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Viewing 271 to 300 of 15354
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2030
Jon Zumberge, Michael Boyd, Raul Ordonez
Cost and performance requirements are driving military and commercial systems to become highly integrated, optimized systems which require more sophisticated, highly complex controls. To realize benefits of those complex controls and make confident decisions, the validation of both plant and control models becomes critical. To quickly develop controls for these systems, it is beneficial to develop plant models and determine the uncertainty of those models to predict performance and stability of the control algorithms. A process of model and control algorithm validation for a dc-dc boost converter circuit based on acceptance sampling is presented here. The validation process described in this paper is based on MIL-STD 3022 with emphasis on requirements settings and the testing process. The key contribution of this paper is the process for model and control algorithm validation, specifically a method for decomposing the problem into model and control algorithm validation stages.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2064
Shashank Krishnamurthy, Stephen Savulak, Yang Wang
Abstract The emergence of wide band gap devices has pushed the boundaries of power converter operations and high power density applications. The wide band gap devices in conjunction with silicon on insulator electronic components enable the realization of power converters that can operate at high ambient temperatures that are typically found in aerospace engine environments. This paper describes the design and test of a power electronic inverter that converts a fixed input DC voltage to a variable voltage variable frequency three phase output. The design of the key functional components such as the gate drive, power module, controller and communication will be discussed in this paper. Test results for the inverter at high temperature are also presented.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2058
Thibaut Billard, Cedric Abadie, Bouazza Taghia
Abstract The present paper reports non-electrically intrusive partial discharge investigations on an aeronautic motor. Relevancy, robustness and repeatability of partial discharge testing procedures, both on insulating materials characterization and on operating aeronautic equipment are essential to ensure reliability of the aircraft systems. The aim of this paper is to be the very first step of defining such procedures and the associated test equipment. To do so, the paper will start by providing an understanding of partial discharge phenomena and will review typical more electrical aircraft architecture. Key characteristics causing partial discharge risk to increase will be highlighted. The impact of harness length, high performance power electronics and voltage level increase on insulation system is demonstrated.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2051
Andreas Himmler, Lars Stockmann, Dominik Holler
Abstract The application of a communication infrastructure for hybrid test systems is currently a topic in the aerospace industry, as also in other industries. One main reason is flexibility. Future laboratory tests means (LTMs) need to be easier to exchange and reuse than they are today. They may originate from different suppliers and parts of them may need to fulfill special requirements and thus be based on dedicated technologies. The desired exchangeability needs to be achieved although suppliers employ different technologies with regard to specific needs. To achieve interoperability, a standardized transport mechanism between test systems is required. Designing such a mechanism poses a challenge as there are several different types of data that have to be exchanged. Simulation data is a prominent example. It has to be handled differently than control data, for example. No one technique or technology fits perfectly for all types of data.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2047
K. Suresh, Rajkumar Dhande, Udupi Ananthakrishna Acharya
Abstract Reducing the amount of physical testing is of importance in the aeronautical industry, where each physical test represents a significant cost. Apart from the cost aspect, it may also be difficult or hazardous to carry out physical testing. Specific to the aeronautic industry are also the relatively long development cycles, implying long periods of uncertainty during product development. In any industry a common viewpoint is that of verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification using simulation models are critical activities for a successful development of a product. In Aeronautical application, the design of store's structural equipments needs to be certified in accordance with MIL-T-7743F [1]. This paper focuses on a case study for shock analysis, whereby an attempt has been made to reduce the cost of certification by way of replacing the actual physical testing by a reliable high fidelity FE simulation.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1918
