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1966-10-01
Standard
ARP907
This recommended practice covers the requirements and qualification tests for two types of flexible all-metal hose assemblies intended for hydraulic use on missile and rocket applications at rated pressures of 4000 psi. Type I -65° to +650°F service temperature range Type II -65° to +1000°F service temperature range
1966-10-01
Magazine
1966-10-01
Standard
J885A_196610
This report reviews current quantitative data on human tolerance levels without recommending specific limits. Data developed on humans (including cadavers) are presented where available; however, in many cases animal data are provided where no suitable human results have been reported. This report confines itself, as much as possible, to information of direct use to the automotive designer and tester. Data of only academic interest are largely omitted; therefore, J885 should not be considered as a complete summary of all available biomechanical data. Most of the data cited in this report applies to adult males since little information is available on women or children. The summary data provided in the tables should be considered with the accompanying descriptive test. This material explains the manner in which the data were obtained and provides an insight as to their limitations.
1966-08-15
Standard
ARP842A
This recommended practice sets forth the design objectives for handling qualities applicable to transport aircraft operating in the subsonic, transonic and supersonic speed range. These objectives are not necessarily applicable to rotor or VTOL aircraft.
1966-08-01
Standard
J966_196608
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a test procedure for determining passenger car tire revolutions per mile. It is intended to supplement SAE J678.
1966-08-01
Standard
AIR818A
This Aerospace Information Report, (AIR) is intended to provide the sponsors of Aerospace Standards, (AS), with standard wording, formatting, and minimum environment and design requirements for use in the preparation of their document. The individual shall use only those parts of this AIR which apply to their particular document. The individual sponsor may expand the standard wording, especially under Sections 4, 5, and 6 as required. The paragraphs of this AIR shall be used verbatim wherever possible. Unless otherwise directed by SAE, cross referenced documents shall be called out by specific revision letter, e.g. "shall be in accordance with AS XXXXB." In addition, all non-SAE documents called out shall include the document title when initially identified. However, every effort shall be made to keep cross-referencing to an absolute minimum.
1966-08-01
Standard
ARP699C
This Recommended Practice is intended to outline the design, installation, testing, and field maintenance criteria for a high temperature metal pneumatic duct system, for use as a guide in the aircraft industry. These recommendations are to be considered as currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time, as a result of the rapid development of the industry.
1966-08-01
Magazine
1966-07-15
Standard
ARP743A
This method describes the procedure for (1) sampling air in contamination controlled spaces for air-borne particulate contamination 5µ or greater in size and for (2) the microscopic determination of the concentration and size range distribution of the particulate material removed from the air sample.
1966-07-01
Standard
J697A_196607
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended as a guide for manufacturers and users of trailers, specifically full trailer(s) and/or converter dollies. Its inclusion in state, federal, or any laws or regulations where flexibility of revision is lacking is discouraged. Emergency safety is the basis of this recommendation. This SAE Recommended Practice covers the number, location, and method of attachment of safety chains for full trailers and/or converter dollies.
1966-07-01
Magazine
1966-06-20
Standard
AIR764A
This technical report documents three surveys to determine realistic vibration requirements for skid control systems specifications and obtain updated vibration information for locations in aircraft where skid control system components are mounted.
1966-06-01
Standard
J964_196606
This test procedure is intended for use in measuring the reflectance of rear view mirrors.
1966-06-01
Standard
AS428
This standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for exhaust gas temperature instruments primarily for use with turbine powered, subsonic aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in paragraph 3.3 et seq. The exhaust gas temperature instruments covered by this standard are of the electrical servonull balance type, actuated by varying emf output of one or more parallel connected Chromel-Alumel thermocouples.
1966-06-01
Magazine
1966-05-25
Standard
AS567C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers devices whose primary function is the retention of fasteners, except for such devices that are integral with the item being retained. The practices cover the types of retaining devices described in the following sections: a. Section 3: safety cable and safety wire; b. Section 4: key washers; and c. Section 5: cotter pins. The purpose of this standard is to establish the requirements and basic principles for retaining fasteners and other parts in aerospace propulsion systems.
1966-05-01
Standard
AS1043A
No scope available.
1966-04-01
Standard
AIR512
This document covers the general recommendations for cabin lighting in order to provide satisfactory illumination for, but not limited to: a. Boarding and deplaning b. Movement about the cabin c. Reading d. Use of lavatories e. Use of work areas f. Exiting under emergency conditions g. Using stowage compartments, coat rooms, and closets h. Using interior stairways and elevators (lifts)
1966-03-01
Standard
ARP917
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) sets forth general specifications for the location, accessibility and restraint for those items of survival, emergency, and miscellaneous equipment which are intended to be used by the operating flight crew, and which are stowed on or near the flight deck.
