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Viewing 181 to 210 of 15311
2016-10-28
Technical Paper
Tests and Testing
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0280
Marcelo F. Gomes, Eduardo Catalani, Daniel Rodrigues, Klemer Santiago
Abstract Vehicles sold in many countries around the globe must comply with ECE R14 or FMVSS 210 regulation in order to ensure proper function of the safety belt system when submitted to high loads. In these regulations, the procedure requests to apply high forces on the safety belts by using proper devices. All components of the system such as seats, safety belts, anchorage points and vehicle body have to resist the specified loads with no damages. The loads are applied slowly and sustained over a long period of time, characterizing a quasi-static test. The present work was developed to understand the energy distribution among all components during seat anchorage test and determine any potential failure, including cases in which components are changed. The system was optimized considering the energy dispersed by each component and their material plastic strength limit.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0226
Javier Gutierrez, Guido Tosolin, Alexandre Catala
Abstract The integration of IDIADA Spain virtual Proving Ground (ISVPG) within ADAMS/Car offers a new virtual scenario to carry out detailed analysis of durability as well as Comfort & Ride. Moreover, these high resolution roads (modeled as OpenCRG road format) support model development activities through better correlation with experimental tests. This approach helps to reduce the number of real tests and to shorten development process times. At the same time, this data would be prepared for performance testing to support driving simulator and active system development. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the benefits to use FTire model for Ride and Comfort applications and the use of flexible bodies for better predictions. The availability of this information will depend on the status of the project and the level of maturity of the simulation input data. As a result, different levels of accuracy will be reached according to the existing input data.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0235
Juliana Lima da Silva Lopes, Cleber Albert Moreira Marques, Genildo de Moura Vasconcelos, Rafael Barreto Vieira, Flavio Fabricio Ventura de Melo Ferreira, Marcelo Henrique Souza Bomfim
Abstract This paper approaches the use of machine vision as an automation tool for verification tests in automotive Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC). A computer integrated with PXI modular instruments, machine vision software and Integrated Development Environment (IDE) composes the test system. The IPC is verified in closed-loop using the Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) technique in which the HiL system simulates all Electronic Control Units (ECUs) that interact with the IPC. Every simulated ECUs signals are sent to the IPC over CAN (Controller Area Network) bus or hardwired I/O using PXI modules integrated with IDE and its responses are captured by cameras. Using machine vision such images are subjected to Digital Image Processing (DIP) techniques as pattern matching, edge detection and Optical Character Recognition (OCR), which can be applied to interpret speedometer, tachometer, fuel gauges, display and warning lights.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0250
Marcelo Leandro dos Santos, André Morais Ferreira
Abstract This paper presents a comparative study of different cubic fixation devices used for vibration tests on electrodynamic shakers. The resonance frequencies are obtained experimentally and they are used to calibrate the finite element simulation model. After that, a new design is proposed in order to increase the frequency of its first vibration mode and improve its useful frequency test range.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0124
Luís Felipe Ferreira Motta Barbosa, José Elias Tomazini, Marcelo Sampaio Martins, Lucas Reis Rangel Querido Moreira, Marcos Yukio Tokuue Hori, Luís Felipe Santos Silva
Abstract The torsional stiffness of a chassis is one of the most important properties of a vehicle’s structure, once a low torsional stiffness has many negative effects, especially in handling characteristics. For the first time, the torsional stiffness was considered on the design of a Baja SAE prototype of the team from UNESP - FEG, “Equipe Piratas do Vale”. In this work, a finite element analysis is first performed in order to evaluate the torsional stiffness of this prototype, called MB1114. Then, an experimental evaluation of this parameter is executed, detailing the post-processing of the results, such as the hysteresis effect and uncertainty analysis. It also shows that it is possible to measure the torsional stiffness of chassis with a low experimental uncertainty without spending too much. The test rig used is simple to be produced and can be easily stocked. Those features are important for Baja and Formula SAE teams.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0127
Gustavo Siebert, Amilton Sinatora
Abstract The growing use of tribotest has been helping the researches to understand the actuation mechanisms of additives on the friction and wear control of engine parts. But, it is common to observe differences between the tribofilms formed in real situation from that obtained using tribotests. Furthermore, the automakers have difficulty to correlate the results obtained using tribotests with that performed using engines in dynamometers. For the piston ring/cylinder bore tribosystem is almost impossible to reproduce its real tribosystem using tribotests. Therefore simplifications are necessary and they affect the tribochemical behavior of the tribosystem. To understand how these simplifications and the test parameters affect the tribochemical behavior of the simplified tribosystem is critical to design a tribotest that correlate well with the real situation.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0134