Yusuke Aoki, Yasuyuki Kanehira, Yukio Nishizawa
Abstract Brake squeal is an uncomfortable noise that occurs while braking. It is an important issue in automobile quality to prevent brake products from squealing. Brake shims are widely used to reduce squeal occurrence rate. The anti-squeal effect of shims is quantified as damping properties measured with a bending mode tester, instead of repeating many dynamometer tests. However, there are cases where measurement results have less correlation to actual squeal suppression rate. Therefore, the evaluation of the anti-squeal effect with a dynamometer or on an actual car is needed until the best shim can be selected. To improve the predicted accuracy of the anti-squeal effect, the difference between measurement conditions and actual braking conditions of shims, was focused on. The bending mode tester measures loss factor under pressure-free conditions, even though shims are compressed by pistons or cylinders towards the backplate of the pad.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1953
Michael Herbert Putz, Harald Seifert, Maximilian Zach, Jure Peternel
Abstract Since more than eight years Vienna Engineering (VE) is working on an electro-mechanical brake (EMB) actuated by eccentrics and a highly non-linear actuation mechanism. The principle allows full braking in approx. 70 milliseconds (including air gap) and only approx. 3 A RMS actuator current at 12 V for classical ABS with oscillations. This EMB reached an elaborated state. Versions for passenger cars, elevators, railway and commercial vehicles (CVs) were derived. Now, as the EMB is going to road tests, it is necessary to fulfill safety requirements closely. What are these safety requirements and how can they be fulfilled? The properties of the overall system, of the mechanics and electronics of the single brake are discussed in this paper. The overall brake system for EMBs needs a truly redundant power supply, a safe control bus and a safe brake pedal. The mechanics of a single brake can be required to release when power is off and it must not get mechanically stuck.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1920
Deaglan O'Meachair, Stamatis Angelinas, Matthew Crumpton, Antonio Rubio Flores, Juan Garcia, Pablo Barles
Abstract Bentley Motors Ltd. has developed a Carbon Silicon Carbide (CSiC) brake system for its Mulsanne product, introduced at 17MY. The CSiC brake system is conceived as a performance brake system, and as such offers notable improvements in brake performance. In developing the brake system, particular focus was placed on meeting the refinement levels required for a premium product, and indeed as the flagship model for Bentley Motors, NVH refinement of the brake system was of particular concern. This paper intends to discuss the technical performance of the brake system and review the NVH performance of the brakes. Particular attention is given to the methodology employed by Bentley Motors Ltd. and IDIADA Automotive Technology S.A. in identifying NVH concerns, and proposing and validating solutions in the field, through extensive NVH endurance runs. The performance of the system is benchmarked against similar systems offered by Bentley Motors.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1932
Niclas Strömberg
Abstract During several years a toolbox for performing virtual rig tests of disc brake systems has been developed by the author. A thermo-flexible multi-body model of a test rig is derived and implemented by coupling two types of models: a finite element model and a multi-body model. The finite element model is a thermo-mechanical model of the pad-disc system that is formulated including thermo-elasticity, frictional contact and wear. The energy balance of the contact interface is governed by contact conductance that depends linearly on the contact pressure and the frictional heat depends on a temperature dependent coefficient of friction. Instead of adopting a standard Lagrangian approach, the disc is formulated in an Eulerian frame like a fluid. This is then coupled to the pad most accurately by using Signorini’s contact conditions, Coulomb’s law of friction and Archard’s law of wear.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1915
Meechai Sriwiboon, Seong Rhee, Kritsana Kaewlob, Nipon Tiempan, Rungrod Samankitesakul
