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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Robert Golimbioschi, Giampiero Mastinu, Luca Cordioli, Massimiliano Gobbi, Davide Tagliabue, Giorgio Previati, Francesco Braga
Abstract A new electric powertrain and axle for light/medium trucks is presented. The indoor testing and the simulation of the dynamic behavior are performed. The powertrain and axle has been produced by Streparava and tested at the Laboratory for the Safety of Transport of the Politecnico di Milano. The tests were aimed at defining the multi-physics perfomance of the powertrain and axle (efficiency, acceleration and braking, temperature and NVH). The whole system for indoor tests was composed by the powertrain and axle (electric motor, driveline, suspensions, wheels) and by the test rig (drums, driveline and electric motor). The (driving) axle was positioned on a couple of drums, and the drums provided the proper torques to the wheels to reproduce acceleration and braking. Additionally a cleat fixed on one drum excited the vibration of the suspensions and allowed assessing NVH performance. The simulations were based on a special co-simulation between 1D-AMESIM and VIRTUAL.LAB. The contact between the wheels and the drums of the test rig were simulated by means of VIRTUAL.LAB.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ping Zhong, Kang Zhang, Xu Chen, Yunlong Shi, Lianxiang Yang
Abstract The assembling accuracy of two contactors during the relay switch production is an important factor affecting the quality of relay. An embedded machine vision quality Inspection system has been developed for electric relay production line inspection. The proposed system can provide online feedback on the quality of the relays by measuring the distance of the gap between the contacts of them. Two CMOS imaging sensors are operated for image acquisition and the parallel working mode is realized under dual-channel mode. A red light illumination system has been adopted to eliminate the imaging noise from the reflection of the surfaces of copper sheet. Before the test, the features areas in the image of same type relay is selected as template and saved in the computer. During the inspection procedure, a rotation invariance detection scheme based on circular projection matching algorithm has been used for fast recognizing and locating detected object with the help of these feature areas.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Massimiliano Gobbi, Giampiero Mastinu, Giorgio Previati
A method for the measurement of the full mass properties of vehicles and subsystems is presented. The knowledge of the center of gravity location and of the inertia tensor of vehicles and subsystems is fundamental for performing accurate dynamic simulations, ranging from handling to durability. The accurate estimation of the inertia tensor can be achieved primarily via experimental tests. Given a rigid body and its mass, the proposed method allows to measure the center of mass location and the inertia tensor during a single test. The proposed technique is based on the analysis of the free motion of a multi-cable pendulum to which the vehicle or the subsystem is connected. The body under test is made rotating around three axes passing nearby the body center of mass with a highly non linear motion. The motion of the pendulum and the forces acting on the system are recorded and the mass properties are identified by means of a proper mathematical procedure based on a least square estimation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kenji Tadakuma, Takashi Sugiyama, Kazuhiro Maeda, Masashi Iyota, Masahiro Ohta, Yoshinao Komatsu
A new wind tunnel was developed and adopted by Toyota Motor Corporation in March 2013. This wind tunnel is equipped with a 5-belt rolling road system with a platform balance that enables the flow simulation under the floor and around the tires in on-road conditions. It also minimizes the characteristic pulsation that occurs in wind tunnels to enable the evaluation of unsteady aerodynamic performance aspects. This paper describes the technology developed for this new wind tunnel and its performance verification results. In addition, after verifying the stand-alone performance of the wind tunnel, a vehicle was placed in the tunnel to verify the utility of the wind tunnel performance. Tests simulated flow fields around the vehicle in on-road conditions and confirmed that the wind tunnel is capable of evaluating unsteady flows.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kevin R. Cooper, Miroslav Mokry
Abstract The solid-wall wind tunnel boundary correction method outlined in this paper is an efficient pressure-signature method that requires few wall-mounted pressures. These pressures are used to determine the strengths of model- and wake-representing singularities that are used with the method of images to calculate the longitudinal and lateral velocity increments induced by the wind tunnel walls. Two force correction models are presented that convert these velocity increments to force and moment corrections. The performances of the correction procedures are demonstrated by their application to data from two sets of four, geometrically identical, differently sized, simplified automotive models.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daichi Katoh, Kensuke Koremoto, Munetsugu Kaneko, Yoshimitsu Hashizume
