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2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2329
Pooyan Kheirkhah, Patrick Kirchen, Steven Rogak
Soot emissions from direct-injection engines are highly sensitive to the fuel-air mixing process, and may vary between combustion cycles due to turbulence and injector instability. Conventional exhaust emissions measurements cannot resolve inter- or intra-cycle variations in particle emissions, which can be important during transient engine operations where a few cycles can disproportionately affect the total exhaust soot. The Fast Exhaust Nephelometer (FEN) is introduced here to use light scattering to measure particulate matter concentration and size near the exhaust port of an engine with a time resolution of 0.1 millisecond. The FEN operates at atmospheric pressure, sampling near the engine exhaust port and uses a laser diode to illuminate a small measurement volume. The scattered light is focused on two amplified photodiodes, sampled synchronous with engine crankshaft encoder.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2351
Kotaro Tanaka, Kazuki Hiroki, Tomoki Kikuchi, Mitsuru Konno, Mitsuharu Oguma
Abstract Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is widely used in diesel engines to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. However, a lacquer is formed on the EGR valve or EGR cooler due to particulate matter and other components present in diesel exhaust, causing serious problems. In this study, the mechanism of lacquer deposition is investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (ATR-FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Deposition of temperature-dependent lacquers was evaluated by varying the temperature of a diamond prism between 80 and 120 °C in an ATR-FTIR spectrometer integrated into a custom-built sample line, which branched off from the exhaust pipe of a diesel engine. Lacquers were deposited on the diamond prism at 100 °C or less, while no lacquer was deposited at 120 °C. Time-dependent ATR-FTIR spectra were obtained for approximately 2 h from the beginning of the experiment.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2004
M. Parvez Alam, Dinesh Manoharan
In this paper we discuss about the design and development of an “Autonomous Amphibious Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (AAUAV)” that can fly autonomously to the polluted water areas where human accessibility is formidable to test the water quality. The AAUAV system is an integrated multi-copter with tilt rotor capability to facilitate easy landing, navigation and maneuver on water. A 3D CAD model has been designed and analyzed. A specific propulsion system has been devised and lab tested. A proof of concept model has been made and tested in the field with its instruments to ascertain its technical/ operational feasibility. This system can also be tailored to collect and store the water samples from the polluted sites for further comprehensive research at the laboratory. AAUAV system is the novel solution to the polluted environment through a complete integrated system. This will be an effective alternative for the conventional water sampling techniques.
CURRENT
2016-09-14
Standard
ARP4755C
This paper describes a recommended practice and procedure for the correlation of test cells that are used for the performance testing of turboprop and turboshaft engines. This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) shall apply to both dynamometer and propeller based testing. Test cell correlation is performed to determine the effect of any given test cell enclosure and equipment on the performance of an engine relative to the baseline performance of that engine. Although no original equipment manufacturer (OEM) documents are actually referenced, the experience and knowledge of several OEMs contributed to the development of this document. Each engine manufacturer has their own practices relating to correlation and they will be used by those OEMS for the purpose of establishing certified test facilities.
2016-09-01
Magazine
Solving the Greenhouse Gas puzzle While automakers and policymakers debate the TAR, engineers and product planners prepare for the steep climb to meet GHG and CAFE rules beyond 2022. Revving up thermal characterization in the component lab The latest generation of high-speed infrared cameras can capture airbag deployments and other fast-moving actions quickly and accurately. C3 consortium aims for soot solution A newly formed group of companies led by CFD specialists Convergent Science targets exhaust particulate reduction in the combustion chamber. Inside the autonomous vehicle With less focus on driver needs, comfort, safety, and occupant productivity will become key. Editorial: Bad gas?
2016-08-31
WIP Standard
ARP5758A
This document describes a recommended practice and procedure for the trending of parameters to maintain the test cell correlation status. Trending is performed to monitor test cells for changes that can affect engine performance or the data acquired from engine tests.
CURRENT
2016-08-12
Standard
ARP741C
This paper describes a recommended practice and procedure for the correlation of test cells that are used for the performance testing of turbofan and turbojet engines. Test cell correlation is performed to determine the effect of any given test cell enclosure and equipment on the performance of an engine relative to the baseline performance of that engine. When baseline testing is performed in an indoor test cell, the baseline performance data are adjusted to open air conditions. Although no original equipment manufacturer (OEM) documents are actually referenced, the experience and knowledge of several OEMs contributed to the development of this document. Each engine Manufacturer has their own practices relating to correlation and they will be used by those OEMS for the purpose of establishing certified test facilities.
