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2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1298
Kamlesh Yadav, Abhishek Sinha, Rajdeep Singh Khurana
Vehicle Hood being the face of a passenger car poses a challenge to meet the regulatory and aesthetic requirements. However, the urge to make a saleable product makes aesthetics a primary condition. This eventually makes the role of structure optimization much more important. A recent development in the Indian automotive industry, which is known for dynamics of cost competitive cars, has posed the challenge to make passenger cars meeting the regulation and having optimized cost. This work is application of structure optimization of Hood and design of peripheral parts for meeting pedestrian protection performance keeping the focus on having cost-effective solution. This paper discusses Headform compliance of the work done on one of the flagship model of Maruti Suzuki India Ltd., providing detailed analysis of the procedure followed from introduction stage of regulatory requirement in the project to final validation of the engineering intent.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1300
Raj Jayachandran, Bhimaraddi Alavandi, Matt Niesluchowski, Erika Low, Yafang Miao, Yi Zhang
An engine cooling system in an automotive vehicle comprises of heat exchangers such as a radiator, charge air cooler, and oil coolers along with engine cooling fans. Typical automotive engine-cooling fan assembly includes an electric motor mounted on to a shroud that encloses radiator core. Typically a fan shroud is made of plastic material and holds one or two motors and is supported at four corners. One of the main drivers of a fan shroud design is Noise, Vibration, and Harshness requirements, without compromising the main function - airflow requirement for cooling. Usually, stiffness requirement is not given adequate attention in arriving at optimal design of a fan shroud. Research Council for Automotive Repairs (RCAR), based in Europe, issues vehicle ratings on the basis of its performance in Low Speed Damageability (LSD) tests. One such test is a 15kph, 40% offset rigid wall impact to the front of the vehicle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1303
Nobuhisa Yasuda, Shinichi Nishizawa, Maiko Ikeda, Tadashi Sakai
The purpose of this study is to validate a reverse engineering based design method for automotive trunk lid torsion bars (TLTB) in order to determine a free shape that meets a target closed shape as well as a specified torque. A TLTB is a trunk lid component that uses torsional restoring force to facilitate the lifting open of a trunk lid, as well as to maintain the open position. Bend points and torque at a closed trunk position are specified by a car maker. Conventionally, a TLTB supplier determines bend points of the free shape by rotating the given bend points from a closed position around a certain axis to satisfy the specified torque at the closed position. Bend points of a deformed TLTB shape in the closed position often do not match the target bend points given by a car maker when designed by the conventional method, which can potentially cause interference issues with surrounding components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1304
Alejandro Rosas Vazquez, Fernando Paisano, Diego Santillan Gutierrez
For many years the use of in-mold fasteners has been avoided for various reasons including: not fully understand the load cases in the part, the fear for quality issues to occur, the need for servicing, or the lack of understanding the complexity of all failure modes. The most common solution has been the use of secondary operations to provide attachments, such as, screws, metal clips, heat staking, sonic welding or other methods which are ultimately a waste in the process and increase manufacturing costs. The purpose of this paper is to take the reader through a design process which allows for the design of in-molded attachment clips on plastic parts. The paper explores the design process for in-molded attachment clips starting with a design concept idea, testing the basic concept using a personal 3D printer, optimizing the design with physical tests and CAE analysis, and finally producing high resolution 3D prototypes for validation and tuning.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1393
Georges Beurier, Michelle Cardoso, Xuguang Wang
A new experimental seat was designed to investigate sitting biomechanics. Previous literature suggested links between sitting discomfort and shear forces, however, research on this topic is limited. The evaluation of sitting discomfort derived from past research has been primarily associated with seat pressure distribution. The key innovative feature of the experimental seat is not only pressure distribution evaluation but shear forces as well. The seat pan of the experimental seat compromises of a matrix of 52 cylinders, each equipped with a tri-axial force sensor, enabling us to measure both normal and shear forces. The position of each cylinder is also adjustable permitting a uniform pressure distribution underneath the soft tissue of the buttocks and thighs. Backrest, armrests, seat pan and flooring are highly adjustable and equipped with forces sensors to measure contact forces.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1390
Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Jangwoon Park, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, K. Han Kim, Matthew P. Reed
