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Viewing 1 to 30 of 898
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2497
Georg Peter Ostermeyer, Alexander Vogel
Abstract The Automated Universal Tribotester (AUT) is developed by the Institute of Dynamics and Vibrations (TU Braunschweig) and represents a reduced scale brake dynamometer. The setup is based on the pin-on-disc principle and the down-scaled test specimen are brought to contact to the disc and loaded via the specifically designed load unit. The AUT’s load unit is designed as a combination of parallel and serial leaf springs, resulting in a friction free motion. The stiffnesses in radial and tangential directions are much higher than in normal orientation. For the investigation of wear debris over time, changes in loads (e.g. forces, speeds, temperatures) are applied. Those varying loads result in tilting of the contact surface of the test specimen due to small elastic deformations. A change of the contact area is inevitable, and long time periods are needed to adopt the contact area to the new conditions. This prevents from investigating fast changes in the above mentioned loads.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0169
Robert E. Morgan, Neville Jackson, Andrew Atkins, Guangyu dong, Morgan Heikal, Christopher lenartowicz
Abstract The conventional Diesel cycles engine is now approaching the practical limits of efficiency. The recuperated split cycle engine is an alternative cycle with the potential to achieve higher efficiencies than could be achieved using a conventional engine cycle. In a split cycle engine, the compression and combustion strokes are performed in separate chambers. This enables direct cooling of the compression cylinder reducing compression work, intra cycle heat recovery and low heat rejection expansion. Previously reported analysis has shown that brake efficiencies approaching 60% are attainable, representing a 33% improvement over current advanced heavy duty diesel engine. However, the achievement of complete, stable, compression ignited combustion has remained elusive to date.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1896
Richard A. Kolano, Darren J. Brown
Abstract A large reverberation room of approximately 310 m3 (11,000 ft3) used in the air conditioning, heating and refrigeration industry, was in need of improvements to meet the updated requirements of the American Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Standard 220. In addition, it was desired to extend the measurement qualification of the room down to the 63 Hz octave band. The initial qualification test results showed that the room did not qualify for the extended low frequency range and also had some irregularities in the 100 Hz third octave band. This paper reports the results of a three-part investigation to correct reverberation room response irregularities in the 100 Hz third octave band, to establish performance that qualifies relative to the most recent standard, and to determine and integrate the means by which its qualification could be extended down to the frequency bands of 50, 63, and 80Hz.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1857
Joshua R. Goossens, William Mars, Guy Smith, Paul Heil, Scott Braddock, Jeanette Pilarski
Abstract Fatigue life prediction of elastomer NVH suspension products has become an operating norm for OEMs and suppliers during the product quoting process and subsequent technical reviews. This paper reviews a critical plane analysis based fatigue simulation methodology for a front lower control arm. Filled natural rubber behaviors were measured and defined for the analysis, including: stress-strain, fatigue crack growth, strain crystallization, fatigue threshold and initial crack precursor size. A series of four distinct single and dual axis bench durability tests were derived from OEM block cycle specifications, and run to end-of-life as determined via a stiffness loss criterion. The tested parts were then sectioned in order to compare developed failure modes with predicted locations of crack initiation. In all cases, failure mode was accurately predicted by the simulation, and predicted fatigue life preceded actual end-of-life by not more than a factor of 1.4 in life.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1681
Kyaw Soe
Abstract This paper describes a test system for improving the completeness and representativeness of automotive electrical/electronic (E/E) test benches. This is with the aim to enable more testing and hence increase the usage and effectiveness of these facilities. A proportion of testing for automotive electrical and electronics systems and components is conducted using E/E testing boards (“test-boards”). These are table-like rigs consisting of most or all electrical and electronic parts connected together as per a car/truck/van. A major problem is that the testing is conducted on the equivalent of a static vehicle: test-boards lack basic dynamic elements such as a running engine, vehicle motion, environmental, component and fluid temperatures, etc. This limits the testing that can be carried out on such a test-board.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1527
Felix Wittmeier
Abstract After being in operation since 1989, the 25% / 20% model scale wind tunnel of University of Stuttgart received its second major upgrade in 2016. In a first upgrade in 2001, a rolling road with a 5 belt system from MTS was installed. This system includes a steel center belt to simulate the road underneath the vehicle and four FKFS designed rubber belts for wheel rotation. The recent upgrade now enables the wind tunnel to be used not only for standard, steady state aerodynamic measurements but also for measurements of unsteady aerodynamic effects. This enables the use of the FKFS swing system as a standard measurement technique. Therefore, the former balance was replaced by a balance manufactured by AND with a high Eigenfrequency and the ability to sample the measurement data at up to 1000 Hz. The second large part of the upgrade was the replacement of the control system. With the new Wind Tunnel Control System (WCTS), control system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1534
