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Viewing 211 to 240 of 15354
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0072
Moqtik Bawase, M R Saraf
Abstract Utilization of higher ethanol blends, 20% ethanol in gasoline (E20), as an alternate fuel can provide apparent benefits like higher octane number leading to improved anti-knocking properties, higher oxygen content resulting in complete combustion. Apart from technical benefits, use of ethanol blends offer certain widespread socioeconomic benefits including option of renewable source of energy, value addition to agriculture feedstock resulting in increase in farm income, creation of more jobs in rural sector and creating job at local levels. Use of higher blends of ethanol can reduce dependence on foreign crude leading to substantial savings in cost of petroleum import. The impact of higher Gasoline-Ethanol blend (E20), on the fuel system components of gasoline vehicles must be known for assessment of whether the fuel system will be able to perform as intended for the complete design life of the system.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0152
Serge Lievens, Bjorn Van Gasse, Sandra Claeys, Jurgen De Kimpe, Amol Chore
Abstract In conjunction with modern engine design and long term reliability needs, the resistance of engine coolants to oxidative stress has become an increasingly important feature. This paper describes the results of a study that evaluated the influence of parameters such as temperature, aeration and catalytic metal interaction on the oxidation stability of engine coolants. Three different test set-ups were used in which the selected conditions put variable weights to the contribution of each parameter. A comparison was made of the oxidation resistance of multiple high quality OEM approved coolant products with different additive technologies. This work is different from previous investigations focusing mainly on the behavior of coolants in single test conditions.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0242
Guido Tosolin, Kwang Chan Ko
Abstract A vehicle simulation model is developed, validated and integrated into a closed-loop virtual driving environment using a state-of-the-art hexapod driving simulator. Thirty variant states are implemented and evaluated subjectively on steering and handling performance quality and quantity. Standard open-loop objective testing manoeuvres are simulated and performance metrics are calculated, allowing for a systematic cross-correlation process. Graphical analysis of the correlation metrics proves that chassis changes may accurately be felt through the simulator interface. It is proposed how obtained correlation models may serve for driver-feel optimizing target setting in early vehicle development stages, frontloading a great deal of costly prototype testing. System requirements are established and benefits and limitations are portrayed.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0292
Irshad Mahammad, Vinay Nagaraj, Saurabh Prabhakar
Abstract To replicate on-road brake test cycle of cooling or heating through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations, the vehicle model with brake assembly must be solved in transient mode. However, such simulations require significant computational time owning to the physics involved in computing the variation of temperature with time. A methodology developed using commercial CFD tools to predict the Heat Transfer Coefficient (h), Cooling Coefficient (b) and rotor temperatures is described in this paper. All the three modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection and radiation are considered in the current method. Heat transfer coefficients from the CFD simulations are exported to Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools to validate the Brake Rotor Thermal Coning caused by high thermal gradients in brake rotor.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0130
Hemant P. Urdhwareshe
Abstract In the recent times, there have been number of cases of failure to pass the COP tests. When a vehicle fails a COP test, it is very embarrassing and expensive for the manufacturer as there is a loss of faith by the society and consumers. It is also painful for the certification agency as well as government. In this context, it is important to quantify and minimize the risk associated with these tests for manufacturers as well as certification agencies. The sampling plan specified in MoRTH / CMVR / TAP-115 is designed to quickly pass vehicles which have very low emissions and quickly reject (fail) vehicles having higher emissions compared to the specified limit. These sampling plans can be classified under Probability Ratio Sequential Tests (PRST).
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0364
Igor Gritsuk, Vladimir Volkov, Vasyl Mateichyk, Yurii Gutarevych, Mykola Tsiuman, Nataliia Goridko
Abstract The article suggests the results of experimental and theoretical studies of the engine heating system with a phase-transitional thermal accumulator when the vehicle is in motion in a driving cycle. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficiency of the vehicle heating system within thermal accumulator and catalytic converter under operating conditions. The peculiarity of the presented system is that it uses thermal energy of exhaust gases to accumulate energy during engine operation. The article describes the methodology to evaluate vehicle fuel consumption and emission in the driving cycle according to the UNECE Regulation № 83-05. The methodology takes into account the environmental parameters, road conditions, the design parameters of the vehicle, the modes of its motion, thermal state of the engine cooling system and the catalytic converter.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0260
Amar Penta, Prasad Warule, Sanjay Patel, Lohit Dhamija
Abstract Single plate dry clutch is most commonly used in automotive transmission. This paper proposes a unique approach of modelling a single plate dry clutch in Simulink and Simscape simulation environment. Clutch model is divided into two subsystems as translational and rotational. The translational system is linear system of diaphragm and cushion spring as a two-degree freedom system. Nonlinearity of the diaphragm and cushion spring has been modelled based on experimental data. This enables to simulate friction torque variation during clutch engagement. In rotational system, frictional torque generation between flywheel-clutch disc and pressure plate-clutch disc has been modelled separately. This novel approach of developing separate friction models helps in understanding variation in torque carrying capacity due to rise in the temperature of the friction pads because of frictional and engine heat.
