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Viewing 181 to 210 of 17076
2016-04-12
Technical Paper
2016-01-7000
Daniel P. Malone, John F. Creamer
In 1966, Congress boldly reshaped the American approach to road safety and thereby established the United States as the worldwide leader in vehicle safety. Congressional action led to the establishment of the Department of Transportation, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, and the motor-vehicle safety defects and recall system. However, the safety environment that gave rise to these responses has evolved substantially. Fifty years later, the United States is unable to properly regulate rapidly advancing safety technologies, and the recall system is wholly unsuited to ensuring the safety of software-driven systems. Congress must act to update the road safety system in order to enable the United States to meet the challenges and seize the opportunities of the new transportation era.
2016-04-11
Article
Automakers are increasingly employing digital crash test dummies made of zeroes and ones to take the big hits in virtual vehicles.
2016-04-08
Magazine
Software's role continues to expand Design teams use different technologies to create new software and link systems together. Emissions regulations and engine complexity With the European Commission announcing a Stage V criteria emissions regulation for off-highway, scheduled to phase-in as earlly as 2019, there will be an end to a brief era of harmonized new-vehicle regulations. Will this affect an already complex engine development process? Evaluating thermal design of construction vehicles CFD simulation is used to evaluate two critical areas that address challenging thermal issues: electronic control units and hot air recirculation.
2016-04-07
Article
Annual New York Auto Show Traffic Safety Symposium points to high fatality and injury rate among teens, while University of Bridgeport design school students propose technology solutions and Ford discusses impaired driving simulator "suits.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
ARP6199A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides an approach for determining which parts on aircraft seats are non-traditional, large, non-metallic panels that need to meet the test requirements of 14CFR Part 25 Appendix F, Parts IV & V.
2016-04-06
WIP Standard
AS85352A
This specification covers a direct reading, remote control, pneumatic pressure inflator assembly, for use on aircraft tires and struts having pneumatic pressure requirements up to 600 psi. It includes pressure relief provisions for safe inflation. Also included are dual chuck stem gages for measuring tire pressure.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1525
Anil Kalra, Kartik Somasundram, Ming Shen, Vishal Gupta, Clifford C. Chou, Feng Zhu
Abstract Numerical models of Hybrid III had been widely used to study the effect of underbody blast loading on lower extremities. These models had been primarily validated for automotive loading conditions of shorter magnitude in longer time span which are different than typical blast loading conditions of higher magnitude of shorter duration. Therefore, additional strain rate dependent material models were used to validate lower extremity of LSTC Hybrid III model for such loading conditions. Current study focuses on analyzing the mitigating effect of combat boots in injury responses with the help of validated LSTC Hybrid III model. Numerical simulations were run for various impactor speeds using validated LSTC Hybrid III model without any boot (bare foot) and with combat boot.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1534
Rudolf Reichert, Pradeep Mohan, Dhafer Marzougui, Cing-Dao Kan, Daniel Brown
Abstract A detailed finite element model of a 2012 Toyota Camry was developed by reverse engineering. The model consists of 2.25M elements representing the geometry, thicknesses, material characteristics, and connections of relevant structural, suspension, and interior components of the mid-size sedan. This paper describes the level of detail of the simulation model, the validation process, and how it performs in various crash configurations, when compared to full scale test results. Under contract with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Center for Collision Safety and Analysis (CCSA) team at the George Mason University has developed a fleet of vehicle models which has been made publicly available. The updated model presented is the latest finite element vehicle model with a high level of detail using state of the art modeling techniques.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1539
Do Hoi KIm
Abstract Given the importance of vehicle safety, OEMs are focused on ensuring the safety of passengers during car accidents. Injury is related to the passenger’s kinematics and interaction with airbag, seatbelt, and vehicle drop. However, the correlation between vehicle drop (vehicle pitch) and passengers’ injury is the main issue recently being discussed. This paper presents the definition of vehicle drop and analyzes the relationship through a dynamic sled test. This study defines the relationship between individual vehicle systems (body, chassis, tire, etc.) and vehicle drop, and how to control the amount of vehicle drop to minimize the injury of passengers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1538