Nina Tortosa, David Schroeck, Tony Nagle, Guy Flynt
Abstract The General Motors Reduced Scale Wind Tunnel Facility, which came into operation in the fall of 2015, is a new state-of-the-art scale model aerodynamic test facility that expands GM’s test capabilities. The new facility also increases GM’s aerodynamic testing through-put and provides the resources needed to achieve the growing demand for higher fuel economy requirements for next generation of vehicles. The wind tunnel was designed for a nominal model scale of 40%. The nozzle and test section were sized to keep wind tunnel interference effects to a minimum. Flow quality and other wind tunnel performance parameters are on par with or better than the latest industry standards. A 5-belt system with a long center belt and boundary layer suction and blowing system are used to model underbody flow conditions. An overhead probe traverse system is installed in the test section along with a model positioning robot used to move the model in an out of the test section.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0315
Jyoti Kale, Satish Kumar, Pravin Lavangare, Anand Subramaniam
Abstract The Steering system is one of the most safety critical systems in an automobile. With time the durability, reliability and the fine-tuning of the parameters involved in this subsystem have increased along with the competitiveness of the market. In a competitive market, accelerated testing is the key to shorter development cycles. It is observed that the majority of component manufacturers have a preference on vehicle level testing to achieve their development goals. The vehicle level trials are time consuming and lack the control and repeat-ability of a laboratory environment. This paper describes the development of a steering test rig designed to simulate the disturbances experienced on road within a controlled laboratory environment. The five axis steering rig would allow simulation of individual road wheel displacement along with steering wheel angle input and lateral steering rack displacements. The rig also is designed to be adaptable to a range of vehicle categories.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0326
Michael Wohlthan, Gerhard Pirker, Igor Sauperl, Andreas Wimmer, Wolfram Rossegger, Norbert Buch
Abstract Experimental investigations on engine test beds represent a significant cost in engine development. To reduce development time and related costs, it is necessary to check the quality of measurements automatically whenever possible directly on the test bed to allow early detection of faults. A fault diagnosis system should provide information about the presence, cause and magnitude of an inconsistency in measurement. The main challenge in developing such a system is to detect the fault quickly and reliably. However, only faults that have actually occurred should be detected because the user will only adopt a system that provides accurate results. This paper presents a methodology for automated fault diagnosis at engine test beds, starting with an explanation of the general procedure. Next, the methods applied for fault detection are introduced.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0195
Sachin Kumar Jain, Manasi Joshi, Harshal Bankar, Prashant Kamble, Prasad Yadav, Nagesh Karanth
Abstract The paper discusses the methodology for measuring the sound absorption of sound package materials in a different sizes of reverberation chambers. The large reverberation chamber is based on test methods and requirements as per ASTM C423 and ISO 354 standards. Both the test standards are similar and recommend a reverberation chamber volume of at least 125 m3 and 200 m3 respectively for sound absorption measurements from 100 Hz to 5000 Hz. The test sample size requirements are from 5.5 to 6.7 m2 as per ASTM C423 and 10 to 12 m2 as per ISO 354. In the automotive sector passenger car, heavy truck, and commercial vehicle, the parts that are used are much smaller in size than the size prescribed in both the standards. The requirement is to study the critical parameters such as the chamber volume, sample size, reverberation time and cut-off frequency etc. which are affecting the sound absorption property of acoustic material.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8144
John Lacey
Abstract The trucking industry is being encouraged by environmental and cost factors to improve fuel efficiency. One factor that affects fuel efficiency is the aerodynamic design of the vehicles; that is, the vehicles with lower aerodynamic drag will get better mileage, reducing carbon emissions and reducing costs through lower fuel usage. A significant tool towards developing vehicles with lower drag is the wind tunnel. The automobile industry has made great improvements in fuel efficiency by using wind tunnels to determine the best designs to achieve lower drag. Those wind tunnels are not optimum for testing the larger, longer heavy trucks since the wind tunnels are smaller than needed. The estimated costs for a heavy truck wind tunnel based on automotive wind tunnel technology are quite high. A potential nozzle concept to reduce wind tunnel cost and several other new possible approaches to lower wind tunnel costs are presented.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1807
Olga Roditcheva, Lennart Carl Lofdahl, Simone Sebben, Pär Harling cEng, Holger Bernhardsson
Abstract This paper presents an experimental study of aeroacoustical sound sources generated by the turbulent flow around the side mirror of a Volvo V70. Measurements were carried out at the Volvo Cars aerodynamical wind tunnel (PVT) and at the aeroacoustical wind tunnel of Stuttgart University (FKFS). Several different measurement techniques were applied in both tunnels and the results were compared to each other. The configurations considered here were: side mirror with a cord and without the cord. The results discussed in this paper include intensity probe measurements in the flow around the side mirror, sound source localization with beamforming technique using a three-dimensional spherical array as well as standard measurements inside the car with an artificial head. This experimental study focused on understanding the differences between testing at the PVT and FKFS.
