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Viewing 1 to 30 of 15311
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0018
Nikiforos Zacharof, Georgios Fontaras, Theodoros Grigoratos, Biagio Ciuffo, Dimitrios Savvidis, Oscar Delgado, J. Felipe Rodriguez
Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) account for some 5% of the EU’s total greenhouse gas emissions. They present a variety of possible configurations that are deployed depending on the intended use. This variety makes the quantification of their CO2 emissions and fuel consumption difficult. For this reason, the European Commission has adopted a simulation-based approach for the certification of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of HDVs in Europe; the VECTO simulation software has been developed as the official tool for the purpose. The current study investigates the impact of various factors on the CO2 emissions of European trucks through vehicle simulations performed in VECTO. The chosen vehicles represent average 2015 vehicles and comprised of two rigid trucks (12 t and 18 t) and two tractor trailers (30 t and 40 t), which were simulated under their reference configurations and official driving cycles.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0042
Ali Jannoun, Xavier Tauzia, Pascal Chesse, Alain Maiboom
Residual gas plays a crucial role in the combustion process of spark ignited engines. It acts as a diluent and has a huge impact on pollutant emissions (NOx and CO emissions), engine efficiency and tendency to knock. Therefore, characterizing the residual gas fraction is an essential task for engine modelling and calibration purposes. Thus, an in-cylinder sampling technique was developed on a spark ignited VVT engine to measure residual gas fraction during the compression phase. Two gas sampling valves were flush mounted to the combustion chamber walls; they are located between the intake valves and between intake and exhaust valves respectively. Sampled gas was stocked in a sampling bag using a vacuum pump and measured with a standard gas analyzer. This paper describes in details the sampling technique and proposes a methodology allowing the evaluation of the residual gas fraction. For this purpose, five kinds of tests were undertaken.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0169
Robert E. Morgan, Neville Jackson, Andrew Atkins, Guangyu dong, Morgan Heikal, Christopher lenartowicz
Electrification of long haul freight applications offers a number of major challenges mainly the cost and weight of on-board energy storage. Efforts to reduce the cost and complexity of electrification will continue, but there will remain a long term need for a clean and efficient chemically fuelled thermal powertrain. Best in class Otto and Diesel cycles engines are now approaching the practical limits of efficiency, requiring new approaches to deliver future improvements. Harnessing waste heat through a bottoming cycle delivers limited benefit due to the narrow temperature range at which heat is recovered and rejected. Integration of heat recovery directly to the main power cycle, via a ‘split engine cycle’ offers a novel approach to achieving significant improvements in efficiency. In the split engine cycle, compression and combustion strokes are performed in separate chambers.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0129
Vladimir Merzlikin, Svetlana Parshina, Victoria Garnova, Andrey Bystrov, Alexander Makarov, Sergey Khudyakov
The core of this paper is reduction of exhaust emission and increase of diesel efficiency due to application of microstructure ceramic semitransparent heat-insulating coatings (SHIC). The authors conducted experimental study of thermal state of internal-combustion engine piston head with a heat-insulating layer formed by plasma coating method. The paper presents physical and mathematical simulation of improved optical (transmittance, reflectance, absorption, scattering) and thermo radiative (emittance) characteristics determining optimal temperature profiles inside SHIC. The paper considers the effect of subsurface volumetric heating up and analyzes temperature maximum position inside subsurface of this coating. Decrease of SHIC surface temperature of the coated piston in comparison with temperature of traditional opaque heat-insulating coatings causes NOx emission reduction.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0138
Giovanni Meccariello, Livia Della Ragione
In the context of a transport sustainability, some solutions could be proposed from the integration of many disciplines, architects, environmentalists, policy makers, and consequently it may be addressed with different approaches. These solutions would be apply at different geographical levels, i.e. national, regional or urban scale. Moreover, the assessment of cars emissions in real use plays a fundamental role for their reductions. This is also the direction of the new harmonized test procedures (WLTP). Furthermore, it is fundamental to keep in mind that the new WLTC cycle will reproduce a situation closer to the reality respect to the EUDC/NEDC driving cycle. In this paper, we will be focused on vehicle kinematic evaluation aimed at valuation of traffic situation and emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0140
