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Viewing 1 to 30 of 293
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0109
Nic Van Vuuren, Lucio Postrioti, Gabriele Brizi, Federico Picchiotti
ABSTRACT: Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems are virtually indispensable to meet NOx emissions limits worldwide. These systems generate the NH3 reductant by injecting aqueous urea solution (AUS-32/AdBlue®/DEF) into the exhaust for the SCR NOx reduction reactions. Understanding the AUS-32 injector spray performance is critical to proper optimization of the SCR system. Specifically, better knowledge is required of urea sprays under operating conditions including those where fluid temperatures exceed the atmospheric fluid boiling point. Results were previously presented from imaging of an AUS-32 injector spray which showed substantial structural differences in the spray between room temperature fluid conditions, and conditions where the fluid temperature approached and exceeded 104º C and “flash boiling” of the fluid was initiated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0121
Ivan Arsie, Giuseppe Cialeo, Federica D'Aniello, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare, Luigi Paiano
The demand for high NOx conversion efficiency and low tailpipe ammonia slip for urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems has substantially increased in the past decade, as NOx emission legislations for Diesel engines are becoming more stringent than ever before. Model-based control strategies are fundamental to meet the dual objective of maximizing NOx reduction and minimizing NH3 slip in urea-SCR catalysts. In this paper, a control oriented model of a Cu-zeolite urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for automotive diesel engines is presented. The model is derived from a quasi-dimensional four-state model of the urea-SCR plant. In order to make it suitable for the real-time urea-SCR management, a reduced order one-state model has been developed, with the aim of capturing the essential behavior of the system with a low computational demand. The model estimates the relevant species (i.e. NO, NO2 and NH3) independently.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1927
Saurav Roy, Jyotirmoy Barman, Rizwan Khan
Abstract The urea NOx selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is an effective technique for the reduction of NOx emitted from diesel engines. Urea spray quality has significant effect on NOx conversion efficiency. Air less injection is one of effective, less complex way of injecting urea spray into the Exhaust stream. Further with air less injection it become more challenging in an engine platform of ~3 to 4L where Exhaust mass flow and temperature are relatively less. The droplet diameter and velocity distribution of De-Nox system has taken as input along with Engine raw emission data for a numerical model. The atomization and evaporation of airless urea injection systems were modeled using computational fluid dynamics. The numerical model was validated by the experimental results.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1945
Jyotirmoy Barman, Himanshu Gambhir, Rizwan Khan
Abstract During the last few decades, concerns have grown on the negative effects that diesel particulate matter has on health. Because of this, particulate emissions were subjected to restrictions and various emission-reduction technologies were developed. It is ironic that some of these technologies led to reductions in the legislated total particulate mass while neglecting the number of particles. Focusing on the mass is not necessarily correct, because it might well be that not the mass but the number of particles and the characteristics of them (size, composition) have a higher impact on health. During the diesel engine combustion process, soot particles are produced which is very harmful for the atmosphere. Particulate matter is composed of much organic and inorganic composition which was analyzed after the optimization of SCR and EGR engine out.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1875
Martino Pigozzi, Flavio Faccioli, Carlo Ubertino, Davide Allegro, Daniel Zeni
Abstract Within recent years, passenger comfort has become a main focus of the automotive industry. The topic is directly connected with acoustics, since sounds and noises have a major impact on the well-being of vehicle occupants. So-called “noise control” focuses on directly optimizing acoustic comfort by implementing innovative materials or geometries for automotive components and systems. One possibility to optimize the acoustics within a vehicle is connected to the phenomenon of sloshing in Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) tanks. Sloshing is a noise which is generated during normal driving situations by the motion of the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) in the tank. Until now, no procedure for measuring sloshing noise in SCR tanks has been defined, and neither a specific acoustic target which the SCR tanks need to fulfil.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0964
