Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 15391 to 15420 of 15829
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630220
Capt. H. D. Mann
Today's aircraft carrier must be prepared to operate high performance aircraft in all extremes of weather, day or night. This requirement poses the most complex problem in air traffic control known today. To realize the advantages of modern aircraft, minimum time in flight must be utilized in the control and handling processes. The system of control must be tuned to the highest performance of the men and material concerned. The costs of mistakes allow no margin for error. This presentation covers the techniques of controlling today's carrier aircraft in a high performance environment.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630192
H. S. Simpson
Competitive forces of business, social legislation, public opinion, and operating costs are making employers consider the human factors as a definite part of design criteria for implements, tools, or systems. Consideration of human factors in the design can reduce accidents, make the operator more comfortable, and increase his efficiency.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630237
Robert L. Paullin, Edward B. Heyl
This paper points out the need for emergency evacuation of air transports involved in accidents which result in cabin interiors becoming uninhabitable. Recent transport experience in accidents, involving ditchings and accidents, involving fire following impact are cited to illustrate the importance of the evacuation system. It is pointed out that aircraft designs often result in configurations which make expeditious egress arduous. As an attempt at improving overall occupant safety, it is suggested that emergency evacuation provisions be designed and tested from a system and maximum time limit viewpoint.
1963-01-01
Technical Paper
630265
Otto E. Kirchner
The purpose of this paper is to bring together for review the several safety aspects of air transport design and operation. The aspects discussed consist of items that do not fall readily into any major airline group or classification and which are generally of a controversial nature. Due credit is given to the remarkable maintenance, operation, and control of military aircraft. Crash evacuation (and in-flight evacuation), pilot limitations, and design specifications in relation to safety practices are among the topics discussed.
1963-01-01
Standard
J853_196301
This SAE Standard has been established to provide direction for the design and installation of a Vehicle Identification Number assigned to a passenger car or truck. In adhering to these standards, facility of application in factory production and appearance are matters for manufacturer control.
1962-12-01
Standard
AIR746
This document supplements ARP85, to extend its use in the design of ECS for supersonic transports. The ECS provides an environment controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals and equipment. These limits include pressure, temperature, humidity, conditioned air velocity, ventilation rate, thermal radiation, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.) of the environment. The ECS is comprised of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute conditioned air to the occupied compartments. This system is defined within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 21. It interfaces with the pneumatic system (Chapter 36 of ATA 100), at the inlet of the air conditioning system shutoff valves.
1962-10-30
Standard
AS516
No scope available.
1962-10-30
Standard
AS515
No scope available.
1962-10-30
Standard
AS517
No scope available.
1962-10-30
Standard
AS534
No scope available.
1962-10-30
Standard
AS532
No scope available.
1962-10-30
Standard
AS533
No scope available.
1962-10-15
Standard
ARP577A
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides criteria for the development and standardization of placards containing easily understood signs, symbols and/or instructions for locating and operating exits and emergency equipment which might be used or operated by cabin occupants and rescue personnel under emergency conditions. In addition, this ARP gives guidance in the selection and development of warning labels. The placards are intended to be seen and understood by occupants within and, in the case of external exit placards, by persons outside the airplane. The purpose of this ARP is to assist manufacturers as well as commercial, corporate and private operators to produce standardized emergency placarding.
1962-10-15
Standard
ARP583A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance for the design and location of flight attendant stations, including emergency equipment installations at or near such stations, so as to enable the flight attendant to function effectively in emergency situations, including emergency evacuations. Recommendations regarding design of flight attendant stations apply to all such stations; recommendations regarding location apply to those stations located near or adjacent to floor level exits.
1962-08-30
Standard
ARP743
This method describe the procedure for (1) sampling air in contamination controlled spaces for air-borne particulate contamination 5u or greater in size and for (2) the microscopic determination of the concentration and size range distribution of the particulate material removed from the air sample.
1962-08-15
Standard
ARP503A
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides criteria for design and location of power supplies, controls, light fixtures, and associated equipment which are used to provide emergency illumination in transport aircraft, designed to comply with FAR 25 (Ref. 1) for operation under FAR 91 (Ref. 11) and FAR 121 (Ref. 2), and also in compliance with FAA Advisory Circulars AC25.812-1A (Ref. 3) and AC25.812-2 (Ref. 10). It is not the purpose of an ARP to specify design methods to be followed in the accomplishment of the stated objectives.
