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Viewing 91 to 120 of 15290
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0145
Edward Palmer, Wilko Jansen
Abstract In order to specify a brake system that will have robust performance over the entire range of expected vehicle drive cycles it is vital that it has sufficient thermal inertia and dissipation to ensure that component temperatures are kept within acceptable limits. This paper presents a high fidelity CAE (computer aided engineering) technique for predicting the temperature of the front brake and the surrounding suspension components whilst installed on vehicle. To define the boundary conditions the process utilizes a coupled unsteady CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and thermal solver to accurately predict the convective heat transfer coefficients across a range of vehicle speeds. A 1-D model is used to predict the brake energy inputs as well as the vehicle speed-time curves during the drive cycle based on key vehicle parameters including wide-open-throttle performance, drive train losses, rolling resistance, aerodynamic drag etc.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0160
Longjie Xiao, Tianming He, Gangfeng Tan, Bo Huang, Xianyao Ping
Abstract While the car ownership increasing all over the world, the unutilized thermal energy in automobile exhaust system is gradually being realized and valued by researchers around the world for better driving energy efficiency. For the unexpected urban traffic, the frequent start and stop processes as well as the acceleration and deceleration lead to the temperature fluctuation of the exhaust gas, which means the unstable hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module generator (TEG). By arranging the heat conduction oil circulation at the hot end, the hot-end temperature’s fluctuation of the TEG can be effectively reduced, at the expense of larger system size and additional energy supply for the circulation. This research improves the TEG hot-end temperature stability by installing solid heat capacity material(SHCM) to the area between the outer wall of the exhaust pipe and the TEG, which has the merits of simple structure, none energy consumption and light weight.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0901
Alex Pink, Adam Ragatz, Lijuan Wang, Eric Wood, Jeffrey Gonder
Vehicles continuously report real-time fuel consumption estimates over their data bus, known as the controller area network (CAN). However, the accuracy of these fueling estimates is uncertain to researchers who collect these data from any given vehicle. To assess the accuracy of these estimates, CAN ­reported fuel consumption data are compared against fuel measurements from precise instrumentation. The data analyzed consisted of eight medium/heavy-­duty vehicles and two medium-­duty engines. Varying discrepancies between CAN fueling rates and the more accurate measurements emerged but without a vehicular trend—for some vehicles the CAN under-­reported fuel consumption and for others the CAN over­-reported fuel consumption. Furthermore, a qualitative real-time analysis revealed that the operating conditions under which these fueling discrepancies arose varied among vehicles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0865
Mark Walls, Michael Joo, Michael Ross
Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is commonly known as autogas when used as a fuel for internal combustion engines. Autogas is primarily made up of propane, but can contain small amounts of butane, methane and propylene. Autogas is not a new fuel for internal combustion engines, but as engine technology evolves, the properties of autogas can be utilized to improve engine and vehicle efficiency. With support from the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) performed testing to quantify efficiency differences with liquid autogas direct injection in a modern downsized and boosted direct-injected engine using the production gasoline fuel injection hardware. Engine dynamometer testing demonstrated that autogas produced similar performance characteristics to gasoline at part load, but could be used to improve brake thermal efficiency at loads above 12 bar BMEP.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0131
Chiranth Srinivasan, Chonglin Zhang, Haiyang Gao, De Ming Wang, Jody Slike
Abstract In an automotive cooling circuit, the wax melting process determines the net and time history of the energy transfer between the engine and its environment. A numerical process that gives insight into the mixing process outside the wax chamber, the wax melting process inside the wax chamber, and the effect on the poppet valve displacement will be advantageous to both the engine and automotive system design. A fully three dimensional, transient, system level simulation of an inlet controlled thermostat inside an automotive cooling circuit is undertaken in this paper. A proprietary CFD algorithm, Simerics-Sys®/PumpLinx®, is used to solve this complex problem. A two-phase model is developed in PumpLinx® to simulate the wax melting process. The hysteresis effect of the wax melting process is also considered in the simulation.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0319
Dae-Young Kim, Yongtak Han, Sahnghoon Shin, Hyungsub Yook
Abstract The aim of this paper is to apply an advanced fracture model and to evaluate its applicability in automotive seat structures. A Generalized Incremental Stress-State dependent damage Model (GISSMO), which was one of the advanced fracture models implemented in LS-DYNA, was adopted as a fracture model. A description of the damage parameter identification process with material tests was introduced in this study. The GISSMO adopts most of the fracture factors, and was introduced in previous works. In order to evaluate the fracture strain in various stress states, uniaxial tension, simple shear-tension, notched-tension, and biaxial tension tests were carried out. The GISSMO damage parameters were calculated and identified using reverse analysis method and theoretical equations with some numerical fitting techniques. The results were compared with material test results, and it was evaluated that the values might be applicable to the seat frame model.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0318