2016-11-16
Journal Article
2016-01-9047
Taewon Han, Huajun Zhen, Gediminas Mainelis
Abstract We recently developed a novel diesel emissions control device, Electrostatic Screen Battery for Emissions Control (ESBEC), where diesel exhaust particles are collected onto metal screens using electrostatic principle. This paper focuses on further development of this technology: design and integration of a particle charger and testing of ESBEC with diesel exhaust. Two units - 0.038 and 0.152 m (1.5 and 6 inches) in diameter - were fabricated using 3D printing. Both units feature cylinder-shaped housing integrating the electrical charger and up to seven pairs of metal screens, which collect airborne particles. In the small-scale version, particles are charged by ions emitted from a carbon fiber brush, while in the large-scale version, this is done by using two tungsten wires traversing the cross-section of ESBEC in a crisscross pattern.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0059
Maki Kawakoshi, Takashi Kobayashi, Makoto Hasegawa
Abstract For applying ISO 26262 to motorcycles, controllability classification (C class evaluation) by expert riders is considered an appropriate technique. Expert riders have evaluated commercial product development for years and can appropriately conduct vehicle tests while observing safety restrictions (such as avoiding the risk of falling). Moreover, expert riders can ride safely and can stably evaluate motorcycle performance even if the test conditions are close to the limits of vehicle performance. This study aims to construct a motorcycle C class evaluation method based on an expert rider’s subjective evaluation. On the premise that expert riders can rate the C class, we improved a test procedure that used a subjective evaluation sheet as the concrete C class evaluation method for an actual hazardous event.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0054
Barath Mohan, KVM Raju, Sai Praveen Velagapudi, Chandramouli Padmanabhan
The aim of the present study is to develop feasible test methods to measure the lateral force characteristics of motorcycle tires. In this work, new experimental procedures are developed to estimate the lateral friction coefficient and lateral stiffness characteristics of motorcycle tires. A fairly accurate tire model is developed using the measured lateral force characteristics. Based on this tire model, the steer behavior and the cornering limits of the motorcycle are estimated using an analytical model of the vehicle. The results are validated with experimental data. The test methods proposed are shown to be adequate to estimate tire characteristics that are important for tire development and is less expensive compared to the standard testing facilities available.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0013
Chiara Giordano, Svein Kleiven
This study describes a method to identify laboratory test procedures and impact response requirements suitable for assessing the biofidelity of finite element head models used in prediction of traumatic brain injury. The selection of the experimental data and the response requirements were result of a critical evaluation based on the accuracy, reproducibility and relevance of the available experimental data. A weighted averaging procedure was chosen in order to consider different contributions from the various test conditions and target measurements based on experimental error. According to the quality criteria, 40 experimental cases were selected to be a representative dataset for validation. Based on the evaluation of response curves from four head finite element models, CORA was chosen as a quantitative method to compare the predicted time history response to the measured data.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0005
Matthieu Lebarbé, Pascal Baudrit, Pascal Potier, Philippe Petit, Xavier Trosseille, Sabine Compigne, Mitsutoshi Masuda, Takumi Fujii, Richard Douard
The aim of this study was to investigate the sacroiliac joint injury mechanism. Two test configurations were selected from full scale car crashes conducted with the WorldSID 50th dummy resulting in high sacroiliac joint loads and low pubic symphysis force, i.e. severe conditions for the sacroiliac joint. The two test conditions were reproduced in laboratory using a 150-155 kg guided probe propelled respectively at 8 m/s and 7.5 m/s and with different shapes and orientations for the plate impacting the pelvis. Nine Post Mortem Human Subject (PMHS) were tested in each of the two configurations (eighteen PMHS in total). In order to get information on the time of fracture, eleven strain gauges were glued on the pelvic bone of each PMHS. Results - In the first configuration, five PMHS out of nine sustained AIS2+ pelvic injuries. All five presented sacroiliac joint injuries associated with pubic area injuries.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0009
Hollie A. Pietsch, Kelly E. Bosch, David R. Weyland, E. Meade Spratley, Kyvory A. Henderson, Robert S. Salzar, Terrance A. Smith, Brandon M. Sagara, Constantine K. Demetropoulos, Christopher J. Dooley, Andrew C. Merkle
Three laboratory simulated sub-injurious under-body blast (UBB) test conditions were conducted with whole-body Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) and the Warrior Assessment Injury Manikin (WIAMan) Technology Demonstrator (TD) to establish and assess UBB biofidelity of the WIAMan TD. Test conditions included a rigid floor and rigid seat with independently varied pulses. On the floor, peak velocities of 4 m/s and 6 m/s were applied with a 5 ms time to peak (TTP). The seat peak velocity was 4 m/s with varied TTP of 5 and 10 ms. Tests were conducted with and without personal protective equipment (PPE). PMHS response data was compiled into preliminary biofidelity response corridors (BRCs), which served as evaluation metrics for the WIAMan TD. Each WIAMan TD response was evaluated against the PMHS preliminary BRC for the loading and unloading phase of the signal time history using Correlation Analysis (CORA) software to assign a numerical score between 0 and 1.
