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Viewing 1 to 30 of 15233
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0238
Arpit Kulshrestha, Nalin Rawat
During the conceptualization of vehicle, it is big challenge for automotive manufacturer to design a vehicle which has an excellent aesthetic looks as well as meet the stringent vehicle regulations. In the vehicle styling, bumper plays an important role in deciding of the contemporary looks of the vehicle. To improve customer satisfaction, it is important to design a bumper which provides feeling and sense of durability. In addition, bumper should sustain low-speed impact and protects the peripheral components such as parking lights, headlamps, hood, back door and safety related installed equipments like Rear parking camera, parking sensors, etc. Bumper should be dent resistant and be able to regain its original shape on removal of the applied load. An elegant design of bumper should be light weight with high strength. This paper explains about a new CAE methodology developed to simulate the real life loading condition of bumper and to calculate the deformation in the bumper.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0239
Azeez Ahmed, Gopalakrishna Deshpande, Varghese Manu Varghese, Ramakrishnan R, Prakash Prashanth Ravi
Caterpillar Engine Development Test cells consist of expensive test and measurement systems. They also demand trained and skilled labour to ensure good quality data. Effective utilization of these test cells are a key enabler to meet stringent emission while meeting project time and cost targets. Engine Design process and tools when used effectively in the Engine Development can increase efficiency and lower test cell operation cost substantially. The paper discuss examples of this application in the area of Engine Install, Sensitive Instrumentation installation/assembly Example 1 With a vast catalogue of engines manufactured by Caterpillar, the test peripherals and engine mounting systems need to be designed and developed for specific engine size, horsepower etc. A conventional pallet system is not feasible for the installation of higher displacement engines because of its size.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0240
Avinash Dhole, Chetan Raval, Rishi Shrivastava
In commercial vehicles which generally have large capacity fuel tank, sloshing of fuel and its effect on the tank structure is very important aspect during fuel tank design. Dynamic pressures exerted by the fuel on baffles, end plates and tank shell during sloshing can lead to failures and fuel leakage problems. Fluid structure interaction simulation of automotive fuel tank sloshing and its correlation with physical test is demonstrated in this study. During physical sloshing test of 350 L fuel tank, cracks were observed on center baffle and spot weld failures developed on fuel tank shell. Same sloshing test was simulated for one sloshing cycle using fluid structure interaction approach in LS Dyna explicit FE solver. Water was used instead of fuel. Mesh free smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is used to represent water as it requires less computational time as compared to Eulerian or ALE method.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0235
Raju P Soudatti, Amarnath R TBD, Harish Ramesh cEng
This paper deals the verification & Validation of passenger seat of buses for life cycle requirement. Through various methodologies adopted from Data collection, CAE verification and physical validation to verify the seat in virtual environment. Generally it is observed that in City Buses most of the time Passenger seat leg mounting area failures occurs in buses used for typically more than 3years. This fatigue failure doesn't get captured in either Anchorage test or limited vibration test. Passenger seats durability should be equal to vehicle life which is 10L or 12 Years of life span. Testing on Physical vibration (Rig) machine is time consuming and costly most of the time Machine availability for testing will be an issue to validate alternate seat proposals. There is need to establish a correlation between Physical testing and CAE simulation so that alternate proposals can be easily and quickly verified using CAE alone.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0216
Ramesh Babu Pathuri, Prasanna Nagarhalli
During early phases of vehicle program, upfront performance prediction of cool pack i.e. CRFM (Condenser Radiator Fan Module) has become vital and hence simulation tools have gained tremendous importance. A 1D simulation model can be introduced early in the design process to evaluate several system configurations at different test conditions and results in reduced experimental work. These models also help the design engineers for better understanding of the physical phenomena of the engine cooling system and its optimization. Thus, there is always a need for more and more reliable simulation models. 1D model of engine cooling system is developed by inputting all necessary geometrical and performance data of all components (radiator heat load, coolant pipe geometry, CRFM, pump, thermostat etc.) with necessary assumptions at appropriate time in vehicle program. Air flow rates used on heat exchangers are predicted in 3D CFD analysis.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0126
Prince Shital, Chiranjit Ghosh, Harveen Talwar, Avnish Gosain, Praneet Shanker Dayal
Three-cylinder Engine without balancer shaft is a recent trend towards development of lightweight and fuel-efficient power train for passenger car. In addition of that, customer's expectation of superior NVH inside driver cabin is increasing day by day. Engine mounts address majority of the NVH issues related to transfer of vibration from engine to passenger cabin. Idle vibration isolation for a three-cylinder engine is a challenging task due to possibility of overlapping of Power train’s rigid body modes with engine's firing frequency. This Overlapping of rigid body modes of power train can be avoided either by modifying mount characteristic or by changing the position of mounts based on multi body dynamics (MBD) simulation. This paper explains about two types of engine mounting system for a front-wheel drive transversely mounted three-cylinder engine. The base vehicle was having three-point mounting system i.e. all three engine mounts were pre-loaded.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0237
