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2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2869
Sumit Sharma, Sandeep sharma, Umashanker Gupta, Ravi Joshi, shailesh pawar
Buses are one of the main and favorite sources of public transit in India. Thousands of people die or injure severely every year due to Bus accidents. Passenger injury in Bus accidents can be due to high stiff seat structures. Most of the occupants seated in the second row or further back were injured by hitting the seat back in the row in front of them. AIS023 (AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY STANDARDS) is one of the several mandatory standards from CMVR (CENTRAL MOTOR VEHICLES RULES) to ensure the safety during crash. As per AIS-023 passenger seat of bus should not cause injury because of high stiffness, on the other hand seat should also be able to carry the passenger force during accidents. With this mechanism AIS023 specifies minimum and maximum range deformations of seat back to minimize the passenger injury. This study includes the FE (Finite Element) analysis and design of Bus seat as per AIS023 test setup with LS-Dyna explicit tool.
2015-07-17
Standard
ARP5526D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) documents a common understanding of terms, compliance issues and design criteria to facilitate certification of seat installations specific to Part 25 aircraft. This ARP provides general guidance for seats to be installed in Part 23 aircraft and Parts 27 and 29 rotorcraft and does not specify specific designs or design methods for such certification.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2271
Yong Du Jun, Bong Hyun Park, Kang Seok Seo, Tae Hyun Kim, Myoung Jae Chae
Abstract Modern automotive seats require improvements in their design, safety, comfort including sitting and riding comfort. Among those, seat comfort is known to be difficult to evaluate because the comfort is a human feeling. As an approach to evaluate the human comfort in an objective manner, an objective measure is proposed for seat riding comfort evaluation under low frequency vibratory conditions which represents typical roll and pitch motions of driving motor vehicles. The related feeling due to this low frequency vehicle motion is termed ‘hold feeling’ because the seated body may tend to deviate from the defined seating position under such vehicle motion input. Dynamic pressure measurements have been conducted in the frequency range up to 1.0 Hz to monitor the interface pressure change behavior of the seat-subject body.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0613
Donghong Ning, James Coyte, Hai Huang, Haiping Du, Weihua Li
Abstract This paper presents a study on experimental vibration simulation using a multiple-DOF motion platform for heavy duty vehicle seat suspension test. The platform is designed to have 6-DOF with the advantages of high force-to-weight ratio, high dexterity and high position accuracy. It can simulate vehicle vibrations in the x, y and z translational axis and in the roll pitch and yaw axis rotation. To use this platform to emulate the real vibration measured from vehicle seat base under real operation for vehicle seat suspension test in lab, an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is applied to collect the acceleration data from a real vehicle. An estimation algorithm is developed to estimate the displacement from the measured acceleration. The estimated displacement is then used to calculate the length of each leg of the platform so that the platform can generate the motion similar to the measured one.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0727
Udayakumar Rajamanickam, Anshul Singhal, Miller Jothi
Abstract This paper aims at Fiber Reinforced Panel or FRP mold and panel manufacturing of body panel and driver seat for a Formula Society of Automotive Engineers or FSAE racecar. The competition involves designing a Formula 1 type car that lays the standards for a high performance-racing car [1]. This calls for a high Power: Weight ratio. The rules of the competition ensure a mandatory use of an air restrictor with an engine of a maximum capacity of 600cc to reduce the power of the engines [2]. Hence, to compensate for the loss of power the target now shifts to minimizing the car's weight without compromising the strength. The body panel and driver's seat are two most valuable parts as the first adds elegance and aerodynamics to the car while the latter makes it comfortable for the driver to drive the car under high lateral load shifts. Weight reduction in this area is easier as strength is not the dominating factor.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1334
Shreyas Shingavi, Pankaj Bhirud, Abhishek Ranjan
Abstract Safety and Comfort are the core requirements of the automotive seating systems. Number of the occupants, determines type of the seating system requirement. The second row seat often needs to fold and slide, to allow the passenger to enter inside the car. Folding second row seat will also allow accommodating larger length cargo. The over folding of seat is controlled by hard stop mechanism. The hard stop mechanism generally consists of the seat arm stopper at back seat and hard stop located at base of the seat. These stoppers will limit the further motion of back seat. The folding speed of back seat is governed by various factors e.g. adjacent seat foam/structure friction, location, structural mass of seat etc. The scope of the paper is to evaluate various folding speeds of the back seat. Its effects are evaluated for the stresses and fatigue life of the hard stop components.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1457