Levi N. da Silva, Kerolin F. Tessari, Maicon D. Garcia, Thiago C. de Freitas
Abstract Experimental results reveal that the temperature rise of two contacting bodies in relative sliding motion is related to increase of torque and loads caused by expansion of bearing components. The evolution of effects of thermally induced loads with time in an angular contact ball bearing in a controlled temperature environment is studied experimentally and analytically. The test apparatus is an axially-loaded angular contact ball bearing instrumented to measure the dynamic frictional torque as well as the transient temperature of the raceway and environment inside of a chamber with controlled temperature. Effects of friction torque were examined at different speeds, operating temperatures and pre-loads. The mathematical model developed provides a comprehensive thermal analysis of the ball bearing with provision for frictional heat generation, heat transfer processes and thermal expansion of bearing components.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0170
Moisés Krutzmann, Dimitrius Caloghero, Tiago Schmidt, Rogério Marczak
Abstract The knowledge of mechanical behaviour of material is vital for durability prediction and attending initial project requirements. Through the experimental evaluations is possible to measure this behaviour and use it as input in numerical simulations. Temperature changes considerably static and dynamic mechanical properties of materials, particularly in elastomers. This study was motivated to predict the durability under several working temperatures of center bearings rubber cushion of driveshafts that needs to achieve prespecified stiffness and durability parameters. Standardized specimens were tested in fatigue for experimental investigation of the rubber compound. Durability tests were performed in the final product sample and compared with tests performed in standardized specimens. It was concluded that this approach produces accurate results for fatigue predictions and provided useful equations for practical design applications and reducing product validation time.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0405
Antônio Carlos Scardini Villela, Rogério Nascimento de Carvalho, Pedro Caffaro Vicentini
Abstract In order to simulate the real behavior of vehicles during laboratory tests, such as fuel consumption [1] and pollutant emissions [2], coast down coefficients must be set on the chassis dynamometer control system. These coefficients are used to determine load curves, which represent the resistance imposed on the vehicle movement by the wheels rolling and the air, being obtained from track tests performed according to Brazilian standard ABNT NBR 10312 [3]. However, coast down tests depend on the availability of long and flat tracks. This may entail costs for deployment or leasing of facilities with these characteristics, which may include even long commutes of human and material resources, depending on its location. This paper proposes an alternative methodology for coast down coefficients determination, from experiments on chassis dynamometer and vehicles aerodynamic specifications. It was applied to some Petrobras Research Center (Cenpes) test vehicles.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0423
Bruno Barbosa Salles, Almir Atoatte, Robson Cruz
Abstract Targeting the current demands for engines with lower emissions, reduced fuel consumption, downsizing and higher peak combustion pressures, thyssenkrupp has developed a new cranktrain concept comprising an increased radial transition between journal and web that extends itself into the bearing’s load-carrying zone, creating a symmetrical U-shaped profile. The resulting non-straight bearing contour restricts the use of a standard bearing shell and led to the development of an integral bearing solution, where a copper based material was applied directly to the connecting rod big end bore. The so-called U-shape cranktrain was experimentally evaluated on a fired engine through a series of eight test steps with varied loads and speeds, being each step condition defined in a way that increased severity was applied to the connecting rod bearings as the test proceeded. The engine was disassembled after each step for analysis and measurement of the crankshaft and connecting rods.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0457
Weber Ferreira Veloso, Marcela Rodrigues Machado Garcia, Sabrina Glicéria Firmino, Juliana Queiroga Gazaniga de Assis, Diego Palhares de Faria
Abstract Through a computing transient thermal analysis, the team evaluated the quality of the material and its resistance to thermal fatigue by a comparative method. With the steel used in 1020 failed in 2014, for the team Formula UFMG, the 1020 steel, 1045, 1070 and stainless steel 304 were compared, where the stainless steel was the parameter of better resistance to thermal cracking. The main calculated parameters were subjected to empiric validations and the best material has been applied and used in the 2015 season. The use of the disks in a competition and in a battery of tests superior to 2014, permitted the evaluation of the final result of applying the material.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2207
Elizabeth Schiferl, Timothy N. Hunt, Robert Slocum