Seat fit is characterized as the spatial relationship between the seat and the sitter’s anthropometric dimensions. Seat surface pressure distribution is one of the best available quantitative measures of the interaction between occupant and seat interface. The relationship between areas of contact or pressure and seat fit has not been well established. The objective of this study is to model seat pressure distribution as a function of the dimensions of the seat and the sitter’s body. A laboratory study was conducted using 12 production driver seats from passenger cars and light trucks. Thirty-eight men and women sat in each seat in a driving mockup. Seat surface pressure distribution was measured on the seatback and cushion. Standard anthropometric dimensions were recorded for each participant and standardized dimensions based on SAE J2732 were acquired for each test seat.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0491
Hyerin Choi, Jaeyong Ko, JunHo Song, SeungKeon Woo
Recently, it is one of a major problem in automotive industry that wrinkles on seat interior occur at detaching between seat covering and padding material. To laminate seat trim cover and padding material is applied to thermoplastic composite material such as Web Hot Melt. Flame lamination is also using for seat trim cover and padding material lamination but it can be only applied on polyurethane padding and makes toxic substance. The purpose of this research verifies and suggests the way to improve seat appearance and heat resistance using polyurethane reactive (PUR) material of thermosetting plastic. Viscosity and melting temperature can be adjusted coating amount on padding material unlike traditional method to coat leather. We develop PUR that works on thin film at padding material and find optimum situation (method and amount) for seat trim cover and padding material. PUR is cross-linked by moisture concentration in the air and pressure.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1309
S. M. Akbar Berry, Hoda ElMaraghy, Johnathan Line, Marc Kondrad
Modularity in product architecture and its importance in product development has become a critical discussion topic in the last few decades. Several Product Modularity definitions and prospects were discussed by many researchers, however, most of the definitions and concepts are proliferated such that it is difficult to apply one universal definition to every modular product architecture and in product development. Automotive seat modular design and key factors for consideration towards modular seat design and assemblies are the main objectives of this work. The primary objectives are focused around the most “natural segmentation” of the seat elements (i.e., cushions, backs, trims, plastics, head restraints, etc.) to enable the greatest ease of final assembly and greatest flexibility for scalable feature offerings around common assembly “hard-points.”
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1474
Raed E. El-Jawahri, Agnes Kim, Dean Jaradi, Rich Ruthinowski, Kevin Siasoco, Cortney Stancato, Para Weerappuli
Sled testing simulating a full-frontal rigid barrier impacts were conducted using the Hybrid III 5th female and the 50th male anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). The ATDs were positioned in the outboard rear seat of a generic small car environment. Two belt configurations were used: 1) a standard belt with no load limiter or pre-tensioner and 2) a seatbelt with a 4.5 kN load-limiting retractor with a stop function and a retractor pre-tensioner (LL-PT). In the current study, the LL-PT belt system reduced the peak responses of both ATDs. Probabilities of serious-to-fatal injuries (AIS3+), based on the ATDs peak responses, were calculated using the risk curves in NHTSA’s December 2015 Request for Comments (RFC) proposing changes to the United States New Car Assessment Program (US-NCAP). Those probabilities were compared to the injury rates (IRs) observed in the field on aggregate and point estimate bases.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0406
Jindong Ren, Xiaoming Du, Tao Liu, Honghao Liu, Meng Hua, Qun Liu
This paper presented an integrated method for rapid modeling, simulation and virtual evaluation of the interface pressure between driver human body and seat. For the simulation of the body-seat interaction and the calculation of the interface pressure, in addition to body dimensions and material characteristics, an important aspect was the posture and position of the driver body with respect to the seat. The correct simulation results could be acquired only by realistic setting of the body posture, by introducing posture prediction models. To ensure accommodation of the results to the target population, usually several individuals were simulated, whose body anthropometries covered the scope of the whole population. The multivariate distribution of the body anthropometry and the sampling techniques were adopted to generate the individuals and to predict the detailed body dimensions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1308
Abhishek Softa, Anuj Shami, Rajdeep Singh Khurana