Rajendra More, Darshan Vachhani, Chetan Raval
Strength and durability of commercial vehicle structure is of prime importance to users while quicker time to market and least material cost are demands of competitive world. This requires assessment not just with simplistic load cases but robust and accurate predictions closely co-relating real proving ground conditions. This paper demonstrates systematic approach of first road load predictions using MBD model, then stress analysis using FE model and finally life prediction using fatigue solver. MBD model was built using flex body, air suspensions with rigid links and tires with FTire characteristics. Same model ran on various virtual proving grounds and load history at various joints were extracted. Then inertia relief stress analysis with unit loads were carried out in Nastran and output stresses were mapped against load history in fatigue solver.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0024
Sivanesan Murugesan, Lakshmikanthan Chinnasamy, Abhijeet Patil
Appropriate test cycle is required for engine testing. To do so, a new methodology is developed for deriving Engine Test Cycle based on real world duty cycle. Transient speed and load is to be collected from the functional engine on the field. The duty cycle for cyclic operation will be developed from the actual transient speed and load conditions. An iterative process and the comparison of chi-square statistical data is used to categorize typical microtrips, segments of engine operation collected during performance of certain activities. Different microtrips of all activities were combined together to make up a cycle of operation and test cycle as well. These data’s are compared to statistical data which is used to illustrate the raw data. On successful comparison, the transient test cycle is validated on the test bed. To facilitate further engine testing, the cycle is transformed into a schedule of torque and speed points at One second intervals.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2582
José Galindo, José Ramón Serrano, Pedro Piqueras, Javier Gómez
Abstract Calibration of internal combustion engines at different altitudes, above or below sea level, is important to improve engine performance and to reduce fuel consumption and emissions in these conditions. In this work, a flow test rig that reproduces altitude pressure variation is presented. The system stands out by its altitude range, compactness, portability and easy control. It is based on the use of turbomachinery to provide the target pressure to the engine intake and exhaust lines. The core of the system is composed of a variable geometry turbine (VGT) with a waste-gate (WG) and a mechanical compressor. Given a set of turbomachinery systems, the operation pressure and the air mass flow are controlled by the speed of the mechanical compressor and the VGT and WG position. A simple modification in the installation setup makes possible to change the operating mode from vacuum to overpressure.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2558
Qiyou Deng, Richard Burke
Abstract Current turbocharger models are based on characteristic maps derived from experimental measurements taken under steady conditions on dedicated gas stand facility. Under these conditions heat transfer is ignored and consequently the predictive performances of the models are compromised, particularly under the part load and dynamic operating conditions that are representative of real powertrain operations. This paper proposes to apply a dynamic mathematical model that uses a polynomial structure, the Volterra Series, for the modelling of the turbocharger system. The model is calculated directly from measured performance data using an extended least squares regression. In this way, both compressor and turbine are modelled together based on data from dynamic experiments rather than steady flow data from a gas stand. The modelling approach has been applied to dynamic data taken from a physics based model, acting as a virtual test cell.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2559
Christopher Bannister
Abstract When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2664
Akira Iijima, Naoya Ito, Takashi Shimada, Masanori Yamada, Hideo Shoji
Abstract Knocking combustion experiments were conducted in this study using a test engine that allowed the entire bore area to be visualized. The purpose was to make clear the detailed characteristics of knocking combustion that occurs accompanied by cylinder pressure oscillations when a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine is operated at high loads. Knocking combustion was intentionally induced by varying the main combustion period and engine speed. Under such conditions, knocking in HCCI combustion was investigated in detail on the basis of cylinder pressure analysis, high-speed photography of the combustion flame and spectroscopic measurement of flame light emissions. The results revealed that locally occurring autoignition took place rapidly at multiple locations in the cylinder when knocking combustion occurred. In that process, the unburned end gas subsequently underwent even more rapid autoignition, giving rise to cylinder pressure oscillations.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2667
Ida Truedsson, William Cannella, Bengt Johansson, Martin Tuner
Abstract This study examines fuel auto-ignitability and shows a method for determining fuel performance for HCCI combustion by doing engine experiments. Previous methods proposed for characterizing HCCI fuel performance were assessed in this study and found not able to predict required compression ratio for HCCI auto-ignition (CRAI) at a set combustion phasing. The previous indices that were studied were the Octane Index (OI), developed by Kalghatgi, and the HCCI Index, developed by Shibata and Urushihara. Fuels with the same OI or HCCI Index were seen to correspond to a wide range of compression ratios in these experiments, so a new way to describe HCCI fuel performance was sought. The Lund-Chevron HCCI Number was developed, using fuel testing in a CFR engine just as for the indices for spark ignition (research octane number and motor octane number, RON and MON) and compression ignition (cetane number, CN).