2016-05-11
Technical Paper
2016-36-0061
Juliana Negrini de Araújo, Leonardo Hoss, Alexandre Viecelli, Maicon Molon
Abstract The use of virtual and / or experimental test rigs applying random loading is becoming more relevant in the development and validation of new products. An application example is the analysis of components subject to vibrations, especially suspended components. For this type of application, product validation applying random loads and different frequencies becomes mandatory. This study developed a virtual test rig for suspended components validation and definition of experimental test rigs. The study was based on a standard component, using LMS Virtual.Lab Siemens software for the dynamic analysis and durability. The experimental data (extensometry and accelerometry) was collected on the special tracks of Randon Companies Proving Ground. From the virtual modeling and experimental data, the proper hydraulic actuators signals were defined to characterize the component behavior according to the field application.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0982
Philip Lawson, John Houldcroft, Andrew Neil, Andrea Balcombe, Richard Osborne, Antonio Ciriello, Wilhelm Graupner
Abstract A recent trend in powertrain development organisations has been to apply processes historically associated with manufacturing. The aim is to capitalise on the resulting productivity gains to contain the increasing test demand necessary to develop current and future product. Significant obstacles to the implementation of manufacturing derived methods include the lack of clarity of the engineering test requirements and existing working practices in the product development environment. The System Optimisation Approach has been presented in previous work as a potential solution [1]. As an extension, this paper introduces a new concept closely related to the established manufacturing principle of Process Capability (Cp). Application of the resulting method quantifies the test facility’s capability to provide a test result subject to a specified statistical confidence within a certain number of test repeats.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1581
Felix Wittmeier, Armin Michelbach, Jochen Wiedemann, Victor Senft
Abstract With its recent wind tunnel upgrade, FKFS installed the first interchangeable three-belt / five-belt-system (FKFS first®) in a full scale automotive wind tunnel. With the five-belt system, which today is a state-of-the-art ground simulation technique, the system is ideally suited for production vehicle development work. The five-belt system offers high flexibility, quick access to the underfloor and vehicle fixation, and setting the vehicle’s ride height by the restraint device. The first results of the five-belt system have already been published in SAE 2015-01-1557 [1]. The three-belt system on the other hand, offers a much more sophisticated ground simulation technique which is necessary especially for sports and racing cars. For such vehicles with very low ground clearances, it is important to have a more accurate ground simulation, in order to capture the same aerodynamic modes of action and response as on the road.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1588
Abdalla Abdel-Rahman, Martin Agelin-Chaab, Gary Elfstrom, John Komar
Abstract Wind tunnels with integrated aerodynamic and thermodynamic testing with yaw capabilities are not common. In this study however, an integrated aerodynamic and thermodynamic testing system with yaw capabilities is developed and applied in the climatic wind tunnel at the University of Ontario-Institute of Technology (UOIT). This was done by installing an incremental force measuring system (FMS) on the large turntable that features a chassis dynamometer. The testing system was utilized to implement an integrated aero-thermal test on a full-scale race car. An efficient testing protocol was developed to streamline the integrated testing process. The FMS was used to enhance the test car’s stability, cornering speed, and fuel efficiency by using aerodynamic devices. These objectives were achieved by installing a high rear wing to increase the rear downforce, a modified front splitter extension to produce a front downforce gain, and front canards to contribute to drag reduction.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0235
Serenat Karagoz, Murat Karaer, Nurettin Ali Dasdemir
Abstract In this paper a combined energy recovery system is suggested for engine test facilities. System consists of two semi loops which are being active according to the temperature of the air feeded to the test cell. Winter and summer semi loops are introduced with the system requirements and equipments. Working principle of both semi-loops and components with the selection critera are explained. Also cost and benefit analysis is given in detail. It is evident that hot exhaust gases of the combustion processes is the main source that a large amount of energy wastes through it. Researchers confirm that more than 30% - 40% of fuel energy in the internal combustion engines wastes from the exhaust and just 12% -25% of the fuel energy converts to useful work. In the other hand, statistics show that producing numbers of the internal combustion engines growth very fast and the concern of decreasing the fossil fuels will be appeared.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1622
Miroslav Mokry
Abstract Lagally’s theorem is used to evaluate the increments to aerodynamic forces on automotive models, tested in solid-wall wind tunnels. The strengths of the model-representing singularities, pre-requisite for the application of the theory, are obtained from experimental wall pressure data, using an influence matrix method. The technique is demonstrated on the drag force acting on full-size and half-size truck models, measured in the same test section.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1607