1966-03-01
Magazine
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660317
Robert B. Meyersburg
Realistic assessment of the role of V/STOL air transportation in the 1970’s is important to government transportation policies being formulated. Studies of a system, including the vehicle, airport, air traffic, and navigation facilities, were conducted in a specific market -- the California Corridor. Four VTOL aircraft representing various concepts were designed to a common set of requirements. These aircraft, one STOL, a conventional jet aircraft, and a conventional helicopter, were operated in a simulated airline network. Costs and revenues were compared to those of conventional jet aircraft operating on the same airline network. Ground transportation systems were assessed, including the automobile which is a formidable opponent on shorter routes. However, the STOL/VTOL systems by virtue of their convenience and overall speed, capture some traffic from other transportation means and generate new customer markets.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660319
George Litchford, John E. Gallagher
The inauguration of true city center schedules coupled with the tremendous response from the traveling public and the continuing increase in passenger seat mile revenues for over a decade of VTOL scheduled air carrier service is evidence of the public need and confirmation of a continuing expansion of operations. Future research and development will be directed at reducing operating costs and improving schedule regularity on trip lengths that vary from the very short inter-airport to city distances to upwards of a hundred miles. The airframe manufacturers are already building helicopters large enough to carry 45 to 65 passengers and if adequate progress can be made in reducing direct operating costs (and thereby lowering seat mile costs), helicopters will become a common mode of air transportation in the very short-haul market. One significant advantage of VTOL air transportation is the flexibility of service patterns that can be provided.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660310
W. E. Helfrich
One of the problems associated with long part life in aircraft jet engines is wear in nonlubricated mating parts resulting from vibration, fretting, impact, or sliding during engine operation. A significant improvement in the life of engine parts subject to this type of wear can be achieved by coating mating surfaces with protective, wear resistant materials. Numerous plasma sprayed and detonation flame plated coatings have been developed for this purpose. Successful use of the plasma sprayed coatings in these applications is dependent on development of the necessary coating properties and strict control of the coating process. Engine experience with both types of protective coatings has been most successful when coatings are tailored to the environment and type of wear encountered.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660658
L. Yates
Considerations governing the selection of superalloys and refractory alloys for the fabrication of high-performance reentry vehicles are discussed. Oxidation resistant coatings were evaluated to determine their capacity to protect faying surfaces. The performance of the R-512A coating under simulated reentry conditions is reported.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660653
C. P. Boebel, S. J. Babjak
Newer concepts of thermal control coatings involving tailored optical properties are compared with the paints and coatings presently used on spacecraft. Emphasis is also given to evaluation and measurement techniques specifically dealing with the combined spatial environmental effects facility. Into a facility of the type both exposure and intermittant “in situ” optical measurements can be performed under an ultra high vacuum. A brief discussion of damage mechanisms is included along with a description of a computerized data retrieval system based on optical properties. Researchers in this aerospace field have high hopes for significant advances in the next several years through advanced materials and composites, “in situ” evaluation and measurement techniques, and computerized optical data retrieval for thermal control designers.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660660
S. Priceman, L. Sama
A recently developed high temperature oxidation protective coating system for columbium and tantalum alloys is described and characterized. Oxidation test data and mechanical property data are given which indicate the suitability of these coatings as thermal protective materials for use in multicycle earth re-entry vehicles. The inherent capability of this coating to be uniformly applied to practically any size or shape part, or even to intricate sheet metal assemblies, is demonstrated. Several types of coated components are illustrated as examples of the adaptability of the process to complex full scale aerospace hardware.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660583
Merlin Hansen
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660582
E. W. TANQUARY
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660539
Louis C. Lundstrom
The National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966, now under development by Congress, provides for the establishment of motor vehicle safety standards. In anticipation of the development of new standards, engineers in the SAE and in industry are planning ahead, collecting additional safety test information and analyzing designs and data. Computers are playing an increasingly important role in this work. The results of such work will assist the safety engineer in determining the true value of proposed safety standards and whether the proposed changes in vehicle design will actually result in an improvement in safety for the passenger.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660536
J. L. Fulton
This paper compares the performance of seat belts and shoulder Harnesses in high-performance vehicles used in hazardous traffic assignments by the Los Angeles Police Department. Results are positive in favor of the harness, and support the predictions of effectiveness reported in the many research and test projects concerned with restraining devices. Also discussed are the steps taken in the design and field testing of vehicle occupant “packaging.” A basic question is raised: Can or will the harness replace the seat belt in the near future?
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