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2637
Katsufumi Kondo, Junya Takahashi, Tetsuya Aizawa
Abstract Wall-deposition of soot particles occurs due to the interaction between spray flame and cylinder liner wall/piston surface, which can potentially affect soot morphology after the in-flame formation/oxidation processes and before the exit from engine cylinder. In order to investigate these effects, flame wall impingement was simulated in a constant volume combustion vessel and thermophoretic soot sampling was conducted for Transmission Electron Microscopic analysis. A TEM grid for the sampling was exposed to a single-shot diesel spray flame multiple times and the variation of soot morphology (concentration, primary particle diameter and aggregate gyration radius) among the multiple exposures was compared. Furthermore, a newly designed impingement-type sampler vertically exposed the grid to the spray flame and sampled soot particles under different boundary condition from that of conventionally used skim-type sampler.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2642
Masaki Kuribayashi, Yuta Mizutani, Yutaro Ishizuka, Natsuki Taki, Tetsuya Aizawa
Abstract For better understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes in diesel combustion, effects of ambient oxygen concentration on in-flame diesel soot particle properties including concentration, size, number density and morphology were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel via simultaneous LII (Laser-Induced Incandescence) / LS (Laser Scattering) imaging techniques and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) analysis. An analysis of LII and LS images yielded 2-dimensional distribution images of concentration, size and number density of soot particles in diesel spray flame, based on a practical assumption that LII and LS signals are proportional to the soot particle size to the power of 3 and 6, respectively.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2811
Michal Vojtisek-Lom, Martin Pechout, Michael Fenkl
Abstract The paper focuses on portable “on-board” instrumentation and methods for evaluation of exhaust emissions from scooters and various small machinery under real-world driving conditions. Two approaches are investigated here. In one, a miniature on-board system mounted on the equipment itself performs online measurements of the concentrations of the pollutants of interest (HC, CO, CO2, NOx, some property of particulate matter), and measurement or computation of the intake air flow. This approach has been used on a 50 cm3 scooter fitted with a 14-kg on-board system and driven on local routes. Measured concentrations of gaseous compounds, particle mass and total particle length were multiplied with the corresponding intake air flow computed from measured engine rpm, intake air manifold pressure and temperature. In the second approach, a full-flow dilution tunnel, gas analyzers and particle measurement or sampling devices are mounted on an accompanying hand cart or vehicle.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2713
Jianyi Tian, Hongming Xu, Ramadhas Arumugam Sakunthalai, Dai Liu, Cheng Tan, Akbar Ghafourian
Abstract Engine transient operation has attracted a lot of attention from researchers due to its high frequency of occurrence during daily vehicle operation. More emissions are expected compared to steady state operating conditions as a result of the turbo-lag problem. Ambient temperature has significant influences on engine transients especially at engine start. The effects of ambient temperature on engine-out emissions under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) are investigated in this study. The transient engine scenarios were carried out on a modern 3.0 L, V6 turbocharged common rail diesel engine fuelled with winter diesel in a cold cell within the different ambient temperature ranging between +20 °C and −7 °C. The engine with fuel, coolant, combustion air and lubricating oil were soaked and maintained at the desired test temperatures during the transient scenarios.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2840
Juan J. Hernández, Rosario Ballesteros, Javier Barba, José Guillén-Flores
Abstract In order to reduce the pollutant emissions (NOx and PM) of diesel engines, the addition of small gaseous fuel amounts or dual mode operation have been proved as potential techniques. This paper is focused on a detailed characterization of the particles emitted from a single cylinder diesel engine when part of the diesel fuel (5 to 20% by energy) is replaced by a gaseous fuel (producer gas, mainly composed by H2, CO, CH4 and inert compounds) coming from biomass steam gasification. The engine was run at constant speed and torque and different EGR rates. Particle samples were collected by means of fiber glass filters placed in a dilution mini-tunnel. Simultaneously, during tests, part of the exhaust gas was conducted to an SMPS to determine the particle size distribution.
