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Viewing 1 to 20 of 20
2017-06-19
Video
Automatic Emergency Braking, or AEB, uses radar to monitor a vehicle's closeness to the vehicle ahead. If it detects a frontal collision, the system warns the driver. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at Nissan and Toyota's announcement to make AEB standard on nearly all of their 2018 U.S. models. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show.
2017-06-14
Video
Soon, new vehicles will be able to communicate back and forth with each other and with traffic signals. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at the V2I capabilities of Cadillac's CTS. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show.
2016-09-26
Video
As self-driving "robot" vehicles begin to enter the roadways in a few years, the technology's ethical issues are being discussed. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at the important issues facing autonomous vehicles. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering.
2016-06-29
Video
As new vehicles become more connected to the internet, to other cars, and to the road infrastructure, the number of potential intrusion points for hackers is growing fast. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-in-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at new vehicle cybersecurity products. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering.
2015-12-18
Video
Big changes are coming to the government's 5-Star Safety Rating system for new vehicles. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Senior Editor Lindsay Brooke looks at the new ratings aimed at making crash testing more accurately represent real-world crashes. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering at: http://www.sae.org/magazines/podcasts.
2015-12-08
Video
Electric and hybrid vehicles driving at low speeds are so quiet they can pose a danger to sight-impaired pedestrians crossing the street. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Senior Editor Lindsay Brooke looks at the U.S. government plans to require electrified vehicles emit a warning sound when traveling less than 18 mph. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering at: http://www.sae.org/magazines/podcasts.
2015-04-16
Video
“Spotlight on Design: Insight” features an in-depth look at the latest technology breakthroughs impacting mobility. Viewers are virtually taken to labs and research centers to learn how design engineers are enhancing product performance/reliability, reducing cost, improving quality, safety or environmental impact, and achieving regulatory compliance. Automated driving is made possible through the data acquisition and processing of many different kinds of sensors working in unison. Sensors, cameras, radar, and lidar must work cohesively together to safely provide automated features. In the episode “Automated Vehicles: Converging Sensor Data” (8:01), engineers from IAV Automotive Engineering discuss the challenges associated with the sensor data fusion, and one of Continental North America’s technical teams demonstrate how sensors, radars, and safety systems converge to enable higher levels of automated driving.
2015-02-01
Video
"Spotlight on Design" features video interviews and case study segments, focusing on the latest technology breakthroughs. Viewers are virtually taken to labs and research centers to learn how design engineers are enhancing product performance/reliability, reducing costs, improving quality, safety or environmental impact, and achieving regulatory compliance. Sensors are essential to the safety, efficiency, and dependability of modern vehicles. Crash sensors can anticipate a collision faster than humans would, and tire pressure sensors can alert the driver or pilot in case action is needed. In the episode “Sensors: Advanced Safety” (20:36) Continental engineers look at the evolution of passive safety systems, discuss the changes in sensors over the last ten years and what is coming next. Engineers at Meggitt demonstrate how tire pressure monitoring system sensors for aerospace are built and tested.
2012-09-18
Video
ISO 26262 is the first comprehensive automotive safety standard that addresses the safety of the growing number of electric/electronic and software intensive features in today's road vehicles. This paper assesses the standard's ability to provide safety assurance. The strengths of the standard are: (1) emphasizing safety management and safety culture; (2) prescribing a system engineering development process; (3) setting up a framework for hazard elimination early in the design process; (4) disassociating system safety risk assessment from component probabilistic failure rate. The third and fourth strengths are noteworthy departure from the philosophy of IEC61508. This standard has taken much-needed and very positive steps towards ensuring the functional safety of the modern road vehicles. SAE publications from industry show a lot of enthusiasm towards this standard.
2012-05-29
Video
Historically, studies by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in support of CAF� rulemaking indicate that lightweighting vehicles lead to degraded safety. However, recent studies provided to NHTSA show that good designs for lightweighting can provide equivalent safety. This presentation highlights two studies funded by NHTSA in part to address these latest findings. The first is a George Washington University study, �Investigate Opportunities for Lightweighting Vehicles Using Advanced Plastics and Composites.� The second is an Electricore study, �Mass Reduction for Light-Duty Vehicles for Model Years 2017-2015. The findings presented include that it is possible to lightweight vehicles and provide equivalent safety and that costs drive designers toward the use of advanced metals.
2012-05-22
Video
Software products in the automotive industry are by nature widely distributed and costly to update (recall), so high reliability is clearly of utmost importance. Just as clearly, the increasing reliance on remote access to such systems, for diagnostic and other purposes, has made security an essential requirement, and traditional techniques for software development are proving to be inadequate in dealing with these issues. Correctness by Construction is a software design and development methodology that builds reliability and security into the system from the start. It can be used to demonstrate, with mathematical rigor, a program's correctness properties while reducing the time spent during testing and debugging. This paper will discuss the use of Correctness by Construction, and its accompanying SPARK language technology, to improve automotive systems' security and reliability. (The approach can also account for safely issues, although that is not the focus of this paper.)
