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Viewing 61 to 90 of 15362
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1881
Charles Moritz, Satyajeet Deshpande
Abstract As part of the update process to SAE J1637, Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar, the Acoustical Materials Committee commissioned a round robin study to determine the current laboratory-to-laboratory variation, and to better understand best practices for composite loss factor measurements. Guidance within the current standard from a previous round robin study indicates a coefficient of variation of 35% for laboratory-to-laboratory measurements. It was hoped that current instrumentation and test practices would yield lower variability. Over the course of 2 years, 8 laboratories tested 4 bars, three damped steel bars and one bare steel bar. These bars were tested at -20°C, -5°C, 10°C, 25°C, 40°C, and 55°C. The damping materials were intentionally selected to provide low damping, moderate damping, and high damping as difficulties in determining the composite loss increase with increased damping.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1803
John Van Baren
Abstract The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation addresses three fundamental questions about developing accelerated random vibration stress tests.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1800
Robert White
Abstract Several analytical tools exist for estimating a driveshaft’s critical speed, from simple elementary beam theory to sophisticated FEA models. Ultimately, nothing is better than a test, because no one will argue with the outcome from a well-designed measurement. Impact response measurements are easy, but they tend to over predict the critical speed. A test which sweeps the shaft speed up until failure is telling, but the speed causing failure is strongly dependent on even small amounts of variation in rotor unbalance. Waterfall plots of shaft displacement measurements offer the best indication of critical speed, however sometimes the resonance isn’t unmistakable or multiple resonances exist, making the critical speed unclear. A method less susceptible to system variation is offered here, fitting shaft orbit measurements to the theoretical single degree of freedom equation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1851
Taewook Yoo, Ronald W. Gerdes, Seungkyu Lee, Daniel Stanley, Thomas Herdtle, Georg Eichhorn
Abstract Several methods for evaluating damping material performance are commonly used, such as Oberst beam test, power injection method and the long bar test. Among these test methods, the Oberst beam test method has been widely used in the automotive industry and elsewhere as a standard method, allowing for slight bar dimension differences. However, questions have arisen as to whether Oberst test results reflect real applications. Therefore, the long bar test method has been introduced and used in the aerospace industry for some time. In addition to the larger size bar in the long bar test, there are a few differences between Oberst (cantilever) and long bar test (center-driven) methods. In this paper, the differences between Oberst and long bar test methods were explored both experimentally and numerically using finite element analysis plus an analytical method. Furthermore, guidelines for a long bar test method are provided.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1857
Joshua R. Goossens, William Mars, Guy Smith, Paul Heil, Scott Braddock, Jeanette Pilarski
Abstract Fatigue life prediction of elastomer NVH suspension products has become an operating norm for OEMs and suppliers during the product quoting process and subsequent technical reviews. This paper reviews a critical plane analysis based fatigue simulation methodology for a front lower control arm. Filled natural rubber behaviors were measured and defined for the analysis, including: stress-strain, fatigue crack growth, strain crystallization, fatigue threshold and initial crack precursor size. A series of four distinct single and dual axis bench durability tests were derived from OEM block cycle specifications, and run to end-of-life as determined via a stiffness loss criterion. The tested parts were then sectioned in order to compare developed failure modes with predicted locations of crack initiation. In all cases, failure mode was accurately predicted by the simulation, and predicted fatigue life preceded actual end-of-life by not more than a factor of 1.4 in life.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1908
Rong Guo, Jun Gao, Xiao-kang Wei, Zhao-ming Wu, Shao-kang Zhang
Abstract The statement of the engine shake problem is presented through comparing the quarter vehicle models with the rigid-connected and flexible-connected powertrain which is supported on the body by a rubber mount. Then the model is extended by replacing the rubber mount as a hydraulic engine mount (HEM) with regard to the inertia and resistance of the fluid within the inertia track. Based on these, a full vehicle model with 14 degree of freedoms (DOFs) is proposed to calculate the engine shake, which consists of 6 of the powertrain, 1 of the fluid within the inertia track of the HEM, 3 of the car body and 4 of the unsprung mass. Simulation analysis based on the proposed model is implemented, through which the conclusion is drawn that the HEM has great influence on the body and seat track response subjected to front wheel inputs, compared with the rubber mount.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1774
Fabio Luis Marques dos Santos, Tristan Enault, Jan Deleener, Tom Van Houcke