Jakob Heide, Mikael Karlsson, Mireia Altimira
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx through injection of Urea-Water-Solution (UWS) into the hot exhaust gas stream is an effective and extensively used strategy in internal combustion engines. Even though actual SCR systems have 95-96% de-NOx efficiency over test cycles, real driving emissions of NOx are a challenge, proving that there is room for improvement. The efficiency of the NOx conversion is highly dependent on the size of UWS droplets and their spatial distribution. These factors are, in turn, mainly determined by the spray characteristics and its interaction with the exhaust gas flow. The main purpose of this study is to numerically investigate the sensitivity to the modelling framework of the evaporation and mixing of the spray upstream of the catalyst. The dynamics of discrete droplets is handled through the Lagrangian Particle Tracking framework, with models that account for droplet breakup and coalescence, turbulence effects, and water evaporation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0944
Ryuji Ando, Takashi Hihara, Yasuyuki Banno, Makoto Nagata, Tomoaki Ishitsuka, Nobuyuki Matsubayashi, Toshihisa Tomie
Abstract Modern diesel emission control systems often use Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction (Urea-SCR) for NOx control. One of the most active SCR catalysts is based on Cu-zeolite, specifically Cu-Chabazite (Cu-CHA), also known as Cu-SSZ-13. The Cu-SCR catalyst exhibits high NOx control performance and has a high thermal durability. However, its catalytic performance deteriorates upon long-term exposure to sulfur. This work describes our efforts to investigate the detailed mechanism of poisoning of the catalyst by sulfur, the optimum conditions required for de-sulfation, and the recovery of catalytic activity. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to locate the sulfur adsorption site within the Cu-zeolite structure. Analytical characterization of the sulfur-poisoned catalyst was performed using Extreme Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (EUPS) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0965
Lorenzo Nocivelli, Gianluca Montenegro, Angelo Onorati, Francesco Curto, Panayotis Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Yujun Liao, Alexander Vogel
Abstract The application of liquid aqueous Urea Solution (AUS) as reductant in SCR exhaust after-treatment systems is now a commonly accepted industry standard. Unfortunately, less acceptable are the associated difficulties caused by incomplete decomposition of the liquid, resulting in solid deposits which accumulate in the exhaust pipe downstream of the dosing components. The correct prediction of the spray pattern and, therefore, the spray impact on the walls is a key feature for the system optimization. A mechanical patternator, designed on the basis of CFD performance assessment, involving a Lagrangian representation of the dispersed liquid fully coupled with a 3D Eulerian description of the carrier phase, has been built and used to measure the spray mass distribution.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0943
Cory S. Hendrickson, Devesh Upadhyay, Michiel Van Nieuwstadt
Abstract Over the past decade urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has become a leading aftertreatment solution to meet increasingly stringent Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions requirements in diesel powertrains. A common trend seen in modern SCR systems is the use of "split-brick" configurations where two SCR catalysts are placed in thermally distinct regions of the aftertreatment. One catalyst is close-coupled to the engine for fast light-off and another catalyst is positioned under-floor to improve performance at high space velocities. Typically, a single injector is located upstream of the first catalyst to provide the reductant necessary for efficient NOx reduction. This paper explores the potential benefit, in terms of improved NOx reduction, control of NH3 slip or reduced reductant consumption, of having independently actuated injectors in front of each catalyst.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0953
Jinyong Luo, Yadan Tang, Saurabh Joshi, Krishna Kamasamudram, Neal Currier, Aleksey Yezerets
Abstract Cu/CHA catalysts have been widely used in the industry, due to their desirable performance characteristics including the unmatched hydrothermal stability. While broadly recognized for their outstanding activity at or above 200°C, these catalysts may not show desired levels of NOx conversion at lower temperatures. To achieve high NOx conversions it is desirable to have NO2/NOx close to 0.5 for fast SCR. However even under such optimal gas feed conditions, sustained use of Cu/CHA below 200°C leads to ammonium nitrate formation and accumulation, resulting in the inhibition of NOx conversion. In this contribution, the formation and decomposition of NH4NO3 on a commercial Cu/CHA catalyst have been investigated systematically. First, the impact of NH4NO3 self-inhibition on SCR activity as a function of temperature and NO2/NOx ratios was investigated through reactor testing.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0822