David Soderblom, Per Elofsson, Ann Hyvärinen
Abstract The effect of blockage due to the presence of the wind tunnel walls has been known since the early days of wind tunnel testing. Today there are several blockage correction methods available for correcting the measured aerodynamic drag. Due to the shape of the test object, test conditions and wind tunnel dimensions the effect on the flow may be different for two cab variants. This will result in a difference in the drag delta between so-called open-road conditions and the wind tunnel. This makes it more difficult to evaluate the performance of two different test objects when they are both tested in a wind tunnel and simulated in CFD. A numerical study where two different cab shapes were compared in both open road condition, and in a digital wind tunnel environment was performed.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1583
Brian R. McAuliffe, Alanna Wall, Guy Larose
Abstract During the past year, a novel turbulence generation system has been commissioned in the National Research Council (NRC) 9 m Wind Tunnel. This system, called the Road Turbulence System was developed to simulate with high fidelity the turbulence experienced by a heavy duty vehicle on the road at a geometrical scale of 30%. The turbulence characteristics that it can simulate were defined based on an extensive field measurement campaign on Canadian roads for various conditions (heavy and light traffic, topography, exposure) at heights above ground relevant not only for heavy duty vehicles but also for light duty vehicles. In an effort to improve continually the simulation of the road conditions for aerodynamic evaluations of ground vehicles, a study was carried out at NRC to define the applicability of the Road Turbulence System to aerodynamic testing of full-scale light duty vehicles.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1597
Christopher Collin, Steffen Mack, Thomas Indinger, Joerg Mueller
Abstract The open jet wind tunnel is a widespread test section configuration for developing full scale passenger cars in the automotive industry. However, using a realizable nozzle cross section for cost effective aerodynamic development is always connected to the presence of wind tunnel effects. Wind tunnel wall interferences which are not present under open road conditions, can affect the measurement of aerodynamic forces. Thus, wind tunnel corrections may be required. This work contains the results of a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) approach using unsteady Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) to evaluate wind tunnel interferences for open jet test sections. The Full Scale DrivAer reference geometry of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) using different rear end shapes has been selected for these investigations.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1595
Haibo Wu, Jiangbin Zhou, Qian Chen, Gongwen Liu, Chaoqun Qian
Abstract In this paper we present the work which was done at Shanghai-VW for using computational aero-acoustic (CAA) simulation in the vehicle development process to assess and improve the buffeting behavior of a vehicle when the rear side window is open. In the first step, a methodology was established and validated against wind tunnel tests using a Sedan. The methodology consists of a calibration of the CAA model to represent the properties of the cabin interior of the real car in terms of damping, wall compliance and leakage followed by CAA simulations of the full vehicle at different wind speeds to obtain the transient flow field around the exterior shape and inside the passenger compartment. The interior noise spectra are directly calculated from the transient pressure inside the cabin.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1598
Frank Meinert, Kristian Johannessen, Fernando Saito, Bongha Song, Jewel Barlow, David Burton, Taehwan Cho, Luis Fernando Gouveia de Moraes
Abstract Wind tunnel testing of reduced-scale models is a valuable tool for aerodynamic development during the early stages of a new vehicle program, when basic design themes are being evaluated. Both full-and reduced-scale testing have been conducted for many years at the General Motors Aerodynamics Laboratory (GMAL), but with increased emphasis on aerodynamic drag reduction, it was necessary to identify additional facilities to provide increased test capacity. With vehicle development distributed among engineering teams around the world, it was also necessary to identify facilities local to those teams, to support their work. This paper describes a cooperative effort to determine the correlation among five wind tunnels: GMAL, the Glenn L.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1614
Edward Duell, Amir Kharazi, Paul Nagle, Per Elofsson, David Söderblom, Christer Michael Ramden
Abstract Scania AB has opened the new CD7 climatic wind tunnel test facility, located at the Scania Technical Center in Södertälje, Sweden. This facility is designed for product development testing of heavy trucks and buses in a range of controllable environments. Having this unique test environment at the main development center enables Scania to test its vehicles in a controlled repeatable environment year round, improving lead times from design to production, producing higher quality and more reliable vehicles, and significantly improves the capability for large vehicle performance research. This state-of-the-art facility provides environmental conditions from -35°C to 50°C with humidity control from 5 to 95 percent. The 13 m2 nozzle wind tunnel can produce wind speeds up to 100 km/h. The dynamometer is rated at 800 kW for the rear axle and 150 kW for the front axle, which also has ±10° yaw capability.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2552
Helmut Plankl