John George, Kishore Pydimarry, Jeremy Seidt, Kelton Rieske
Abstract Characterization of the plastic and ductile fracture behavior of a ferrous casting commonly used for the steering knuckle of an automotive suspension system is presented in this work. Ductile fracture testing for various coupon geometries was conducted to simulate a wide range of stress states. Failure data for the higher stress triaxiality were obtained from tension tests conducted on thin flat specimens, wide flat specimens and axisymmetric specimens with varying notch radii. The data for the lower triaxiality were generated from thin-walled tube specimens subjected to torsional loading and compression tests on cylindrical specimens. The failure envelopes for the material were developed utilizing the test data and finite element (FE) simulations of the corresponding test specimens. Experiments provided the load-displacement response and the location of fracture initiation.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0346
Radwan Hazime, Thomas Seifert, Jeremy Kessens, Frank Ju
Abstract A complete thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction methodology is developed for predicting the TMF life of cast iron cylinder heads for efficient heavy duty internal combustion engines. The methodology uses transient temperature fields as thermal loads for the non-linear structural finite-element analysis (FEA). To obtain reliable stress and strain histories in the FEA for cast iron materials, a time and temperature dependent plasticity model which accounts for viscous effects, non-linear kinematic hardening and tension-compression asymmetry is required. For this purpose a unified elasto-viscoplastic Chaboche model coupled with damage is developed and implemented as a user material model (USERMAT) in the general purpose FEA program ANSYS. In addition, the mechanism-based DTMF model for TMF life prediction developed in Part I of the paper is extended to three-dimensional stress states under transient non-proportional loading conditions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0389
Carlo Cantoni, Giampiero Mastinu, Massimiliano Gobbi, Federico Ballo, Giorgio Previati
Abstract The durability performance of brake hoses is a crucial issue for such components. Accelerated fatigue testing of brake hoses is necessary for understanding achievable lifetime, actually computation of durability is quite cumbersome due to the many different materials the hoses are made from. Despite SAE standards are available, accelerated testing of brake hoses subject to actual torsional and bending stresses seem important to provide relevant feedback to designers. In this paper, an innovative methodology for assessing the fatigue behavior of brake hoses of road vehicles is proposed. A dynamic testbed is specifically designed and realized, able to reproduce the actual assembly conditions of the hoses fitted into a vehicle suspension. The designed testbed allows to replicate actual loading conditions on the brake hoses by simulating the vertical dynamics and steering of the suspension system together with brake pressure.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0390
Muhamamd Yasir, Helmut Wieser, Daniel Knoll, Simon Burger
Abstract The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of material and design selection for future light weight exhaust systems. Material validation for new components usually requires various types of tests on different types of test coupons. There are varieties of corrosion test methods which are in practice since years now. Majority of these testing approaches are used to make relative ranking among different materials. In most of these tests a correlation between testing and field behavior is missing. There is also no test available in which both external as well as internal corrosion can be realized simultaneously. Additionally, none of these corrosion tests cover the design aspects of the components. To combat this challenge Faurecia has built and validated a corrosion test setup where complete exhaust silencer can be tested near to real conditions. A comparative study was performed between field parts and test parts to validate the test cycle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0400
Theo Rickert
Abstract Hole drilling is a very common technique for measuring residual stresses. Adding an orbiting motion of the drill was found to improve hole quality in difficult to drill materials and has been in practice for decades. This study compares measurements using various orbiting amounts. Each measurement was repeated twice to evaluate measurement statistics. There is a distinct, though relatively small, effect of the hole shape when no orbiting is used. It disappears already when the hole is 50% larger than the tool size. Different orbiting amounts also produce systematically different results. These may be related to the absolute hole size.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0380
Liang Wang, Robert Burger, Alan Aloe
Abstract As an automobile is driven, its components and structures consistently experience the random excitations from road inputs and periodic vibration from engine firing. This could cause durability issues if the component structure isn’t fully validated. Vibration fatigue is a field of study regarding the assessment and improvement of a component’s or system’s robustness to vibration inputs. This paper introduces aspects of vibration fatigue to help designers, release engineers, and test engineers better understand the requirements, testing methodologies available, and strategies for improving vibration fatigue performance for the design and validation testing of their products. Vibration characteristics such as typical vibration levels and frequency content for varied areas in the automotive environment are introduced. Methodologies available for conducting actual vibration testing are introduced with listed advantages and disadvantages.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0451