Abstract With government mandates, original equipment manufacturers are increasingly focusing on fuel economy and finding efficiency gains throughout the vehicle. Lubricant companies have been asked to design fluids that aid in this effort. Demonstrating real gains becomes complex given the intricacies of these systems and methods range from bench top screen tests to component test stands to full vehicle testing. This paper addresses the variation that was encountered when testing automatic transmission fluid efficiency within a full vehicle test. While it is well known that variability in testing conditions such as engine load or vehicle speed will lead to variability in results, the magnitude of their impact on average throughout the test cycle suggests that repeat testing may not be sufficient to guard against improper conclusions.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2217
Alex K. Gibson, John Corn, Jeremy Walker
Abstract This paper describes the bench testing procedures for a series-parallel, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle architecture used in its charge depleting mode. This architecture will be integrated into a 2016 Chevrolet Camaro by the Mississippi State University EcoCAR 3 Team. Our bench testing goals are to determine the accuracy of our current vehicle model components, if our current controller algorithms are efficient, and if our powertrain is properly integrated. Three torque control strategies using two UQM motors will be evaluated. Initial findings in this paper will be used to prepare the MSU EcoCAR 3 team for vehicle optimization and further integration work during the year three portion of the EcoCAR 3 competition. Three charge depleting motor control strategies are evaluated for drivetrain torque loss and energy consumption. The control strategies were tested using a Nissan Frontier chassis as the bench testing frame (or mule) on a chassis dynamometer.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2351
Kotaro Tanaka, Kazuki Hiroki, Tomoki Kikuchi, Mitsuru Konno, Mitsuharu Oguma
Abstract Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is widely used in diesel engines to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. However, a lacquer is formed on the EGR valve or EGR cooler due to particulate matter and other components present in diesel exhaust, causing serious problems. In this study, the mechanism of lacquer deposition is investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (ATR-FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Deposition of temperature-dependent lacquers was evaluated by varying the temperature of a diamond prism between 80 and 120 °C in an ATR-FTIR spectrometer integrated into a custom-built sample line, which branched off from the exhaust pipe of a diesel engine. Lacquers were deposited on the diamond prism at 100 °C or less, while no lacquer was deposited at 120 °C. Time-dependent ATR-FTIR spectra were obtained for approximately 2 h from the beginning of the experiment.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2356
Shaopeng Tian, Geng Li, Tongliang Que
Abstract This paper mainly researches transmission efficiency (TE) of mechanical transmission in relation to the temperature of lubricating oil. Firstly the formula of TE is calculated about the kinematic viscosity of lubricating oil, then analyze the relationship between kinematic viscosity and temperature of lubricating oil, and finally the formula of TE which is related to the oil temperature is put forward. In order to verify the theoretical formula, the test bench for mechanical transmission is designed, which is used to research the N109 transmission of one mini car. The bench can be used to measure the curve of TE under different speed , load and lubricating oil temperature. The optimum operating temperature of the transmission is obtained by analyzing the measured data and theoretical calculation results. The test bench adopts 2 AC asynchronous motors to respectively simulate the driving and load performance of a vehicle.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2328
Edward Chappell, Richard Burke, Pin Lu, Michael Gee, Rod Williams
Abstract Precise, repeatable and representative testing is a key tool for developing and demonstrating automotive fuel and lubricant products. This paper reports on the first findings of a project that aims to determine the requirements for highly repeatable test methods to measure very small differences in fuel economy and powertrain performance. This will be underpinned by identifying and quantifying the variations inherent to this specific test vehicle, both on-road and on Chassis Dynamometer (CD), that create a barrier to improved testing methods. In this initial work, a comparison was made between on-road driving, the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC) and World harmonized Light-duty Test Cycle (WLTC) cycles to understand the behavior of various vehicle systems along with the discrepancies that can arise owing to the particular conditions of the standard test cycles.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2324
Xiaoguo Tang, Dan McBryde
Abstract Modern light-duty vehicles require well-controlled engine-out feed-gas and very high catalyst efficiencies to meet the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 2 & 3 standards. When a vehicle with either a gasoline or diesel engine is operating within its controlled state-space the exhaust emissions present at the tailpipe are extremely low. When it is not operating within its controlled state-space the combustion process and therefore its exhaust emissions characteristics will be different. This may occur when an emission control device fails or if a defeat device is employed. Moreover, different control technologies each have unique characteristics or signatures that could assist in identifying either emission control device failure or an existing defeat device.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2330
E. Robert Fanick, Svitlana Kroll, Kristin Favela
