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2017-10-13
Technical Paper
2017-01-5013
G. Magendran
The input shafts are conventionally developed through Hot forging route. Considering upcoming new technologies the same part was developed through cold forging route which resulting in better Mechanical properties than existing hot forging process. It has added benefit of cost as well as environmental friendly. Generally the part like Input shaft which having gear teeth, splines etc., will be manufactured through Hot forging process due to degree of deformation, availability of press capacity, diameter variations etc., This process consumes more energy in terms of electricity for heating the bar and also creates pollution to the atmosphere. Automotive input shaft design modified to accommodate cold forging process route to develop the shaft with press capacity of 2500T which gives considerable benefit in terms of mechanical and metallurgical Properties, close dimensional tolerances, less machining time, higher material yield when compared to hot forging and metal cutting operation.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2294
Julien Gueit, Jerome Obiols
Abstract In order to be ever more fuel efficient the use of Direct Injection (DI) is becoming standard in spark ignition engines. When associated with efficient turbochargers it has generated a significant increase in the overall performance of these engines. These hardware developments lead to increased stresses placed upon the fuel and the fuel injection system: for example injection pressures increased up to 400 bar, increased fuel and nozzle temperatures and contact with the flame in the combustion chamber. DISI injectors are thus subjected to undesirable deposit formation which can have detrimental consequences on engine operation such as reduced power, EOBD (Engine On Board Diagnostics) issues, impaired driveability and increased particulate emissions. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of DI spark ignition engines to fuel-related injector deposit formation, a new engine test procedure has been developed.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2328
Yuanxu Li, Karthik Nithyanandan, Zhi Ning, Chia-Fon Lee, Han Wu
Abstract Bio-butanol has been widely investigated as a promising alternative fuel. However, the main issues preventing the industrial-scale production of butanol is its relatively low production efficiency and high cost of production. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE), the intermediate product in the ABE fermentation process for producing bio-butanol, has attracted a lot of interest as an alternative fuel because it not only preserves the advantages of oxygenated fuels, but also lowers the cost of fuel recovery for individual component during fermentation. If ABE could be directly used for clean combustion, the separation costs would be eliminated which save an enormous amount of time and money in the production chain of bio-butanol.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2332
Tamara Ottenwaelder, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract In order to reduce engine out CO2 emissions it is a main subject to find new alternative fuels out of renewable sources. For this paper, several fuels were selected which can be produced out of biomass or with hydrogen which is generated directly via electrolysis with electricity from renewable sources. All fuels are compared to conventional diesel fuel and two diesel surrogates. It is well known that there can be a large effect of fuel properties on mixture formation and combustion, which may result in a completely different engine performance compared to the operation with conventional diesel fuels. Mixture formation and ignition behavior can also largely affect the pollutant formation. The knowledge of the combustion behavior is also important to design new engine geometries or implement new calibrations for an existing engine. The fuel properties of the investigated fuels comprise a large range, for example in case of the derived cetane number, from below 30 up to 100.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2349
Sarita Seth, Swamy Maloth, Prashant Kumar, Bhuvenesh Tyagi, Lokesh Kumar, Rajendra Mahapatra, Sarita Garg, Deepak Saxena, R Suresh, SSV Ramakumar
Abstract Automobile OEMs are looking for improving fuel economy[1,2] of their vehicles by reducing weight, rolling resistance and improving engine and transmission efficiency apart from the aerodynamic design. Fuel economy may be improved by using appropriate low viscosity [3] and use of friction reducers (FRs)[4,5] in the engine oils. The concept of high viscosity index [6] is being used for achieving right viscosity at required operating temperatures. In this paper performance properties of High Viscosity Index engine oils have been compared with conventional VI engine oils. Efforts have been made to check the key differentiation in oil properties w.r.t. low temperature fluidity, high temperature high shear viscosity/deposits, friction behavior, oxidation performance in bench tribological /engine/chassis dyno tests which finally lead to oil performance assessment.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2354
Dave Horstman, John Sparrow
Abstract Due to recent legislation on CO2 emissions, Heavy Duty engine and vehicle manufacturers and their suppliers have had an increased interest in improving vehicle fuel economy. Many aspects are being investigated including vehicle aerodynamics, tire rolling resistance, waste heat recovery, engine fuel efficiency, and others. Crankcase oils offer a cost-effective mechanism to reduce engine friction and increase engine fuel efficiency. The potential gains realized by optimized fuel-efficient oils are relatively small, usually less than 3%. Therefore, in order to develop these oils, formulators must have a robust, repeatable, and realistic test method for differentiation. To serve Light Duty (LD) engines, this need has been partially satisfied by the development of what became the Sequence VI engine test for gasoline passenger car oils in the early 1990’s.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2432
Xiangwang Li, Weimin Wang, Xiongcai Zou, Zhiming Zhang, Wenlong Zhang, Shemin Zhang, Tao Chen, Yuhuang Cao, Yuanda Chen