Jim Elkjær Bebe, Kasper Steen Andersen
Abstract The purpose of this work is to determine essential spray parameters for a specific nozzle to be integrated in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of selective catalytic reduction systems (SCR) based on the injection of urea water solution (UWS). As Dinex does not develop nozzles, but rather integrate nozzles from a variety of manufacturers, the spray data made available is of an inhomogeneous quality. This paper presents the results of a simple, partial validation and calibration of a CFD simulation performed with the commercial CFD code AVL FIRE 2014.2 using the Lagrangian discrete droplet method. The validation is based on a novel and low cost experimental setup, where the experimental method utilizes high-speed imaging to provide spray cone angle, axial spray penetration length and spray plume droplet density.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2016-01-9080
Yong-Yuan Ku, Jau-Huai Lu, Ko Wei Lin
Due to the rising price of crude oil, biofuel is being considered as a global alternative for fossil fuels to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. Diesel blended with bio fuel is currently being widely adopted in many countries. The Taiwanese government has been enforcing the adoption of B2 since 2010. However, there have remained consistent concerns about engine durability related to the use of biofuel, especially regarding after-treatment systems. A selective catalytic reduction system (SCR) has been utilized recently to reduce NOX emission in order to meet the Euro IV and V emission standards. To evaluate the impact of biodiesel on the durability of engines equipped with the SCR system, a long-term testing program was organized for the purposes of this study. The results can be used as a reference for the development of marketing promotion strategies as well as government policies in Taiwan.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2017-01-9275
Neng Zhu, Lin Lv, Chengwei Ye
Abstract In vehicles with urea-SCR system, normal operation of the urea-SCR system and engine will be influenced if there are deposits appearing on exhaust pipe wall. In this paper, a commercial vehicle is employed to study the influence factors of deposits through the vehicle road test. The results show that, urea injection rate, temperature and flow field have impacts on the formation of deposits. When decreasing the urea injection rate of calibration status by 20%, the deposit yield would reduce by 32%. If the ambient temperature decreased from 36 °C to 26 °C, the deposit yield would increase by 95%. After optimizing the exhaust pipe downstream of the urea injector by removing the step surface, only a few flow marks of urea droplets are observed on the pipe wall, and no lumps of deposits existing.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0118
Satoshi Sumiya, David Bergeal, Kenan Sager
Abstract The Indian government has announced that India will skip BS V legislation and move to BS VI from 2020. In order to meet this NOx emission standard, most vehicles will need to adopt either NOx Storage Catalyst (NSC) or Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). It is shown that these two devices have different NOx reduction temperature windows and different sulfur tolerance. In the LDD application, it is highly important to deal with NOx in the low temperature region directly after a cold start. NSC works in this region with better performance than SCR, but its sulfur tolerance is weaker than SCR. To improve the weakness in low temperature NOx control on SCR, SCRF® which is SCR coated Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) was developed and it demonstrated an advantage in light-off performance, due to the advantage in temperature conditions, by minimizing heat loss upstream of the SCR device.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0113
Azael J. Capetillo, Fernando Ibarra, Dominik Stepniewski, Jo Vankan
Abstract Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems have become the preferred technology to deal with NOx emissions in Diesel engines. Their efficiency is highly reliant, among other factors, on the uniformity of distribution - known as Uniformity Index (UI) - of NH3 which is injected into the system through a urea-water solution (UWS). SCR system make use of a mixer component designed to achieve the desired UI levels. However, the great variety of exhaust systems, makes it impossible to employ a universal solution. Therefore, each SCR system requires of a tailor made mixer, capable of achieving the required UI, while preventing urea crystallisation and minimising pressure drops. Computer fluid dynamics (CFD) tools together with optimisation techniques based on the design of experiments (DoE) can be used to obtain the appropriate mixer design.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0043
Peter Heuser, Stefano Ghetti, Devising Rathod, Sebastian Petri, Sascha Schoenfeld