Klaus-Peter Heinig, David A. Stephenson, Timothy G. Beyer
Abstract Thermally sprayed coatings have used in place of iron bore liners in recent aluminum engine blocks. The coatings are steel-based, and are sprayed on the bore wall in the liquid phase. The thermal response of the block structure determines how rapidly coatings can be applied and thus the investment and floor space required for the operation. It is critical not to overheat the block to prevent dimensional errors, metallurgical damage, and thermal stress cracks. This paper describes an innovative finite element procedure for estimating both the substrate temperature and residual stresses in the coating for the thermal spray process. Thin layers of metal at a specified temperature, corresponding to the layers deposited in successive thermal spray torch passes, are applied to the substrate model, generating a heat flux into the block. The thickness, temperature, and application speed of the layers can be varied to simulate different coating cycles.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0403
Guangqiang Wu, Huwei Wu
Abstract Experimental schemes, frequency characteristics, subjective and objective sound quality evaluation and sound quality prediction model establishment of a certain mass-production SUV (Sport Utility Vehicle, SUV) manual transmission gear rattle phenomenon were analyzed in this paper. Firstly, vehicle experiments, including experiment conditions, vibration acceleration sensor and microphone arrangements and especial considerations in experiments, were described in detail. Secondly, through time-frequency analysis, broadband characteristics of manual transmission gear rattle noise were identified and vibro-impact of gear rattle occurs in the frequency range of 450~4000Hz on the vehicle idle condition and the creeping condition. Thirdly, based on bandwidth filtering processing of gear rattle noise, subjective assessment experiments by a paired comparison method were carried out.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0462
Marcel Meuwissen, Jippe Van Ruiten, Thijs Besseling, Robbert van Sluijs, Maik Broda, Brian Pearce, Fenton I. O'Shea
Abstract Fuel economy improvement efforts in engines have focused on reducing parasitic losses. This paper addresses the friction losses in the valve train chain drive system where about half of the losses is caused by the chain sliding on plastic guide and tensioner arm faces (Figure 1). Efforts have been made to reduce these friction losses by optimizing the chain link profile, the geometry of the guide and tensioner arm rails, and developments towards low friction materials. This paper describes the approach taken for the development of new low-friction chain tensioner arm plastic materials. The approach is characterized by building an understanding of the friction mechanisms and identifying the most critical material’s properties. A lab-scale test is used for a first assessment of the friction performance of materials. The correlation between this lab-scale test and the actual chain-on-tensioner arm application is discussed.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0518
Sebastian Hann, Lukas Urban, Michael Grill, Michael Bargende
Abstract Since 0D/1D-simulations of natural gas spark ignition engines use model theories similar to gasoline engines, the impact of changing fuel characteristics needs to be taken into consideration in order to obtain results of higher quality. For this goal, this paper proposes some approaches that consider the influence of binary fuel mixtures such as methane with up to 40 mol-% of ethane, propane, n-butane or hydrogen on laminar flame speed and knock behavior. To quantify these influences, reaction kinetics calculations are carried out in a wide range of the engine operation conditions. Obtained results are used to update and extend existing sub-models. The model quality is validated by comparing measured burn rates with simulation results. The benefit of the new sub-models are utilized by predicting the influence the fuel takes on engine operating limits in terms of knocking and lean misfire limits, the latter being determined by using a cycle-to-cycle variation model.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0863
Bader Almansour, Sami Alawadhi, Subith Vasu
Abstract The biofuel and engine co-development framework was initiated at Sandia National Labs. Here, the synthetic biologists develop and engineer a new platform for drop-in fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass, using several endophytic fungi. Hence this process has the potential advantage that expensive pretreatment and fuel refining stages can be optimized thereby allowing scalability and cost reduction; two major considerations for widespread biofuel utilization. Large concentrations of ketones along with other volatile organic compounds were produced by fungi grown over switchgrass media. The combustion and emission properties of these new large ketones are poorly known.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0801
Keith Vertin, Brent Schuchmann, William Studzinski, Richard S. Davis, Thomas G. Leone, James E. Anderson, Asim Iqbal
Abstract Automakers are designing smaller displacement engines with higher power densities to improve vehicle fuel economy, while continuing to meet customer expectations for power and drivability. The specific power produced by the spark-ignited engine is constrained by knock and fuel octane. Whereas the lowest octane rating is 87 AKI (antiknock index) for regular gasoline at most service stations throughout the U.S., 85 AKI fuel is widely available at higher altitudes especially in the mountain west states. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of gasoline octane rating on the net power produced by modern light duty vehicles at high altitude (1660 m elevation). A chassis dynamometer test procedure was developed to measure absorbed wheel power at transient and stabilized full power operation. Five vehicles were tested using 85 and 87 AKI fuels.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0899