Abstract The paper will start with a short introduction to the structure of the Airbus Group, before addressing the Airbus Defence and Space business line Military Aircraft. The Rig Operation department for airborne solutions within this organisation is responsible for the development, design, operation and support of ground test facilities and test support systems, which are used for design validation and verification of civil and military air systems. The main part of this document will start with a typical sequence of tests in our Test Centre. The presentation will then focus on some advanced methods used during the qualification of test equipment and to improve the efficiency of ground test facilities in terms of cost, time and risk reduction. The next topic is tool-based rig management and control, beginning with test preparation and test shift planning and also covering aspects of configuration control, automatisation of test facilities and support of the test report.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2550
Kiran Thupakula
Abstract In Aerospace Industry, the major challenge is to meet the safety and quality of subsystem / system elements to comply with the standards defined by regulatory authorities for product certification. Engineering test labs are created to provide such precision oriented test platforms ranging from component level to fully integrated test labs/test systems, standalone or distributed network. Even after massive initial capital investment and with the evolution of technologies followed by principles of practice in establishing test facilities, industry is facing open challenges in meeting the performance parameters like productivity, optimum usage, accessibility, monitoring, control and ease of maintenance to list a few. It's very important to standardize the test facilities to optimize time to market and reduce the product cost.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2155
Tadas P. Bartkus, Peter Struk, Jen-Ching Tsao
Abstract This paper describes a numerical model that simulates the thermal interaction between ice particles, water droplets, and the flowing air applicable during icing wind tunnel tests where there is significant phase-change of the cloud. It has been previously observed that test conditions, most notably temperature and humidity, change when the icing cloud is activated. It is hypothesized that the ice particles and water droplets thermally interact with the flowing air causing the air temperature and humidity to change by the time it reaches the test section. Unlike previous models where the air and particles are uncoupled, this model attempts to explain the observed changes in test conditions by coupling the conservation of mass and energy equations. The model is compared to measurements taken during wind tunnel tests simulating ice-crystal and mixed-phase icing that relate to ice accretions within turbofan engines.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2346
Balakumar Swaminathan
Abstract From a facility perspective, engine test cells are rarely evaluated for their vibration levels in their functional configuration. When complicated dynamic systems such as an internal combustion engine and a dynamometer are coupled together using driveshafts and coupling components, the overall system behavior is significantly different from that of the individual sub-systems. This paper details an instance where system level experimental testing and finite element analysis methods were used to mitigate high vibration levels in an engine test cell. Modal and operational test data were taken to establish baseline vibration levels at a diesel engine test cell during commissioning. Measurements were taken on all major sub-systems such as the engine assembly, dynamometer assembly, intermediate driveshaft bearing pedestal and driveshaft components.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2348
Richard Kolano
Abstract This paper presents the results of a study to reduce the background noise level within a large Quiet Room located adjacent to other laboratory testing environments and below a mechanical mezzanine which houses an extensive array of mechanical and electrical equipment including banks of low-temperature chiller compressors, air handling units, and electrical switchgear that serves the entire building complex. This equipment was installed atop the concrete mezzanine floor deck without provisions for isolating vibration. As a result, structure-borne noise from that equipment travels through the floor, radiates from the underside of the floor deck, and intrudes into the Quiet Room below. This causes the background noise level within the Quiet Room to be too high for conducting low sound level measurements and studies on vehicles brought into the Quiet Room.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2116
Peter Struk, Tadas Bartkus, Jen-Ching Tsao, Tom Currie, Dan Fuleki
Abstract This paper presents measurements of ice accretion shape and surface temperature from ice-crystal icing experiments conducted jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. The data comes from experiments performed at NRC's Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac) in 2012. The measurements are intended to help develop models of the ice-crystal icing phenomenon associated with engine ice-crystal icing. Ice accretion tests were conducted using two different airfoil models (a NACA 0012 and wedge) at different velocities, temperatures, and pressures although only a limited set of permutations were tested. The wedge airfoil had several tests during which its surface was actively cooled. The ice accretion measurements included leading-edge thickness for both airfoils. The wedge and one case from the NACA 0012 model also included 2D cross-section profile shapes.
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