Abstract In order to reduce emissions, size and manufacturing cost, integrated exhaust manifold become popular in gasoline engine, especially in three-cylinder engine. Moreover, due to shorter length, lighter weight, and less component connections, the exhaust manifold and hot end durability will improve apparently. In this work, an advanced cylinder head with integrated exhaust manifold is adopted in a three-cylinder turbo engine. Because of this integration characteristic, the gas retain in cylinder head longer and the temperature reach higher level than normal cylinder head, which will cause thermal fatigue failure more easily. To validate the exhaust manifold and hot end durability, series simulation and test validation work have been done. Firstly, overall steady state and transient temperature simulation was done for global model. For turbocharger, in order to simulate the outlet turbulent flow and 3d rotation, a code was compiled to define this 3d rotation.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2361
David R. Lancaster
Abstract Virtually all developed countries regulate light-duty vehicle emissions and fuel consumption. Those regulations rely on different procedures and driving cycles in testing to different standards in different countries. As a result, it is often very difficult to compare the standards imposed by different countries. This paper utilizes publicly available data to compare the energy requirements of the chassis dynamometer driving cycles in common use throughout the world. It also examines the relative severity of the currently existing light duty vehicle CO2 standards, some of which are mass-based with a targeted fleet average, and some of which are individual vehicle targets based on footprint.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2291
Sandro Gail, Takashi Nomura, Hitoshi Hayashi, Yuichiro Miura, Katsumi Yoshida, Vinod Natarajan
In emerging markets, Port Fuel Injection (PFI) technology retains a higher market share than Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) technology. In these markets fuel quality remains a concern even despite an overall improvement in quality. Typical PFI engines are sensitive to fuel quality regardless of brand, engine architecture, or cylinder configuration. One of the well-known impacts of fuel quality on PFI engines is the formation of Intake Valve Deposits (IVD). These deposits steadily accumulate over time and can lead to a deterioration of engine performance. IVD formation mechanisms have been characterized in previous studies. However, no test is available on a state-of-the-art engine to study the impact of fuel components on IVD formation. Therefore, a proprietary engine test was developed to test several chemistries. Sixteen fuel blends were tested. The deposit formation mechanism has been studied and analysed.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2298
Charles S. Shanahan, S. Scott Smith, Brian D. Sears
Abstract The ubiquity of gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles has been rapidly increasing across the globe due to the increasing demand for fuel efficient vehicles. GDI technology offers many advantages over conventional port fuel injection (PFI) engines, such as improvements in fuel economy and higher engine power density; however, GDI technology presents unique challenges as well. GDI engines can be more susceptible to fuel injector deposits and have higher particulate emissions relative to PFI engines due to the placement of the injector inside the combustion chamber. Thus, the need for reliable test protocols to develop next generation additives to improve GDI vehicle performance is paramount. This work discloses a general test method for consistently fouling injectors in GDI vehicles and engines that can accommodate multiple vehicle/engine types, injector designs, and drive cycles, which allows for development of effective GDI fuel additives.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2341
Kongsheng Yang, Kristin A. Fletcher, Jeremy P. Styer, William Y. Lam, Gregory H. Guinther
Abstract Countries from every region in the world have set aggressive fuel economy targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To meet these requirements, automakers are using combinations of technologies throughout the vehicle drivetrain to improve efficiency. One of the most efficient types of gasoline engine technologies is the turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engine. The market share of TGDI engines within North America and globally has been steadily increasing since 2008. TGDI engines can operate at higher temperature and under higher loads. As a result, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have introduced additional engine tests to regional and OEM engine oil specifications to ensure performance of TGDI engines is maintained. One such engine test, the General Motors turbocharger coking (GMTC) test (originally referred to as the GM Turbo Charger Deposit Test), evaluates the potential of engine oil to protect turbochargers from deposit build-up.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2348
Michael Clifford Kocsis, Peter Morgan, Alexander Michlberger, Ewan E. Delbridge, Oliver Smith
Abstract Increasingly stringent fuel economy and emissions regulations around the world have forced the further optimization of nearly all vehicle systems. Many technologies exist to improve fuel economy; however, only a smaller sub-set are commercially feasible due to the cost of implementation. One system that can provide a small but significant improvement in fuel economy is the lubrication system of an internal combustion engine. Benefits in fuel economy may be realized by the reduction of engine oil viscosity and the addition of friction modifying additives. In both cases, advanced engine oils allow for a reduction of engine friction. Because of differences in engine design and architecture, some engines respond more to changes in oil viscosity or friction modification than others. For example, an engine that is designed for an SAE 0W-16 oil may experience an increase in fuel economy if an SAE 0W-8 is used.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2404
Douglas Ball, David Lewis, David Moser, Sanket Nipunage
Abstract Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions were measured on a 2009 4 cylinder 2.4L Malibu PZEV vehicle with 10 and 30ppm sulfur fuel while varying the PGM (Platinum Group Metals) of the close-coupled and underfloor converters. Base CARB PH-III certification fuel was used. Three consecutive FTPs were used to measure the impact of fuel sulfur and catalyst PGM loading combinations. In general, reducing fuel sulfur and increasing catalyst PGM loadings, decrease FTP emissions. Increasing Pd concentrations can mitigate the impact of higher fuel sulfur concentrations. The results also suggest that a 50% reduction in PGM can be achieved with a reduction in fuel sulfur from 30 to 10 ppm. On average, NMHC, CO and NOx emissions were reduced by 12, 49 and 64%, respectively with the 10 ppm sulfur fuel. In addition, HC and NOx vehicle emission variability were reduced by 74 and 57% with the 10 ppm sulfur fuel.