Roberto Aliandro Varella, Gonçalo Duarte, Patricia Baptista, Pablo Mendoza Villafuerte, Luis Sousa
Due to the need to properly quantify vehicle emissions in real world operation, Real Driving Emissions (RDE) test procedures will be used for measuring gaseous emissions on new EURO 6 vehicles.at the RDE 1 & 2: Commission Regulation (EU) 2016/427 of 10 March 2016 amending Regulation (EC) No 692/2008 as regards emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles. Updated regulations have been enhanced to define RDE tests boundaries and data analysis procedures, in order to provide an accurate way to obtain representative results. The boundary conditions defined for vehicle testing include external atmospheric temperature, which can range from 0ºC to around 30ºC, for moderate conditions and -7oC up to 35oC for extended conditions in RDE tests. As a result of this range of possible test ambient temperature, pollutant emissions and energy consumption can vary considerably.
2017-08-29
Journal Article
2017-01-9001
Hermann Ferschitz, Michael Wannemacher, Otto Bucek, Florian Knöbel, Wolfgang Breitfuß
Abstract RTA Rail Tec Arsenal Fahrzeugversuchsanlage GmbH has focused on the simulation of in-flight icing conditions since 2012. Following the successful implementation of the icing conditions specified in EASA CS-25 Appendix C, it was expected that the facility could also be used to simulate the SLD conditions required by EASA CS-25 Appendix O. This paper sets forth theoretical considerations concerning the selection of suitable nozzles and their operation in the existing facility. The transport of large droplets through the contraction nozzle was simulated using a CFD program. The results then served as a basis for deriving secondary droplet breakup. The validations carried out confirm the theoretical considerations and identify potential limits and open research questions.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1921
Jyotirmoy Barman
Abstract Engine down speeding is rapidly picking up momentum in many segment of world market. Numerous engine down speeding packages from OEM have been tailored to take advantage of the increased efficiencies associated with engine down speeding. Running engine at lower rpm has numerous advantages. The most obvious of these is reduced fuel consumption, since the engine can spend more time running within its optimum efficiency range. By down speeding, the engine is made to run at low speeds and with high torques. For the same power, the engine is operated at higher specific load- Brake Mean Effective pressure (BMEP) which results in higher efficiency and reduced fuel consumption-Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). The reasons for increased fuel efficiency are reduced engine friction due to low piston speeds, reduced relative heat transfer and increased thermodynamic efficiency.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1931
Shaul Hameed Syed, K Rameshkumar
Abstract In this work an attempt is made to design and fabricate a low cost dynamometer for measuring cutting forces in three directions in a CNC vertical milling machine. The dynamometer is designed and fabricated to withstand load up to 5000 N along ‘X’, ‘Y’ and ‘Z’ axis. Milling dynamometer developed in this work, consists of four octagonal rings as an elastic member on which strain gauges are mounted for measuring the cutting forces. Suitable materials for the fixture and for the octagonal rings are chosen for constructing the dynamometer. Structural analysis has been carried out to check the safe design of the dynamometer assembly consisting of fixture and the octagonal rings for the maximum loading conditions. Static calibration of the dynamometer is carried out using slotted weight method by simulating the actual conditions. Calibration chart was prepared for three directions by relating load and corresponding strain.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1851
Taewook Yoo, Ronald W. Gerdes, Seungkyu Lee, Daniel Stanley, Thomas Herdtle, Georg Eichhorn
Abstract Several methods for evaluating damping material performance are commonly used, such as Oberst beam test, power injection method and the long bar test. Among these test methods, the Oberst beam test method has been widely used in the automotive industry and elsewhere as a standard method, allowing for slight bar dimension differences. However, questions have arisen as to whether Oberst test results reflect real applications. Therefore, the long bar test method has been introduced and used in the aerospace industry for some time. In addition to the larger size bar in the long bar test, there are a few differences between Oberst (cantilever) and long bar test (center-driven) methods. In this paper, the differences between Oberst and long bar test methods were explored both experimentally and numerically using finite element analysis plus an analytical method. Furthermore, guidelines for a long bar test method are provided.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1863
Bhaskar Avutapalli, Mayuresh Pathak, Shalini Solipuram, Ken Buczek, Aaron Lock