Vaibhav V. Gokhale, Carl Marko, Tanjimul Alam, Prathamesh Chaudhari, Andres Tovar
Abstract This work introduces a new Advanced Layered Composite (ALC) design that redirects impact load through the action of a lattice of 3D printed micro-compliant mechanisms. The first layer directly comes in contact with the impacting body and its function is to prevent an intrusion of the impacting body and uniformly distribute the impact forces over a large area. This layer can be made from fiber woven composites imbibed in the polymer matrix or from metals. The third layer is to serve a purpose of establishing contact between the protective structure and body to be protected. It can be a cushioning material or a hard metal depending on the application. The second layer is a compliant buffer zone (CBZ) which is sandwiched between two other layers and it is responsible for the dampening of most of the impact energy.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1520
Gunti R. Srinivas, Anindya Deb, Clifford C. Chou
Abstract The present work is concerned with the objective of design optimization of an automotive front end structure meeting both occupant and pedestrian safety requirements. The main goal adopted here is minimizing the mass of the front end structure meeting the safety requirements without sacrificing the performance targets. The front end structure should be sufficiently stiff to protect the occupant by absorbing the impact energy generated during a high speed frontal collision and at the same time it should not induce unduly high impact loads during a low speed pedestrian collision. These two requirements are potentially in conflict with each other; however, there may exist an optimum design solution, in terms of mass of front end structure, that meets both the requirements.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1511
Jan Vychytil, Ludek Hyncik, Jaroslav Manas, Petr Pavlata, Radim Striegler, Tomas Moser, Radek Valasek
Abstract In this work we present the VIRTHUMAN model as a tool for injury risk assessment in pedestrian crash scenarios. It is a virtual human body model formed of a multibody structure and deformable segments to account for the mechanical response of soft tissues. Extensive validation has been performed to ensure its biofidelity. Due to the scaling algorithm implemented, variations in the human population in terms of height, weight, gender and age can be considered. Assessment of the injury risk is done via automatic evaluation software developed. Injury criteria for individual body parts are evaluated using accelerations, forces and displacements of certain points. Injury risk is indicated by the colour of particular body parts in accordance with NCAP rating. A real accident is investigated in this work. A 60-year-old female was hit laterally by a passenger vehicle with the impact velocity of 40 km/h. The accident is reconstructed using VIRTHUMAN as pedestrian representative.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0046
Markus Ernst, Mario Hirz, Jurgen Fabian
Abstract A steady increasing share and complexity of automotive software is a huge challenge for quality management during software development and in-use phases. In cases of faults occurring in customer’s use, warranty leads to product recalls which are typically associated with high costs. To avoid software faults efficiently, quality management and enhanced development processes have to be realized by the introduction of specific analysis methods and Key Process/Performance Indicators (KPIs) to enable objective quality evaluations as soon as possible during product development process. The paper introduces an application of specific analysis methods by using KPIs and discusses their potential for automotive software quality improvement. Target is to support quality evaluation and risk-analysis for the release process of automotive software.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0114
Chris Schwarz, Timothy Brown, John Lee, John Gaspar, Julie Kang
Abstract Distracted driving remains a serious risk to motorists in the US and worldwide. Over 3,000 people were killed in 2013 in the US because of distracted driving; and over 420,000 people were injured. A system that can accurately detect distracted driving would potentially be able to alert drivers, bringing their attention back to the primary driving task and potentially saving lives. This paper documents an effort to develop an algorithm that can detect visual distraction using vehicle-based sensor signals such as steering wheel inputs and lane position. Additionally, the vehicle-based algorithm is compared with a version that includes driving-based signals in the form of head tracking data. The algorithms were developed using machine learning techniques and combine a Random Forest model for instantaneous detection with a Hidden Markov model for time series predictions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0119
Preeti J. Pillai, Veeraganesh Yalla, Kentaro Oguchi