2014-10-01
Journal Article
2014-01-9030
Sermet Yucel, Melinda Moran Lucking, Jon Magnuson, Germana Paterlini, Benjamin Worel
Fuel economy and performance vary significantly with the vehicle design and configuration, road profile, and payload. The variation is more pronounced for heavy-duty trucks and understanding its origin is critical to maximizing fleet profitability. In this paper we demonstrate a method to continuously estimate fuel consumption breakdown over resistive forces while the vehicle is driven on a public highway. The method is fast, cost-effective, and capable of analyzing trip segments as short as one second. The method utilizes a non-linear Kalman filter and a vehicle dynamical model that has a coupled longitudinal and vertical motion. The paper presents the breakdown of fuel consumption and an estimate of road grade profile obtained by driving a heavy-duty vehicle at the MnROAD research facility in Albertville MN.
2014-09-30
Journal Article
2014-01-2347
Britney J. McCoy, Arman Tanman
Abstract In-use testing of diesel emission control technologies is an integral component of EPA's verification program. Device manufacturers are required to complete in-use testing once 500 units have been sold. Additionally, EPA conducts test programs on randomly selected retrofit devices from installations completed with grants by the National Clean Diesel Campaign. In this test program, EPA identified and recovered a variety of retrofit devices, including diesel particulate filters (DPFs) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs), installed on heavy-duty diesel vehicles (on-highway and nonroad). All of the devices were tested at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. This study's goal was to evaluate the durability, defined here as emissions performance as a function of time, of retrofit technologies aged in real-world applications.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2306
Mathialagan Balaji, Hemant Bhatkar, Jeya Kumar Ranjith Kumar, Ananthan Anbazhagan, Pramod Palkar
Abstract Rear axles are subjected to bending and torsion loads out of which Bending loads are predominant. In case of Off road vehicles Bi Axial- combination of Bending and torsion loads were predominant, because of axle construction and vehicle usage pattern. Defined test procedures are available for bending durability and torsional durability evaluation of axles. In this experiment, new test methodology was developed for Bi Axial durability evaluation of Off road vehicle rear axle with single servo hydraulic linear actuator. For creating Bi Axial load condition, we may need multiple actuators and complicated fixtures. Axle wheel end is constrained at an angle with suitable fixtures for creating the bending and torsional forces together in the axle. Servo hydraulic linear actuator with suitable loading arm is used for applying the test torque in the axle input flange.
2014-09-30
Journal Article
2014-01-2445
Shaoyun Sun, Yin-ping Chang, Qiang Fu, Jing Zhao, Long Ma, Shijie Fan, Bo Li, Andrea Shestopalov, Paul Stewart, Heinz Friz
Abstract In the development of an FAW SUV, one of the goals is to achieve a state of the art drag level. In order to achieve such an aggressive target, feedback from aerodynamics has to be included in the early stage of the design decision process. The aerodynamic performance evaluation and improvement is mostly based on CFD simulation in combination with some wind tunnel testing for verification of the simulation results. As a first step in this process, a fully detailed simulation model is built. The styling surface is combined with engine room and underbody detailed geometry from a similar size existing vehicle. From a detailed analysis of the flow field potential areas for improvement are identified and five design parameters for modifying overall shape features of the upper body are derived. In a second step, a response surface method involving design of experiments and adaptive sampling techniques are applied for characterizing the effects of the design changes.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2526
Kenneth D. Norman, Amandeep Singh
Abstract Assessment of braking performance that includes brake fade is a critical part of the evaluation of military light tactical vehicles as it is for conventional light cars and trucks. These vehicles are sometimes called upon to operate in severe mountain regions that challenge the braking performance well beyond the environment in which these vehicles are normally operated. The U.S. Army Test Operating Procedure (TOP) 2-2-608 includes a test schedule conducted in the mountainous region near Jennerstown, Pennsylvania. While this test procedure represents a typical mountain environment, it does not represent the most severe mountain descents that can be encountered across the United States. As a preliminary step to developing a representative severe mountain descent braking test, mountain roads throughout the United States were evaluated analytically to identify potential test venues.
