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Viewing 61 to 90 of 15311
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1682
Matthew von der Lippe, Mark Waterbury, Walter J. Ortmann, Bernard Nefcy, Scott Thompson
Abstract The FMEA and DV&PV process of developing automotive products requires identifying and repeatedly testing critical vehicle attributes and their response to noise factors that may impair vehicle function. Ford has developed a new automated scripting tool to streamline in-vehicle robustness testing and produce more accurate and repeatable results. Similar noise factors identified during the FMEA process are grouped together, condensed, and scripts are developed to simulate these noise factors using calibration parameters and vehicle controls. The automated testing tool uses the API of a calibration software tool and a graphical scripting interface to consistently simulate driver inputs with greater precision than a human calibrator and enable more sophisticated controls, which would have previously required experimental software builds.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1681
Kyaw Soe
Abstract This paper describes a test system for improving the completeness and representativeness of automotive electrical/electronic (E/E) test benches. This is with the aim to enable more testing and hence increase the usage and effectiveness of these facilities. A proportion of testing for automotive electrical and electronics systems and components is conducted using E/E testing boards (“test-boards”). These are table-like rigs consisting of most or all electrical and electronic parts connected together as per a car/truck/van. A major problem is that the testing is conducted on the equivalent of a static vehicle: test-boards lack basic dynamic elements such as a running engine, vehicle motion, environmental, component and fluid temperatures, etc. This limits the testing that can be carried out on such a test-board.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1679
Felix Martin, Michael Deubzer
Abstract In the automotive industry a steady increase in the number of functions driven by innovative features leads to more complex embedded systems. In the future even more functions will be implemented in the software, especially in the areas of automatic driving assistance functions, connected cars, autonomous driving, and mobility services. To satisfy the increasing performance requirements, multi- and many-core controllers are used, even in the classic automotive domains. This case study has been conducted in the steering system domain, but the results can be applied to other areas as well. Safety critical functions of classic automotive domains must fulfill strict real-time requirements to avoid malfunctions, which can potentially endanger people and the environment. For this reason, ISO 26262 requires verification of the performance and timing behavior of system critical functions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1676
Hartmut Lackner
Abstract Software systems, and automotive software in particular, are becoming increasingly configurable to fulfill customer needs. New methods such as product line engineering facilitate the development and enhance the efficiency of such systems. In modern, versatile systems, the number of theoretically possible variants easily exceeds the number of actually built products. This produces two challenges for quality assurance and especially testing. First, the costs of conventional test methods increase substantially with every tested variant. And secondly, it is no longer feasible to build every possible variant for the purpose of testing. Hence, efficient criteria for selecting variants for testing are necessary. In this contribution, we propose a new test design method that enables systematic sampling of variants from test cases. We present six optimization criteria to enable control of test effort and test quality by sampling variants with different characteristics.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1636
Lukas Preusser
Abstract Along with the development and marketability of vehicles without an internal combustion engine, electrically heated surfaces within these vehicles are getting more and more important. They tend to have a quicker response while using less energy than a conventional electric heater fan, providing a comfortable temperature feel within the cabin. Due to the big area of heated surface it is important to spread the heating power in a way that different heat conduction effects to underlying materials are considered. In case an accurate sensor feedback of the targeted homogeneous surface temperature cannot be guaranteed, a thermal energy model of the heated system can help to set and maintain a comfortable surface temperature. For a heated steering wheel development project, different models have been created to meet that aim using mechanistic approaches starting with a predominantly first-order dynamics model and ending with a distributed parameter multi-feedback system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1566
Willibald Brems, Nico Kruithof, Richard Uhlmann, Andreas Wagner, Werner Krantz, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract In recent years, driving simulators have become a valuable tool in the automotive design and testing process. Yet, in the field of vehicle dynamics, most decisions are still based on test drives in real cars. One reason for this situation can be found in the fact that many driving simulators do not allow the driver to evaluate the handling qualities of a simulated vehicle. In a driving simulator, the motion cueing algorithm tries to represent the vehicle motion within the constrained motion envelope of the motion platform. By nature, this process leads to so called false cues where the motion of the platform is not in phase or moving in a different direction with respect to the vehicle motion. In a driving simulator with classical filter-based motion cueing, false cues make it considerably more difficult for the driver to rate vehicle dynamics.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1555