Abstract The Bharat Stage VI (BS-VI) emission legislation will come into force in 2020, posing a major engineering challenge in terms of system complexity, reliability, cost and development time. Solutions for the EURO VI on-road legislation in Europe, from which the BS-VI limits are derived, have been developed and have already been implemented. To a certain level these European solutions can be transferred to the Indian market. However, several market-specific challenges are yet to be defined and addressed. In addition, a very strict timeline has to be considered for application of advanced technologies and processes during the product development. In this paper, the emission roadmap will be introduced in the beginning, followed by a discussion of potential technology solutions on the engine itself as well as on the exhaust aftertreatment side. This includes boosting and fuel injection technologies as well as different exhaust gas recirculation methods.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0133
Ashok Kumar, Junhui Li, Jinyong Luo, Saurabh Joshi, Aleksey Yezerets, Krishna Kamasamudram, Niklas Schmidt, Khyati Pandya, Prachetas Kale, Thangaraj Mathuraiveeran
Abstract Advanced emission control systems for diesel engines usually include a combination of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), and Ammonia Slip Catalyst (ASC). The performance of these catalysts individually, and of the aftertreatment system overall, is negatively affected by the presence of oxides of sulfur, originating from fuel and lubricant. In this paper, we illustrated some key aspects of sulfur interactions with the most commonly used types of catalysts in advanced aftertreatment systems. In particular, DOC can oxidize SO2 to SO3, collectively referred to as SOx, and store these sulfur containing species. The key functions of a DOC, such as the ability to oxidize NO and HC, are degraded upon SOx poisoning. The impact of sulfur poisoning on the catalytic functions of a DPF is qualitatively similar to DOC.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0132
Abhilash Jain, Jyotirmoy Barman, Kumar Patchappalam, Srikanth Gedela
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction has established itself to significantly reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines. Typically, in this technology, aqueous urea solution is injected into hot exhaust stream which chemically decomposes to form ammonia and then reacts with NOx to form safe byproducts as H2O and N2 over the catalyst surface. However, incomplete thermal decomposition of urea not only reduces the NOx conversion efficiency and increases the ammonia slip, but also leads to the formation of solid crystals that adversely affect the performance of the system by increasing the back pressure and lowering the overall fuel economy. The present study discusses about the main reasons that lead to crystal formation in a vanadium based SCR system on a six cylinder 5.6l diesel engine and also design considerations of decomposition tube that affect the formation of crystals and ways to mitigate them.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0142
Zahra Nazarpoor, Steve Golden, Ru-Fen Liu
Abstract Stricter regulatory standards are continuously adopted worldwide to control heavy duty emissions, and at the same time, fuel economy requirements have significantly lowered exhaust temperatures. The net result is a significant increase in Precious Group Metal (PGM) usage with current Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) technology. Therefore, the design and development of advanced DOC with ultra-low PGM to achieve highly beneficial emission performance improvement is necessary. The advanced DOC is synergized PGM (SPGM) with Mixed Metal Oxide (MMO). The presence of MMO in SPGM is responsible for NO oxidation to NO2 which is critical for the passive regeneration of the downstream filter and SCR function. This paper outlines the development of MMO for application in modern DOCs and addresses some specific challenges underlying this application.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0143
Saroj Pradhan, Arvind Thiruvengadam, Pragalath Thiruvengadam, Berk Demirgok, Marc Besch, Daniel Carder, Bharadwaj Sathiamoorthy
Abstract Three-way catalyst equipped stoichiometric natural gas vehicles have proven to be an effective alternative fuel strategy that has shown superior low NOx benefits in comparison to diesels equipped with SCR. However, recent studies have shown the TWC activity to contribute to high levels of tailpipe ammonia emissions. Although a non-regulated pollutant, ammonia is a potent pre-cursor to ambient secondary PM formation. Ammonia (NH3) is an inevitable catalytic byproduct of TWCduring that results also corresponds to lowest NOx emissions. The main objective of the study is to develop a passive SCR based NH3 reduction strategy that results in an overall reduction of NH3 as well as NOx emissions from a stoichiometric spark ignited natural gas engine. The study investigated the characteristics of Fe-based and Cu-based zeolite SCR catalysts in storage, and desorption of ammonia at high exhaust temperature conditions, that are typical of stoichiometric natural gas engines.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2185