An air-dam spoiler is commonly used to reduce aerodynamic drag in production vehicles. However, it inexplicably tends to show different performances between wind tunnel and coast-down tests. Neither the reason nor the mechanism has been clarified. We previously reported that an air-dam spoiler contributed to a change in the wake structure behind a vehicle. In this study, to clarify the mechanism, we investigated the coefficient of aerodynamic drag CD reduction effect, wake structure, and underflow under different boundary layer conditions by conducting wind tunnel tests with a rolling road system and constant speed on-road tests. We found that the air-dam spoiler changed the wake structure by deceleration of the underflow under stationary floor conditions. Accordingly, the base pressure was recovered by approximately 30% and, the CD value reduction effect was approximately 10%. The ratio of the base pressure recovery to the CD value reduction effect was approximately 90%, suggesting that the main mechanism is the base pressure recovery produced by changing the wake structure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Pierre-Olivier Santacreu, Laurent Faivre, Antoine Acher
Thermal fatigue of austenitic and ferritic stainless steel grades has been experimentally and numerically investigated. A special test has been developed to determine the thermal fatigue resistance of clamped V-shaped specimens. This test permits to impose thermal cycle by alternating resistance heating and air cooling. The thermal fatigue life of a specimen is expressed as the number of cycles to failure. For a given grade, the fatigue life depends on the maximal and minimal temperature of the cycle, holding time at the maximal temperature and specimen thickness. The advantage of this V-shape test is that it is a simple procedure quite representative of the thermal fatigue process occurring in an exhaust manifold. This test is well suited to perform a study of damage mechanisms and to compare stainless steel grades. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that cracks could be mainly attributed to out-of-phase (OP) thermal fatigue process especially in case of ferritic grades. For austenitic steels (AISI304 EN1.4301, AISI321 EN1.4541 or AISI308 EN1.4828) at a critical temperature or above, an in-phase (IP) thermal fatigue mechanism is coupled with oxidation and creep, which are further significantly reducing the lifetime.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gerhard Wickern
Abstract Open jet wind tunnels are normally tuned to measure “correct” results without any modifications to the raw data. This is an important difference to closed wall wind tunnels, which usually require wind tunnel corrections. The tuning of open jet facilities is typically done experimentally using pilot tunnels and adding final adjustments in the commissioning phase of the full scale tunnel. This approach lacked theoretical background in the past. There is still a common belief outside the small group of people designing and using open jet wind tunnels, that - similar to closed wind tunnels, which generally measure too high aerodynamic forces and moments without correction - open jet wind tunnels measure coefficient too low compared to the real world. The paper will try to show that there is a solid physical foundation underlying the experimental approach and that the expectation to receive self-correcting behavior can be supported by theoretical models. During the past years an improved understanding of test section interference in open jet wind tunnels has been developed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Oliver Mankowski, David Sims-Williams, Robert Dominy
This paper outlines the creation of a facility for simulating on-road transients in a model scale, ¾ open jet, wind tunnel. Aerodynamic transients experienced on-road can be important in relation to a number of attributes including vehicle handling and aeroacoustics. The objective is to develop vehicles which are robust to the range of conditions that they will experience. In general it is cross wind transients that are of greatest significance for road vehicles. On-road transients include a range of length scales but the most important scales are in the in the 2-20 vehicle length range where there are significant levels of unsteadiness experienced, the admittance is likely to be high, and the reduced frequencies are in a band where a dynamic test is required to correctly determine vehicle response. Based on measurements of on-road conditions, the aim was for the turbulence generation system to achieve yaw angles up to 6-8°, equating to a lateral turbulence intensity of 8-10% with a frequency range extending up to 10 Hz.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dirk Wieser, Hanns-Joachim Schmidt, Stefan Müller, Christoph Strangfeld, Christian Nayeri, Christian Paschereit