Mirosław Jan Gidlewski, Krystof JANKOWSKI, Andrzej MUSZYŃSKI, Dariusz ŻARDECKI
Abstract Lane change automation appears to be a fundamental problem of vehicle automated control, especially when the vehicle is driven at high speed. Selected relevant parts of the recent research project are reported in this paper, including literature review, the developed models and control systems, as well as crucial simulation results. In the project, two original models describing the dynamics of the controlled motion of the vehicle were used, verified during the road tests and in the laboratory environment. The first model - fully developed (multi-body, 3D, nonlinear) - was used in simulations as a virtual plant to be controlled. The second model - a simplified reference model of the lateral dynamics of the vehicle (single-body, 2D, linearized) - formed the basis for theoretical analysis, including the synthesis of the algorithm for automatic control. That algorithm was based on the optimal control theory.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1540
Yuri M. Lopes, Maxwell R. Taylor, Todd H. Lounsberry, Gregory J. Fadler
Abstract Typical production vehicle development includes road testing of a vehicle towing a trailer to evaluate powertrain thermal performance. In order to correlate tests with simulations, the aerodynamic effects of pulling a trailer behind a vehicle must be estimated. During real world operation a vehicle often encounters cross winds. Therefore, the effects of cross winds on the drag of a vehicle–trailer combination should be taken into account. Improving the accuracy of aerodynamic load prediction for a vehicle-trailer combination should in turn lead to improved simulations and better thermal performance. In order to best simulate conditions for real world trailer towing, a study was performed using reduced scale models of a Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV) and a Pickup Truck (PT) towing a medium size cargo trailer. The scale model vehicle and trailer combinations were tested in a full scale wind tunnel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1360
John D. Bullough
Abstract Nighttime driving cannot be accomplished without vehicle headlighting. A growing body of evidence demonstrates the role of lighting on visual performance and in turn on nightttime driving safety in terms of crashes. Indirect impacts of lighting via comfort or other factors are less well understood, however. A two-part field study using real-world drivers of an instrumented vehicle was conducted to assess the potential role of oncoming headlight glare as a factor in driving behaviors that might be related to increased crash risks. In the first part of the study, drivers' behaviors when navigating through roadway intersections having different levels of crash risk were recorded in order to identify responses that were correlated with the risk level. In the second part, drivers were exposed to different levels of glare from oncoming headlights; several of the same risk-related behaviors identified in the first part of the study were exhibited.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1354
Timothy Morse, Michael Cundy, Harri Kytomaa
Abstract One potential fire ignition source in a motor vehicle is the hot surfaces on the engine exhaust system. These hot surfaces can come into contact with combustible and flammable liquids (such as engine oil, transmission fluid, brake fluid, gasoline, or Diesel fuel) due to a fluid leak, or during a vehicle collision. If the surface temperature is higher than the hot surface ignition temperature of the combustible or flammable liquid in a given geometry, a fire can potentially ignite and propagate. In addition to automotive fluids, another potential fuel in post-collision vehicle fires is grass, leaves, or other vegetation. Studies of hot surface ignition of dried vegetation have found that ignition depends on the type of vegetation, surface temperature, duration of contact, and ambient conditions such as temperature and wind speed. Ignition can occur at surface temperatures as low as 300 °C, if the vegetation is in contact with the surface for 10 minutes or longer.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1356
Rainer Neumann
Abstract In the last years we recognize a big amount of innovative solutions in the field of automotive lighting and especially in front lighting systems. The major target to improve the light performance and to make driving at night safe is most important. The measure for the performance rating and the ability to compare different systems with a technology neutral process seems to be quite difficult. The legislation is looking for a simplification with clearly defined parameters for the future. Experimental test series recently published causing a lot of discussions as the sensitivity of the aiming of the headlamps can cause completely different performance test results. The paper will report on a study with various production vehicles, all in the same way initially aimed and prepared for all type of technologies.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1371
Hao Pan, Xuexun Guo, Xiaofei Pei, Xingzhi Dong
Abstract Brake pedal feel plays an important role in the driver's comprehensive subjective feeling when braking, which directly affects the active safety and riding comfort of passenger car. A systematical mathematical model of the vehicle brake system is built in according with the structure and system characteristics of hydraulic servo brake system. A complete hydraulic servo brake system simulation model composed of brake pedal, vacuum booster, brake master cylinder, brake pipe, brake wheel cylinders, brake calipers is established in AMESim. The effects of rubber reaction plate stiffness, rubber valve opening, brake master cylinder piston, brake caliper, brake pipe deformation and friction liner deformation on brake pedal feel are considered in this model. The accuracy of this model is verified by real road vehicle tests under static and dynamic two different conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1383