Abstract Road noise and speech intelligibility are becoming ever more important, irrespective of the vehicle size, due to vehicle refinement as well as connectivity with mobile communication equipment. With better aerodynamic designs, development of refined powertrains, and a tectonic shift from I.C. engine to electric motors, road noise and wind noise will become more apparent to the customer and hence will become a priority for automakers to refine their vehicles. This paper describes the efforts undertaken to identify the road noise paths and develop countermeasures for a compact SUV vehicle. A hybrid test/CAE approach was followed to improve road noise performance of this vehicle. This effort involved developing tire CAE models from physical hardware and creating synthesized road-load input from data taken on roads.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1896
Richard A. Kolano, Darren J. Brown
Abstract A large reverberation room of approximately 310 m3 (11,000 ft3) used in the air conditioning, heating and refrigeration industry, was in need of improvements to meet the updated requirements of the American Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Standard 220. In addition, it was desired to extend the measurement qualification of the room down to the 63 Hz octave band. The initial qualification test results showed that the room did not qualify for the extended low frequency range and also had some irregularities in the 100 Hz third octave band. This paper reports the results of a three-part investigation to correct reverberation room response irregularities in the 100 Hz third octave band, to establish performance that qualifies relative to the most recent standard, and to determine and integrate the means by which its qualification could be extended down to the frequency bands of 50, 63, and 80Hz.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1881
Charles Moritz, Satyajeet Deshpande
Abstract As part of the update process to SAE J1637, Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar, the Acoustical Materials Committee commissioned a round robin study to determine the current laboratory-to-laboratory variation, and to better understand best practices for composite loss factor measurements. Guidance within the current standard from a previous round robin study indicates a coefficient of variation of 35% for laboratory-to-laboratory measurements. It was hoped that current instrumentation and test practices would yield lower variability. Over the course of 2 years, 8 laboratories tested 4 bars, three damped steel bars and one bare steel bar. These bars were tested at -20°C, -5°C, 10°C, 25°C, 40°C, and 55°C. The damping materials were intentionally selected to provide low damping, moderate damping, and high damping as difficulties in determining the composite loss increase with increased damping.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1886
Siwen Zhang, Jian Pang, Jun Zhang, Zhuangzhuang Ma, Xiaoxuan Zhang, Congguang Liu, Lihui Deng
Abstract A subjective evaluation method for the air-borne sound insulation of vehicle body in reverberation room is developed and the correlation between the subjective preference and objective noise reduction level (NRL) is investigated in this paper. The stationary vehicle's interior noise is recorded by using a digital artificial head under a given white noise excitation in the reverberation room, which demonstrates more credible than those in traditional road test methods. The recorded noises of six different vehicles are replayed and evaluated subjectively by 22 appraisers in a sound quality room. The paired comparison scoring method is employed and the check and statistic methods for the subjective scores are introduced. The subjective preference is introduced and calculated by the statistics and normalization of the effective scores, which can indicate an overall preference ranking of all the six vehicles numerically.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1908
Rong Guo, Jun Gao, Xiao-kang Wei, Zhao-ming Wu, Shao-kang Zhang
Abstract The statement of the engine shake problem is presented through comparing the quarter vehicle models with the rigid-connected and flexible-connected powertrain which is supported on the body by a rubber mount. Then the model is extended by replacing the rubber mount as a hydraulic engine mount (HEM) with regard to the inertia and resistance of the fluid within the inertia track. Based on these, a full vehicle model with 14 degree of freedoms (DOFs) is proposed to calculate the engine shake, which consists of 6 of the powertrain, 1 of the fluid within the inertia track of the HEM, 3 of the car body and 4 of the unsprung mass. Simulation analysis based on the proposed model is implemented, through which the conclusion is drawn that the HEM has great influence on the body and seat track response subjected to front wheel inputs, compared with the rubber mount.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1774
Fabio Luis Marques dos Santos, Tristan Enault, Jan Deleener, Tom Van Houcke
