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1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640317
Donald W. Conover
Cockpit design of modern highspeed aircraft has become greatly complicated by the need for providing sufficient visual field coverage for the pilot during take-off and landing. This paper is concerned with the problem of specifying minimum required down angles for forward and side vision from the cockpit. A method based on theoretical assumptions is presented, and includes a formula that considers the various factors involved.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640318
John P. Stapp, Frank M. Townsend
Jet transport means vastly increased velocities at takeoff, flight, and landing. These velocities build up correspondingly high kinetic energy that increases the hazards of crash landings if not dissipated. But jet safety design standards have changed little from those of the piston engine, even though there are sufficient statistics available for design purposes. In addition, the limits of human tolerance to injury have been determined with sufficient precision to provide minimum standards for safety equipment. If these data were applied to modern aircraft design, many fatalities occurring today could be prevented.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640799
K. A. Stonex
Abstract The single-car accident contributes nearly 42% of the highway traffic accident fatalities, or an average currently of nearly 16,000 deaths. A review of fatal accident statistics from 1900 through 1962 shows that the number of fatal accidents increased rapidly between 1920 and 1930 by more than 2000 per year, that a sharp break occurred around 1930, and that the average increase since then has been less than 500 per year. A comparable long-range review of passenger car improvements shows significant reduction in height, development of enclosed bodies with safety glass, vastly improved brakes and lighting systems and many others. Development in steering and control has concentrated on making it possible to keep out of accidents, and recently, a great deal has been achieved in “packaging the passenger.”
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640828
Arthur G. Gross
Abstract A general dissertation on the factors relating to accidental door opening, including: nomenclature, classification of the various types of loading of significance; description of five known causes of accidental door opening not associated with door latch strength; supporting evidence from full-scale collision research; photographic display of 1964 model door latches; review of the factors relating to the evaluation of door latch installation and three suggested test configurations to cover the most significant causes of accidental door opening.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640785
Stanley R. Mohler, John J. Swearingen, Ernest B. McFadden, J. D. Garner
Abstract This paper presents newly discovered principles concerning human factors in emergency evacuation of aircraft following survivable accidents. A comprehensive summary and evaluation of all known emergency evacuation tests through December 1963 is presented. Human factors data resulting from tests conducted between July 1963 and February 1964 in CARI's 132,000 gal indoor ditching pool, under extreme conditions of lighting, and at Lake Tenkiller in eastern Oklahoma are presented. Also, land tests were conducted using new escape devices, including the “Telescape” device. Lack of familiarity with emergency equipment on the part of the crew, plus certain equipment design defects, doubled the escape times, and in certain instances resulted in unsuccessful escapes. Designs enabling a minimum escape time of 90 sec are recommended for future civil aircraft.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640316
Herbert C. Spicer, Donald W. Voyls, Donald F. Carroll
Two full scale crash safety tests of transport aircraft are being conducted to study take-off and landing accidents wherein speeds and loads do not exceed survivable limits. The wings and fuselage are being extensively instrumented to measure loads, accelerations, and fuel pressures. Secondary experiments are also being carried out on board. The data will be used to improve impact protection and to reduce the possibility of fire after impact. A general discussion of the results of the first test is presented.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640525
L C. Keene, L O. Gilmore, B. C. Hawkins, K. B. Olsen
This paper outlines the requirements and definitions for lower landing minimums applicable to four-engine jets, associated economics, methods to meet the requirements, and results of the existing program at American Airlines. The emphasis is on coupled approaches and the requirements to accomplish Phase II (minimum weather condition of 100 ft ceiling and/or visibility of 1300 ft).