Abstract As some brake engineers believe that brake squeal can be related to pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility while others disagree, a study has been undertaken to develop further insights. Two commercial formulas, one low-copper NAO and the other copper-free NAO, were made into disc pads of varying porosity without an underlayer and they were checked for specific gravity, porosity, hardness (HRS and HRR), natural frequencies, compressibility, friction, wear and squeal. With increasing porosity, the hardness and natural frequencies continue to decrease. The compressibility definitely does not increase, but rather slightly decrease or stays the same. The coefficient of friction decreases for the low-copper along with pad and disc wear reduction, and increases for the copper-free along with pad wear increase with no change in disc wear. No obvious correlation emerges between brake squeal and pad hardness, friction coefficient or compressibility.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1913
Alessandro Sanguineti, Federico Tosi, Andrea Bonfanti, Flavio Rampinelli
Abstract Organic brake pads for automotive can be defined as brake linings with bonding matrix constituted of high-temperature thermosetting resins. Bonded together inside the polymeric binder are a mix of components (e.g. abrasives, lubricants, reinforcements, fillers, modifiers…), each playing a distinctive role in determining the tribology and friction activity of the final friction material. The herein reported work presents inorganic “alkali-activated”-based materials suitable for the production of alternative brake linings (i.e. brake pads), by means of an unconventional low-temperature wet process. Exploiting the hydraulic activity of specific components when exposed to an alkaline environment, such peculiar inorganic materials are capable of coming to a complete hardening without the need of traditional high-temperature energivorous procedures.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1925
David B. Antanaitis
Abstract The strong focus on reducing brake drag, driven by a historic ramp-up in global fuel economy and carbon emissions standards, has led to renewed research on brake caliper drag behaviors and how to measure them. However, with the increased knowledge of the range of drag behaviors that a caliper can exhibit comes a particularly vexing problem - how should this complex range of behaviors be represented in the overall road load of the vehicle? What conditions are encountered during coastdown and fuel economy testing, and how should brake drag be measured and represented in these conditions? With the Environmental Protection Agency (amongst other regulating agencies around the world) conducting audit testing, and the requirement that published road load values be repeatable within a specified range during these audits, the importance of answering these questions accurately is elevated. This paper studies these questions, and even offers methodology for addressing them.
2016-09-16
Journal Article
2016-01-9019
Jan Grüner, Stefanie Marker
Abstract Standardized driving cycles, such as the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) in Europe or the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) in the U.S. are an important tool to certify new vehicle models. They are used to estimate real world fuel consumption as well as real world emissions. The latter has recently become more important with the stronger focus on green driving, resulting in much stricter emission regulations, while fuel consumption still remains one of the most important aspects in terms of economy and long term costs for the vehicle owner. However these cycles do not reflect the actual behaviour of the driver or regional influences (i.e. topography). Therefore, manufacturers have developed their own usage and test cycles and are able to extract data from the vehicle to analyse the individual driving behaviour and vehicle usage. Apart from that, Naturalistic Driving Observation (NDO) is interested in understanding the driver.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1827
Giorgio Bartolozzi, Marco Danti, Andrea Camia, Davide Vige
Abstract The time to market in the automotive industry is constantly decreasing pushing the carmaker companies to increase the efforts in numerical simulations and to decrease the number of prototypes. In the NVH field, this time constraint reflects in moving the well-established finite element simulations towards the so called “full-vehicle simulations”. Specifically, the CAE techniques should be able to predict the complete behavior of the vehicles in mission conditions, so to reproduce some usual tests, such as the “coast down” test on different roads. The aim of this paper is to present a methodology to improve rolling noise simulations exploiting an integrated full-vehicle approach. An accurate modeling of all the subsystems is needed, with particular attention to the wheels and the suspension systems. Therefore, the paper firstly covers the modeling approach used to obtain the FE models of tires and suspension system.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1783
Oliver Engler