Abstract The fuel efficiency of a vehicle depends on multiple factors such as engine efficiency, type of fuel, aerodynamic drag, and tire friction and vehicle weight. Analysis of weight and functionality was done, to develop a lightweight and low-cost Roof rack rail. The Roof rack rail is made up of a lightweight material with thin cross section and has the design that allows the fitment of luggage carrier or luggage rack on the car roof. In starting this paper describes the design and weight contribution by standard Roof rack rail and its related parts. Secondly, the selection of material within different proposed options studied and a comparison of manufacturing and design-related factors. Thirdly, it has a description of the design of Roof rack rail to accommodate the luggage carrier fitment on the car roof. Moreover, optimizations of Roof rack rail design by continuous change in position, shape, and parts used.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1395
Se Jin Park, Murali Subramaniyam, Seunghee Hong, Damee Kim, Tae Hyun Kim, Dong Woo Cho, Bum Il Shim
Abstract Seat cushions are considered as one of the important factors influence the seating comfort. In the automotive seat cushions, flexible polyurethane foams have been widely used due to the cushioning performance. Automotive seat designers are paying more attention to the improvement of seat cushion properties. This study introduces an automotive seat that uses an air-mat in the seat cushion along with polyurethane foam. The air-mat can be adjusted with its internal air pressure. The objective of this paper is to examine air-mat seat pressure level on seating comfort. Vibration experiments have been performed on the BSR simulator with random vibration. Tri-axial accelerometers were used to measure vibration at the foot and hip. All measured vibration were about the vertical direction (z-axis). The whole-body vibration exposure parameters (weighted root-mean-square (RMS), vibration dose value (VDV), transmissibility (SEAT value)) were calculated per ISO 2631-1 standard.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1392
Abhilash CHOUBEY, RAJESH PAL, Kotanageswararao Puli, Pankaj Maheshwari, Sandeep Raina
Abstract The seating system is an inseparable part of any automobile. Its main function is not only to provide a space to the user for driving but also to provide support, comfort and help to ergonomically access the various features and necessary operations of the vehicle. For comfort and accessibility, seats are provided with various mechanisms for adjustments in different directions. Typical mechanisms used for seating adjustment include seatback recliners, lifters (height adjusters), longitudinal adjusters, lumber support, rear seat folding mechanism etc. These mechanisms can be power operated or manual based on vehicle/market requirements. For manual mechanisms, the occupant adjusts the position of seat by operating the mechanism with his/her hand. Often comfort to the occupant during operation is limited to the operating effort of the mechanism. However, as will be shown through this study, operating effort is only one of the parameters which provide overall comfort feeling.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1389
Ankush Kamra, Sandeep Raina, Pankaj Maheshwari, Abhishek Agarwal, Prasad Latkar
Abstract Automotive seating is designed by considering safety, comfort and aesthetics for the occupants. Seating comfort is one of the important parameters for the occupant for enhancing the overall experience in a vehicle. Seating comfort is categorized as static (or showroom) comfort and dynamic comfort. The requirements for achieving static and dynamic comfort can sometimes differ and may require design parameters such as PU hardness to be set in opposite directions. This paper presents a case wherein a base seat with good dynamic comfort is taken and an analysis is done to improve upon the static comfort, without compromising on the dynamic comfort. The study focuses on improving the initial comfort by considering various options for seating upholstery.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1388
S. M. Akbar Berry, Michael Kolich, Johnathan Line, Waguih ElMaraghy
Abstract Thermal comfort in automotive seating has been studied and discussed for a long time. The available research, because it is focused on the components, has not produced a model that provides insight into the human-seat system interaction. This work, which represents the beginning of an extensive research program, aims to establish the foundation for such a model. This paper will discuss the key physiological, psychological, and biomechanical factors related to perceptions of thermal comfort in automotive seats. The methodology to establish perceived thermal comfort requirements will also be presented and discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1391
Heather Bronczyk, Michael Kolich, Marie-Eve Cote
Abstract Load deflection testing is one type of test that can be used to understand the comfort performance of a complete trimmed automotive seat. This type of testing can be conducted on different areas of the seat and is most commonly used on the seatback, the seat cushion and the head restraint. Load deflection data can be correlated to a customer’s perception of the seat, providing valuable insight for the design and development team. There are several variables that influence the results obtained from this type of testing. These can include but are not limited to: seat structure design, suspension system, component properties, seat materials, seat geometry, and test set-up. Set-up of the seat for physical testing plays a critical role in the final results. This paper looks at the relationship of the load deflection data results on front driver vehicle seatbacks in a supported and unsupported test set-up condition.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0497