CURRENT
2016-08-03
Standard
J2517_201608
This procedure establishes a recommended practice for establishing the sensitivity of the chest displacement potentiometer assembly used in the Hybrid III family of Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs, or crash dummies). This potentiometer assembly is used in the Hybrid III family to measure the linear displacement of the sternum relative to the spine (referred to as chest compression). An inherent nonlinearity exists in this measurement because a rotary potentiometer is being used to measure a generally linear displacement. As the chest cavity is compressed the potentiometer rotates, however the relationship between the compression and the potentiometer rotation (and voltage output) is nonlinear. Crash testing facilities have in the past used a variety of techniques to calibrate the chest potentiometer, that is to establish a sensitivity value (mm/ (volt/volt) or mm/ (mvolt/volt)).
CURRENT
2016-08-02
Standard
J2413_201608
1.1 This Recommended Practice is for use by contractual parties to verify new xenon arc test apparatus ability to perform SAE J1885, J1960, J2412, J2527, or other as specified. 1.2 This Protocol defines the process for analysis of performance capabilities of candidate xenon arc test apparatus for comparison to current xenon arc test apparatus being utilized by the industry. This will require documentation of the candidate apparatus to: a. Produce the exposure environments as specified in the test method. b. Produce the required degradation in the standard reference material(s) in the specified time frame. c. Produce satisfactory repeatable and reproducible exposure results. d. Produce satisfactory uniform results throughout the specimen exposure region of the test chamber. e. Produce similar degradation in the benchmark test specimens, as agreed upon by contractual parties.
CURRENT
2016-08-01
Standard
AIR6236A
This AIR provides guidance to the EMI test facility on how to check performance of the following types of EMI test equipment: - Current probe - Line Impedance Stabilization Network (LISN) - Directional coupler - Attenuator - Cable loss - Low noise preamplifier - Rod antenna base - Passive antennas All performance checks can be performed without software. A computer may be required to generate an electronic or hard copy of data. This is not to say that custom software might not be helpful; just that the procedures documented herein specifically eschew the necessity of automated operation.
CURRENT
2016-07-27
Standard
J1802/1_201607
This SAE Recommended Practice contains the reference information for SAE J1802.
CURRENT
2016-07-26
Standard
AIR1794B
This metric SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) details a ball-on-cylinder (BOC) test device and specifies a method of rating the relative lubricity of aviation turbine fuel samples. The BOC produces a wear scar on a stationary steel ball by forcing it with a fixed load against a fuel wetted steel test ring in a controlled atmosphere. The test ring is rotated at a fixed speed so its surface is wetted by a momentary exposure to the fluid under test. The size of the wear scar is a measure of the test fluid lubricity and provides a basis for predicting friction or wear problems.
CURRENT
2016-06-17
Standard
J3095_201606
This recommended practice provides a procedure for measuring quantitatively the physical characteristics of linear impactors that are believed to effect impact test accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility. Suggested values and tolerance are also provided for specific applications of linear impactor testing (i.e. Ejection Mitigation tests, Head form Impact tests, Body Block tests). Two functional groups of linear impactors are considered, those whose function is related primarily to displacement and those related to measuring acceleration or force.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
CURRENT
2016-06-09
Standard
ARP598D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines the materials, apparatus and procedure for sizing and counting of particulate contamination, 5 μm or greater, in hydraulic fluid samples by membrane filtration iwth microscopic counting. It is capable of counting particulate matter in samples withdrawn from fluid power systems as identified by the 12 classes of SAE AS 4059 or NAS 1638 and projected beyond these for the five standard ranges specified and can thus serve as the primary document to determine acceptability. It is also capable of revealing but not measuring evidence of abnormal amount of water, other fluids, fine particulate and other materials, especially fibers and metals. It is applicable to all military, civil, space vehicles and test equipment.
CURRENT
2016-06-06
Standard
AS681K
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides the method for presentation of gas turbine engine steady state and transient performance calculated using computer programs. It also provides for the presentation of parametric gas turbine data including performance, weight, and dimensions computed by computer programs. This standard is intended to facilitate calculations by the program user without unduly restricting the method of calculation used by the program supplier. This standard is applicable to, but not limited to the following program types: data reduction, steady-state, transient, preliminary design, study, specification, status, and parametric programs.