2016-10-28
Technical Paper
Tests and Testing
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0280
Marcelo F. Gomes, Eduardo Catalani, Daniel Rodrigues, Klemer Santiago
Abstract Vehicles sold in many countries around the globe must comply with ECE R14 or FMVSS 210 regulation in order to ensure proper function of the safety belt system when submitted to high loads. In these regulations, the procedure requests to apply high forces on the safety belts by using proper devices. All components of the system such as seats, safety belts, anchorage points and vehicle body have to resist the specified loads with no damages. The loads are applied slowly and sustained over a long period of time, characterizing a quasi-static test. The present work was developed to understand the energy distribution among all components during seat anchorage test and determine any potential failure, including cases in which components are changed. The system was optimized considering the energy dispersed by each component and their material plastic strength limit.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0226
Javier Gutierrez, Guido Tosolin, Alexandre Catala
Abstract The integration of IDIADA Spain virtual Proving Ground (ISVPG) within ADAMS/Car offers a new virtual scenario to carry out detailed analysis of durability as well as Comfort & Ride. Moreover, these high resolution roads (modeled as OpenCRG road format) support model development activities through better correlation with experimental tests. This approach helps to reduce the number of real tests and to shorten development process times. At the same time, this data would be prepared for performance testing to support driving simulator and active system development. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the benefits to use FTire model for Ride and Comfort applications and the use of flexible bodies for better predictions. The availability of this information will depend on the status of the project and the level of maturity of the simulation input data. As a result, different levels of accuracy will be reached according to the existing input data.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0250
Marcelo Leandro dos Santos, André Morais Ferreira
Abstract This paper presents a comparative study of different cubic fixation devices used for vibration tests on electrodynamic shakers. The resonance frequencies are obtained experimentally and they are used to calibrate the finite element simulation model. After that, a new design is proposed in order to increase the frequency of its first vibration mode and improve its useful frequency test range.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0124
Luís Felipe Ferreira Motta Barbosa, José Elias Tomazini, Marcelo Sampaio Martins, Lucas Reis Rangel Querido Moreira, Marcos Yukio Tokuue Hori, Luís Felipe Santos Silva
Abstract The torsional stiffness of a chassis is one of the most important properties of a vehicle’s structure, once a low torsional stiffness has many negative effects, especially in handling characteristics. For the first time, the torsional stiffness was considered on the design of a Baja SAE prototype of the team from UNESP - FEG, “Equipe Piratas do Vale”. In this work, a finite element analysis is first performed in order to evaluate the torsional stiffness of this prototype, called MB1114. Then, an experimental evaluation of this parameter is executed, detailing the post-processing of the results, such as the hysteresis effect and uncertainty analysis. It also shows that it is possible to measure the torsional stiffness of chassis with a low experimental uncertainty without spending too much. The test rig used is simple to be produced and can be easily stocked. Those features are important for Baja and Formula SAE teams.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0127
Gustavo Siebert, Amilton Sinatora
Abstract The growing use of tribotest has been helping the researches to understand the actuation mechanisms of additives on the friction and wear control of engine parts. But, it is common to observe differences between the tribofilms formed in real situation from that obtained using tribotests. Furthermore, the automakers have difficulty to correlate the results obtained using tribotests with that performed using engines in dynamometers. For the piston ring/cylinder bore tribosystem is almost impossible to reproduce its real tribosystem using tribotests. Therefore simplifications are necessary and they affect the tribochemical behavior of the tribosystem. To understand how these simplifications and the test parameters affect the tribochemical behavior of the simplified tribosystem is critical to design a tribotest that correlate well with the real situation.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0134
Levi N. da Silva, Kerolin F. Tessari, Maicon D. Garcia, Thiago C. de Freitas
Abstract Experimental results reveal that the temperature rise of two contacting bodies in relative sliding motion is related to increase of torque and loads caused by expansion of bearing components. The evolution of effects of thermally induced loads with time in an angular contact ball bearing in a controlled temperature environment is studied experimentally and analytically. The test apparatus is an axially-loaded angular contact ball bearing instrumented to measure the dynamic frictional torque as well as the transient temperature of the raceway and environment inside of a chamber with controlled temperature. Effects of friction torque were examined at different speeds, operating temperatures and pre-loads. The mathematical model developed provides a comprehensive thermal analysis of the ball bearing with provision for frictional heat generation, heat transfer processes and thermal expansion of bearing components.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0170