Abstract Advanced combustion strategies used to improve efficiency, emissions, and performance in internal combustion engines (IC) alter the chemical composition of engine-out emissions. The characterization of exhaust chemistry from advanced IC engines requires an analytical system capable of measuring a wide range of compounds. For many years, the widely accepted Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Auto/Oil procedure[1,2] has been used to quantify hydrocarbon compounds between C1 and C12 from dilute engine exhaust in Tedlar polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) bags. Hydrocarbons greater than C12+ present the greatest challenge for identification in diesel exhaust. Above C12, PVF bags risk losing the higher molecular weight compounds due to adsorption to the walls of the bag or by condensation of the heavier compounds. This paper describes two specialized exhaust gas sampling and analytical systems capable of analyzing the mid-range (C10 - C24) and the high range (C24+) hydrocarbon in exhaust.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2329
Pooyan Kheirkhah, Patrick Kirchen, Steven Rogak
Abstract Soot emissions from direct-injection engines are sensitive to the fuel-air mixing process, and may vary between combustion cycles due to turbulence and injector variability. Conventional exhaust emissions measurements cannot resolve inter- or intra-cycle variations in particle emissions, which can be important during transient engine operations where a few cycles can disproportionately affect the total exhaust soot. The Fast Exhaust Nephelometer (FEN) is introduced here to use light scattering to measure particulate matter concentration and size near the exhaust port of an engine with a time resolution of better than one millisecond. The FEN operates at atmospheric pressure, sampling near the engine exhaust port and uses a laser diode to illuminate a small measurement volume. The scattered light is focused on two amplified photodiodes.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2123
Matthias Busch, Benedikt Faupel
Abstract The integration of omega stringers to panels made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) by adhesive bonding, which is achieved by baking in an autoclave, must be subject to high quality standards. Failures such as porosity, voids or inclusion must be detected safely to guaranty the functionality of the component. Therefore, an inspection system is required to verify these bonds and detect different kinds of defects. In this contribution, the advantages of a robotic inspection system, which will be achieved through continuous testing, will be introduced. The testing method is the active thermography. The active thermography has major advantages compared with other non-destructive testing methods. Compared to testing with ultrasonic there is no coupling medium necessary, thus testing will be significantly enhanced.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2145
Ryan Haldimann
Abstract Inspection of fasteners prior to installation is critical to the quality of aerospace parts. Fasteners must be inspected for length/grip and diameter at a minimum. Inspecting the fasteners mechanically just prior to insertion can cause additional cycle time loss if inspection cannot be performed at the same time as other operations. To decrease fastener inspection times and to ensure fastener cartridges contain the expected fastener a system was devised to measure the fastener as it travels down the fastener feed tube. This process could be adapted to inspection of fasteners being fed to the process head of a running machine eliminating the mechanical inspection requirement and thus decreasing cycle time.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8010
M. Kamel Salaani, David Mikesell, Chris Boday, Devin Elsasser
Abstract Field testing of Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) systems using real actual heavy trucks and buses is unavoidably limited by the dangers and expenses inherent in crash-imminent scenarios. For this paper, a heavy vehicle is defined as having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) that exceeds 4536 kg (10,000 lbs.). High fidelity Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) simulation systems have the potential to enable safe and accurate laboratory testing and evaluation of heavy vehicle AEB systems. This paper describes the setup and experimental validation of such a HiL simulation system. An instrumented Volvo tractor-trailer equipped with a Bendix Wingman Advanced System, including the FLR20 forward looking radar and AEB system, was put through a battery of different types of track tests to benchmark the AEB performance.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8013
Marius Feilhauer, Juergen Haering, Sean Wyatt
Abstract The way to autonomous driving is closely connected to the capability of verifying and validating Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), as it is one of the main challenges to achieve secure, reliable and thereby socially accepted self-driving cars. Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) based testing methods offer the great advantage of validating components and systems in an early stage of the development cycle, and they are established in automotive industry. When validating ADAS using HiL test benches, engineers face different barriers and conceptual difficulties: How to pipe simulated signals into multiple sensors including radar, ultrasonic, video, or lidar? How to combine classical physical simulations, e.g. vehicle dynamics, with sophisticated three-dimensional, GPU-based environmental simulations? In this article, we present current approaches of how to master these challenges and provide guidance by showing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8044
Guoyu Feng, Wenku Shi, Henghai Zhang, Qinghua Zu