Mercedes-AMG GmbH specializes in unique, high-performance vehicles. The image of AMG as the successful performance brand of Mercedes-Benz is reflected in its impressive successes in the world of motorsport and its unique vehicles. One of these vehicles is the SLS AMG Coupé Electric Drive. After an elaborate series of tests as well as numerous test drives, we have created the SLS eSound which captures the exceptional dynamism of this unique super sports car with electric drive. Starting with a characteristic start-up sound, which rings out on pressing the "Power" button on the AMG DRIVE UNIT, the occupants can experience a tailor-made driving sound for each driving situation: incredibly dynamic when accelerating, subdued when cruising and as equally characteristic during recuperation. The sound is not only dependent on road speed, engine speed and load conditions, but also reflects the driving situation and the vehicle's operating state with a suitable driving noise.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1835
Albert Albers, Fabian Schille, Matthias Behrendt
Abstract In terms of customer requirements, driving comfort is an important evaluation criterion. Regarding hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), maneuver-based measurements are necessary to analyze this comfort characteristic [1]. Such measurements can be performed on acoustic roller test benches, yielding time efficient and reproducible results. Due to full hybrid vehicles’ various operation modes, new noise and vibration phenomena can occur. The Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) performance of such vehicles can be influenced by transient powertrain vibrations e.g. by the starting and stopping of the internal combustion engine in different driving conditions. The paper at hand shows a methodical procedure to measure and analyze the NVH of HEVs in different driving conditions.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1848
Jean-Loup Christen, Mohamed Ichchou, Olivier Bareille, Bernard Troclet
Abstract The problem of noise transmission through a structure into a cavity appears in many practical applications, especially in the automotive, aeronautic and space industries. In the mean time, there is a trend towards an increasing use of composite materials to reduce the weight of the structures. Since these materials usually offer poor sound insulation properties, it is necessary to add noise control treatments. They usually involve poroelastic materials, such as foams or mineral wools, whose behaviour depends on many parameters. Some of these parameters may vary in rather broad ranges, either because of measurement uncertainties or because their values have not been fixed yet in the design process. In order to efficiently design sound protections, performing a sensitivity analysis can be interesting to identify which parameters have the most influence on the relevant vibroacoustic indicators and concentrate the design effort on them.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1807
Olga Roditcheva, Lennart Carl Lofdahl, Simone Sebben, Pär Harling cEng, Holger Bernhardsson
Abstract This paper presents an experimental study of aeroacoustical sound sources generated by the turbulent flow around the side mirror of a Volvo V70. Measurements were carried out at the Volvo Cars aerodynamical wind tunnel (PVT) and at the aeroacoustical wind tunnel of Stuttgart University (FKFS). Several different measurement techniques were applied in both tunnels and the results were compared to each other. The configurations considered here were: side mirror with a cord and without the cord. The results discussed in this paper include intensity probe measurements in the flow around the side mirror, sound source localization with beamforming technique using a three-dimensional spherical array as well as standard measurements inside the car with an artificial head. This experimental study focused on understanding the differences between testing at the PVT and FKFS.
2016-05-11
Technical Paper
2016-36-0061
Juliana Negrini de Araújo, Leonardo Hoss, Alexandre Viecelli, Maicon Molon
Abstract The use of virtual and / or experimental test rigs applying random loading is becoming more relevant in the development and validation of new products. An application example is the analysis of components subject to vibrations, especially suspended components. For this type of application, product validation applying random loads and different frequencies becomes mandatory. This study developed a virtual test rig for suspended components validation and definition of experimental test rigs. The study was based on a standard component, using LMS Virtual.Lab Siemens software for the dynamic analysis and durability. The experimental data (extensometry and accelerometry) was collected on the special tracks of Randon Companies Proving Ground. From the virtual modeling and experimental data, the proper hydraulic actuators signals were defined to characterize the component behavior according to the field application.