Moisés Krutzmann, Dimitrius Caloghero, Tiago Schmidt, Rogério Marczak
Abstract The knowledge of mechanical behaviour of material is vital for durability prediction and attending initial project requirements. Through the experimental evaluations is possible to measure this behaviour and use it as input in numerical simulations. Temperature changes considerably static and dynamic mechanical properties of materials, particularly in elastomers. This study was motivated to predict the durability under several working temperatures of center bearings rubber cushion of driveshafts that needs to achieve prespecified stiffness and durability parameters. Standardized specimens were tested in fatigue for experimental investigation of the rubber compound. Durability tests were performed in the final product sample and compared with tests performed in standardized specimens. It was concluded that this approach produces accurate results for fatigue predictions and provided useful equations for practical design applications and reducing product validation time.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0423
Bruno Barbosa Salles, Almir Atoatte, Robson Cruz
Abstract Targeting the current demands for engines with lower emissions, reduced fuel consumption, downsizing and higher peak combustion pressures, thyssenkrupp has developed a new cranktrain concept comprising an increased radial transition between journal and web that extends itself into the bearing’s load-carrying zone, creating a symmetrical U-shaped profile. The resulting non-straight bearing contour restricts the use of a standard bearing shell and led to the development of an integral bearing solution, where a copper based material was applied directly to the connecting rod big end bore. The so-called U-shape cranktrain was experimentally evaluated on a fired engine through a series of eight test steps with varied loads and speeds, being each step condition defined in a way that increased severity was applied to the connecting rod bearings as the test proceeded. The engine was disassembled after each step for analysis and measurement of the crankshaft and connecting rods.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0457
Weber Ferreira Veloso, Marcela Rodrigues Machado Garcia, Sabrina Glicéria Firmino, Juliana Queiroga Gazaniga de Assis, Diego Palhares de Faria
Abstract Through a computing transient thermal analysis, the team evaluated the quality of the material and its resistance to thermal fatigue by a comparative method. With the steel used in 1020 failed in 2014, for the team Formula UFMG, the 1020 steel, 1045, 1070 and stainless steel 304 were compared, where the stainless steel was the parameter of better resistance to thermal cracking. The main calculated parameters were subjected to empiric validations and the best material has been applied and used in the 2015 season. The use of the disks in a competition and in a battery of tests superior to 2014, permitted the evaluation of the final result of applying the material.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0405
Antônio Carlos Scardini Villela, Rogério Nascimento de Carvalho, Pedro Caffaro Vicentini
Abstract In order to simulate the real behavior of vehicles during laboratory tests, such as fuel consumption [1] and pollutant emissions [2], coast down coefficients must be set on the chassis dynamometer control system. These coefficients are used to determine load curves, which represent the resistance imposed on the vehicle movement by the wheels rolling and the air, being obtained from track tests performed according to Brazilian standard ABNT NBR 10312 [3]. However, coast down tests depend on the availability of long and flat tracks. This may entail costs for deployment or leasing of facilities with these characteristics, which may include even long commutes of human and material resources, depending on its location. This paper proposes an alternative methodology for coast down coefficients determination, from experiments on chassis dynamometer and vehicles aerodynamic specifications. It was applied to some Petrobras Research Center (Cenpes) test vehicles.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0235
Juliana Lima da Silva Lopes, Cleber Albert Moreira Marques, Genildo de Moura Vasconcelos, Rafael Barreto Vieira, Flavio Fabricio Ventura de Melo Ferreira, Marcelo Henrique Souza Bomfim
Abstract This paper approaches the use of machine vision as an automation tool for verification tests in automotive Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC). A computer integrated with PXI modular instruments, machine vision software and Integrated Development Environment (IDE) composes the test system. The IPC is verified in closed-loop using the Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) technique in which the HiL system simulates all Electronic Control Units (ECUs) that interact with the IPC. Every simulated ECUs signals are sent to the IPC over CAN (Controller Area Network) bus or hardwired I/O using PXI modules integrated with IDE and its responses are captured by cameras. Using machine vision such images are subjected to Digital Image Processing (DIP) techniques as pattern matching, edge detection and Optical Character Recognition (OCR), which can be applied to interpret speedometer, tachometer, fuel gauges, display and warning lights.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2324