Satheesh Kumar Chandran, James Forbes, Carrie Bittick, Kathleen Allanson, Fnu Brinda
Abstract There is a strong business case for automotive interfaces to undergo usability testing throughout their product development lifecycle. System Usability Scale (SUS) is a simple and standard measure of usability. To meet the timing needs for product development, usability testing needs to be performed in a quick, cost effective manner. Hence the required sample size of participants for a usability study is one of the critical factors. To determine an acceptable sample size, a Monte Carlo simulation using SUS scores from eleven different in-vehicle automotive interface usability studies was used to create 500,000 subsamples of different sample sizes. The percentage of subsamples with mean scores within the confidence interval of the population mean was calculated. At a subsample size of thirty-five, 95% of the subsamples have a mean SUS score within the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1374
Michael J. Flannagan, Shan Bao, Anuj Pradhan, John Sullivan, Yu Zhang
Abstract Mcity at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor provides a realistic off-roadway environment in which to test vehicles and drivers in complex traffic situations. It is intended for testing of various levels of vehicle automation, from advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) to fully self-driving vehicles. In a recent human factors study of interfaces for teen drivers, we performed parallel experiments in a driving simulator and Mcity. We implemented driving scenarios of moderate complexity (e.g., passing a vehicle parked on the right side of the road just before a pedestrian crosswalk, with the parked vehicle partially blocking the view of the crosswalk) in both the simulator and at Mcity.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1417
Enrique Bonugli, Richard Watson, Mark Freund, Jeffrey Wirth
Abstract This paper reports on seventy additional tests conducted using a mechanical device described by Bonugli et al. [4]. The method utilized quasi-static loading of bumper systems and other vehicle components to measure their force-deflection properties. Corridors on the force-deflection plots, for various vehicle combinations, were determined in order to define the system stiffness of the combined vehicle components. Loading path and peak force measurements can then be used to evaluate the impact severity for low speed collisions in terms of delta-v and acceleration. The additional tests refine the stiffness corridors, previously published, which cover a wide range of vehicle types and impact configurations. The compression phase of a low speed collision can be modeled as a spring that is defined by the force-deflection corridors. This is followed by a linear rebound phase based on published restitution values [1,5].
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1427
Daniel Koch, Gray Beauchamp, David Pentecost
Abstract Tire disablement events can cause a drag force that slows a vehicle. In this study, the magnitude of the deceleration was measured for different phases of 29 high speed tire tread separation and air loss tests. These deceleration rates can assist in reconstructing the speed of a vehicle involved in an accident following a tire disablement.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1388
S. M. Akbar Berry, Michael Kolich, Johnathan Line, Waguih ElMaraghy
Abstract Thermal comfort in automotive seating has been studied and discussed for a long time. The available research, because it is focused on the components, has not produced a model that provides insight into the human-seat system interaction. This work, which represents the beginning of an extensive research program, aims to establish the foundation for such a model. This paper will discuss the key physiological, psychological, and biomechanical factors related to perceptions of thermal comfort in automotive seats. The methodology to establish perceived thermal comfort requirements will also be presented and discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1398
Yoshiyuki Hatakeyema
Abstract Since drowsy driving is a major cause of serious traffic accidents, there is a growing requirement for drowsiness prevention technologies. This study proposes a drowsy driving prediction method based on eye opening time. One issue of using eye opening time is predicting strong drowsiness before the driver actually feels sleepy. Because overlooking potential hazards is one of the causes of traffic accidents and is closely related to driver cognition and drowsiness, this study focuses on eye opening movements during driving. First, this report describes hypotheses concerning drowsiness and eye opening time based on the results of previous studies. It is assumed that the standard deviation of eye opening time (SDEOP) indicates driver drowsiness and the following two transitions are considered: increasing and decreasing SDEOP. To confirm the hypotheses, the relationship between drowsiness and SDEOP was investigated.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1410
Richard F Lambourn, James Manning