Abstract The increasing pressure on fuel economy has brought car manufacturers to implement solutions that improve vehicle efficiency, such as downsized engines, cylinder deactivation and advanced torque lock-up strategies. However, these solutions have a major drawback in terms of noise and vibration comfort. Downsized engines and lock-up strategies lead to the use of the engine at lower RPMs, and the reduced number of cylinders generates higher torque irregularities. Since the torque generated by the engine is transferred through flexible elements (clutch, torsional damper, gearbox, transmission, tire), these also impact the energy that is transferred to the vehicle body and perceived by the driver. This phenomenon leads to low frequency behavior, for instance booming noise and vibration. This paper presents a combined test and CAE modelling approach (1D/3D) to reverse engineer a vehicle equipped with a CPVA (centrifugal pendulum vibration absorber).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1783
Chris Todter, Olivier Robin, Paul Bremner, Christophe Marchetto, Alain Berry
Abstract Surface pressure measurements using microphone arrays are still challenging, especially in an automotive context with cruising speeds around Mach 0.1. The separated turbulent boundary layer excitation and the side mirror wake flow generate both acoustic and aerodynamic components, which have wavenumbers that differ by a factor of approximately 10. This calls for high spatial resolution measurements to fully resolve the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. In a previous publication [1], the authors reported a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) surface microphone array that successfully used wavenumber analysis to quantify acoustic versus turbulence loading. It was shown that the measured surface pressure at each microphone could be strongly influenced by self-noise induced by the microphone “packaging”, which can be attenuated with a suitable windscreen.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1805
Krzysztof Prażnowski, Jaroslaw Mamala
Abstract The vibrations of the sprung mass of a passenger car, traveling along a road surface, are random. They also form its main source but there are besides other factors to consider. The resulting force ratio is overlapped by other phenomena occurring at the interface of the pneumatic tire with the road surface, such as non-uniformity of tires, shape deformations and imbalances. The resulting additional inertia force acts on the kinematic force that was previously induced on the car body. The vibrations of the sprung mass of the car body at the time can be considered as a potential source of diagnostic information, but getting insight their direct identification is difficult. Moreover, the basic identification is complicated because of the forces induced due to the random interference from road roughness. In such a case, the ratio defined as SNR assumes negative values.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1803
John Van Baren
Abstract The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation addresses three fundamental questions about developing accelerated random vibration stress tests.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1800
Robert White
Abstract Several analytical tools exist for estimating a driveshaft’s critical speed, from simple elementary beam theory to sophisticated FEA models. Ultimately, nothing is better than a test, because no one will argue with the outcome from a well-designed measurement. Impact response measurements are easy, but they tend to over predict the critical speed. A test which sweeps the shaft speed up until failure is telling, but the speed causing failure is strongly dependent on even small amounts of variation in rotor unbalance. Waterfall plots of shaft displacement measurements offer the best indication of critical speed, however sometimes the resonance isn’t unmistakable or multiple resonances exist, making the critical speed unclear. A method less susceptible to system variation is offered here, fitting shaft orbit measurements to the theoretical single degree of freedom equation.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1857
Joshua R. Goossens, William Mars, Guy Smith, Paul Heil, Scott Braddock, Jeanette Pilarski
Abstract Fatigue life prediction of elastomer NVH suspension products has become an operating norm for OEMs and suppliers during the product quoting process and subsequent technical reviews. This paper reviews a critical plane analysis based fatigue simulation methodology for a front lower control arm. Filled natural rubber behaviors were measured and defined for the analysis, including: stress-strain, fatigue crack growth, strain crystallization, fatigue threshold and initial crack precursor size. A series of four distinct single and dual axis bench durability tests were derived from OEM block cycle specifications, and run to end-of-life as determined via a stiffness loss criterion. The tested parts were then sectioned in order to compare developed failure modes with predicted locations of crack initiation. In all cases, failure mode was accurately predicted by the simulation, and predicted fatigue life preceded actual end-of-life by not more than a factor of 1.4 in life.