2016-06-02
Magazine
A 24-hour battle of speed and efficiency At Le Mans this month, amped-up hybrid prototype racecars from Audi and Toyota face a revamped Porsche 919 hybrid, while Ford hopes to recapture glory with its new GT-R. Pushing the ICE forward, gradually Emergent technologies from BorgWarner, Eaton and Mahle aim for greater efficiency in gasoline and diesel engines. Smile, you're on Magna camera! Magna Electronics is rapidly expanding production of its made-in-U.S.A. onboard cameras to keep pace with booming OEM demand for safety and vehicle-autonomy vision-systems technology. Multi-material body solutions: Possibilities and manufacturing challenges The body-in-white is a prime target for lightweighting and many automakers are pursuing unique and effective multi-material approaches, but improved design tools and processes might yield greater gains.
HISTORICAL
2016-05-13
Standard
AIR1794A
This metric SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) details a ball-on-cylinder (BOC) test device and specifies a method of rating the relative lubricity of aviation turbine fuel samples. The BOC produces a wear scar on a stationary steel ball by forcing it with a fixed load against a fuel wetted steel test ring in a controlled atmosphere. The test ring is rotated at a fixed speed so its surface is wetted by a momentary exposure to the fluid under test. The size of the wear scar is a measure of the test fluid lubricity and provides a basis for predicting friction or wear problems.
CURRENT
2016-05-12
Standard
J2923_201605
This Recommended Practice applies to on-road vehicles with a GVWR below 4540 kg equipped with disc brakes.
2016-04-08
Magazine
Software's role continues to expand Design teams use different technologies to create new software and link systems together. Emissions regulations and engine complexity With the European Commission announcing a Stage V criteria emissions regulation for off-highway, scheduled to phase-in as earlly as 2019, there will be an end to a brief era of harmonized new-vehicle regulations. Will this affect an already complex engine development process? Evaluating thermal design of construction vehicles CFD simulation is used to evaluate two critical areas that address challenging thermal issues: electronic control units and hot air recirculation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1359
R. Pradeepak, Shyamsundar Kumbhar, Nainishkumar Barhate
Abstract At present, vehicle testing in laboratory is one of the important phase to quicken the product validation process. In the early phase of laboratory testing it is required to evaluate the strength of the vehicle structure through physical rig setup which represents the consumer’s usage. Two and Multiple poster input excitation are among the laboratory rig testing to represent the actual road are used to predict the durability of vehicle components. The road inputs through the poster are known as drive files, a feedback controlled system which reproduces the track or real road recorded specimen’s accelerations, displacements and strains in laboratory. Derivation of drive files in poster testing requires iteration of physical specimen to exactly replicate the actual road.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1534
Rudolf Reichert, Pradeep Mohan, Dhafer Marzougui, Cing-Dao Kan, Daniel Brown
Abstract A detailed finite element model of a 2012 Toyota Camry was developed by reverse engineering. The model consists of 2.25M elements representing the geometry, thicknesses, material characteristics, and connections of relevant structural, suspension, and interior components of the mid-size sedan. This paper describes the level of detail of the simulation model, the validation process, and how it performs in various crash configurations, when compared to full scale test results. Under contract with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Center for Collision Safety and Analysis (CCSA) team at the George Mason University has developed a fleet of vehicle models which has been made publicly available. The updated model presented is the latest finite element vehicle model with a high level of detail using state of the art modeling techniques.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1600
Pruthviraj Mohanrao Palaskar, Vivek Kumar, Rohit Vaidya
Abstract Important vehicle performance parameters such as, fuel economy and high speed stability are directly influenced by its aerodynamic drag and lift. Wind tunnel testing to asses these parameters requires heavy investment especially when test wind tunnel is not available in the country where vehicle development center is present. Hence to save cost and to compress development time, it is essential to asses and optimize parameters of a vehicle in very early stages of development. Using numerical flow simulations optimization runs can be carried out digitally. Industry demands prediction of aerodynamic drag and lift coefficients (CD,CL) within an accuracy of a few counts, consuming minimal HPC resources and in a short turnaround time. Different OEMs deploy different testing methods and different softwares for numerical simulations.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1447
Qiang Yi, Stanley Chien, Jason Brink, Wensen Niu, Lingxi Li, Yaobin Chen, Chi-Chen Chen, Rini Sherony, Hiroyuki Takahashi
Abstract As part of active safety systems for reducing bicyclist fatalities and injuries, Bicyclist Pre-Collision System (BPCS), also known as Bicyclist Autonomous Emergency Braking System, is being studied currently by several vehicles manufactures. This paper describes the development of a surrogate bicyclist which includes a surrogate bicycle and a surrogate bicycle rider to support the development and evaluation of BPCS. The surrogate bicycle is designed to represent the visual and radar characteristics of real bicyclists in the United States. The size of bicycle surrogate mimics the 26 inch adult bicycle, which is the most popular adult bicycle sold in the US. The radar cross section (RCS) of the surrogate bicycle is designed based on RCS measurement of the real adult sized bicycles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0907