The experimental investigation was conducted with a 25%-scaled realistic car model called “DrivAer” mounted in a wind tunnel. This model includes geometric elements of a BMW 3 series and an Audi A4, accommodating modular, rear-end geometries so that it represents a generalized modern production car. The measurements were done with two different DrivAer rear end configurations (fastback and notchback) at varying side-wind conditions and a Reynolds number of up to Re=3.2·106. An array of more than 300 pressure ports distributed over the entire rear section measured the temporal pressure distribution. Additionally, extensive flow visualizations were conducted. The combination of flow visualization, and spatially and temporally resolved surface pressure measurements enables a deep insight into the flow field characteristics and underlying mechanisms. Moreover, static pressure fluctuations indicate regions with a high turbulence level due to flow separation and interaction between different vortical structures.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sofie Koitrand, Lennart Lofdahl, Sven Rehnberg, Adrian Gaylard
Automotive aerodynamics measurements and simulations now routinely use a moving ground and rotating wheels (MVG&RW), which is more representative of on-road conditions than the fixed ground-fixed wheel (FG&FW) alternative. This can be understood as a combination of three elements: (a) moving ground (MVG), (b) rotating front wheels (RWF) and (c) rotating rear wheels (RWR). The interaction of these elements with the flow field has been explored to date by mainly experimental means. This paper presents a mainly computational (CFD) investigation of the effect of RWF and RWR, in combination with MVG, on the flow field around a saloon vehicle. The influence of MVG&RW is presented both in terms of a combined change from a FG&FW baseline and the incremental effects seen by the addition of each element separately. For this vehicle, noticeable decrease in both drag and rear lift is shown when adding MVG&RW, whereas front lift shows little change. The same trends are seen in both CFD and experimental data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Austin Hausmann, Christopher Depcik
This study investigates the practicality of vehicle coast down testing as a suitable replacement to moving floor wind tunnel experimentation. The recent implementation of full-scale moving floor wind tunnels is forcing a re-estimation of previous coefficient of drag determinations. Moreover, these wind tunnels are relatively expensive to build and operate and may not capture concepts such as linear and quadratic velocity dependency along with the influence of tire pressure on rolling resistance. As a result, the method elucidated here improves the accuracy of the fundamental vehicle modeling equations while remaining relatively affordable. The trends produced by incorporating on road test data into the model fit the values indicated by laboratory tests. This research chose equipment based on a balance between affordability and accuracy while illustrating that higher resolution frequency equipment would further enhance the model accuracy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bryan Randles, Daniel Voss, Isaac Ikram, Christopher Furbish, Judson Welcher, Thomas Szabo
Determination of vehicle speed at the time of impact is frequently an important factor in accident reconstruction. In many cases some evidence may indicate that the brake pedal of a striking vehicle was disengaged, and the vehicle was permitted to idle forward prior to impacting the target vehicle. This study was undertaken to analyze the kinematic response of various vehicles equipped with automatic transmissions while idling, with the transmissions in drive and the brake pedals disengaged. An array of sedans, SUV's and pickup trucks were tested under 3 roadway conditions (flat, medium slope and high slope). The vehicle responses are reported and mathematical relationships were developed to model the idle velocity profiles for flat and sloped roadway surfaces.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Olof Lindgarde, Rune Prytz
Abstract This paper presents an approach to fault detection and isolation that is based on off-board 1D simulation tools such as GT-power or AVL Boost. The proposed method enables engineers to develop diagnostic functions early on in a development project. The proposed algorithm is evaluated based on measurements from the air path system of the new Volvo FH truck. The results are encouraging. The paper discusses pros and cons of the method and concludes that it has clear potential to be used for on-board diagnostics.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Guerrero, Kapil Butala, Ravi Tangirala, Amy Klinkenberger
NHTSA has been investigating a new test mode in which a research moving deformable barrier (RMDB) impacts a stationary vehicle at 90.1 kph, a 15 degree angle, and a 35% vehicle overlap. The test utilizes the THOR NT with modification kit (THOR) dummy positioned in both the driver and passenger seats. This paper compares the behavior of the THOR and Hybrid III dummies during this oblique research test mode. A series of four full vehicle oblique impact crash tests were performed. Two tests were equipped with THOR dummies and two tests were equipped with Hybrid III dummies. All dummies represent 50th percentile males and were positioned in the vehicle according to the FMVSS208 procedure. The Hybrid III dummies were instrumented with the Nine Accelerometer Package (NAP) to calculate brain injury criteria (BrIC) as well as THOR-Lx lower legs. Injury responses were recorded for each dummy during the event. High speed cameras were used to capture vehicle and dummy kinematics. The vehicle restraint devices and their associated deployment times remained the same for each test.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lokanath Mohanta, Suresh Iyer, Partha Mishra, David Klinikowski