Abstract The increasing pressure on fuel economy has brought car manufacturers to implement solutions that improve vehicle efficiency, such as downsized engines, cylinder deactivation and advanced torque lock-up strategies. However, these solutions have a major drawback in terms of noise and vibration comfort. Downsized engines and lock-up strategies lead to the use of the engine at lower RPMs, and the reduced number of cylinders generates higher torque irregularities. Since the torque generated by the engine is transferred through flexible elements (clutch, torsional damper, gearbox, transmission, tire), these also impact the energy that is transferred to the vehicle body and perceived by the driver. This phenomenon leads to low frequency behavior, for instance booming noise and vibration. This paper presents a combined test and CAE modelling approach (1D/3D) to reverse engineer a vehicle equipped with a CPVA (centrifugal pendulum vibration absorber).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1863
Bhaskar Avutapalli, Mayuresh Pathak, Shalini Solipuram, Ken Buczek, Aaron Lock
Abstract Road noise and speech intelligibility are becoming ever more important, irrespective of the vehicle size, due to vehicle refinement as well as connectivity with mobile communication equipment. With better aerodynamic designs, development of refined powertrains, and a tectonic shift from I.C. engine to electric motors, road noise and wind noise will become more apparent to the customer and hence will become a priority for automakers to refine their vehicles. This paper describes the efforts undertaken to identify the road noise paths and develop countermeasures for a compact SUV vehicle. A hybrid test/CAE approach was followed to improve road noise performance of this vehicle. This effort involved developing tire CAE models from physical hardware and creating synthesized road-load input from data taken on roads.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1805
Krzysztof Prażnowski, Jaroslaw Mamala
Abstract The vibrations of the sprung mass of a passenger car, traveling along a road surface, are random. They also form its main source but there are besides other factors to consider. The resulting force ratio is overlapped by other phenomena occurring at the interface of the pneumatic tire with the road surface, such as non-uniformity of tires, shape deformations and imbalances. The resulting additional inertia force acts on the kinematic force that was previously induced on the car body. The vibrations of the sprung mass of the car body at the time can be considered as a potential source of diagnostic information, but getting insight their direct identification is difficult. Moreover, the basic identification is complicated because of the forces induced due to the random interference from road roughness. In such a case, the ratio defined as SNR assumes negative values.
2017-05-24
Technical Paper
2017-36-0003
Rafael Paini Pavlak, Patric Daniel Neis, Jean Carlos Poletto, Liu Yesukai de Barros, Ney Francisco Ferreira
Abstract The current study presents some testing procedures which have been designed for friction and noise measurements of brake friction materials using a laboratory-scale tribometer. The uncertainties (errors) and precision of the measurements are also described in this paper. Some case studies related to friction, wear and noise related issues in brake friction materials were chosen to show the respective testing procedures. Through the error study, it was shown that the uncertainties of the lab. test bench are mainly associated with 3 variables: torque, force and sliding radius. The combined uncertainty of the friction measurements is less than or equal to ±1%, considering the typical operating range of the machine. The possibility of using two samples from a single brake pad also contributes to the reliability of the machine test and procedures.
2017-05-24
Technical Paper
2017-36-0020
Luiz Filipe de Medeiros Gomes, Fernanda de Lima Menezes, Ademir de Silva Carvalho, Claudio Junior Ferreto, Luciano Matozo
Abstract The brake system is one of the most important safety systems of the vehicle. So far, several researches are being conducted with the objective of improve its efficiency. In a disc brake, it is the friction between the pads and the rotor the responsible for kinetic energy conversion into heat and brake torque generation. Demanding brake applications, can generate high temperatures levels which can reduce the friction coefficient between pads and rotor, reducing brake efficiency. Thus, the present work aims to evaluate the front disc temperature drop by the installation of a duct on the vehicle frontal bumper to direct the outside air into the wheelhouse This duct has the function to direct the outside air towards to the brake disc. Theoretical studies, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and experimental dynamometer tests were carried out.
2017-05-24
Technical Paper
2017-36-0016
Mathias Haag, Achim Reich, Angelo Sardá, Michael Wurmlinger-Georg, Martin Semsch, Leonardo Felix Borim
Abstract Residual brake torque (RBT) is generated in disc brakes as a result of contact between brake disc and brake pads when the braking pressure is not applied. Among the negative implications of RBT are, notably, dispensable additional fuel consumption as well as increased pad (taper) wear. Several properties of the brake system have a direct influence on the level of residual torque [1]. A major effect is connected to the caliper properties determining the clearance gap. This is characterized by the default air gap between pads and disc and its distribution regarding vehicle inner and outer sides (piston and fist sides for floating type calipers). Initial air gap is mainly influenced by the sealing grove design (between piston and housing, where the sealing ring is positioned). The retraction of the piston due to the sealing ring, also called rollback, mainly depends on the load case (e.g. applied pressure and temperature).