2017-04-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9177
N. Obuli Karthikeyan, R. Dinesh Kumar, V. Srinivasa Chandra, Vela Murali
Abstract In the modern automotive sector, durability and reliability are the most common terms. Customers are expecting a highly reliable product but at low cost. Any product that fails within its useful life leads to customer dissatisfaction and affects the reputation of the OEM. To eradicate this, all automotive components undergo stringent validation protocol, either in proving ground or in lab. This paper details on developing an accelerated lab test methodology for steering gearbox bracket using fatigue damage and reliability correlation by simulating field failure. Initially, potential failure causes for steering gearbox bracket were analyzed. Road load data was then acquired at proving ground and customer site to evaluate the cumulative fatigue damage on the steering gearbox bracket. To simulate the field failure, lab test facility was developed, reproducing similar boundary conditions as in vehicle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0131
Chiranth Srinivasan, Chonglin Zhang, Haiyang Gao, De Ming Wang, Jody Slike
Abstract In an automotive cooling circuit, the wax melting process determines the net and time history of the energy transfer between the engine and its environment. A numerical process that gives insight into the mixing process outside the wax chamber, the wax melting process inside the wax chamber, and the effect on the poppet valve displacement will be advantageous to both the engine and automotive system design. A fully three dimensional, transient, system level simulation of an inlet controlled thermostat inside an automotive cooling circuit is undertaken in this paper. A proprietary CFD algorithm, Simerics-Sys®/PumpLinx®, is used to solve this complex problem. A two-phase model is developed in PumpLinx® to simulate the wax melting process. The hysteresis effect of the wax melting process is also considered in the simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0134
Jan Eller, Heinrich Reister, Thomas Binner, Nils Widdecke, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract There is a growing need for life-cycle data – so-called collectives – when developing components like elastomer engine mounts. Current standardized extreme load cases are not sufficient for establishing such collectives. Supplementing the use of endurance testing data, a prediction methodology for component temperature collectives utilizing existing 3D CFD simulation models is presented. The method uses support points to approximate the full collective. Each support point is defined by a component temperature and a position on the time axis of the collective. Since it is the only currently available source for component temperature data, endurance testing data is used to develop the new method. The component temperature range in this data set is divided in temperature bands. Groups of driving states are determined which are each representative of an individual band. Each of the resulting four driving state spaces is condensed into a substitute load case.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0138
Chris Lim, Peter Ireland, Nicholas Collett
Abstract The analysis of thermal fields in the underhood region is complicated by the complex geometry and the influence of a multitude of different heat sources. This complexity means that running full CFD analyses to predict the thermal field in this region is both computationally expensive and time consuming. A method of predicting the thermal field using linear superposition has been developed in order to analyse the underhood region of a simplified Formula One race car, though the technique is applicable to all vehicles. The use of linear superposition allows accurate predictions of the thermal field within a complex geometry for varying boundary conditions with negligible computational costs once the initial characterisation CFD has been run. A quarter scale, rear end model of a Formula One race car with a simplified internal assembly is considered for analysis, though the technique can also be applied to commercial and industrial vehicles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0145
Edward Palmer, Wilko Jansen