Xiaoguo Tang, Dan McBryde
Abstract Modern light-duty vehicles require well-controlled engine-out feed-gas and very high catalyst efficiencies to meet the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 2 & 3 standards. When a vehicle with either a gasoline or diesel engine is operating within its controlled state-space the exhaust emissions present at the tailpipe are extremely low. When it is not operating within its controlled state-space the combustion process and therefore its exhaust emissions characteristics will be different. This may occur when an emission control device fails or if a defeat device is employed. Moreover, different control technologies each have unique characteristics or signatures that could assist in identifying either emission control device failure or an existing defeat device.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2217
Alex K. Gibson, John Corn, Jeremy Walker
Abstract This paper describes the bench testing procedures for a series-parallel, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle architecture used in its charge depleting mode. This architecture will be integrated into a 2016 Chevrolet Camaro by the Mississippi State University EcoCAR 3 Team. Our bench testing goals are to determine the accuracy of our current vehicle model components, if our current controller algorithms are efficient, and if our powertrain is properly integrated. Three torque control strategies using two UQM motors will be evaluated. Initial findings in this paper will be used to prepare the MSU EcoCAR 3 team for vehicle optimization and further integration work during the year three portion of the EcoCAR 3 competition. Three charge depleting motor control strategies are evaluated for drivetrain torque loss and energy consumption. The control strategies were tested using a Nissan Frontier chassis as the bench testing frame (or mule) on a chassis dynamometer.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2207
Elizabeth Schiferl, Timothy N. Hunt, Robert Slocum
Abstract With government mandates, original equipment manufacturers are increasingly focusing on fuel economy and finding efficiency gains throughout the vehicle. Lubricant companies have been asked to design fluids that aid in this effort. Demonstrating real gains becomes complex given the intricacies of these systems and methods range from bench top screen tests to component test stands to full vehicle testing. This paper addresses the variation that was encountered when testing automatic transmission fluid efficiency within a full vehicle test. While it is well known that variability in testing conditions such as engine load or vehicle speed will lead to variability in results, the magnitude of their impact on average throughout the test cycle suggests that repeat testing may not be sufficient to guard against improper conclusions.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2329
Pooyan Kheirkhah, Patrick Kirchen, Steven Rogak
Abstract Soot emissions from direct-injection engines are sensitive to the fuel-air mixing process, and may vary between combustion cycles due to turbulence and injector variability. Conventional exhaust emissions measurements cannot resolve inter- or intra-cycle variations in particle emissions, which can be important during transient engine operations where a few cycles can disproportionately affect the total exhaust soot. The Fast Exhaust Nephelometer (FEN) is introduced here to use light scattering to measure particulate matter concentration and size near the exhaust port of an engine with a time resolution of better than one millisecond. The FEN operates at atmospheric pressure, sampling near the engine exhaust port and uses a laser diode to illuminate a small measurement volume. The scattered light is focused on two amplified photodiodes.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2356
Shaopeng Tian, Geng Li, Tongliang Que
Abstract This paper mainly researches transmission efficiency (TE) of mechanical transmission in relation to the temperature of lubricating oil. Firstly the formula of TE is calculated about the kinematic viscosity of lubricating oil, then analyze the relationship between kinematic viscosity and temperature of lubricating oil, and finally the formula of TE which is related to the oil temperature is put forward. In order to verify the theoretical formula, the test bench for mechanical transmission is designed, which is used to research the N109 transmission of one mini car. The bench can be used to measure the curve of TE under different speed , load and lubricating oil temperature. The optimum operating temperature of the transmission is obtained by analyzing the measured data and theoretical calculation results. The test bench adopts 2 AC asynchronous motors to respectively simulate the driving and load performance of a vehicle.
Viewing 211 to 240 of 15354