2016-05-11
Technical Paper
2016-36-0067
Gustavo de Godoy José, Mauro Rebelatto, Rui Gustavo Lippert Schwanke, Telmo Roberto Strohaecker
Abstract This paper presents several tests carried out on a truck trailer on different types of pavement and load condition, using proving ground tracks and facilities, the instrumentation details, data analysis and validation. Through an extensive analysis of Brazilian goods road transport, a load vehicle combination and a list of test pavements were chosen as off-road pavement, highway pavement, pot holes, washboard, cobblestones and Belgian blocks. Accelerometers were installed throughout the truck trailer chassis longitudinal length in order to obtain the acceleration levels and vibration frequencies on the truck trailer sprung mass. Aiming to evaluate the base excitation imposed to parts mounted to the truck trailers chassis, according to their mounting position, data processing method and cutoff frequency definition strategies were defined.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0639
Brian C. Kaul, Benjamin Lawler, Akram Zahdeh
Abstract Engine acoustics measured by microphones near the engine have been used in controlled laboratory settings for combustion feedback and even combustion phasing control, but the use of these techniques in a vehicle where many other noise sources exist is problematic. In this study, surface-mounted acoustic emissions sensors are embedded in the block of a 2.0L turbocharged GDI engine, and the signal is analyzed to identify useful feedback features. The use of acoustic emissions sensors, which have a very high frequency response and are commonly used for detecting material failures for health monitoring, including detecting gear pitting and ring scuffing on test stands, enables detection of acoustics both within the range of human hearing and in the ultrasonic spectrum. The high-speed acoustic time-domain data are synchronized with the crank-angle-domain combustion data to investigate the acoustic emissions response caused by various engine events.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0575
Konstantinos Siokos, Rohit Koli, Robert Prucka, Jason Schwanke, Shyam Jade
Abstract Low pressure (LP) and cooled EGR systems are capable of increasing fuel efficiency of turbocharged gasoline engines, however they introduce control challenges. Accurate exhaust pressure modeling is of particular importance for real-time feedforward control of these EGR systems since they operate under low pressure differentials. To provide a solution that does not depend on physical sensors in the exhaust and also does not require extensive calibration, a coupled temperature and pressure physics-based model is proposed. The exhaust pipe is split into two different lumped sections based on flow conditions in order to calculate turbine-outlet pressure, which is the driving force for LP-EGR. The temperature model uses the turbine-outlet temperature as an input, which is known through existing engine control models, to determine heat transfer losses through the exhaust.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1573
Ken Archibald, Kyle Archibald, Donald Neubauer
Abstract This paper will document a rationale for wheel straightening based on the rise of declining roads, increased consumer preference for lower profile tires, unintended consequences of wheel customization and the reduction in energy consumption. A recommended patented procedure detailing how A356-T6 wheels can be straightened will be presented. To validate the recommended procedure a sample of wheels was uniformly deformed and straightened and subsequently tested per SAE J328 and SAE J175. Test results are provided that indicate straightened wheels should be fully serviceable in their intended service. A laboratory protocol to replicate the wheel flange cracks is described. The protocol is used to demonstrate that wheels without deformations do not result in flange cracks. Conversely wheels with deformations in excess of 1.5mm do result in cracks at less than 750,000 cycles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1446
Rini Sherony, Qiang Yi, Stanley Chien, Jason Brink, Mohammad Almutairi, Keyu Ruan, Wensen Niu, Lingxi Li, Yaobin Chen, Hiroyuki Takahashi
Abstract According to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 743 pedal cyclists were killed and 48,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes in 2013. As a novel active safety equipment to mitigate bicyclist crashes, bicyclist Pre-Collision Systems (PCSs) are being developed by many vehicle manufacturers. Therefore, developing equipment for evaluating bicyclist PCS is essential. This paper describes the development of a bicycle carrier for carrying the surrogate bicyclist in bicyclist PCS testing. An analysis on the United States national crash databases and videos from TASI 110 car naturalistic driving database was conducted to determine a set of most common crash scenarios, the motion speed and profile of bicycles. The bicycle carrier was designed to carry or pull the surrogate bicyclist for bicycle PCS evaluation. The carrier is a platform with a 4 wheel differential driving system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1454