Paul Dekraker, John Kargul, Andrew Moskalik, Kevin Newman, Mark Doorlag, Daniel Barba
Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) tool was created to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-duty vehicles. ALPHA is a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation capable of analyzing various vehicle types with different powertrain technologies, showing realistic vehicle behavior, and auditing of internal energy flows in the model. In preparation for the midterm evaluation (MTE) of the 2017-2025 light-duty GHG emissions rule, ALPHA has been updated utilizing newly acquired data from model year 2013-2016 engines and vehicles. Simulations conducted with ALPHA provide data on the effectiveness of various GHG reduction technologies, and reveal synergies that exist between technologies. The ALPHA model has been validated against a variety of vehicles with different powertrain configurations and GHG reduction technologies.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0892
Eric Wood, Jeffrey Gonder, Forrest Jehlik
Abstract On-road fuel economy is known to vary significantly between individual trips in real-world driving conditions. This work introduces a methodology for rapidly simulating a specific vehicle’s fuel economy over the wide range of real-world conditions experienced across the country. On-road test data collected using a highly instrumented vehicle is used to refine and validate this modeling approach. Model accuracy relative to on-road data collection is relevant to the estimation of “off-cycle credits” that compensate for real-world fuel economy benefits that are not observed during certification testing on a chassis dynamometer.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0391
Daniel Meyer, Peter Maehling, Thomson Varghese, Jeffery Lewis
Abstract Precise and accurate internal-combustion engine pressure measurements are typically built upon extremely low level piezoelectric sensor signals acquired in the laboratory. In turn, these minute signals must be accurately conditioned using electronic charge amplifiers and then processed for meaningful analysis. Laboratory standard operating procedures often overlook the importance of timely and rigorous calibration of the equipment, or perform them without using sufficient environmental controls. In some facilities, years have been allowed to pass between metrology-quality calibrations, introducing the potential for significant out-of-tolerance conditions and non-compliance when compared to accredited measurement standards.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1566
Willibald Brems, Nico Kruithof, Richard Uhlmann, Andreas Wagner, Werner Krantz, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract In recent years, driving simulators have become a valuable tool in the automotive design and testing process. Yet, in the field of vehicle dynamics, most decisions are still based on test drives in real cars. One reason for this situation can be found in the fact that many driving simulators do not allow the driver to evaluate the handling qualities of a simulated vehicle. In a driving simulator, the motion cueing algorithm tries to represent the vehicle motion within the constrained motion envelope of the motion platform. By nature, this process leads to so called false cues where the motion of the platform is not in phase or moving in a different direction with respect to the vehicle motion. In a driving simulator with classical filter-based motion cueing, false cues make it considerably more difficult for the driver to rate vehicle dynamics.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1518
Emil Ljungskog, Simone Sebben, Alexander Broniewicz, Christoffer Landström
Abstract Many aerodynamic wind tunnels used for testing of ground vehicles have advanced ground simulation systems to account for the relative motion between the ground and the vehicle. One commonly used approach for ground simulation is a five belt system, where moving belts are used, often in conjunction with distributed suction and tangential blowing that reduces the displacement thickness of the boundary layer along the wind tunnel floor. This paper investigates the effects from aft-belt tangential blowing in the Volvo Cars Aerodynamic wind tunnel. First the uniformity of the boundary layer thickness downstream of the blowing slots is examined in the empty tunnel. This is followed by investigations of how the measured performance of different vehicle types in several configurations, typically tested in routine aerodynamic development work, depends on whether the tangential blowing system is active or not.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1512
Fuliang Wang, Zhangshun Yin, Shi Yan, Jia Zhan, Heinz Friz, Bo Li, Weiliang Xie
Abstract The validation of vehicle aerodynamic simulation results to wind tunnel test results and simulation accuracy improvement attract considerable attention of many automotive manufacturers. In order to improve the simulation accuracy, a simulation model of the ground effects simulation system of the aerodynamic wind tunnel of the Shanghai Automotive Wind Tunnel Center was built. The model includes the scoop, the distributed suction, the tangential blowing, the moving belt and the wheel belts. The simulated boundary layer profile and the pressure distribution agree well with test results. The baseline model and multiple design changes of the new Buick Excelle GT are simulated. The simulation results agree very well with test results.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1522
Thomas Blacha, Moni Islam