2017-04-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9177
N. Obuli Karthikeyan, R. Dinesh Kumar, V. Srinivasa Chandra, Vela Murali
Abstract In the modern automotive sector, durability and reliability are the most common terms. Customers are expecting a highly reliable product but at low cost. Any product that fails within its useful life leads to customer dissatisfaction and affects the reputation of the OEM. To eradicate this, all automotive components undergo stringent validation protocol, either in proving ground or in lab. This paper details on developing an accelerated lab test methodology for steering gearbox bracket using fatigue damage and reliability correlation by simulating field failure. Initially, potential failure causes for steering gearbox bracket were analyzed. Road load data was then acquired at proving ground and customer site to evaluate the cumulative fatigue damage on the steering gearbox bracket. To simulate the field failure, lab test facility was developed, reproducing similar boundary conditions as in vehicle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0720
Omar Ramadan, Luc Menard, David Gardiner, Aaron Wilcox, Gary Webster
Abstract This paper is a continuation of work previously discussed in SAE 2014-01-0179 [1] and SAE 2015-01-0805 [2], which was intended to improve the capability and precision of the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT™) and associated ASTM D6890 [3]/CEN EN 15195 [4]/EI IP 498 [5] Test Methods. The results presented in those two papers indicated how the new generation of IQT™ with the TALM Precision Package upgrade can markedly improve the precision of the ASTM D6890, CEN EN 15195 and EI IP 498 Derived Cetane Number (DCN) test methods. This paper will evaluate the performance of the upgraded instruments over the past 21 months of their participation in ASTM’s National Fuel Exchange Group (NEG) diesel fuel exchange program.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1383
Satheesh Kumar Chandran, James Forbes, Carrie Bittick, Kathleen Allanson, Fnu Brinda
Abstract There is a strong business case for automotive interfaces to undergo usability testing throughout their product development lifecycle. System Usability Scale (SUS) is a simple and standard measure of usability. To meet the timing needs for product development, usability testing needs to be performed in a quick, cost effective manner. Hence the required sample size of participants for a usability study is one of the critical factors. To determine an acceptable sample size, a Monte Carlo simulation using SUS scores from eleven different in-vehicle automotive interface usability studies was used to create 500,000 subsamples of different sample sizes. The percentage of subsamples with mean scores within the confidence interval of the population mean was calculated. At a subsample size of thirty-five, 95% of the subsamples have a mean SUS score within the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1388
S. M. Akbar Berry, Michael Kolich, Johnathan Line, Waguih ElMaraghy
Abstract Thermal comfort in automotive seating has been studied and discussed for a long time. The available research, because it is focused on the components, has not produced a model that provides insight into the human-seat system interaction. This work, which represents the beginning of an extensive research program, aims to establish the foundation for such a model. This paper will discuss the key physiological, psychological, and biomechanical factors related to perceptions of thermal comfort in automotive seats. The methodology to establish perceived thermal comfort requirements will also be presented and discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1374
Michael J. Flannagan, Shan Bao, Anuj Pradhan, John Sullivan, Yu Zhang
Abstract Mcity at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor provides a realistic off-roadway environment in which to test vehicles and drivers in complex traffic situations. It is intended for testing of various levels of vehicle automation, from advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) to fully self-driving vehicles. In a recent human factors study of interfaces for teen drivers, we performed parallel experiments in a driving simulator and Mcity. We implemented driving scenarios of moderate complexity (e.g., passing a vehicle parked on the right side of the road just before a pedestrian crosswalk, with the parked vehicle partially blocking the view of the crosswalk) in both the simulator and at Mcity.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1371
Hao Pan, Xuexun Guo, Xiaofei Pei, Xingzhi Dong
Abstract Brake pedal feel plays an important role in the driver's comprehensive subjective feeling when braking, which directly affects the active safety and riding comfort of passenger car. A systematical mathematical model of the vehicle brake system is built in according with the structure and system characteristics of hydraulic servo brake system. A complete hydraulic servo brake system simulation model composed of brake pedal, vacuum booster, brake master cylinder, brake pipe, brake wheel cylinders, brake calipers is established in AMESim. The effects of rubber reaction plate stiffness, rubber valve opening, brake master cylinder piston, brake caliper, brake pipe deformation and friction liner deformation on brake pedal feel are considered in this model. The accuracy of this model is verified by real road vehicle tests under static and dynamic two different conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0381
L. Karthik, R. Dinesh Kumar, E. Prasanna Kumar, V. Srinivasa Chandra