2014-09-28
Journal Article
2014-01-2523
Nils Perzborn, Carlos Agudelo, Georg Peter Ostermeyer
Abstract Inertia dynamometers are commonly used to determine the friction coefficient of brake assemblies. Dynamometers are a well-established platform, allow testing under controlled conditions, exhibit a good correlation to many situations encountered in real driving, and are comparatively economical and less time-consuming than full vehicle test. On the other side of the spectrum is the use of scaled tribometer. These test systems make possible a test without the entire brake corner. This separation allows the investigation of the frictional-contact only (frictional boundary layer) speedily and independently of a given brake system or vehicle configuration. As the two test systems (inertia dynamometers and tribometers) may have different users with possibly different tasks, the question remains regarding how comparable the two systems are. These issues provide incentives to better define the fields of investigations, correlation, and applicability for the two systems.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2501
Abdulwahab A. Alnaqi, Suman Shrestha, David C. Barton, Peter C. Brooks
Abstract Aluminium alloys have been used extensively in the automotive industry to reduce the weight of a vehicle and improve fuel consumption which in turn leads to a reduction in engine emissions. The main aim of the current study is to replace the conventional cast iron rotor material with a lightweight alternative such as coated aluminium alloy. The main challenge has been to meet both the cost and functional demands of modern mass-produced automotive braking systems. A sensitivity analysis based on the Taguchi approach was carried out to investigate the effect of various parameters on the thermal performance of a typical candidate disc brake. Wrought aluminium disc brake rotors coated with alumina on the rubbing surfaces were determined to have the best potential for replacing the conventional cast iron rotor at reasonable cost. Optimisation of the structure was subsequently carried out using a genetic algorithm on the selected coated aluminium disc brake rotor.
2014-09-28
Journal Article
2014-01-2497
Bongkeun Choi
Abstract In this paper an effective technology of virtual thermal test of disc brake with several advanced analytic techniques was presented. With the virtual thermal test process, thermal performance of brake system could be easily evaluated without any possibility of great errors that used to happen in the past. In addition to the classical result of CFD, this virtual thermal test produced several valuable applications such as thermal deformation of rotor, optimization of thermal performance and estimation of braking distance.
2014-09-28
Journal Article
2014-01-2521
Jaroslaw Grochowicz, Carlos Agudelo, Shanglei Li, Harald Abendroth, Karl-Heinz Wollenweber, Achim Reich
Abstract The efforts of the ISO “Test Variability Task Force” have been aimed at improving the understanding and at reducing brake dynamometer test variability during performance testing. In addition, dynamometer test results have been compared and correlated to vehicle testing. Even though there is already a vast amount of anecdotal evidence confirming the fact that different procedures generate different friction coefficients on the same brake corner, the availability of supporting data to the industry has been elusive up to this point. To overcome this issue, this paper focuses on assessing friction levels, friction coefficient sensitivity, and repeatability under ECE, GB, ISO, JASO, and SAE laboratory friction evaluation tests.
2014-09-16
Journal Article
2014-01-2119
Steven David Angus Fletcher, Patrick Norman, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
Abstract The development of the More-Electric Engine (MEE) concept will see an expansion in the power levels, functionality and criticality of electrical systems within engines. However, to date, these more critical electrical systems have not been accounted for in existing engine certification standards. To begin to address this gap, this paper conducts a review of current engine certification standards in order to determine how these standards will impact on the design requirements of More-Electric Engine (MEE) electrical system architectures. The paper focuses on determining two key architectural requirements: the number of individual failures an architecture can accommodate and still remain functional and the rate at which these failures are allowed to occur.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2182
Evan Racine, Zachary Lammers, Street Barnett, John Murphy, Quinn Leland
Abstract The purpose of this study is to set up a laboratory test apparatus to analyze aircraft flight control EMAS' electrical and thermal energy flow under transient and dynamic flight profiles. A hydraulic load frame was used to exert load to the EMA. The actuator was placed within an environmental chamber which simulates ambient temperature as function of altitude. The simulated movement or stroke was carried out by the EMA. The under test EMA's dynamic load, stroke, and ambient temperature were synchronized through a real time Labview DAQ system. Motor drive voltage, current, regenerative current, and motor drive and motor winding temperature were recorded for energy analysis. The EMA under test was subjected to both transient and holding load laid out in a test matrix.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2148
Jon Hagar
Abstract System testing can, in part, be defined as the application of concepts as an attempt to demonstrate that the implementation does not meet its intended use. Unfortunately, some industry verification test efforts only show that a system meets requirements which while necessary, are not sufficient to fully address a product's system-software testing. Managers, engineers, and testers may not be familiar with the wide variety of test concepts, approaches, and standards available for system-software testing-many of which can save projects money and effort in the long run. Newer software test standards and advanced techniques can offer a wealth of knowledge and improvement opportunities for software products.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 15233