Abstract It can happen, following a collision between a car and a pedestrian or in a deliberate assault with a motor vehicle, that the pedestrian comes to be caught or wedged beneath the car, and that the driver then travels on for a considerable distance, afterwards claiming to have been unaware of the presence of the person. However, police, lawyers and jurors are often incredulous that the driver should not have been able to “feel” that there was something underneath his car. The authors have investigated the matter by carrying out practical tests with suitable cars and dummies. This paper describes instrumented tests performed by the authors following one such incident, and gives accounts of two previous incidents investigated in a more subjective fashion. The general conclusion is that the effect on the behavior of the car is very small and that a driver might indeed be unaware that there was a person trapped beneath them.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1504
Peter Tkacik, Zachary Carpenter, Aaron Gholston, Benjamin James Cobb, Sam Kennedy, Ethan Blankenship, Mesbah Uddin, Surya Phani Krishna Nukala
Abstract Wind tunnel aerodynamic testing involving rolling road tire conditions can be expensive and complex to set up. Low cost rolling road testing can be implemented in a 0.3m2 Eiffel wind tunnel by modifying a horizontal belt sander to function as a moving road. This sander is equipped with steel supports to hold a steel plate against the bottom of the wind tunnel to stabilize the entire test section. These supports are bolted directly into the sander frame to ensure minimal vibrational losses or errors during testing. The wind tunnel design at the beginning of the project was encased in a wooden box which was removed to allow easier access to the test section for installation of the rolling road assembly. The tunnel was also modified to allow observers to view the testing process from various angles.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0777
Gordon McTaggart-Cowan, Jian Huang, Sandeep Munshi
Abstract Natural gas offers the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from heavy-duty on-road transportation. One of the challenges facing natural gas as a fuel is that its composition can vary significantly between different fuel suppliers and geographical regions. In this work, the impact of fuel composition variations on a heavy-duty, direct injection of natural gas engine with diesel pilot ignition is evaluated. This combustion process results in a predominantly non-premixed gaseous fuel combustion event; as a result, end-gas autoignition (knock) is not a concern. Changes in the fuel composition do still impact the combustion, both through the changes in the chemical kinetics of the reactions and due to changes in the density of the fuel. Increasing concentrations of heavier hydrocarbons, such as ethane or propane, in the fuel lead to higher fuel densities and hence greater fuel mass being injected for a given injection duration.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0720
Omar Ramadan, Luc Menard, David Gardiner, Aaron Wilcox, Gary Webster
Abstract This paper is a continuation of work previously discussed in SAE 2014-01-0179 [1] and SAE 2015-01-0805 [2], which was intended to improve the capability and precision of the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT™) and associated ASTM D6890 [3]/CEN EN 15195 [4]/EI IP 498 [5] Test Methods. The results presented in those two papers indicated how the new generation of IQT™ with the TALM Precision Package upgrade can markedly improve the precision of the ASTM D6890, CEN EN 15195 and EI IP 498 Derived Cetane Number (DCN) test methods. This paper will evaluate the performance of the upgraded instruments over the past 21 months of their participation in ASTM’s National Fuel Exchange Group (NEG) diesel fuel exchange program.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0738
Akhilendra Pratap Singh, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Abstract Premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion is an advanced combustion technique, which has the potential to be operated by alternative fuels such as alcohols. PCCI combustion emits lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) and results thermal efficiency similar to conventional compression ignition (CI) engines. Due to extremely high heat release rate (HRR), PCCI combustion cannot be used at higher engine loads, which make it difficult to be employed in production grade engines. This study focused on development of an advanced combustion engine, which can operate in both combustion modes such as CI combustion as well as PCCI combustion mode. This Hybrid combustion system was controlled by an open engine control unit (ECU), which varied the fuel injection parameters for mode switching between CI and PCCI combustion modes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0626
LeeAnn Wang, George Garfinkel, Ahteram Khan, Mayur Harsha, Prashanth Rao
Abstract When a driver completes an aggressive drive cycle on a hybrid vehicle, the High Voltage (HV) battery system may be at risk of exceeding the power limit temperature, due to continuous absorption of radiative and convective heat from the environment, such as from exhaust and pavement, even after key-off. In such a case, in the absence of active cooling, the vehicle may not be keyed-on until battery temperatures are reduced below critical values. A transient thermal analysis is conducted on a HV battery system to simulate the key-off operation using an effective Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology. Two stages are considered in this methodology to capture the complexity of the geometry and the multiple phenomena that need to be simulated in the model. The introduced modeling technique can be used for Full Hybrid Electric Vehicle (FHEV) and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) transient key-off situations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1095
Sankar B. Rengarajan, Jayant Sarlashkar, Peter Lobato