Jialin Liu, Hu Wang, Zunqing Zheng, Zeyu Zou, Mingfa Yao
Abstract In this work, both the ‘SCR-only’ and ‘EGR+SCR’ technical routes are compared and evaluated after the optimizations of both injection strategy and turbocharging system over the World Harmonized Stationary Cycle (WHSC) in a heavy duty diesel engine. The exhaust emissions and fuel economy performance of different turbocharging systems, including wastegate turbocharger (WGT), variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), two-stage fixed geometry turbocharger (WGT+FGT) and two-stage variable geometry turbocharger (VGT+FGT), are investigated over a wide EGR range. The NOx reduction methods and EGR introduction strategies for different turbocharger systems are proposed to improve the fuel economy. The requirement on turbocharging system and their potential to meet future stringent NOx and soot emission regulations are also discussed in this paper.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2212
Peter Larsson, Will Lennard, Jessica Dahlstrom, Oivind Andersson, Per Tunestal
Abstract Yearly 3.3 million premature deaths occur worldwide due to air pollution and NOx pollution counts for nearly one seventh of those [1]. This makes exhaust after-treatment a very important research and has caused the permitted emission levels for NOx to decrease to very low levels, for EURO 6 only 0.4 g/kWh. Recently new legislation on ammonia slip with a limit of 10 ppm NH3 has been added [2], which makes the SCR-technology more challenging. This technology injects small droplets of an aqueous Urea solution into the stream of exhaust gases and through a catalytic reaction within the SCR-catalyst, NOx is converted into Nitrogen and Water. To enable the catalytic reaction the water content in the Urea solution needs to be evaporated and the ammonia molecules need to have sufficient time to mix with the gases prior to the catalyst.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2214
Teuvo Maunula, Thomas Wolff
The latest emission regulations for mobile and stationary applications require the use of aftertreatment methods for NOx and diesel particulate filters (DPF) for particulate matter (PM). SCR catalysts were evaluated by laboratory experiments and the most promising SCR catalysts were also scaled up to full-size. Development with copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) on zeolitic materials (Beta, ZSM-5, SAPO, chabazite) has resulted in the new generation of thermally durable SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalysts, which have also an improved sulfur tolerance and a low N2O formation tendency. Opposite to Cu on Beta and ZSM-5, Cu on chabazite and SAPO showed clearly lower N2O formation. Cu-SCR catalysts had a low dependency on NO2/NOx but Fe-SCR catalysts required a higher NO2/NOx ratio (>0.3) to keep a high NOx efficiency.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2281
Simon Dosda, David Berthout, Gilles Mauviot, Adeline Nogre
Abstract With the upcoming Euro 6c emission regulations, the performance of Diesel exhaust lines needs to be improved to meet NOX and soot emission targets. A promising exhaust line architecture to reach these requirements is the association of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), a Selective Catalytic Reduction coated on a particulate filter (SCR-F) and a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst. To develop this system, the car manufacturers have to face several challenges. One of the first is the design of the exhaust line volumes, which has a strong impact on the light-off temperatures of the catalysts and so on system performance. Then, urea injection has to be optimized with an adapted control system to maximize NOx reduction while keeping low tailpipe ammonia emission. Moreover, performance degradation of catalysts due to harsh exhaust conditions during vehicle life time have to be detected by OBD system.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2327
Scott Eakle, Svitlana Kroll, Cary Henry
Abstract Ideally, complete decomposition of urea should produce only two products in active Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems: ammonia and carbon dioxide. In reality, urea decomposition reaction is a two-step process that includes the formation of ammonia and isocyanic acid as intermediate products via thermolysis. Being highly reactive, isocyanic acid can initiate the formation of larger molecular weight compounds such as cyanuric acid (CYN), biuret (BIU), melamine (MEL), ammeline (AML), ammelide (AMD), and dicyandimide (DICY). These compounds can be responsible for the formation of deposits on the walls of the decomposition reactor in urea SCR systems. Composition of these deposits varies with temperature exposure, and under certain conditions can create oligomers that are difficult to remove from exhaust pipes.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2322