Abstract This paper illustrates a method to determine the experimental uncertainties in the measurement of tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and particulates of medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles when tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer and full-scale dilution tunnel. Tests are performed for different chassis dynamometer driving cycles intended to simulate a wide range of operating conditions. Vehicle exhaust is diluted in the dilution tunnel by mixing with conditioned air. Samples are drawn through probes for raw exhaust, diluted exhaust and particulates and measured using laboratory grade emission analyzers and a microbalance. At the end of a driving cycle, results are reported for the above emissions in grams/mile for raw continuous, dilute continuous, dilute bag, and particulate measurements. An analytical method is developed in the present study to estimate the measurement uncertainties in emissions for a test cycle, due to the buildup of measurement uncertainties as they propagate through the system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jakub Zebala, Wojciech Wach
Abstract The objective of the paper is to present the results of an investigation of the effect of reduced tire pressure on car lateral dynamics in lane change maneuver. The intended aim was attained by performing bench and road tests. The aim of the bench tests was parameterization of the mathematical model of the tested car. The road tests covered the vehicle motion with reduced and no tire pressure on a curvilinear track adequate for bypassing an unexpected appearing obstacle. Next, simulations in PC-Crash were performed, and the results were compared with those obtained in experiments.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Roger Bortolin, Matthew Arbour, James Hrycay
Abstract Whether large or small, a truck fleet operator has to know the locations of its vehicles in order to best manage its business. On a day to day basis loads need to be delivered or picked up from customers, and other activities such as vehicle maintenance or repairs have to be routinely accommodated. Some fleets use aftermarket electronic systems for keeping track of vehicle locations, driver hours of service and for wirelessly text messaging drivers via cellular or satellite networks. Such aftermarket systems include GPS (Global Positioning System) technology, which in part uses a network of satellites in orbit. This makes it possible for the fleet manager to remotely view the location of a vehicle and view a map of its past route. These systems can obtain data directly from vehicle sensors or from the vehicle network, and therefore report other information such as fuel economy. The fleet manager can receive alerts when high-level brake applications occur, which could be an indication of tailgating or aggressive driving behavior.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mindy Heading, Douglas Stein, Jeff Dix
Abstract Ejection Mitigation testing is now required by the U.S. government through FMVSS 226 [1]. FMVSS 226 contains the requirement of using a linear guided headform in a horizontal impact test into the inflated curtain, or other ejection mitigation countermeasure that deploys in the event of a rollover. The specification provides dimensions for a featureless headform [2] but there are limited specifications for the headform skin surface condition. In the “Response to Petitions” of the 2011 Final Rule for FMVSS 226 [3], the NHTSA declined the option to include a headform cleaning procedure. This research presents a case study to quantify the effect of changes in the friction between the headform and curtain on the measured excursion. The study presented here shows that a change in friction between the headform and curtain can affect excursion values by up to 135 millimeters (mm).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shai Cohen, Dhafer Marzougui, Cing-Dao Kan, Fadi Tahan
Abstract Many dynamic test systems currently exist to assess rollover. This paper introduces a new test device that combines features from a multitude of different tests. It also covers the concept development, a scaled prototype design and test results from both physical and virtual tests. The Guided Rollover Test (GRT) device subjects vehicles to repeatable initial conditions by having a cart follow a guided maneuver similar to a forward J-turn with an increasing curvature sufficient to roll most vehicles. A test vehicle is carried on the cart at constant longitudinal velocity until it rolls. The cart is fitted with a tripping edge to eliminate slipping and remove the influence of tire properties and road-surface friction. Vehicles are subjected to a rollover based on their own performance characteristics which define the dynamics and consequently the roof to ground contact. Vehicle mechanical systems (suspension), passive safety systems (roof) and occupant containment systems (airbags, seat-belts, etc.) would be assessed under dynamic rollover loading.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Taewung Kim, Jason Kerrigan, Varun Bollapragada, Jeff Crandall, Ravi Tangirala, Michael Guerrero