2017-09-23
Technical Paper
2017-01-1992
Qin Xia, Jianli Duan, Feng Gao, Tao Chen, Cai Yang
Abstract ADAS must be tested thoroughly before they can be deployed for series production. Comparing with road and field test, bench test has been widely used owing to its advantages of less labor costs, more controllable scenarios, etc. However, there is no satisfied systematic approach to generate high-efficiency and full-coverage test scenarios automatically because of its integration of human, vehicle and traffic. Most of the test scenarios generated by the existing methods are either too simple or too few to be able to achieve full coverage of requirements. Besides, the cost is high when the ET method is used. To solve the aforementioned problems, an automatic test scenario generation method based on complexity for bench test is presented in this paper. Firstly, considering the fact that the device is easier to malfunction under complex cases, an index measuring the complexity of test case is proposed by using the method of AHP.
2017-09-23
Technical Paper
2017-01-1993
Daoyuan Sun, Xiaofei Pei, Xu Hu, Hao Pan, Bo Yang
Abstract This paper presents a Driver-In-the-Loop (DIL) bench test system for development of ESC controller. The real-time platform is built-up based on NI/PXI system and the real steering/throttle/braking actuator. In addition, the CarSim provides the vehicle model and the animator for virtual driving environment. A hierarchical ESC controller is proposed in MATLAB/Simulink then download into PXI. In the upper motion controller, the sliding mode theory is adopted and the logic threshold algorithm is used in the lower slip controller. Finally, ESC test is implemented under typical conditions by DIL and Model-In-the-Loop (MIL). The results show that, DIL could make up the shortage of driver model which can’t accurately simulate the emergency response of real driver. Therefore, DIL test could verify the ESC controller more accurately and effectively with considering the human-vehicle-road environment.
2017-09-22
Technical Paper
2017-01-7003
Mengzuo Han, Xin Gao, Tie Wang, Zhiwei Zhang
Hydraulic retarder, as an auxiliary braking device, is widely used in commercial vehicles. Nowadays, the hydraulic retarder’s internal oil is mainly cooled by the coolant circuit directly. It not only aggravates the load of engine cooling system, but also makes the abundant heat energy not be recycled properly. In this study, an independent energy supply device with organic Rankine cycles is applied to solve the problems above. In the structure of this energy supply device, the evaporator’s inlet and outlet is connected in parallel with the oil outlet and inlet of the retarder respectively. A part of oil enters the evaporator to transfer heat with the organic fluid, and the rest of oil enters the oil-water heat exchanger to be cooled by the coolant circuit. According to the different braking conditions of the retarder, the oil temperature in the inlet of the hydraulic retarder can be kept within the proper range through adjusting the oil flow rate into the evaporator properly.
CURRENT
2017-09-22
Standard
J1752/3_201709
This measurement procedure defines a method for measuring the electromagnetic radiation from an integrated circuit (IC). The IC being evaluated is mounted on an IC test printed circuit board (PCB) that is clamped to a mating port (referred to as a wall port) cut in the top or bottom of a TEM or wideband TEM (GTEM) cell. The test board is not in the cell as in the conventional usage but becomes a part of the cell wall. This method is applicable to any TEM or GTEM cell modified to incorporate the wall port; however, the measured RF voltage is affected by the septum to test board (wall) spacing. This procedure was developed using a 1 GHz TEM cell with a septum to wall spacing of 45 mm and a GTEM cell with average septum to wall spacing of 45 mm over the port area. Other cells may not produce identical spectral output but may be used for comparative measurements, subject to their frequency and sensitivity limitations.