Abstract This paper is an extension of our previous work on the CHASE (Classification by Holistic Analysis of Scene Environment) algorithm, that automatically classifies the driving complexity of a road scene image during day-time conditions and assigns it an ‘Ease of Driving’ (EoD) score. At night, apart from traffic variations and road type conditions, illumination changes are a major predominant factor that affect the road visibility and the driving easiness. In order to resolve the problem of analyzing the driving complexity of roads at night, a brightness detection module is incorporated in our end-to-end nighttime EoD system, which computes the ‘brightness factor’ (bright or dark) for that given night-time road scene. The brightness factor along with a multi-level machine learning classifier is then used to classify the EoD score for a night-time road scene.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0124
Andrew Scott Alden, Brian Mayer, Patrick Mcgowen, Rini Sherony, Hiroyuki Takahashi
Abstract Animal-vehicle collision (AVC) is a significant safety issue on American roads. Each year approximately 1.5 million AVCs occur in the U.S., the majority of them involving deer. The increasing use of cameras and radar on vehicles provides opportunities for prevention or mitigation of AVCs, particularly those involving deer or other large animals. Developers of such AVC avoidance/mitigation systems require information on the behavior of encountered animals, setting characteristics, and driver response in order to design effective countermeasures. As part of a larger study, naturalistic driving data were collected in high AVC incidence areas using 48 participant-owned vehicles equipped with data acquisition systems (DAS). Continuous driving data including forward video, location information, and vehicle kinematics were recorded. The respective 11TB dataset contains 35k trips covering 360K driving miles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0150
Felix Pistorius, Andreas Lauber, Johannes Pfau, Alexander Klimm, Juergen Becker
Abstract Various algorithms such as emergency brake or crash warning using V2X communication have been published recently. For such systems hard real-time constraints have to be satisfied. Therefore latency needs to be minimized to keep the message processing delay below a certain threshold. Existing V2X systems based on the IEEE 1609 and SAE J2735 standards implement most message processing in software. This means the latency of these systems strongly depends on the CPU load as well as the number of incoming messages per time. According to safety constraints all messages of nearby vehicles have to be processed, whereby no prediction of the message importance can be given without analyzing the message content. Regarding the aforementioned requirements we propose a novel architecture that optimizes latency to satisfy the hard real-time constraints for V2X messages.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0136
Deepak Gangadharan, Oleg Sokolsky, Insup Lee, BaekGyu Kim, Chung-Wei Lin, Shinichi Shiraishi
Abstract Optional software-based features (for example, to provide active safety, infotainment, etc.) are increasingly becoming a significant cost driver in automotive systems. In state-of-the-art production techniques, these optional features are built into the vehicle during assembly. This does not give the customer the flexibility to choose the specific set of features as per their requirement. They either have to buy a pre-bundled option that may or may not satisfy their preferences or are unable to find an exact combination of features from the inventory provided by a dealership. Alternatively, they have to pre-order a car from the manufacturer, which could result in a substantial delay. Therefore, it is important to improve the flexibility of delivering the optional features to customers. Towards this objective, the vehicle could be configured with the desired options at the dealership, when the customer requires them.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0163
Thomas Rothermel, Jürgen Pitz, Hans-Christian Reuss
Abstract This paper proposes a framework for semi-autonomous longitudinal guidance for electric vehicles. To lower the risk for pedestrian collisions in urban areas, a velocity trajectory which is given by the driver is optimized with respect to safety aspects with the help of Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC). Safety aspects, such as speed limits and pedestrians on the roadway, are considered as velocity and spatial constraints within prediction horizon in NMPC formulation. A slack variable is introduced to enable overshooting of velocity constraints in situations with low risk potential to rise driver acceptance. By changing the weight of slack variable, the control authority can be shifted continuously from driver to automation. Within this work, a prototypical real-time implementation of the longitudinal guidance system is presented and the potential of the approach is demonstrated in human-in-the-loop test drives in the Stuttgart Driving Simulator.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0162
Takashi Kodachi, Masaharu Shimizu, Hideaki Yamato, Kengo Toda, Takayuki Furuta, Hirotoshi Ochiai, Mitsuhiro Ando