Matthew Blanks, Nathan Forster
Abstract In 2012, NHTSA and EPA extended Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for light duty vehicles through the 2025 model year. The new standards require passenger cars to achieve an average of five percent annual improvement in fuel economy and light trucks to achieve three percent annual improvement. This regulatory requirement to improve fuel economy is driving research and development into fuel-saving technologies. A large portion of the current research is focused on incremental improvements in fuel economy through technologies such as new lubricant formulations. While these technologies typically yield less than two percent improvement, the gains are extremely significant and will play an increasing role in the overall effort to improve fuel economy. The ability to measure small, but statistically significant, changes in vehicle fuel economy is vital to the development of new technologies.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1355
Jeffrey R. Hodgkins, Walter Brophy, Thomas Gaydosh, Norimasa Kobayashi, Hiroo Yamaoka
Abstract Current vehicle acoustic performance prediction methods, CAE (computer aided engineering) or physical testing, have some difficulty predicting interior sound in the mid-frequency range (300 to 1000 Hz). It is in this frequency range where the overall acoustic performance becomes sensitive to not only the contributions of structure-borne sources, which can be studied using traditional finite element analysis (FEA) methods, but also the contribution of airborne noise sources which increase proportional to frequency. It is in this higher frequency range (>1000 Hz) that physical testing and statistical CAE methods are traditionally used for performance studies. This paper will discuss a study that was undertaken to test the capability of a finite element modeling method that can accurately simulate air-borne noise phenomena in the mid-frequency range.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1007
Benjamin Ellies, Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
Abstract As part of its technology assessment for the upcoming midterm evaluation (MTE) of the 2022-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas (LD GHG) emissions standards, EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) model, a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation tool. One of the most efficient engines today, a 2.0L Mazda SkyActiv engine, is of particular interest due to its high geometric compression ratio and use of an Atkinson cycle. EPA benchmarked the 2.0L SkyActiv at its National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions laboratory. EPA then incorporated ALPHA into an engine dynamometer control system so that vehicle chassis testing could be simulated with a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) approach.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0029
Chuanliangzi Liu, Bo Chen, Ming Cheng, Anthony Champagne, Keyur Patel
Abstract The Electronic Control Unit (ECU) of an Electric Power Steering (EPS) system is a core device to decide how much assistance an electric motor applies on a steering wheel. The EPS ECU plays an important role in EPS systems. The effectiveness of an ECU needs to be thoroughly tested before mass production. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation provides an efficient way for the development and testing of embedded controllers. This paper focuses on the development of a HiL system for testing EPS controllers. The hardware of the HiL system employs a dSPACE HiL simulator. The EPS plant model is an integrated model consisting of a Vehicle Dynamics model of the dSPACE Automotive Simulation Model (ASM) and the Nexteer Steering model. The paper presents the design of an EPS HiL system, the simulation of sensors and actuators, the functions of the ASM Vehicle Dynamics model, and the integration method of the ASM Vehicle Dynamics model with a Steering model.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0045
Takanori Uno, Akahori Ichiro, Yoichiro Hara
Abstract In this paper, consideration is made to create a simulation model of the BCI test method, which is one of the EMC evaluation methods for in-vehicle electronic devices, and an intrinsic model of a BCI probe is provided. Using this model, it is demonstrated that when the impedance of the BCI probe is sufficiently high, the BCI probe serves as a transformer with a winding ratio of 1:1, and the admittance of a line or a load connected to each wire becomes proportional to the magnitude of current flowing in each wire. This model can also be applied when the leakage inductance inside the BCI probe is taken into consideration. The validity of this model is verified by experiment using a jig which can clamp multiple wires. In addition, by using this model, it is demonstrated that the S-parameters for dozens of wires clamped in the BCI probe can be generated using the S-parameter measurement results from when one wire is in the BCI probe.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0052
Jihas Khan
Abstract HILS is a proven and essential part of the embedded product development life cycle which strives to reduce effort, time and cost spent on automotive validation activities. An efficient HILS system allows to create a precise simulation environment for the ECU which is made to believe that it is sitting inside a real vehicle and there by the intended functionalities implemented in the same could be tested even before the vehicle prototypes or other ECUs or sensors and actuators are available. An inefficient and faulty HILS system provides erroneous test results which could lead to wrong inferences. This paper is proposing a standardized process flow aided by specific documentation and design concepts which validates that the test system designed is robust and caters to the actual requirement. The Design stage starts by a requirement gathering phase where the analysis of the device under test is executed in detail.
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