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640512
David D. Thomas
Accident prevention is one of the FAA's prime statutory responsibilities. Some of the efforts in carrying out these responsibilities are described in this paper, and the following FAA programs are briefly explained: (1) an air carrier maintenance system of establishing airworthiness alert values so that timely maintenance can be performed, (2) outline of a concentrated program to prevent false fire warnings, (3) development and expansion of positive control in Air Traffic Service, (4) flight checking of airline captains by special trained inspectors, (5) participating in CAB-FAA schooling on accident investigation, and (6) dissemination of safety literature in the general aviation field.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640511
Vernon A. Taylor
This interim report compares 135 approach and landing accidents that have occurred in calendar years 1959-1963 with the original study, “Critical Factors in Approach and Landing Accidents,” prepared for the Flight Safety Foundation by Otto E. Kirchner. The accidents contained in this paper represent 56% of the total number presently under study by the Flight Safety Foundation and to be included in a final report.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640522
Bernard C. Doyle, John J. Carroll
Post crash factors which effect survival are discussed in this paper. The two most dangerous hazards in an otherwise survivable accident are drowning and post crash fire, therefore rapid evacuation is crucial. Provisions for such evacuation are described. Case histories of airplane ditching and evacuation are presented and the attendant difficulties detailed.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640520
James W. Turnbow, J. L. Haley
The present area of knowledge of the factors pertinent to the design of crashworthy aircraft seats is briefly reviewed. Ultimate design load factors, based upon human tolerance to decelerative load, and anticipated loads in accident situations for three types of aircraft, are presented. The value of energy absorbing devices for seats is also discussed.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640123
Louis C. Lundstrom, Alonzo H. Kelly, Donald J. LaBelle
The Impact Sled, a full-scale laboratory facility which simulates vehicle accidents, has been in use at the General Motors Proving Ground since late 1962. This paper describes the facility and supporting instrumentation, and reviews some of the many types of tests that were run in the first year of operation. These range from tests of complete vehicles loaded with passenger dummies to tests of single components such as seat belts, seat adjusters, door locks, and windshields. This new research tool, which produces results comparable to those of the classical barrier impact test, has proved to be a valuable and versatile addition to the automotive testing facilities at the Proving Ground.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640107
D. O. Gunson
The safety concepts applicable to the design of the primary systems for the new generation high performance business aircraft are presented and discussed. The systems designs employed in the Lockheed JetStar are used as examples of how these concepts are applied to achieve the high level of operational safety demanded by business operators.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640562
Brig. Gen. Jay T. Robbins
The background leading to the evolution and publication of MIL-S-38130 (USAF), its objectives, major provisions and effects are discussed in this paper. The Mil Spec will provide contractors with a uniform guide with which to assess potential safety hazards in all systems and sub-systems, and analyze actions to reduce such hazards. The heart of the safety engineering effort by contractors is a seven-step System Safety Engineering Plan.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS519
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS518
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS530
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS529
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS526
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS522
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS523
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
AS520
No scope available.
1963-12-15
Standard
ARP726
This recommended practice covers a self-contained detection system which is capable of pressurizing a closed system up to 70 psig with halogen (tracer) gas and up to 3500 psig with nitrogen. An external tracer gas supply may be used to increase the capacity of the system. The detector shall be capable of detecting leaks as small as .05 ounce of tracer gas per year, with a system pressure of 70 psig or less. The purpose of this document is to provide a recommended practice for the design of a universal leak detector which will pressurize a closed system with a mixture of inert and tracer gas and provide a probe and detector to indicate location and rate of system leakage with a high degree of accuracy.
1963-12-01
Standard
ARP699B
This Recommended Practice is intended to outline the design, installation, testing, and field maintenance criteria for a high temperature metal pneumatic duct system, for use as a guide in the aircraft industry. These recommendations are to be considered as currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time, as a result of the rapid development of the industry.
1963-11-01
Standard
AIR764
This technical report documents three surveys to determine realistic vibration requirements for skid control systems specifications and obtain updated vibration information for locations in aircraft where skid control system components are mounted.
1963-10-01
Magazine
1963-09-01
Standard
AIR797
This document lists military and industry specifications and standards which are used in aerospace systems and for ground servicing equipment. The characteristic limitations of the hose, which are of major importance to designers, and the sizes in which the hoses are standard are shown. Revisions and amendments, which are current for these specifications and standards are not listed.
1963-08-30
Standard
AS408B
This Aerospace Standard covers two basic types of fuel, oil and hydraulic pressure instruments as follows: Type I - Direct Indicating Type II - Remote Indicating. This Aerospace Standard does not apply to engine mounted torque meter systems.
1963-08-15
Standard
ARP461B
In order to ease the equipment design engineer's problem and at the same time provide a basis for comparing measurements by manufacturer and user this recommended practice sets up standard test procedures for acceptance testing. These conditions and the basic tests to which the characteristics refer are grouped in Section 2 and compose a complete list of defining characteristics of the synchro. Specifications written around synchros have specified certain necessary characteristics for production acceptance testing, such as null voltage and accuracy, under test conditions and techniques that are mainly and properly concerned with accuracy and the shortest possible test time. These characteristics are inherently degraded when the synchro is operating for a period of time at other than room temperature. In synchros this degradation is a factor of high importance
1963-08-01
Standard
AS756
No scope available.
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