng, Liguang Li
Downsizing gasoline direct injection engine with turbo boost technology is the main trend for gasoline engine. However, with engine downsizing and ever increasing of power output, a new abnormal phenomenon, known as pre-ignition or super knock, occurs in turbocharged engines. Pre-ignition will cause very high in-cylinder pressure and high oscillations. In some circumstances, one cycle of severe pre-ignition may damage the piston or spark plug, which has a severe influence on engine performance and service life. So pre-ignition has raised lots of attention in both industry and academic society. More and more studies reveal that the auto-ignition of lubricants is the potential source for pre-ignition. The auto-ignition characteristics of different lubricants are studied. This paper focuses on the ignition delay of different lubricants in Controllable Active Thermo-Atmosphere (CATA) combustion system.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0896
Masami Ishikawa, Kazuo Yamamori, Satoshi Hirano, Teri Kowalski, James Linden
Abstract Fuel economy improvement has been one of the most important challenges for the automotive industry, and the oil and additive industries. The automotive, oil, and additive industries including related organizations such as SAE, ASTM, and testing laboratories have made significant efforts to develop not only engine oil technologies but also engine oil standards over decades. The API S category and ILSAC engine oil standard are well known and widely used engine oil specifications [1] [2]. The development of an engine oil standard has important roles to ensure the quality of engine oils in the market and encourage industries to improve the engine oil performance periodically. However, the progress of technology advancement can go faster than the revision of engine oil standard. An introduction of new viscosity grades, SAE 0W-16 and 5W-16 is one good example. The 16 grade was added into the SAE J300 standard that defines viscosity grades for engine oils in April 2013 [3].
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0908
Norifumi Mizushima, Kyohei Yamaguchi, Daisuke Kawano, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii
Abstract In the conventional approval test method of fuel consumption for heavy-duty diesel vehicles currently in use in Japan, the fuel consumption under the transient test cycle is calculated by integrating the instantaneous fuel consumption rate referred from a look-up table of fuel consumptions measured under the steady state conditions of the engine. Therefore, the transient engine performance is not considered in this conventional method. In this study, a highly accurate test method for fuel consumption in which the map-based fuel consumption rate is corrected using the transient characteristics of individual engines was developed. The method and its applicability for a heavy-duty diesel engine that complied with the Japanese 2009 emission regulation were validated.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0959
Dhinesh Kumar, Ashwhanth Raju, Nitin Sheth, Steffen Digeser
Abstract The future emission regulation (BS V) in India is expected to create new challenges to meet the particulate matter (PM) limit for diesel cars. The upcoming emission norms will bring down the limit of PM by 80 % when compared to BS IV emission norms. The diesel particulate filter (DPF) is one of the promising technologies to achieve this emission target. The implementation of DPF system into Indian market poses challenges against fuel quality, driving cycles and warranty. Hence, it is necessary to do a detailed on-road evaluation of the DPF system with commercially available fuel under country specific drive cycles. Therefore, we conducted full vehicle durability testing with DPF system which is available in the European market to evaluate its robustness and reliability with BS III fuel (≤350ppm sulfur) & BS IV (≤50ppm sulfur) fuel under real Indian driving conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0957
Patrick Schrangl, Roman Schmied, Stephan Stadlbauer, Harald Waschl, Luigi del Re, Bernhard Ramsebner, Christoph Reiter
Abstract Abatement and control of emissions from passenger car combustion engines have been in the focus for a long time. Nevertheless, to address upcoming real-world driving emission targets, knowledge of current engine emissions is crucial. Still, adequate sensors for transient emissions are seldom available in production engines. One way to target this issue is by applying virtual sensors which utilize available sensor information in an engine control unit (ECU) and provide estimates of the not measured emissions. For real-world application it is important that the virtual sensor has low complexity and works under varying conditions. Naturally, the choice of suitable inputs from all available candidates will have a strong impact on these factors. In this work a method to set up virtual sensors by means of design of experiments (DOE) and iterative identification of polynomial models is augmented with a novel input candidate selection strategy.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0984
Venkatraman Mahadevan, Suresh Iyer, David Klinikowski