Abstract In order to specify a brake system that will have robust performance over the entire range of expected vehicle drive cycles it is vital that it has sufficient thermal inertia and dissipation to ensure that component temperatures are kept within acceptable limits. This paper presents a high fidelity CAE (computer aided engineering) technique for predicting the temperature of the front brake and the surrounding suspension components whilst installed on vehicle. To define the boundary conditions the process utilizes a coupled unsteady CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and thermal solver to accurately predict the convective heat transfer coefficients across a range of vehicle speeds. A 1-D model is used to predict the brake energy inputs as well as the vehicle speed-time curves during the drive cycle based on key vehicle parameters including wide-open-throttle performance, drive train losses, rolling resistance, aerodynamic drag etc.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0160
Longjie Xiao, Tianming He, Gangfeng Tan, Bo Huang, Xianyao Ping
Abstract While the car ownership increasing all over the world, the unutilized thermal energy in automobile exhaust system is gradually being realized and valued by researchers around the world for better driving energy efficiency. For the unexpected urban traffic, the frequent start and stop processes as well as the acceleration and deceleration lead to the temperature fluctuation of the exhaust gas, which means the unstable hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module generator (TEG). By arranging the heat conduction oil circulation at the hot end, the hot-end temperature’s fluctuation of the TEG can be effectively reduced, at the expense of larger system size and additional energy supply for the circulation. This research improves the TEG hot-end temperature stability by installing solid heat capacity material(SHCM) to the area between the outer wall of the exhaust pipe and the TEG, which has the merits of simple structure, none energy consumption and light weight.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0174
Ravi Rungta, Noori Pandit
Abstract A simple and rapid immersion type corrosion test has been successfully developed that discriminates corrosion performance in condensers from various suppliers and with differing manufacturing processes. The goal is to develop a test specification that will be included in the Ford corrosion specification for condensers so that condensers received from various suppliers may be evaluated rapidly for their relative corrosion performance to each other. Sections from condensers from Supplier A (tube is silfluxed), Supplier B (tube is zinc arc sprayed), and Supplier C (bare folded tube with no zinc for corrosion protection) were tested in 2% v/v hydrochloric acid for 16, 24 and 48 hours. The results showed that in terms of corrosion performance, zinc arc sprayed Supplier B condenser performed the worst while Supplier C condenser performed the best with Supplier A in between.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0166
Noori Pandit
Abstract The effects of substituting a 12 mm thick subcool on top condenser in place of a 16 mm subcool on bottom condenser are evaluated in a vehicle level AC pull down test. The A to B testing shows that a thinner condenser with subcool on top exhibits no degradation in AC performance while resulting in a lower total system refrigerant charge. The results are from vehicle level tests run in a climatically controlled vehicle level wind tunnel to simulate an AC pull down at 43°C ambient. In addition to cabin temperature and AC vent temperatures, comparison of compressor head pressures was also done. The conclusion of the study was that a standard 16 mm thick subcool on bottom IRD condenser can be replaced by a 12 mm thick subcool on top IRD condenser with no negative effects on performance.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0164
Venkatesan Muthusamy, S. Sathish Kumar, Saravanan Sambandan
Abstract In an automotive air-conditioning (AC) system, upfront prediction of the cabin cool down rate in the initial design stage will help in reducing the overall product development (PD) time. Vehicle having higher seating capacity will have higher thermal load and providing thermal comfort to all passengers uniformly is a challenging task for the automotive HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning) industry. Dual HVAC unit is generally used to provide uniform cooling to a large cabin volume. One dimensional (1D) simulation is being extensively used to predict the HVAC performance during the initial stage of PD. The refrigerant loop with components such as compressor, condenser, TXV and evaporator was modeled. The complicated vehicle cabin including the glazing surfaces and enclosures were modeled as a three row duct system using 1D tool AMESim®. The material type, density, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material were specified.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 15311