Abstract This abstract work describes a method of data acquisition and validation procedure followed for a metal bumper used in commercial vehicle application. Covariance is considered as major phenomenon for repeatable measurements in proving ground data acquisition and it is to be maintained less than 0.05. In this project covariance of data acquisition is analyzed before physical simulation of acquired data. In addition to that, multiple testing conditions like uni-axial and bi-axial testing were carried out to attain the failure. PG data is used for bi-axial vibration test and conventional constant spectrum signal (CSD signal) is used for uni-axial vibration test. Target duration for uni-axial test (Z direction) was arrived using pseudo damage calculation. Strain gauges were installed in failure locations to compare PG data and rig data as well as to calculate strain life. Failures were simulated in bi-axial vibration test.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0384
Bo Zhang, Qingzhu Cai, Yong Lu, Jianfeng Wang, Lei Wang, Wenqian Chen, Lie Yao, Yuqing Gu, Tao Gu, Shawn S. You
Abstract ADAMS, SIMULINK, and ADAMS-SIMULINK co-simulation models of component test systems, Multi-Axis-Simulation-Table (MAST) systems, and spindle-coupled vehicle testing system (MTS 329) were created. In the ADAMS models, the mechanical parts, joints, and bushings were modeled. Hydraulic and control elements were absent. The SIMULINK models modeled control and hydraulic elements including actuator dynamics, servo valve dynamics, closed loop control, three-variable control, matrix control, and coordinate transformation. However, the specimen had to be simplified due to the limitation of SIMULINK software. The ADAMS-SIMULINK co-simulation models considered hydraulic and control components in the SIMULINK portion and mechanical components in ADAMS portion. The interaction between the ADAMS and SIMULINK portions was achieved using ADAMS/Control.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0321
Silvio César Bastos
Abstract This case study describes improvements to the pin grinding and superfinishing processes for a 900-mm long, 60-kg forged crankshaft used in a six-cylinder diesel engine. Machining vibrations caused by the eccentricity of the mass of the pins in relation to the journals increase the difficulty of achieving a stable and capable process. Through analysis of the crankshaft and connecting rod assembly, an opportunity is identified to improve the pin profile along its 30-mm length. Based on measurements, it is found that, owing to variations of the order of 5 μm, the pin profile (nominally flat) may vary between a concave and a convex shape. Process improvements are focused on the grinding profile. The amplitude of the grinding profile is established between 0 and 5 μm, tending toward a convex shape. The practical implementation of the proposed improvements involves the imposition of a greater restriction on the extent of the grinding profile to 3.5 μm.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0320
Xiao Qing Zhang, Yuxian Han, Emma Huang, An Bo Pan, Ashley Walsh, Xinhua Zhang, Xiyang Yu, Lisong Wang
Abstract Customer expectations for improved performance, comfort levels, and aesthetics have led automobile manufacturers to use leather for seats, steering wheels, instrument panels, door panels, and other components. To increase the drivers’ comfort level, there is always a soft pad layer applied under the leather in the steering wheel. This paper will describe a potential failure mode that occurs when materials migrate from one material to another material in multilayer material constructions. In this case dioctyl phthalate migrated from the soft pad layer into the leather surface, affecting the durability performance of the leather coating. This paper describes the failure and demonstrates an effective test methodology to test for this failure during the materials and components validation process.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0275
N. Obuli Karthikeyan, N. Prajitha, P. Sethu Madhavan
Abstract As technology gets upgraded every day, automotive manufacturers are paying more attention towards delivering a highly reliable product which performs its intended function throughout its useful life (without any failure). To develop a reliable product, accelerated combined stress testing should be conducted in addition to the conventional design validation protocol for the product. It brings out most of the potential failure modes of the product, so that necessary actions can be taken for the reliability improvement. This paper discusses about the field failure simulation and reliability estimation of automotive headlamp relays using accelerated combined stress testing. To analyze various field failure modes, performance and tear down analysis were carried out on the field failure samples. Field data (i.e. electrical, thermal and vibration signals) were acquired to evaluate normal use conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0447
Zhe Li, Mike Dong, Dennis Harrigan, Michael Gardner
In gasoline Powertrain systems, the evaporative emission control (EVAP) system canister purge valve (CPV) can be actuated by pulse-width modulated (PWM) signals. The CPV is an electronically actuated solenoid. The PWM controlled CPV, when actuated, creates pressure pulsations in the system. This pulsation is sent back to the rest of the EVAP system. Given the right conditions, the fill limit vent valve (FLVV) inside the fuel tank can be excited. The FLVV internal components can be excited and produce noise. This noise can be objectionable to the occupants. Additional components within the EVAP system may also be excited in a similar way. This paper presents a bench test method using parts from vehicle’s EVAP system and other key fuel system components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0429
Michael Holland, Jonathan Gibb, Kacper Bierzanowski, Stuart Rowell, Bo Gao, Chen Lv, Dongpu Cao