Abstract Our society is faced with the serious problems such as aging population growth, environmental pollution and limited energy resource issues. As a means to address these issues, we are developing new mobility vehicles designed to support short-distance trips in urban settings. These mobility vehicles are intended for use in pedestrian areas inside buildings as well as outside, including public roads. In order to ensure safe and convenient operation for both pedestrians and mobility users, we conducted a risk assessment of mobility vehicles in pedestrian areas, and then developed a feature to autonomously limit the speed according to their surrounding conditions. This report discusses the utility of these mobility vehicles with the safety functions based on the fully conducted risk assessment, collision test and performance evaluation in public roads.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0456
Zhaozhong Zhang, Dongpu Cao
Abstract One main objective is to find out how these parameters interact and optimal driver control gain and driver preview time are obtained. Some steps further, neuromuscular dynamics is considered and the system becomes different from the simplified driver-vehicle system studied before. New optimal driver control gain and driver preview time could be obtained for both tensed and relaxed muscle state. Final step aims at analysing the full system considering driver, neuromuscular, steer-by-wire and vehicle models. The steer-by-wire system could potentially have a significant influence on the vehicle when the driver is at impaired state, which could be represented by setting higher response delay time or smaller preview time. Vehicle's stability and active safety could also be improved by introducing the steer-by-wire system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0402
Eric S. Elliott, Christopher Roche, Jashwanth Reddy
Since the inception of the IIHS Small Overlap Impact (SOI) test in 2012, automotive manufacturers have implemented many solutions in the vehicle body structure to achieve an IIHS “Good” rating. There are two main areas of the vehicle: forward of vehicle cockpit and immediately surrounding the vehicle cockpit, which typically work together for SOI to mitigate crash energy and prevent intrusion into the passenger zones. The structures forward of vehicle cockpit are designed to either 1) absorb vehicle energy from impact to the barrier, or 2) provide enough strength and rigidity to aid deflection of the vehicle away from the barrier. The structures which are immediately surrounding the vehicle cockpit (known as pillars and rocker/sills) are traditionally components designed to be highly rigid sheet metal panels to protect the occupant during crash events.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0398
Yuqing Zheng, Xichan Zhu, Xueqing Dong
Abstract To overcome some drawbacks of using AHSS (Advanced High Strength Steel) in vehicle weight reduction, like brittleness, spot weld HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) softening and high cost, a new ridgeline strengthening technology was introduced and applied to the thin-walled structure in this paper. The energy absorption mechanism of thin-walled box structure with selective strengthened ridgelines under axial compressing load was discussed in first section. After this, the formulas of mean crushing force and corresponding energy absorption for square tube were theoretically discussed. To demonstrate prediction capabilities of formulas, a set of FE simulations of square tubes were conducted. Simulation results show that energy absorption capacity of square tube under quasi-static axial crushing load is dramatically improved by selectively strengthening their ridgelines.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1518
Carolyn W. Roberts, Jacek Toczyski, Jack Cochran, Qi Zhang, Patrick Foltz, Bronislaw Gepner, Jason Kerrigan, Mark Clauser
Abstract Multiple laboratory dynamic test methods have been developed to evaluate vehicle crashworthiness in rollover crashes. However, dynamic test methods remove some of the characteristics of actual crashes in order to control testing variables. These simplifications to the test make it difficult to compare laboratory tests to crashes. One dynamic method for evaluating vehicle rollover crashworthiness is the Dynamic Rollover Test System (DRoTS), which simulates translational motion with a moving road surface and constrains the vehicle roll axis to a fixed plane within the laboratory. In this study, five DRoTS vehicle tests were performed and compared to a pair of unconstrained steering-induced rollover tests. The kinematic state of the unconstrained vehicles at the initiation of vehicle-to-ground contact was determined using instrumentation and touchdown parameters were matched in the DRoTS tests.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2015-01-9152
André Lundkvist, Arne Nykänen, Roger Johnsson