Abstract This paper proposes a method to recover species concentrations at the tail pipe exit of heavy-duty vehicles during chassis dynamometer tests, and investigates its effect in the calculation of emissions from their raw exhaust streams. It was found that the method shown in this paper recovered the sharp peaks of the gas species. The effect on calculations was significant, as time-variant raw exhaust flow rate and emissions concentrations data are acquired continuously during a test (at 10 Hz), and their product is integrated during calculations. The response of the analyzer is delayed due to the time taken for transport of the sample gases from the probe tip to the analyzer, and deformed due to mixing and diffusion during this transport. This ‘convolution’ of the concentration data stream introduces an error in the final result, calculated in g/mile.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0982
Philip Lawson, John Houldcroft, Andrew Neil, Andrea Balcombe, Richard Osborne, Antonio Ciriello, Wilhelm Graupner
Abstract A recent trend in powertrain development organisations has been to apply processes historically associated with manufacturing. The aim is to capitalise on the resulting productivity gains to contain the increasing test demand necessary to develop current and future product. Significant obstacles to the implementation of manufacturing derived methods include the lack of clarity of the engineering test requirements and existing working practices in the product development environment. The System Optimisation Approach has been presented in previous work as a potential solution [1]. As an extension, this paper introduces a new concept closely related to the established manufacturing principle of Process Capability (Cp). Application of the resulting method quantifies the test facility’s capability to provide a test result subject to a specified statistical confidence within a certain number of test repeats.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0578
Giuseppe Cicalese, Fabio Berni, Stefano Fontanesi
Abstract New SI engine generations are characterized by a simultaneous reduction of the engine displacement and an increase of the brake power; such targets are achieved through the adoption of several techniques such as turbocharging, direct fuel injection, variable valve timing and variable port lengths. This design approach, called “downsizing”, leads to a marked increase in the thermal loads acting on the engine components, in particular on those facing the combustion chamber. Hence, an accurate evaluation of the thermal field is of primary importance in order to avoid mechanical failures. Moreover, the correct evaluation of the temperature distribution improves the prediction of pointwise abnormal combustion onset.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0806
James Sevik, Michael Pamminger, Thomas Wallner, Riccardo Scarcelli, Ronald Reese, Asim Iqbal, Brad Boyer, Steven Wooldridge, Carrie Hall, Scott Miers
Abstract Interest in natural gas as a fuel for light-duty transportation has increased due to its domestic availability and lower cost relative to gasoline. Natural gas, comprised mainly of methane, has a higher knock resistance than gasoline making it advantageous for high load operation. However, the lower flame speeds of natural gas can cause ignitability issues at part-load operation leading to an increase in the initial flame development process. While port-fuel injection of natural gas can lead to a loss in power density due to the displacement of intake air, injecting natural gas directly into the cylinder can reduce such losses. A study was designed and performed to evaluate the potential of natural gas for use as a light-duty fuel. Steady-state baseline tests were performed on a single-cylinder research engine equipped for port-fuel injection of gasoline and natural gas, as well as centrally mounted direct injection of natural gas.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0639
Brian C. Kaul, Benjamin Lawler, Akram Zahdeh
Abstract Engine acoustics measured by microphones near the engine have been used in controlled laboratory settings for combustion feedback and even combustion phasing control, but the use of these techniques in a vehicle where many other noise sources exist is problematic. In this study, surface-mounted acoustic emissions sensors are embedded in the block of a 2.0L turbocharged GDI engine, and the signal is analyzed to identify useful feedback features. The use of acoustic emissions sensors, which have a very high frequency response and are commonly used for detecting material failures for health monitoring, including detecting gear pitting and ring scuffing on test stands, enables detection of acoustics both within the range of human hearing and in the ultrasonic spectrum. The high-speed acoustic time-domain data are synchronized with the crank-angle-domain combustion data to investigate the acoustic emissions response caused by various engine events.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0049
Jinwei Zhou, Roman Schmied, Alexander Sandalek, Helmut Kokal, Luigi del Re