Abstract The aerodynamic development of the new Audi Q5 (released in 2017) is described. In the course of the optimization process a number of different tools has been applied depending on the chronological progress in the project. During the early design phase, wind tunnel experiments at 1:4 scale were performed accompanied by transient DES and stationary adjoint simulations. At this stage the model contained a detailed underbody but no detailed engine bay for underhood flow. Later, a full scale Q5 model was built up for the aerodynamic optimization in the 1:1 wind tunnel at Audi AG. The model featured a detailed underbody and engine bay including original parts for radiators, engine, axles and brakes from similar vehicles. Also the 1:1 experiments were accompanied by transient DES and stationary adjoint simulations in order to predict optimization potential and to better understand the governing flow.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1530
Di Bao, Qing Jia, Zhigang Yang
Abstract Based on a 1:15 scaled 3/4 open jet automotive wind tunnel, this paper studies the effect of vortex generator on the buffeting phenomenon. The mean velocity, static pressure gradient, turbulent intensity as well as frequencies of fluctuant velocities have been explored experimentally with and without vortex generator. It shows that the less protruding vortex generator could control the buffeting phenomenon and improve the flow quality. Furthermore, the unsteady coherent structures in the jet shear layer have been visualized and analyzed by Detached-eddy simulation (DES). The vortex-ring pairing process is identified in the shear layer along with obvious frequency characteristics and velocity fluctuations. The vortex generator can postpone and restrain this vortex-ring pairing process, then reducing the velocity fluctuations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1527
Felix Wittmeier
Abstract After being in operation since 1989, the 25% / 20% model scale wind tunnel of University of Stuttgart received its second major upgrade in 2016. In a first upgrade in 2001, a rolling road with a 5 belt system from MTS was installed. This system includes a steel center belt to simulate the road underneath the vehicle and four FKFS designed rubber belts for wheel rotation. The recent upgrade now enables the wind tunnel to be used not only for standard, steady state aerodynamic measurements but also for measurements of unsteady aerodynamic effects. This enables the use of the FKFS swing system as a standard measurement technique. Therefore, the former balance was replaced by a balance manufactured by AND with a high Eigenfrequency and the ability to sample the measurement data at up to 1000 Hz. The second large part of the upgrade was the replacement of the control system. With the new Wind Tunnel Control System (WCTS), control system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1534
Nina Tortosa, David Schroeck, Tony Nagle, Guy Flynt
Abstract The General Motors Reduced Scale Wind Tunnel Facility, which came into operation in the fall of 2015, is a new state-of-the-art scale model aerodynamic test facility that expands GM’s test capabilities. The new facility also increases GM’s aerodynamic testing through-put and provides the resources needed to achieve the growing demand for higher fuel economy requirements for next generation of vehicles. The wind tunnel was designed for a nominal model scale of 40%. The nozzle and test section were sized to keep wind tunnel interference effects to a minimum. Flow quality and other wind tunnel performance parameters are on par with or better than the latest industry standards. A 5-belt system with a long center belt and boundary layer suction and blowing system are used to model underbody flow conditions. An overhead probe traverse system is installed in the test section along with a model positioning robot used to move the model in an out of the test section.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0777
Gordon McTaggart-Cowan, Jian Huang, Sandeep Munshi
Abstract Natural gas offers the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from heavy-duty on-road transportation. One of the challenges facing natural gas as a fuel is that its composition can vary significantly between different fuel suppliers and geographical regions. In this work, the impact of fuel composition variations on a heavy-duty, direct injection of natural gas engine with diesel pilot ignition is evaluated. This combustion process results in a predominantly non-premixed gaseous fuel combustion event; as a result, end-gas autoignition (knock) is not a concern. Changes in the fuel composition do still impact the combustion, both through the changes in the chemical kinetics of the reactions and due to changes in the density of the fuel. Increasing concentrations of heavier hydrocarbons, such as ethane or propane, in the fuel lead to higher fuel densities and hence greater fuel mass being injected for a given injection duration.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0781
Philip Zoldak, Jeffrey Naber
Abstract The increased availability of natural gas (NG) in the United States (US) and its relatively low cost versus diesel fuel has increased interest in the conversion of medium duty (MD) and heavy duty (HD) engines to NG fueled combustion systems. The aim for development for these NG engines is to realize fuel cost savings and increase operating range while reduce harmful emissions and maintaining durability. Traditionally, port-fuel injection (PFI) or premixed NG spark-ignited (SI) combustion systems have been used for light duty LD, and MD engines with widespread use in the US and Europe [1]. However, this technology exhibits poor thermal efficiency and is load limited due to knock phenomenon that has prohibited its use for HD engines. Spark Ignited Direct Injection (SIDI) can be used to create a partially stratified combustion (PSC) mixture of NG and air during the compression stroke.
Viewing 91 to 120 of 15290