Abstract In order to predict the fatigue life of thrust rod heavy duty commercial vehicle balanced suspension, based on the continuum mechanics theory, the fatigue life prediction model of rubber with equivalent effect as damage parameter is established. Based on the equivalent stress and fatigue cumulative damage theory, the fatigue damage evolution equation of rubber material expressed by stress is derived by using the strain energy function. The general fatigue life model is established by using the maximum logarithmic principal strain as the damage parameter. The finite element model of the thrust rod is established, and the stress distribution of the spherical hinge rubber layer and the easy damage area are analyzed. Based on the equivalent stress calculation results and the axial tension stress and strain data of the rubber material, the accuracy of the results of the finite element calculation is verified.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8042
Danna Jiang, Ying Huang, Xiaoyi Song, Dechun Fu, Zhiquan Fu
Abstract This paper describes a uniform Hardware-In-the-Loop (HiL) test rig for the different types of Electronic Braking System (EBS). It is applied to both modular testing and integrated testing. This test rig includes a vehicle dynamic model, a real-time simulation platform, an actual brake circuit and the EBS system under test. Firstly, the vehicle dynamic model is a highly parameterized commercial vehicle model. So it can simulate different types of commercial vehicle by different parameter configurations. Secondly, multi-types of brake circuit are modeled using brake components simulation library. So, it can test the EBS control unit independently without the influence of any real electro-pneumatic components. And a software EBS controller is also modeled. So it can test the algorithm of EBS offline. Thirdly, all real electro-pneumatic components without real gas inputted are connected to the real-time test platform through independent program-controlled relay-switches.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8016
Devaraj Dasarathan, Matthew Ellis, Surya Chinnamani, Ray Ayala, James Haws
Abstract The primary purpose of this paper is to correlate the CFD simulations performed using PowerFLOW, a Lattice Boltzmann based method, and wind tunnel tests performed at a wind tunnel facility on 1/8th scaled tractor-trailer models. The correlations include results using an aerodynamic-type tractor paired with several trailer configurations, including a baseline trailer without any aerodynamic devices as well as combinations of trailer side skirts and a tractor-trailer gap flow management device. CFD simulations were performed in a low blockage open road environment at full scale Reynolds number to understand how the different test environments impact total aerodynamic drag values and performance deltas between trailer aerodynamic devices. There are very limited studies with the Class-8 sleeper tractor and 53ft long trailer comparing wind tunnel test and CFD simulation with and without trailer aerodynamic device. This paper is to fill this gap.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8017
Eric Wood, Adam Duran, Kenneth Kelly
Abstract In collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has conducted a national analysis of road grade characteristics experienced by U.S. medium- and heavy-duty trucks on controlled access highways. These characteristics have been developed using TomTom’s commercially available street map and road grade database. Using the TomTom national road grade database, national statistics on road grade and hill distances were generated for the U.S. network of controlled access highways. These statistical distributions were then weighted using data provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for activity of medium- and heavy-duty trucks on controlled access highways. The national activity-weighted road grade and hill distance distributions were then used as targets for development of a handful of sample grade profiles potentially to be used in the U.S.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8018
Houshun Zhang, L. James Sanchez, Matthew Spears, Jayant Sarlashkar, Dennis Robertson, Michael Ross
Abstract In June of 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve the fuel efficiency of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. The agencies proposed that vehicle manufacturers would certify vehicles to the standards by using the agencies’ Greenhouse Gas Emission Model (GEM). The agencies also proposed a steady-state engine test procedure for generating GEM inputs to represent the vehicle’s engine performance. In the proposal the agencies also requested comment on an alternative engine test procedure, the details of which were published in two separate 2015 SAE Technical Papers [1, 2]. As an alternative to the proposed steady-state engine test procedure, these papers presented a cycle-average test procedure.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8019
Marius-Dorin Surcel, Adime Kofi Bonsi
Abstract The main objective of this project was to compare the fuel consumption and dynamic performances of direct-drive and overdrive transmission tractors. Fuel consumption was evaluated at constant high speed and on various road profiles, while the dynamic performance was assessed on various road profiles only. The SAE Fuel Consumption Test Procedure (J1526) was used for constant high speed fuel consumption track test evaluations. The direct-drive transmission tractor consumed less than the overdrive transmission tractor, even though it was heavier. The testing on various road profiles was conducted using a towing dynamometer, for comparing the dynamic capability of the tractors when simulating the same towing load on two hilly road profiles: the Townes Pass path (in the Rocky Mountains) and the Saguenay path (in the Saguenay region of Quebec). Each tractor was to haul the set load along the given path while trying to attain 90 km/h speed.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 15311