Libo Dong, Stanley Chien, Jiang-Yu Zheng, Yaobin Chen, Rini Sherony, Hiroyuki Takahashi
Abstract Pedestrian Automatic Emergency Braking (PAEB) for helping avoiding/mitigating pedestrian crashes has been equipped on some passenger vehicles. Since approximately 70% pedestrian crashes occur in dark conditions, one of the important components in the PAEB evaluation is the development of standard testing at night. The test facility should include representative low-illuminance environment to enable the examination of the sensing and control functions of different PAEB systems. The goal of this research is to characterize and model light source distributions and variations in the low-illuminance environment and determine possible ways to reconstruct such an environment for PAEB evaluation. This paper describes a general method to collect light sources and illuminance information by processing large amount of potential collision locations at night from naturalistic driving video data.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1447
Qiang Yi, Stanley Chien, Jason Brink, Wensen Niu, Lingxi Li, Yaobin Chen, Chi-Chen Chen, Rini Sherony, Hiroyuki Takahashi
Abstract As part of active safety systems for reducing bicyclist fatalities and injuries, Bicyclist Pre-Collision System (BPCS), also known as Bicyclist Autonomous Emergency Braking System, is being studied currently by several vehicles manufactures. This paper describes the development of a surrogate bicyclist which includes a surrogate bicycle and a surrogate bicycle rider to support the development and evaluation of BPCS. The surrogate bicycle is designed to represent the visual and radar characteristics of real bicyclists in the United States. The size of bicycle surrogate mimics the 26 inch adult bicycle, which is the most popular adult bicycle sold in the US. The radar cross section (RCS) of the surrogate bicycle is designed based on RCS measurement of the real adult sized bicycles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1450
Peter Vertal, Hermann Steffan
Abstract The objective of this work is to test the potential benefit of active pedestrian protection systems. The tests are based on real fatal accidents with passenger cars that were not equipped with active safety systems. Tests have been conducted in order to evaluate what the real benefit of the active safety system would be, and not to gain only a methodological prediction. The testing procedure was the first independent testing in the world which was based on real fatal pedestrian accidents. The aim of the tests is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Volvo pedestrian detection system. The in-depth accident database ZEDATU contains about 300 fatal pedestrian traffic accidents in urban areas. Eighteen cases of pedestrians hit by the front end of a passenger vehicle were extracted from this database. Cases covering an average traffic scenario have been reconstructed to obtain detailed model situations for testing.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1518
Carolyn W. Roberts, Jacek Toczyski, Jack Cochran, Qi Zhang, Patrick Foltz, Bronislaw Gepner, Jason Kerrigan, Mark Clauser
Abstract Multiple laboratory dynamic test methods have been developed to evaluate vehicle crashworthiness in rollover crashes. However, dynamic test methods remove some of the characteristics of actual crashes in order to control testing variables. These simplifications to the test make it difficult to compare laboratory tests to crashes. One dynamic method for evaluating vehicle rollover crashworthiness is the Dynamic Rollover Test System (DRoTS), which simulates translational motion with a moving road surface and constrains the vehicle roll axis to a fixed plane within the laboratory. In this study, five DRoTS vehicle tests were performed and compared to a pair of unconstrained steering-induced rollover tests. The kinematic state of the unconstrained vehicles at the initiation of vehicle-to-ground contact was determined using instrumentation and touchdown parameters were matched in the DRoTS tests.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1534
Rudolf Reichert, Pradeep Mohan, Dhafer Marzougui, Cing-Dao Kan, Daniel Brown
Abstract A detailed finite element model of a 2012 Toyota Camry was developed by reverse engineering. The model consists of 2.25M elements representing the geometry, thicknesses, material characteristics, and connections of relevant structural, suspension, and interior components of the mid-size sedan. This paper describes the level of detail of the simulation model, the validation process, and how it performs in various crash configurations, when compared to full scale test results. Under contract with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Center for Collision Safety and Analysis (CCSA) team at the George Mason University has developed a fleet of vehicle models which has been made publicly available. The updated model presented is the latest finite element vehicle model with a high level of detail using state of the art modeling techniques.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 15354