Byoung-Keon Daniel Park, Matthew P. Reed
Abstract Reliable, accurate data on vehicle occupant characteristics could be used to personalize the occupant experience, potentially improving both satisfaction and safety. Recent improvements in 3D camera technology and increased use of cameras in vehicles offer the capability to effectively capture data on vehicle occupant characteristics, including size, shape, posture, and position. In previous work, the body dimensions of standing individuals were reliably estimated by fitting a statistical body shape model (SBSM) to data from a consumer-grade depth camera (Microsoft Kinect). In the current study, the methodology was extended to consider seated vehicle occupants. The SBSM used in this work was developed using laser scan data gathered from 147 children with stature ranging from 100 to 160 cm and BMI from 12 to 27 kg/m2 in various sitting postures.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0492
Mahendra Beera, Dinesh Pahuja, Arpit Kapila, Rajat Handa, Sandeep Raina
Abstract Plastic plays a major role in automotive interiors. Till now most of the Indian automobile industries are using plastics mainly to cover the bare sheet metal panels and to reduce the weight of the vehicle along with safety concerns. Eventually Indian customer requirement is changing towards luxury vehicles. Premium look and luxury feel of the vehicle plays an equal role along with fuel economy and cost. Interior cabin is the place where aesthetics and comfort is the key to attract customers. Door Trims are one of the major areas of interiors where one can be able to provide premium feeling to the customer by giving PVC skin and decorative inserts. This paper deals with different types of PVC skins and its properties based on process constraints, complexity of the inserts. Door trim inserts can be manufactured by various methods like adhesive pasting, thermo-compression molding and low pressure injection molding process etc.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0170
Aditya Velivelli, Daniel Guerithault, Stefan Stöwe
ABSTRACT
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0493
Li Lu, Sean West, Stacey Raines, Jin Zhou, Paul Hoke, Yi Yang Tay
Traditionally, Knee Air Bag (KAB) is constructed of a woven nylon or polyester fabric. Recently, Ford developed an injection molded air bag system for the passenger side called Active Glove Box (AGB). This system integrates a bladder welded between the glove box outer and inner door. This new system is smaller and lighter, thus improving the roominess and other creature comforts inside the passenger cabin, while providing equivalent restraint performance as traditional knee airbag system. This patented technology allows positioning of airbags in new locations within the vehicle, thus giving more freedom to designers. The first application of this technology will be standard equipment on the 2015 Ford Mustang. Given that this technology is first in industry, it was a challenge to design, test and evaluate the performance of the system as there is no benchmark to compare the technology against. To overcome this challenge, a CAE driven design methodology was chosen.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1305
Yucheng Liu, Jeremy Batte, Zachary Collins, Jennifer Bateman, John Atkins, Madelyn Davis, David Salley, Cindy L. Bethel, John Ball, Christopher Archibald
Abstract A robot mining system was developed by the State Space Robotic undergraduate student design team from Mississippi State University (MSU) for the 2016 NASA Robotic Mining Competition. The mining robot was designed to traverse the Martian chaotic terrain, excavate a minimum of 10 kg of Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes as part of the competition. A Systems Engineering approach was followed in proceeding with this design project. The designed mining robot consisted of two major components: (1) mechanical system and (2) control system. This paper mainly focuses on the design and assessment process of the mechanical system but will also briefly mention the control system so as to evaluate the designed robotic system in its entirety. The final designed robot consisted of an aluminum frame driven by four motors and wheels. It utilized a scoop and lifting arm subsystem for collecting and depositing Martian regolith.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1302
Hyung In Yun, Jae Kyu Lee, Jae Hong Choi, MyoungKwon Je, Junhyuk Kim
Abstract A sliding door is one of the car door systems, which is generally applied to the vans. Compared with swing doors, a sliding door gives comfort to the passengers when they get in or out the car. With an increasing number of the family-scale activities, there followed a huge demand on the vans, which caused growing interests in the convenience technology of the sliding door system. A typical sliding door system has negative effects on the vehicle interior package and the operating effort. Since the door should move backward without touching the car body, the trajectory of the center rail should be a curve. The curve-shaped center rail infiltrates not only the passenger shoulder room, but also the opening flange curve, which results in the interior package loss. Moreover, as the passenger pulls the door outside handle along the normal direction of the door outer skin, the curved rail causes the opening effort loss.