Aditya Belwadi, Richard Hanna, Audrey Eagle, Daniel Martinez, Julie Kleinert, Eric Dahle
Abstract Automotive interior design optimization must balance the design of the vehicle seat and occupant space for safety, comfort and aesthetics with the accommodation of add-on restraint products such as child restraint systems (CRS). It is important to understand the range of CRS dimensions so that this balance can be successfully negotiated. CRS design is constantly changing. In particular, the introduction of side impact protection for CRS as well as emphasis on ease of CRS installation has likely changed key design points of many child restraints. This ever-changing target creates a challenge for vehicle manufacturers to assure their vehicle seats and occupant spaces are compatible with the range of CRS on the market. To date, there is no accepted method for quantifying the geometry of child seats such that new designs can be catalogued in a simple, straightforward way.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1236
John Jaranson, Meraj Ahmed
Abstract The Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) developed by Magna International and Ford Motor Company is a result of a US Department of Energy project DE-EE0005574. The project demonstrates the lightweighting potential of a five passenger sedan, while maintaining vehicle performance and occupant safety. Prototype vehicles were manufactured and limited full vehicle testing was conducted. The MMLV vehicle design, comprised of commercially available materials and production processes, achieved a 364kg (23.5%) full vehicle mass reduction, enabling the application of a 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine resulting in a significant environmental benefit and fuel reduction. This paper describes the concept design, prototyping, and validation for interior subsystems of the MMLV. Case studies are presented for two of the interior subsystems: the instrument panel/cross-car beam (IP/CCB) and the front seat structures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1472
Roberto Arienti, Carlo Cantoni, Massimiliano Gobbi, Giampiero Mastinu, Mario Pennati, Giorgio Previati
Abstract The lightweight seat of a high performance car is designed taking into account a rear impact, i.e. the crash due to an impulse applied from the rear. The basic parameters of the seat structure are derived resorting to simulations of a crash with a test dummy positioned on the seat. The simulations provide the forces acting at the seat structure, in particular the forces applied at the joint between the seat cushion and the seat backrest are taken into account. Such a joint is simulated as a plastic hinge and dissipates some of the crash energy. The simulations are validated by means of indoor tests with satisfactory results. A tool has been developed for the preliminary design of lightweight seats for high performance cars.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1391
Scott Allen Ziolek, Joshua Pryor, Tony Schwenn, Adam Steinman
Abstract Optimizing climate seat systems requires increased complexity in seat design which in turn is driving a need for more detailed thermal simulation methods. This paper presents the model development considerations and results of a thermal simulation study aimed at improving the thermal seat comfort experience of Hyundai-Kia's heated seating systems.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1122
Kengo Yabe, Toru Inagaki, Takashi Kondo
Abstract Seat vibration when a vehicle is idling or in motion is an issue in automobile development. In order to reduce this vibration, dynamic damper or inertia mass is widely used. These countermeasures increases vehicle's weight and causes bad fuel-efficiency. Some new ways to reduce the vibration without weight increase are needed. One of that is the floating seat. Seat vibration has been reduced by controlling seat resonance frequencies. In order to control resonance frequency, the structures of the seat-mounting unit are replaced with floating structures using rubber bushings. It was demonstrated that partially replacing the mounting unit with floating structures makes it possible to control the resonance frequencies of the entire seat. The issue of balancing vibration reduction with strength and durability and crash safety performance caused by the fitting of rubber bushings to the seat-mounting unit was addressed using stopper structures optimized for each type of input.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1392
Se Jin Park, Seung Nam Min, Murali Subramaniyam, Heeran Lee, Yu Kyung Shin, Chang Hee Jang, Soon Hyun Hwang
Abstract Driving posture measurement is essential for the evaluation of a driver workspace and for improved seat comfort design. This study captures the comfortable driving postures for Koreans using a handheld portable Artec L™ 3D scanner. Subjects consisted of 20 healthy individuals (10 males and 10 females) ranging in age from 20 to 40 years and grouped as three weight groups (<59 kg, 60-79 kg and >80 kg). Eighteen land markers were attached (car seat: 9 markers; subject: 9 markers). From the 3D scanned data, the angles (neck, back, headrest, seat back, wrist, elbow, knee, and ankle) and distances (head to headrest, seat height, and seat back and forth) between the land markers were extracted in the Rapidform XOR software. The body pressure distribution was measured using two pressure mats from 17 body part regions. The measured pressure data were analyzed for average pressure, contact area, and body part pressure ratio.