Abstract Virtual testing of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) using a simulation environment provides great potential in reducing real world testing and therefore currently much effort is spent on the development of such tools. This work proposes a simulation and hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) framework, which helps to create a virtual test environment for ADAS based on real world test drive. The idea is to reproduce environmental conditions obtained on a test drive within a simulation environment. For this purpose, a production standard BMW 320d is equipped with a radar sensor to capture surrounding traffic objects and used as vehicle for test drives. Post processing of recorded GPS raw data from the navigation system using an open source map service and the radar data allows an exact reproduction of the driven road including other traffic participants.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0050
Huafeng Yu, Chung-Wei Lin, BaekGyu Kim
Abstract Modern vehicles can have millions of lines of software, for vehicle control, infotainment, etc. The correctness and quality of the software play a key role in the safety of whole vehicles. In order to assure the safety, engineers give an effort to prove correctness of individual subsystems or their integration using testing or verification methods. One needs to eventually certify that the developed vehicle as a whole is indeed safe using the artifacts and evidences produced throughout the development cycle. Such a certification process helps to increase the safety confidence of the developed software and reduce OEM’s liability. However, software certification in automotive domain is not yet well established, compared to other safety-critical domains, such as avionics and medical devices. At the same time, safety-relevant standards and techniques, including ISO 26262 and assurance cases, have been well adopted.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0102
Michael Ludwig, Martin Rieder, Marco Wolf
Abstract Due to regulations which limit the CO2 emission of passenger vehicles in the upcoming years, hybrid cars are becoming more and more important. In this paper different concepts of hybridization are discussed with a link to the properties of the electric machine behind these hybrid concepts. Upon the basis of a generalized principle of operation of an electric machine the influence of position and speed data, acquired by a rotary position sensor, is presented with a detailed analysis of various sensor concepts. Therefore the major products used nowadays are presented with a brief introduction to the underlying measurement principle. Additionally a new semiconductor-based sensor concept is introduced with high measurement accuracy and of small form factor.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1374
Julian Wiederer, Lukas Leitner, Christian Endisch, Hans Reiss
Abstract During series production of modern combustion engines a major challenge is to ensure the correct operation of every engine part. A common method is to test engines in end-of-line (EOL) cold test stations, where the engines are not fired but tugged by an electric motor. In this work we present a physically based 0D model for dynamic simulation of combustion engines under EOL test conditions. Our goals are the analysis of manufacturing faults regarding their detectability and the enhancement of test procedures under varying environmental conditions. Physical experiments are prohibitive in production environments, and the simulative approach reduces them to a minimum. This model is the first known to the authors exploring advanced engine test methods under production conditions. The model supports a wide range of manufacturing faults (with adjustable magnitude) as well as error-free production spread in engine components.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0192
Alaa El-Sharkawy, Ahmed Uddin
Abstract Engine mount is one of the temperature sensitive components in the vehicle under-hood. Due to increasing requirements for improved fuel economy, the under-hood thermal management has become very challenging in recent years. In order to study the effects of material thermal degradation on engine mount performance and durability; it is required to estimate the temperature of engine mount rubber during various driving conditions. The effect of temperature on physical properties of natural rubber can then be evaluated and the life of engine mount can be estimated. In this paper, a bench test is conducted where the engine mount is exposed to a step change in the environment around it, and the temperature of the rubber section is recorded at several points till a steady state temperature is reached. A time response curve is generated, from which a time constant is determined.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0373
Mohammadreza Eftekhari, Ali Fatemi, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh
Abstract An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the variable amplitude fatigue behavior of a neat polymer (polypropylene impact co-polymer) and a polymer composite made of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) with 30 wt% short glass fibers. Fatigue tests were conducted on un-notched and notched specimens at room temperatures. Plate-type specimens were prepared in the transverse direction with respect to the injection mold flow direction and a circular hole was drilled in the center of notched specimens. Two-step loadings (high-low and low-high) tests at two damage ratio of 0.2 and 0.5 at stress ratios of R = 0.1 and -1 were conducted to investigate load sequence effects and prediction accuracy of the linear damage rule. Different behaviors were observed for unreinforced and short glass fiber reinforced polymers under the two-step loading tests.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0371