Michael Lance, Andrew Wereszczak, Todd J. Toops, Richard Ancimer, Hongmei An, Junhui Li, Leigh Rogoski, Petr Sindler, Aaron Williams, Adam Ragatz, Robert L. McCormick
Abstract For renewable fuels to displace petroleum, they must be compatible with emissions control devices. Pure biodiesel contains up to 5 ppm Na + K and 5 ppm Ca + Mg metals, which have the potential to degrade diesel emissions control systems. This study aims to address these concerns, identify deactivation mechanisms, and determine if a lower limit is needed. Accelerated aging of a production exhaust system was conducted on an engine test stand over 1001 h using 20% biodiesel blended into ultra-low sulfur diesel (B20) doped with 14 ppm Na. This Na level is equivalent to exposure to Na at the uppermost expected B100 value in a B20 blend for the system full-useful life. During the study, NOx emissions exceeded the engine certification limit of 0.33 g/bhp-hr before the 435,000-mile requirement.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2320
Tsuyoshi Asako, Ryuji Kai, Tetsuo Toyoshima, Claus Vogt, Shogo Hirose, Shiori Nakao
Abstract Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is adapted for a variety of applications to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) in diesel engine exhaust. The most commonly used catalyst for SCR in established markets is Cu-Zeolite (CuZ) due to excellent NOx conversion and thermal durability. However, most applications in emerging markets and certain applications in established markets utilize vanadia SCR. The operating temperature is typically maintained below 550°C to avoid vanadium sublimation due to active regeneration of the diesel particulate filter (DPF), or some OEMs may eliminate the DPF because they can achieve particulate matter (PM) standard with engine tuning. Further improvement of vanadia SCR durability and NOx conversion at low exhaust gas temperatures will be required in consideration of future emission standards.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2319
Kihong Kim, Rahul Mital, Takehiro Higuchi
Abstract In the previous research1), the authors discovered that the sudden pressure increase phenomenon in diesel particulate filter (DPF) was a result of soot collapse inside DPF channels. The proposed hypothesis for soot collapse was a combination of factors such as passive regeneration, high humidity, extended soak period, high soot loading and high exhaust flow rate. The passive regeneration due to in-situ NO2 and high humidity caused the straw like soot deposited inside DPF channels to take a concave shape making the collapse easier during high vehicle acceleration. It was shown that even if one of these factor was missing, the undesirable soot collapse and subsequent back pressure increase did not occur. Currently, one of the very popular NOx reduction technologies is the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) on Filter which does not have any platinum group metal (PGM) in the washcoat.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8077
Guanyu Zheng
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) has become a mainstream approach to reduce diesel engine NOx emissions. Urea Water Solution (UWS) injection and interactions with mixers and exhaust gases affect the homogeneity of ammonia distribution at catalyst inlet and solid deposits formation on walls / mixer surfaces, therefore influencing SCR performance and durability. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to simulate an EU V compliant SCR system with a dual baffle mixer for heavy duty diesel engines. The modeling procedure is carried out by a multi-dimensional CFD code CONVERGE that includes transient urea transport processes in an exhaust flow configuration, detailed spray break-up, evaporation, wall-film, turbulence, and Conjugate Heat Transfer (CHT) models as well as an automated mesh generation approach. Locations of urea deposits and system pressure drop are predicted and validated against measurements, providing uniformity index (UI) predictions at the catalyst inlet.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8075
Sudarshan Ramesh, Rob J.C. Nieuwenhof, Xander Seykens, Sriram Srinivasan, Gautam Sharma
Abstract SCR on Filter (SCRoF) is an efficient and compact NOX and PM reduction technology already used in series production for light-duty applications. The technology is now finding its way into the medium duty and heavy duty market. One of the key challenges for successful application is the robustness to real world variations. The solution to this challenge can be found by using model-based control algorithms, utilizing state estimation by physics-based catalyst models. This paper focuses on the development, validation and real time implementation of a physics-based control oriented SCRoF model. An overview of the developed model will be presented, together with a brief description of the model parameter identification and validation process using engine test bench measurement data. The model parameters are identified following a streamlined approach, focusing on decoupling the effects of deNOx and soot phenomena.
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