Abstract Many of the information systems in cars require visual attention, and a way to reduce both visual and cognitive workload could be to use sound. An experiment was designed in order to determine how driving and secondary task performance is affected by the use of information sound signals and their spatial positions. The experiment was performed in a driving simulator utilizing Lane Change Task as a driving scenario in combination with the Surrogate Reference Task as a secondary task. Two different signal sounds with different spatial positions informed the driver when a lane change should be made and when a new secondary task was presented. Driving performance was significantly improved when both signal sounds were presented in front of the driver. No significant effects on secondary task performance were found. It is recommended that signal sounds are placed in front of the driver, when possible, if the goal is to draw attention forward.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1604
Anton Kabanovs, Max Varney, Andrew Garmory, Martin Passmore, Adrian Gaylard
Abstract This paper focuses on methods used to model vehicle surface contamination arising as a result of rear wake aerodynamics. Besides being unsightly, contamination, such as self-soiling from rear tyre spray, can degrade the performance of lighting, rear view cameras and obstruct visibility through windows. In order to accurately predict likely contamination patterns, it is necessary to consider the aerodynamics and multiphase spray processes together. This paper presents an experimental and numerical (CFD) investigation of the phenomenon. The experimental study investigates contamination with controlled conditions in a wind tunnel using a generic bluff body (the Windsor model.) Contamination is represented by a water spray located beneath the rear of the vehicle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1527
Paul Podzikowski, Suk Jae Ham, John Cadwell, Aviral Shrivatri
Abstract The introduction of a revised New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) frontal crash test in the US has been challenging due to more stringent Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) rating metrics such as neck injury (Nij). These ATD responses in full vehicle tests may be under-predicted with conventional linear sleds because they are not capable of reproducing the pitching effect seen in some vehicle tests. The primary objective of this study was to confirm the effects of pitching sled on front passenger 5th %ile female ATD Nij response by comparing prototype vehicle test to pitching sled and linear sled tests. A second objective was to confirm that newly introduced pitching sled with enhanced pitching capability was able to reproduce similar vehicle kinematics when compared to a baseline vehicle test.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0050
Huafeng Yu, Chung-Wei Lin, BaekGyu Kim
Abstract Modern vehicles can have millions of lines of software, for vehicle control, infotainment, etc. The correctness and quality of the software play a key role in the safety of whole vehicles. In order to assure the safety, engineers give an effort to prove correctness of individual subsystems or their integration using testing or verification methods. One needs to eventually certify that the developed vehicle as a whole is indeed safe using the artifacts and evidences produced throughout the development cycle. Such a certification process helps to increase the safety confidence of the developed software and reduce OEM’s liability. However, software certification in automotive domain is not yet well established, compared to other safety-critical domains, such as avionics and medical devices. At the same time, safety-relevant standards and techniques, including ISO 26262 and assurance cases, have been well adopted.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0149
Mehdi Jalalmaab, Mohammad Pirani, Baris Fidan, Soo Jeon
In this paper, a consensus framework for cooperative parameter estimation within the vehicular network is presented. It is assumed that each vehicle is equipped with a dedicated short range communication (DSRC) device and connected to other vehicles. The improvement achieved by the consensus for parameter estimation in presence of sensor’s noise is studied, and the effects of network nodes and edges on the consensus performance is discussed. Finally, the simulation results of the introduced cooperative estimation algorithm for estimation of the unknown parameter of road condition is presented. It is shown that due to the faster dynamic of network communication, single agents’ estimation converges to the least square approximation of the unknown parameter properly.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1510
Chinmoy Pal, Tomosaburo Okabe, Kulothungan Vimalathithan, Jeyabharath Manoharan, Pratapnaidu Vallabhaneni, Munenori Shinada, Kazuto Sato
Abstract Many active safety systems are being developed with the intent of protecting pedestrians namely; pedestrian airbags, active hood, active emergency braking (AEB), etc. Effectiveness of such protection system relies on the efficiency of the sensing systems. The pop-uphood system was developed to help reduce pedestrian head injuries. A pop-up system is expected to make full deployment of the hood before the pedestrian’s head could hit the hood. The system should have the capability to detect most road users ranging from a six year old (6YO) child to a large male. To test the sensing system, an impactor model (PDI-2) was developed. Sensor response varies for vehicles with different front end profile dimensions.
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