Abstract This paper outlines the procedure used to assess the performance of a Lane Keeping Assistance System (LKAS) in a virtual test environment using the newly developed Euro NCAP Lane Support Systems (LSS) Test Protocol, version 1.0, November 2015 [1]. A tool has also been developed to automate the testing and analysis of this test. The Euro NCAP LSS Test defines ten test paths for left lane departures and ten for right lane departures that must be followed by the vehicle before the LKAS activates. Each path must be followed to within a specific tolerance. The vehicle control inputs required to follow the test path are calculated. These tests are then run concurrently in the virtual environment by combining two different software packages. Important vehicle variables are recorded and processed, and a pass/fail status is assigned to each test based on these values automatically.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0395
Xin Xie, Danielle Zeng, Boyang Zhang, Junrui Li, Liping Yan, Lianxiang Yang
Abstract Vehicle front panel is an interior part which has a major impact on the consumers’ experience of the vehicles. To keep a good appearance during long time aging period, most of the front panel is designed as a rough surface. Some types of surface defects on the rough surface can only be observed under the exposure of certain angled sun light. This brings great difficulties in finding surface defects on the production line. This paper introduces a novel polarized laser light based surface quality inspection method for the rough surfaces on the vehicle front panel. By using the novel surface quality inspection system, the surface defects can be detected real-timely even without the exposure under certain angled sun light. The optical fundamentals, theory derivation, experiment setup and testing result are shown in detail in this paper.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0393
Keunsoo Kim
Abstract Fuel tank in vehicle must hold the fuel in a stable way under any driving condition. However, the fuel tank might not conserve the fuel firmly in case a crack emerged while the fuel tank is exposed to different driving condition. Basically, when the engine is in purging at a normal ambient temperature before fuel boiling, the pressure inside the fuel tank decreases. However, the pressure inside a fuel tank increases while a vehicle is driven at extreme hot ambient temperature as fuel is boiling. This repetitive pressure change in the fuel tank comes with fuel tank’s physical expansion and shrink, which would cause a damage to the fuel tank. The main purpose of this research is to investigate the root cause of why fuel tank cracks at a fatigue point. We also aim to set up the method of how to test durability of the fuel tank in association with the pressure inside the tank.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1676
Hartmut Lackner
Abstract Software systems, and automotive software in particular, are becoming increasingly configurable to fulfill customer needs. New methods such as product line engineering facilitate the development and enhance the efficiency of such systems. In modern, versatile systems, the number of theoretically possible variants easily exceeds the number of actually built products. This produces two challenges for quality assurance and especially testing. First, the costs of conventional test methods increase substantially with every tested variant. And secondly, it is no longer feasible to build every possible variant for the purpose of testing. Hence, efficient criteria for selecting variants for testing are necessary. In this contribution, we propose a new test design method that enables systematic sampling of variants from test cases. We present six optimization criteria to enable control of test effort and test quality by sampling variants with different characteristics.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1679
Felix Martin, Michael Deubzer
Abstract In the automotive industry a steady increase in the number of functions driven by innovative features leads to more complex embedded systems. In the future even more functions will be implemented in the software, especially in the areas of automatic driving assistance functions, connected cars, autonomous driving, and mobility services. To satisfy the increasing performance requirements, multi- and many-core controllers are used, even in the classic automotive domains. This case study has been conducted in the steering system domain, but the results can be applied to other areas as well. Safety critical functions of classic automotive domains must fulfill strict real-time requirements to avoid malfunctions, which can potentially endanger people and the environment. For this reason, ISO 26262 requires verification of the performance and timing behavior of system critical functions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1681
Kyaw Soe
Abstract This paper describes a test system for improving the completeness and representativeness of automotive electrical/electronic (E/E) test benches. This is with the aim to enable more testing and hence increase the usage and effectiveness of these facilities. A proportion of testing for automotive electrical and electronics systems and components is conducted using E/E testing boards (“test-boards”). These are table-like rigs consisting of most or all electrical and electronic parts connected together as per a car/truck/van. A major problem is that the testing is conducted on the equivalent of a static vehicle: test-boards lack basic dynamic elements such as a running engine, vehicle motion, environmental, component and fluid temperatures, etc. This limits the testing that can be carried out on such a test-board.
Viewing 61 to 90 of 15362