1962-08-01
Standard
J800A_196208
This SAE Recommended Practice provides general installation instructions for aftermarket, universal type seat belt assemblies for installation in passenger cars, trucks, buses, and multipurpose passenger vehicles. This SAE document is intended to provide guidance in the installation of seat belt assemblies meeting the requirements of Part 571.209 of Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations as established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
1962-07-01
Standard
AS425A
This Standard is intended to establish preferred abbreviations for use on panels, controls, instruments, displays, placards and markings. The recommendations apply to terms used in the flight deck of transport aircraft. The abbreviations, symbols and codes do not supersede those used in airworthiness regulations or aeronautical charts and documents. Where conflict is possible the operational context must be such as to resolve any ambiguity. If doubt exists, an alternative abbreviation or less truncated abbreviation should be used.
1962-06-30
Standard
ARP499A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes a method for classifying the frequencies of analysis of solutions used in the processing of metals, such as electroplating, anodizing, and conversion coating and associated processes but usage is not limited to such applications. This document is intended to establish a periodic test plan that may be used by processors to satisfy the requirement of an Aerospace Material Specification (AMS) for a chemical processing solution periodic test plan as a control factor.
1962-06-01
Magazine
1962-05-01
Magazine
1962-03-01
Standard
AS446
This Aerospace Standard covers three basic types of cargo compartment fire detector instruments. Basic Types - Definition of: Type I: Carbon Monoxide, an instrument which will actuate an alarm siganl when the concentration of carbon monoxide in air exceeds a specified value. Type II: Smoke Detector, Electronic, an instrument operating on the principle of smoke particles modifying the relationsihp between a light beam and electronic light sensor which will actuate an alarm signal when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value. Type III: Smoke Detector, Visual, an instrument whcih by visual means will show in a positive manner the presence of smoke when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value.
1962-03-01
Standard
AS420B
This Aerospace Standard establishes essential minimum safe performance standards for Flight Director instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aerospace Standard covers Flight Directors for use on aircraft to indicate to the pilot, by visual means, the correct control application for the operation of an aircraft in accordance with a pre-selected flight plan.
1962-03-01
Standard
J587A_196203
This SAE Standard provides test procedures, requirements, and guidelines for vehicular license plate illumination devices.
1962-02-15
Standard
AS400A
This Aerospace Standard covers three basic types of cargo compartment fire detector instruments. Basic Types - Definition of: Type I: Carbon Monoxide, an instrument which will actuate an alarm signal when the concentration of carbon monoxide in air exceeds a specified value. Type II: Smoke Detector, Electronic, an instrument operating on the principle of smoke particles modifying the relationship between a light beam and electronic light sensor which will actuate an alarm signal when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value. Type III: Smoke Detector, Visual, an instrument which, by visual means, will show in a positive manner the presence of smoke when the concentration of smoke in air exceeds a specified value.
1962-02-01
Standard
AS431A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers three basic types of true mass flow indicating instruments. Each may consist of an indicator, transmitter and other auxiliary means such as a power supply or amplifier as required. This Aerospace Standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for True Mass Fuel Flow Instruments primarily for use with turbine powered, subsonic transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3.
1962-01-01
Standard
ARP680A
This recommended practice covers a series of stands that may be used for assembly, disassembly and maintenance; incorporating the following design criteria: a collapsible frame construction, envelope dimensions, attachment shear pad configuration and gear box and caster specifications. To provide a recommended practice for the design of a series of build-up stands which will be adaptable to small propulsion units (excluding those units requiring special assembly) and/or all propulsion unit components for the specified classes.
1962-01-01
Standard
ARP695
This Aerospace Recommended Practice provides criteria for design with respect to overall safety, particularly to afford minimum risk exposure to flight attendants and passengers from injuries due to: A. Routine use of galley installations B. Galley components becoming dislodged under routine or abnormal operating conditions and under survivable crash or ditching conditions C. Malfunctions of, or defects in, galleys or associated galley equipment. NOTE: It is not the purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice to specify the design methods or specific design to be followed in the accomplishment of the stated objectives.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620441
H. F. Jordon
Helicopters have attained a new stage in rescue operations. From being used primarily to retrieve and transport crash victims, they have now emerged as an integrated airborne crash fire rescue system by virtue of the development of especially designed helicopters, specialized equipment, and refined techniques. This integrated system is presently being used as a primary means of rescuing aircraft crash survivors from post crash fires, especially where surface rescue equipment is not immediately available. Examples of rescues are presented.
Viewing 15391 to 15420 of 15829

Filter

  • Article
    492
  • Book
    105
  • Collection
    42
  • Magazine
    617
  • Technical Paper
    10009
  • Standard
    4564