Abstract Some rollover test methods, which impose a touchdown condition on a test vehicle, have been developed to study vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection in rollover crashes. In ground-tripped rollover crashes, speed, steering maneuver, braking, vehicle inertial and geometric properties, topographical and road design characteristics, and soil type can all affect vehicle touchdown conditions. It is presumed that while there may be numerous possible combinations of kinematic metrics (velocity components and orientation) at touchdown, there are also numerous combinations of metrics that are not likely to occur in rollover crashes. To determine a realistic set of touchdown conditions to be used in a vehicle rollover crash test, a lateral deceleration sled-based non-destructive rollover initiation test system (RITS) with a fully programmable deceleration pulse is in development. A full-size SUV vehicle dynamics model was developed and validated with static test data and curb-trip rollover test data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sheryl Janca, Kurt Shanks, Janet Brelin-Fornari, Ravi Tangirala, Massoud Tavakoli
Abstract A near-side, rear seat side impact component test, was conducted and validated utilizing a SIDIIs anthropomorphic test device (ATD). The test fixture consisted of the rear seat structure, side door, interior trim, and side airbag curtain module. Test parameters were determined from full scale tests including impact speed, angle of impact, and depth of door intrusion. A comparative assessment was conducted between the full scale test and the deceleration sled test including ATD contact with the vehicle interior, contact duration, sequential timing of ATD contact, and dummy injury measures. Validation was achieved so that the deceleration sled test procedure could be utilized for further evaluations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Pawel Skruch, Gabriel Buchala
The paper presents a model-based approach to testing embedded automotive software systems in a real-time. Model-based testing approach relates to a process of creating test artifacts using various kinds of models. Real-time testing involves the use of a real-time environment to implement test application. Engineers shall use real-time testing techniques to achieve greater reliability and/or determinism in a test system. The paper contains an instruction how to achieve these objectives by proper definition, implementation, execution, and evaluation of test cases. The test cases are defined and implemented in a modeling environment. The execution and evaluation of test results is made in a real-time machine. The paper is concluded with results obtained from the initial deployment of the approach on a large scale in production stream projects.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sooncheol Park, Wonwook Jung, Chunwoo Shin, Jaewung Jung
Abstract Customer vehicle usage monitoring is one of the most fundamental elements to consider in the process of developing a durable vehicle. The extant method to research customer vehicle usage takes considerable time and effort because it requires attaching a series of sensors to the vehicle-gyroscope, accelerometer, microphone, and GPS-to gather information through data logs and then to analyze data in a computer where designated analyzing software has been installed. To solve the problem, this paper introduces a new concept of integrated system developed to examine customer vehicle usage that can analyze data by collecting it from a variety of sensors installed on a smartphone.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Karsten Schmidt, Jens Harnisch, Denny Marx, Albrecht Mayer, Andre Kohn, Reinhard Deml
Abstract Integration scenarios for ECU software become more complicated, as more constraints with regards to timing, safety and security need to be considered. Multi-core microcontrollers offer even more hardware potential for integration scenarios. To tackle the complexity, more and more model based approaches are used. Understanding the interaction between the different software components, not only from a functional but also from a timing view, is a key success factor for high integration scenarios. In particular for multi-core systems, an amazing amount of timing data can be generated. Usually a multi-core system handles more software functionality than a single-core system. Furthermore, there may be timing interference on the multicore systems, due to the shared usage of buses, memory banks or other hardware resources. The current approach for timing analysis, often based on execution times and sequences of executions in Gantt charts, will not scale arbitrarily for high integration scenarios on multi-core systems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bjoern Lumpp, Mouham Tanimou, Martin McMackin, Eva Bouillon, Erica Trapel, Micha Muenzenmay, Klaus Zimmermann