2017-02-03
WIP Standard
ARP6199B

This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is only applicable to 14 CFR part 25 Transport Airplane passenger seats. This document provides an approach for determining which parts on aircraft seats are required to meet the test requirements of 14 CFR part 25 Appendix F, Parts IV and V. Such materials are referred to as Heat Release Special Conditions (HRSC) compliant]. Additionally, it is recommended to use HRSC compliant materials in applications where not required.

Independent furniture related to seat installations is outside the scope of this document.

CURRENT
2017-02-02
Standard
ARP6199A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is only applicable to 14 CFR part 25 Transport Airplane passenger seats. This document provides an approach for determining which parts on aircraft seats are required to meet the test requirements of 14 CFR part 25 Appendix F, Parts IV and V. Such materials are referred to as Heat Release Special Conditions (HRSC) compliant]. Additionally, it is recommended to use HRSC compliant materials in applications where not required. Independent furniture related to seat installations is outside the scope of this document.
2017-01-12
WIP Standard
ARP5765B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines a means of assessing the credibility of computer models of aircraft seating systems used to simulate dynamic impact conditions set forth in Federal Regulations §14 CFR Part 23.562, 25.562, 27.562, and 29.562. The ARP is applicable to lumped mass and detailed finite element seat models. This includes specifications and performance criteria for aviation specific virtual anthropomorphic test devices (v-ATDs). A methodology to evaluate the degree of correlation between a seat model and dynamic impact tests is recommended. This ARP also provides testing and modeling best practices specific to support the implementation of analytical models of aircraft seat systems. Supporting information within this document includes procedures for the quantitative comparison of test and simulation results, as well as test reports for data generated to support the development of v-ATDs and a sample v-ATD calibration report.
CURRENT
2017-01-03
Standard
ARP583J
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance for the design and location of cabin crew stations, including emergency equipment installations at or near such stations, so as to enable the cabin crew to function effectively in emergency situations, including emergency evacuations. Recommendations regarding design of cabin crew stations apply to all such stations; recommendations regarding location apply to those stations located near or adjacent to floor level exits.
2016-12-28
WIP Standard
AS8049D

This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines minimum performance standards, qualification requirements, and minimum documentation requirements for passenger and crew seats in civil rotorcraft, transport aircraft, and general aviation aircraft. The goal is to achieve comfort, durability, and occupant protection under normal operational loads and to define test and evaluation criteria to demonstrate occupant protection when a seat/occupant/restraint system is subjected to statically applied ultimate loads and to dynamic impact test conditions set forth in the applicable Federal Regulations 14 CFR 23, 25, 27, or 29.

Guidance for test procedures, measurements, equipment, and interpretation of results is also presented to promote uniform techniques and to achieve acceptable data.

While this document addresses system performance, responsibility for the seating system is divided between the seat supplier and the installation applicant.

2016-12-14
WIP Standard
AS6316
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) documents a common understanding of terms, compliance issues and occupant injury criteria to facilitate the design and certification of oblique facing passenger seat installations specific to Part 25 aircraft.
CURRENT
2016-12-13
Standard
AS8049/1B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines Minimum Performance Standards (MPS), qualification requirements, and minimum documentation requirements for side-facing seats in civil rotorcraft, transport aircraft, and general aviation aircraft. The goal is to achieve comfort, durability, and occupant protection under normal operational loads and to define test and evaluation criteria to demonstrate occupant protection when a side-facing seat/occupant/restraint system is subjected to statically applied ultimate loads and to dynamic test conditions set forth in Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 23, 25, 27, or 29. While this document addresses system performance, responsibility for the seating system is divided between the seat supplier and the installation applicant. The seat supplier’s responsibility consists of meeting all the seat system performance requirements and obtaining and supplying to the installation applicant all the data prescribed by this document.
2016-11-09
Book
This title includes the technical papers developed for the 2016 Stapp Car Crash Conference, the premier forum for the presentation of research in impact biomechanics, human injury tolerance, and related fields, advancing the knowledge of land-vehicle crash injury protection. The conference provides an opportunity to participate in open discussion about the causes and mechanisms of injury, experimental methods and tools for use in impact biomechanics research, and the development of new concepts for reducing injuries and fatalities in automobile crashes. The topics covered this year include: • Head/brain biomechanics • Thorax, spine, and pelvis biomechanics • Foot-Ankle Biomechanics • Injury and effect of directional impacts • Pedestrian and cyclist injury factors and testing • Commercial truck and pedestrian accidents factors and testing
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