2017-09-21
WIP Standard
AIR8012
The purpose of the document is to provide the guidelines of the technological approach for developing a PHM system for EMAs with particular reference to their possible use as primary flight control actuators. It provides a basic description of the physics of the most common degradation processes,a reliability assessment and a discussion on the signals, with the associated data processing, required to build up an effective health monitoring system.
2017-09-20
WIP Standard
AMS2628B
This specification covers procedures for ultrasonic immersion inspection of premium grade wrought titanium and titanium alloy round billet 5.0 inches (127 mm) and over in nominal diameter. This inspection procedure has been used typically for locating internal defects such as cracks, voids, inclusions, and other structural discontinuities which may or may not be exposed to the surface in billets, but usage is not limited to such applications. Testing normally will be by longitudinal procedure, but shear wave procedure may be added when agreed upon by purchaser and vendor. This specification includes zoned inspection and digital data acquisition.
2017-09-20
WIP Standard
AS5148A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) describes the assembly, installation and torque values for flareless and straight thread fluid fittings and tube assemblies.
CURRENT
2017-09-20
Standard
ARP4252B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice is intended as a guide toward standard practices for the determination of surface cleanliness that are applicable to field operation. Some of these methods can also be used to determine quality assurance that a surface has been properly prepared and maintained. The instrumental methods are: Wettabaility, Surface Potential Difference (SPD), Ellipsometry, and Optically Stimulated Electron Emission (OSEE). Each instrument is described with respect to measurement techniques, limitations, and advantages and types of available instruments. Elementary theoretical prinicples and examples of the use of each instrument are also given.
2017-09-19
WIP Standard
AS6960
Seat surrounding furniture (commonly known as shells) is intended to enhance passenger comfort and privacy. They can offer additional space for reclining the seat into a bed position, additional stowage, amenities, etc. Often some amenities are located on the furniture including the front row monument installed in front of the passenger seat. The units normally attach to the same aircraft floor tracks directly in front or behind passenger seat(s) or to the seat primary structure. The unit structures are not directly integrated into the main fuselage and do not offer main supports for aircraft integrity. This Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes the minimum design, performance and qualification requirements for Seat Surrounding Furniture to be certified for installation in transport category airplanes.
CURRENT
2017-09-19
Standard
J2555_201709
This SAE Standard describes a procedure to be used to evaluate a disturbance known as “idle gear rattle” which can exist in vehicles equipped with manual transmissions and clutches. Other types of noises associated with operation at idle are also briefly described.
CURRENT
2017-09-19
Standard
J2908_201709
This document provides test methods for evaluating the maximum power of electrified vehicle powertrain systems by direct measurement at the drive wheel hubs or axles. Additional tests are included specifically for PHEVs to measure electric-only propulsion power and for HEVs to measure electric power assist and regenerative braking. The testing requires either a chassis or hub dynamometer for all driven wheels. Results are processed to provide fair and consistent comparisons of power capabilities among different designs of electrified powertrains. Tests can also be performed on conventional vehicles if precise comparisons to electrified vehicles are desired.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2153
Patrick Land, Petros Stavroulakis, Richard Crossley, Patrick Bointon, Harvey Brookes, Jon Wright, Svetan Ratchev, David Branson
Abstract Inspection of Composite panels is vital to the assessment of their ability to be fit for purpose. Conventional methods such as X-ray CT and Ultrasonic scanning can be used, however, these are often expensive and time consuming processes. In this paper we investigate the use of off-the-shelf Non-Destructive Test, NDT, equipment utilizing Fringe projection hardware and open source software to rapidly evaluate a series of composite panels. These results are then verified using destructive analysis of the panels to prove the reliability of the rapid NDT methods for use with carbon composite panels. This process allows us to quickly identify regions of geometric intolerance or formed defects without the use of expensive sub-surface scanning systems, enabling a fast and cost effective initial part evaluation system. The focus of this testing series is on 6mm thick pre-preg carbon-epoxy composite laminates that have been laid up using AFP and formed using TRF.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2150
Joshua Cemenska, Todd Rudberg, Michael Henscheid, Andrew Lauletta, Bradley Davis
Abstract In AFP manufacturing systems, manually inspection of parts consumes a large portion of total production time and is susceptible to missing defects. The aerospace industry is responding to this inefficiency by focusing on the development of automated inspection systems. The first generation of automated inspection systems is now entering production. This paper reviews the performance of the first generation system and discusses reasonable expectations. Estimates of automated inspection time will be made, and it will be shown that the automated solution enables a detailed statistical analysis of manufactured part quality and provides the data necessary for statistical process control. Data collection allows for a reduction in rework because not all errors need to be corrected. Expectations will be set for the accuracy for both ply boundary and overlap/gap measurements. The time and resource cost of development and integration will also be discussed.
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