Abstract Current exhaust gas emission regulations can only be well adhered to through optimal interplay of combustion engine and exhaust gas after-treatment systems. Combining a modern diesel engine with several exhaust gas after-treatment components (DPF, catalytic converters) leads to extremely complex drive systems, with very complex and technically demanding control systems. Current engine ECUs (Electronic Control Unit) have hundreds of functions with thousands of parameters that can be adapted to keep the exhaust gas emissions within the given limits. Each of these functions has to be calibrated and tested in accordance with the rest of the ECU software. To date this task has been performed mostly on engine test benches or in Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) setups. In this paper, a Software-in-the-Loop (SiL) approach, consisting of an engine model and an exhaust gas treatment (EGT) model, coupled with software from a real diesel engine ECU, will be described in detail. A virtual (SiL) test bench is realized with which the diesel engine software functions can be calibrated without any special hardware, using industry- standard calibration tools like INCA from ETAS.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijiao Yu, Hongyu Zheng, Changfu Zong
Abstract Nowadays, electric control steering system has been a main tendency. It consists of Electric Power Steering (EPS) system, Steer by Wire (SBW) system and Active Front Steering (AFS) system. EPS is more widely applied and its technology is more developed. By 2010, the cars equipped with EPS have reached almost 30%. This paper describes one integrated test bench which can test and verify electric control steering system. The main target of the paper is to design and set up a resistance loading system for the test bench referred. The paper takes EPS as a prototype to verify the designed resistance loading system. If the resistance loading system provides a precise simulated torque for the bench, the results of tests will be more approximate with vehicle tests and the acquired data will be reliable for electric control steering system's design and improvement. The linear electric cylinder applied in the loading system is used to provide simulated torque for the bench. The linear electric cylinder is combined with a kind of software independently designed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Louis Chretien, Adrien Laurino
Abstract The effect of cold-working, i.e. wire drawing, on the corrosion behavior of a 6101 and a 1370 aluminum alloy was investigated in NaCl solutions. For the both alloys, a “grain size - corrosion resistance” was highlighted. The preliminary works performed on Al-Cu welds showed two scales of heterogeneity and two scales of heterogeneity of media which are not considered by the current automotive specifications. Consequently, it seems to be necessary to establish new pertinent specifications to evaluate the new Al solutions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
James G. McLeish, Russell Haeberle
Quality, Reliability, Durability (QRD) and Safety of vehicular Electrical/Electronics (E/E) systems traditionally have resulted from arduous rounds of Design-Built-Test-Fix (DBTF) Reliability and Durability Growth Testing. Such tests have historically required 12-16 or more weeks of Accelerated Life Testing (ALT), for each round of validation in a new product development program. Challenges have arisen from: The increasing number of E/E modules in today's vehicle places a high burden on supplier's test labs and budgets. The large size and mass of electric vehicle power modules results in a lower test acceleration factors which can extend each round of ALT to 5-6 months. Durability failures tend to occur late in life testing, resulting in the need to: perform a root cause investigation, fix the problem, build new prototype parts and then repeat the test to verify problem resolutions, which severely stress program budgets and schedules. To resolve these challenges, automakers and E/E suppliers are moving to Physics of Failure (PoF) based durability simulations and reliability assessment solutions performed in a Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) Environment.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijiao Yu, Hongyu Zheng, Changfu Zong
Abstract Nowadays, conventional steering system cannot meet consumers' requirements as their environmental awareness increasing. Electrically controlled steering system can solve this problem well [1] [2]. Electrically controlled steering system has been not only applied widely in automobile steering technique but also becomes an important section of automobile integrated chassis control technology. It is necessary for vehicles to test their every component repeatedly before every component assembled. So a test bench becomes an essential part for vehicle products' design and improvement. The electrically controlled steering system consists of Electric Power Steering system (EPS), Active Front Steering (AFS) and Steer by Wire (SBW). The similarity among them is containing pinion-and-rack mechanical structure, so it is viable to design a test bench suitable for these three systems. This paper takes EPS as a prototype to verify the design's availability. The designed test bench is also used to detect and verify the electrically controlled steering system's performance at the same time.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 15188