Abstract SAE Recommended Practice J1540 [1] specifies test procedures to map transmission efficiency and parasitic losses in a manual transmission. The procedure comprises two parts. The first compares input and output torque over a range of speed to determine efficiency. The second measures parasitic losses at zero input torque over a range of speed. As specified in J1540, efficiency of transmissions is routinely measured on a test-stand under steady torque and speed [2] [3]. While such testing is useful to compare different transmissions, it is unclear whether the “in-use” efficiency of a given transmission is the same as that measured on the stand. A vehicular transmission is usually mated to a reciprocating combustion engine producing significant torque and speed fluctuations at the crankshaft. It is thus a valid question whether the efficiency under such pulsating conditions is the same as that under steady conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1096
Robin Temporelli, Philippe Micheau, Maxime Boisvert
Abstract Automated Manual Transmission (AMT) based on classic electrohydraulic clutch actuation gives high performances and comfort to a recreational vehicle. However, overall power consumption remains high due to the pump efficiency. In addition, the pump is often driven by the vehicle’s engine and thus is continuously working. To address this issue, a new electrified clutch based on electromechanical actuation has been designed and prototyped. In order to evaluate the effective fuel consumption reduction using this new clutch actuator, a low-cost and agile method is presented and used in this paper. Indeed, instead of integrating the clutch actuator in a real vehicle and performing expensive real emission test cycles on a road, this original method proposes to perform accurate semi-virtual emission test cycles. Moreover, the method allows to perform numerous test iterations in a short time.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1147
Hyunjun Kim, Jingeon Kang, Dongsuk Kum
Abstract Input- and output-split hybrids using a single planetary gear (PG) can provide high fuel economy, but they tend to suffer from low acceleration performance. In order to improve their acceleration performance, speed reduction (multiplication) gears (SRG/SMG) have often been employed in various mass-produced split hybrids. In fact, adding one SRG (SMG) to input- or output-split hybrids can improve not only the acceleration performance, but also the fuel economy. Nevertheless, the full potentials of using SRGs (SMGs) have not yet been thoroughly investigated because the design space of input- and output-split configurations using one SRG (SMG) is huge; 432 configurations can be generated using two PGs where one PG is used as an SRG/SMG. Thus, in order to investigate the impacts of SRG (SMG) within a reasonable time, an efficient analysis procedure is required.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1065
Douglas R. Martin, Benjamin Rocci
Abstract Exhaust temperature models are widely used in the automotive industry to estimate catalyst and exhaust gas temperatures and to protect the catalyst and other vehicle hardware against over-temperature conditions. Modeled exhaust temperatures rely on air, fuel, and spark measurements to make their estimate. Errors in any of these measurements can have a large impact on the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, air-fuel imbalances, air leaks, engine coolant temperature (ECT) or air charge temperature (ACT) inaccuracies, or any unforeseen source of heat entering the exhaust may have a large impact on the accuracy of the modeled estimate. Modern universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensors have heaters with controllers to precisely regulate the oxygen sensing element temperature. These controllers are duty cycle based and supply more or less current to the heating element depending on the temperature of the surrounding exhaust gas.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1066
Christoph Beerens, Alexander Mueller, Kimm Karrip
Abstract As emissions regulations and carbon footprint are more and more demandingly controlled, thermal efficiency of engine components must be optimized. Valve group components have to allow for ever increasing temperatures, endure aggressive condensates or even contribute directly to rising efficiency and emissions demands. Even with integrated and cooled exhaust manifolds, the exhaust valves are meeting full combustion temperatures, especially for stoichiometric combustion. MAHLE has developed a new technology in order to measure valve temperatures in real time, i.e. Transient Valve Temperature Measurement (TVTM). This is a complex methodology using thermocouples installed inside of the valves, offering the possibility to run the engine at different conditions, without any functional changes in the valve train system at all. Specifically valve rotation is not affected and thus temperatures all around the valve seat can be captured during rotation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1002
Daisuke Tanaka, Ryo Uchida, Toru Noda, Andreas Kolbeck, Sebastian Henkel, Yannis Hardalupas, Alexander Taylor, Allen Aradi
Abstract The purpose of this work was to gain a fundamental understanding of which fuel property parameters are responsible for particulate emission characteristics, associated with key intermediate behavior in the engine cylinder such as the fuel film and insufficient mixing. Accordingly, engine tests were carried out using various fuels having different volatility and chemical compositions under different coolant temperature conditions. In addition, a fundamental spray and film visualization analysis was also conducted using a constant volume vessel, assuming the engine test conditions. As for the physical effects, the test results showed that a low volatility fuel displayed high particulate number (PN) emissions when the injection timing was advanced. The fundamental test clearly showed that the amount of fuel film on the impingement plate increased under such operating conditions with a low volatility fuel.
Viewing 61 to 90 of 15311