2012-05-22
Video
There is a need to accelerate the automotive industry's alert notification and distribution process for quality, reliability, counterfeit, and safety issues that reside in specific electronic components or circuit card assemblies. This paper describes an alert procedure for an entire supply chain that can improve operational efficiency and reduce the costs associated with responding to and resolving those issues. Interoperability: Ability to work with each other. It is frequently unnecessary for separate resources to know the details of how they each work. But they need to have enough common ground to reliably exchange messages quickly without error or misunderstanding. Presenter William Crowley, QTEC Inc.
2012-05-22
Video
The CAN protocol has served the automotive and related industries well for over twenty-five (25) years now; with the original CAN protocol officially released in 1986 followed by the release of CAN 2.0 in 1991. Since then many variants and improvements in CAN combined with the proliferation of automotive onboard microprocessor based sensors and controllers have resulted in CAN establishing itself as the dominant network architecture for automotive onboard communication in layers one (1) and two (2). Going forward however, the almost exponential growth of automotive onboard computing and the associated devices necessary for supporting said growth will unfortunately necessitate an equivalent growth in the already crowded wired physical infrastructure unless a suitable wireless alternative can be provided. While a wireless implementation of CAN has been produced, it has never obtained real traction within the automotive world.
2012-05-22
Video
ISO 26262 is the actual standard for Functional Safety of automotive E/E (Electric/Electronic) systems. One of the challenges in the application of the standard is the distribution of safety related activities among the participants in the supply chain. In this paper, the concept of a Safety Element out of Context (SEooC) development will be analyzed showing its current problematic aspects and difficulties in implementing such an approach in a concrete typical automotive development flow with different participants (e.g. from OEM, tier 1 to semiconductor supplier) in the supply chain. The discussed aspects focus on the functional safety requirements of generic hardware and software development across the supply chain where the final integration of the developed element is not known at design time and therefore an assumption based mechanism shall be used.
2012-05-17
Video
The ISO 26262, titled "Road vehicles - Functional safety," is a Functional Safety standard that gives a guidance to reduce the risks to tolerable level by providing feasible requirements and processes. This standard is an adaptation of the Functional Safety standard IEC 61508 for Automotive Electrical/Electronic and programmable electronic Systems. The standard covers the development of safety-related electrical, electronic and programmable electronics systems in the road vehicles. It will have a significant impact on the way such systems are designed, developed, integrated and validated for safety. Functional safety of embedded systems has become an integral part in automotive engineering activities due to the recently released safety standard ISO 26262. One main challenge is to perform development activities compliant to the standard and provide the respective documentation.
2012-05-17
Video
Multicore processor are well established in classical and tablet personal computers for some year. Such processors use more then one central core for computation and allow to integrate more computational power with smaller costs. However more than 90% of all processors worldwide are not placed in classical IT but are empedded in bigger systems like in modern vehicles or airplanes. Such systems face a very high demand in terms of safety, security an reliability which hinders the use of multicores in such systems. The funded project ARAMiS faces these demands and has the goal to enable the usability of multicore systems in the domains automotive and avionics, as well as later also railway. ARAMiS is the basis for higher traffic safety, traffic efficiency and comfort.
2012-03-21
Video
The Java language is now the most popular programming language for the creation of new software capabilities. Its popularity has resulted in signficant economies of scale, with Java adopted as the primary language of instructional within many university curriculums, an abundance of reusable Java software components and Java software development tools available both from commercial suppliers and as open source technology, a large pool of competent Java developers from which to recruit staff, and a general willingness by senior staff software engineers to invest the effort required to learn this new programming language and technology. This talk describes the special approaches recommended for the use of Java in safety-critical deployments. The talk surveys the current state of the draft JSR-302 Safety Critical Java Specification and describes related experiences with commercially available technologies based on the constraints of early JSR-302 design discussions.
2012-02-14
Video
Technical Keynote: Reflections over the Development of ISO 26262 Presenter Joseph D. Miller, TRW Automotive US LLC
2012-01-23
Video
Need for worldwide harmonization of regulations. Presenter James Vondale, Ford Motor Co.
2011-11-17
Video
When vehicles share certain information wirelessly via Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC), they enable a new layer of electronic vehicle safety that, when needed, can generate warnings to drivers and even initiate automatic preventive actions. Vehicle location and velocity provided by Global Navigation Systems (GNSS), including GPS, are key in allowing vehicle path estimation. GNSS is effective in accurately determining a vehicle's location coordinates in most driving environments, but its performance suffers from obstructions in dense urban environments. To combat this, augmentations to GNSS are being contemplated and tested. This testing has been typically done using a reference GNSS system complimented by expensive military-grade inertial sensors, which can still fail to provide adequate reference performance in certain environments.
Viewing 1 to 20 of 20