2015-04-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9151
Eric S. Winkel, Daniel E. Toomey, Robert Taylor
Abstract Thoracolumbar vertebral fractures are most commonly due to compressive loading modes and associated with falls from height. Two injury metrics are generally referenced for assessing the potential for compressive thoracolumbar injury; the Dynamic Response Index (DRI) and the compressive load measured between the pelvis and lumbar spine using the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) title 49 part 572 subpart B anthropomorphic test device (ATD). This study utilizes an ATD to investigate the injury mitigation potential of a variety of seat cushions during vertical impact in an unrestrained seated posture. ATD responses and DRI are reported for 65 vertical impacts with and without cushions from heights between 4 and 80 inches. The cushions investigated reduced ATD peak pelvic acceleration 63 +/− 11% and compressive lumbar load 42 +/− 9% on average.
2015-03-27
Standard
J1819_201503
The scope of this SAE Recommended Practice is to promote compatibility between child restraint systems and vehicle seats and seat belts. Design guidelines are provided to vehicle manufacturers for certain characteristics of seats and seat belts, and to child restraint system (CRS) manufacturers for corresponding CRS features so that each can be made more compatible with the other. The Child Restraint System Accommodation Fixture, shown in Figure 1, is used to represent a CRS to the designers of both the vehicle interior and the CRS for evaluation of each product for compatibility with the other. The features of the accommodation fixture are described as each is used. A CRS accommodation template of transparent plastic, not shown, represents the side of the accommodation fixture for use in approximating its installed position on design drawings.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0235
Raju P Soudatti, Ragunathan Amarnath, Ramesh Harish
Abstract Generally it is observed that in city buses most of the time, passenger seat fails at the seat mounting area in buses which are used for more than 3 years. This fatigue failure doesn't get captured either in Anchorage Test or Limited Vibration Test. Passenger seats' durability should be equal to vehicle life which is 10L km or 12 Years of life span. Physical testing on the vibration test rig is time consuming and costly. Most of the time machine availability for testing will be an issue, to validate alternate seat proposals. So there is a need to establish a correlation between physical testing and CAE simulation so that alternate proposals can be easily and quickly verified using CAE alone. This paper deals with the verification and validation of passenger seat in buses for life cycle requirement, through various methodologies adopted from data collection, CAE verification and physical validation to simulate real-time environment.
2014-12-28
Standard
ARP6256
This document is a guide to the application of magnesium alloys to aircraft interior components including but not limited to aircraft seats. It provides background information on magnesium, its alloys and readily available forms such as extrusions and plate. It also contains guidelines for “enabling technologies” for the application of magnesium to engineering solutions including: machining, joining, forming, cutting, surface treatment, flammability issues, and designing from aluminum to magnesium.
2014-12-03
Standard
J1522_201412
This SAE Recommended Practice describes two-dimensional 95th percentile truck driver side view, seated stomach contours for horizontally adjustable seats (see Figure 1). There is one contour and three locating lines to accommodate male-to-female ratios of 50:50, 75:25, and 90:10 to 95:5.
2014-12-03
Standard
J1521_201412
This SAE Recommended Practice describes two-dimensional, 95th percentile truck driver, side view, seated shin-knee contours for both the accelerator operating leg and the clutch operating leg for horizontally adjustable seats (see Figure 1). There is one contour for the clutch shin-knee and one contour for the accelerator shin-knee. There are three locating equations for each curve to accommodate male-to-female ratios of 50:50, 75:25, and 90:10 to 95:5.
2014-11-25
Book
The Automotive Seating Systems Report from IHS SupplierBusiness takes an in-depth look at the global seating market including the key changes currently underway in the industry and what the future holds for this sector. The report considers in-house seat manufacture and supply chain developments along with advances in safety, comfort and convenience. Fitment rates for various seat features such as powered and memory functions, lumbar support and massage have been increasing and will continue to do so as vehicle interiors become “smarter”. Much of the technology in today’s seats is electric or electronically driven, and can be remotely controlled via links on the dashboard or controllers located throughout the vehicle. The market is opening up to New Tier 1 suppliers as well as Tier 2 and specialist niche technology players, all of whom will intensify the competition for supplying the world’s leading seating companies.
2014-11-19
Standard
J782_201411
This recommended practice is a source of information for body and trim engineers and represents existing technology in the field of on-highway vehicle seating systems. It provides a more uniform system of nomenclature, definitions of functional requirements, and testing methods of various material components of motor vehicle seating systems.