Wenkai Li, Carlos Engler-Pinto, Haitao Cui, Weidong Wen, Xuming Su
Abstract In this paper, fatigue tests on a cast aluminum alloy (AS7GU-T64) were performed under different frequencies and humidity levels. Tests conducted under conventional frequency in laboratory air have been compared to tests conducted under ultrasonic frequency in dry air, saturated humidity and in distilled water. It was observed that the highest and lowest fatigue lives correspond to ultrasonic fatigue tests in dry air and in distilled water, respectively. Unlike specimens tested at conventional frequency, all of the specimens tested at ultrasonic frequency presented a large amount of slip facets on the fatigue crack propagation fracture surface.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0499
Xu Zhang, Jennifer Johrendt
Abstract Successful manufacture of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) by Long-Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastic (LFT) processes requires knowledge of the effect of numerous processing parameters such as temperature set-points, rotational machinery speeds, and matrix melt flow rates on the resulting material properties after the final compression moulding of the charge is complete. The degree to which the mechanical properties of the resulting material depend on these processing parameters is integral to the design of materials by any process, but the case study presented here highlights the manufacture of CFRP by LFT as a specific example. The material processing trials are part of the research performed by the International Composites Research Centre (ICRC) at the Fraunhofer Project Centre (FPC) located at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0128
Philip Koopman, Michael Wagner
Abstract Software testing is all too often simply a bug hunt rather than a well-considered exercise in ensuring quality. A more methodical approach than a simple cycle of system-level test-fail-patch-test will be required to deploy safe autonomous vehicles at scale. The ISO 26262 development V process sets up a framework that ties each type of testing to a corresponding design or requirement document, but presents challenges when adapted to deal with the sorts of novel testing problems that face autonomous vehicles. This paper identifies five major challenge areas in testing according to the V model for autonomous vehicles: driver out of the loop, complex requirements, non-deterministic algorithms, inductive learning algorithms, and fail-operational systems.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1543
Donald F. Tandy, Scott Hanba, Robert Pascarella
Abstract One important part of the vehicle design process is suspension design and tuning. This is typically performed by design engineers, experienced expert evaluators, and assistance from vehicle dynamics engineers and their computer simulation tools. Automotive suspensions have two primary functions: passenger and cargo isolation and vehicle control. Suspension design, kinematics, compliance, and damping, play a key role in those primary functions and impact a vehicles ride, handling, steering, and braking dynamics. The development and tuning of a vehicle kinematics, compliance, and damping characteristic is done by expert evaluators who perform a variety of on road evaluations under different loading configurations and on a variety of road surfaces. This “tuning” is done with a focus on meeting certain target characteristics for ride, handling, and steering One part of this process is the development and tuning of the damping characteristics of the shock absorbers.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AS6302A
This specification covers one type of fuel pressure transmitter designated MS28005-7.
2016-04-05
Standard
J1563_201604
These guidelines are intended for those engineers and scientists who evaluate the corrosion performance of painted automotive parts in laboratory cyclic tests. The guidelines are intended to help ensure that the results of the tests can be used to reach conclusions concerning the variables under study without being confounded by the test procedure itself. The guidelines also serve as a means to assist users of this type of test in obtaining good inter-laboratory agreement of results.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1088
Julio Carrera
Abstract The increasingly restrictive emission standards in the automotive industry require higher thermal requirements in the EGR loop in terms of gas mass flow, gas temperature and lower coolant flow rate. Also, their performance has to be sustained over a longer period of time. Therefore, thermal load for EGR components, especially EGR coolers, has been increased and thermal fatigue durability is now a critical issue during their development. One of the most challenging issues during product validation is to define a thermal fatigue test with the same field cumulative fatigue damage in order to guarantee durability during vehicle life. A new analytical procedure has been developed in order to define the equivalent thermal fatigue test which has the same cumulative damage as the real application in the field or to estimate durability in the field on the basis of a previous thermal fatigue test result.
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