2014-11-18
WIP Standard
ARP6337
Define and develop test parameters, test methods, measurements, and acceptable performance criteria for composite aircraft seat structures.
2014-11-04
Magazine
2015 engines ride a technology tidal wave Powertrain engineers are diving deeper to find new ways to make light-duty power units more efficient without compromising performance. Connectivity for comfort Seat suppliers such as Continental, Johnson Controls, and Faurecia pursue 'networked' seats to enhance safety, personalization, and comfort. Assembling aluminum vehicles in volume Ford's 2015 F-150 pickup pioneers high-volume mass-production of lightweight aluminum car and truck structures.
2014-10-31
WIP Standard
ARP6316
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) documents a common understanding of terms, compliance issues and occupant injury criteria to facilitate certification of oblique facing seat installations specific to Part 25 aircraft.
2014-10-28
Standard
J384_201410
This SAE Recommended Practice specifies performance requirements and test procedures for the strength and location of seat belt assembly anchorages. It applies to seat belt anchorages attached to vehicle body structure or to seat assemblies in the vehicle. Design Considerations are specified in SAE J383.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2429
C Venkatesan, V Faustino, S Arun, S Ravi Shankar
Abstract The automotive industry needs sustainable seating products which offer good climate performance and superior seating comfort. The safety requirement is always a concern for current seating systems. The life of the present seating system is low and absorbs moisture over a period of time which affects seat performance (cushioning effect). Recycling is one of the major concerns as far as polyurethane (PU) is concerned. This paper presents the development of an alternative material which is eco-friendly and light in weight. Thermoplastic Polyolefin (PO) materials were tried in place PU for many good reasons. It is closed cell foam which has better tear and abrasion resistance. It doesn't absorb water and has excellent weathering resistance. Also it has a better cushioning effect and available in various colours. Because of superior tear resistance, it is possible to eliminate upholstery and would reduce system level cost.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-36-0220
Francisco Ganzarolli, Alexandre Tibério J. de C. Leal
Abstract The definition of the ride attribute is very difficult because it is part of human perception during driving. For vehicle dynamics work, have details of what is good or what is bad considering driving comfort, usually, induces some controversial opinions. In this work, the use of a single accelerometer is shown as a tool to characterize the basic vehicle vibrational behavior and so support the correlation between human perception and the resulting ride comfort presented. By using PSD theory, it is possible to “see” how the vehicle vibrates and so have a better understanding of where in the vehicle is located a possible issue and how to fix it. In a more advanced point of view is possible to characterize each vehicle with a ride “personality”, this meaning how each brand and model behave and so how vehicle behave to the consumer approve or complain about it..
2014-06-27
WIP Standard
J287
This recommended practice describes boundaries of hand control locations that can be reached by a percentage of different driver populations in passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and light trucks (Class A vehicles). This practice is not applicable to heavy trucks (Class B vehicles).
2014-05-27
WIP Standard
ARP6330
Methods will be developed to characterize In Flight Entertainment (IFE) component impact performance separate from seat design. These methods will address both initial seat head impact criterion (HIC) testing and subsequent IFE component changes. Methods will evaluate head blunt trauma, post-impact sharp edges, and egress impediment. Criteria development will involve defining test methods, test parameters, measurements, and acceptance criteria. Particular emphasis on evaluating IFE changes that require coordination and evaluation per SAE ARP 6448, Appendix B.
2014-05-16
Standard
AIR6160
This document provides informational background, rationale and a technical case to allow consideration of the removal of the magnesium alloy restriction in aircraft seat construction as contained in AS8049B. The foundation of this argument is flammability characterization work performed by the FAA at the William J. Hughes Technical Center (FAATC), Fire Safety Branch in Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA. The rationale and detailed testing results are presented along with flammability reports that have concluded that the use of specific types of magnesium alloys in aircraft seat construction does not increase the hazard level potential in the passenger cabin in a post-crash fire scenario. Further, the FAA has developed a lab scale test method, reference DOT/FAA/TC-13/52, to be used as a certification test, or method of compliance (MOC) to allow acceptability of the use of magnesium in the governing TSO-C127 and TSO-C39C.
2014-04-30
WIP Standard
ARP583J
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance for the design and location of flight attendant stations, including emergency equipment installations at or near such stations, so as to enable the flight attendant to function effectively in emergency situations, including emergency evacuations. Recommendations regarding design of flight attendant stations apply to all such stations; recommendations regarding location apply to those stations located near or adjacent to floor level exits.
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