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1967-10-01
Standard
AS971
No scope available.
1967-10-01
Magazine
1967-10-01
Standard
AS972
No scope available.
1967-09-01
Magazine
1967-09-01
Standard
ARP926
This document provides guidance in performing Failure/Fault Analyses in relatively low complexity systems. Methodologies and processes are presented and described for accomplishing Failure/Fault Analyses. ARP4761 provides updated methods and processes for use on civil aircraft safety assessment. When analyzing these types of systems, ARP4761 should be used in lieu of this ARP.
1967-08-01
Standard
ARP997
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to establish criteria for the installation of emergency equipment that shall permit its efficient use and encourage standardization, thereby reducing reorientation of crewmembers to equipment accessibility while working on differing types, models, and series of transport-category aircraft. This does not preclude the requirement to pre-flight check all emergency equipment relative to its location, availability, and operational status.
1967-08-01
Standard
ARP682A
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides recommendations intended for standardization of safety lap belts without hindering the development of new, improved design. The purpose is not to specify the design methods or specific mechanism to accomplish the objectives.
1967-08-01
Magazine
1967-08-01
Standard
J673A_196708
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to cover current safety glazing practice applicable to safety glasses for use in motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment. Nominal specifications for thickness, flatness, curvature, size, and fabrication details are included principally for the guidance of body engineers and designers. For additional information on safety glazing materials for use in motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment, see SAE J674.
1967-07-01
Standard
ARP435
This Aerospace Recommended Practice establishes performance standards for overspeed warning instruments primarily for use with turbine powered subsonic transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in paragraph 3.4. This ARP covers an electro-mechanical pneumatic device which is calibrated to provide control contacts that can be made to operate a warning device whenever the indicated airspeed (IAS) reaches a maximum value as defined by the operating limit speed curve for the specific model aircraft.
1967-07-01
Magazine
1967-07-01
Standard
J994_196707
The scope of this SAE Standard is the definition of the functional, environmental, and life cycle test requirements for electrically operated backup alarm devices primarily intended for use on off-road, self propelled work machines as defined by SAE J1116 (limited to categories of 1) construction, and 2) general purpose industrial). This purpose of this document is to define a set of performance requirements for backup alarms, independent of machine usage. The laboratory tests defined in this document are intended to provide a uniform and repeatable means of verifying whether or nor a test alarm meets the stated requirements. For on-machine requirements and test procedures, refer to SAE J 1446.
1967-05-15
Standard
ARP488
null, null
The purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to provide design recommendations for passenger cabin entry doors, service doors, and emergency exits. The objective is to have a reliable system standardized to make operation of the exits simple, quick and obvious to all occupants under normal and emergency conditions and facilitate qualification of cabin attendants for different airplanes. NOTE: It is not the purpose of this ARP to specify the design method or specific mechanism to accomplish the objectives.
1967-05-01
Magazine
1967-04-01
Magazine
1967-03-31
Standard
ARP899
This ARP establishes the basic test and design requirements for permanently attached tube fittings for use in aerospace fluid systems. Definitions of fitting and related terms are included in 6.3. This document recommends the tooling envelope, design criteria, and test requirements for tube fittings attached to tubing by methods which are usually considered to be permanent (brazing, welding, swaging, shrink fit, etc.).
1967-03-01
Magazine
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670683
Thomas J. Lebel
This paper presents a new tool to aid the members of the Systems Safety discipline in the performance of their duties. The RAIDS System has been established as a solution to the problem of data storage and retrieval in the field. Its use is based upon the “real world” of problem solving which is (or should be) the foundation of systems safety. The paper calls attention to the fact that many reference tools and specialized publications are used to identify aerospace safety data. Following identification acquisition, technical evaluation of the data is judged vital to the quality and quantity of the collection. The data are then organized according to a logical pattern and processed to be user-oriented. Storage of the data then takes three basic forms, each chosen to form an arrangement suited- to the final form of data presentation. Retrieval is accomplished in several distinct manners, each benefiting the type of information and the problem solution required.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670667
Robert W. Newton, John F. Krey
This paper describes the System Safety Engineering Program of the AH-56A. The three most important aspects of setting up a proper program; the safety organization, control of safety effort, and the personnel requirements are discussed. An example of the failure-effects method of analysis, which is the method found most suitable for the AH-56A, is given. This example includes all of the worksheets used in conducting the analysis. Both the original design of the example (the fuel system), and the design as changed as a result of conducting the failure-effects analysis are shown. Finally, the quarterly safety reviews held between Lockheed and the Army are discussed. The procedures for conducting the meetings, personnel attending the reviews, as well as the manner in which the Army reviews and supplies their inputs into the safety program, are discussed.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670826
Clifton F. von Kann
Several aspects of V/STOLs for short-haul transportation are considered: production time needed to produce a craft with suitable operational characteristics, profitable operation, noise, safety and reliability, air traffic system control, landing facilities, passenger comfort, marketability, size. The author urges that a joint effort by military and civilian departments of the government and industry be undertaken to develop a V/STOL transport system. Factors to be considered are discussed.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670897
Dennis N. Renneker
Simplified mathematical modeling has been employed to investigate the relationship between automobile forestructure energy absorption and the restraint loads applied to passengers during a 30 mph barrier collision. A two-massmodel was developed and validated to compute restraint loading from a given passenger compartment deceleration. The effect of various deceleration curves, representing forestructure modifications, is reported. A “constant force” restraint system is also evaluated.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670895
R. J. Melosh, D. M. Kelley
The potential for rapid and precise predictions of car crash response lies in recent developments of computer-augmented structural analysis techniques. The essential step required is to develop and validate a mathematical and numerical simulation. This step is impeded by the complexity of the car structure and equation solution, the extensive calculations, and inadequacies in basic data. Test data indicate that no major technical advances are required. An economical analysis capability could be developed in less than 6 months.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670905
Lawrence S. Higgins, Robert A. Schmall
The major contribution of this effort to the investigation of head injury is the design and construction of a machine having the following functional goals: 1. Delivery of a reproducible acceleration-time profile to a primate head. 2. Capability of increasing the acceleration magnitude while retaining a similar acceleration-time profile. 3. The path traversed by the head must be constrained during the acceleration. 4. The forces applied to the head must be distributed so as not to produce gross damage to the brain or skull. The machine that has evolved is designated as the Head Acceleration Device II (HAD-II). Basically, this machine consists of an axial cam cut on the face of a flywheel, and the cam follower imparts the motion of the cam through a linkage to a helmet in which the test subject's head has been potted. The helmet is rigidly pivoted causing the head to be rotated through an arc of 45 degrees.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670904
Raymond R. McHenry, David J. Segal, Norman J. Deleys
AN ELEVEN-DEGREE-of-freedom nonlinear mathematical model of an automobile traversing a variety of irregular terrain features and encountering a variety of roadside obstacles has been formulated and programmed for a digital computer. The primary objective of the described research has been to develop analytical means of evaluating existing and proposed roadside energy conversion systems. However, the developed computer simulation also has potential applications in the reconstruction of single vehicle accidents and in studies of the driving task at the upper limits of vehicle control. A unique feature is the simulation of combined cornering and ride motions. In its present form, the computer program includes open-loop evasive maneuvers. The results of a review of single vehicle accident statistics and measurements of structural load-deformation properties of automobiles, performed within this research program, are both presented.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670909
James J. Ryan
The engineering extrapolation of the data from the University of Minnesota tests on the hydraulic bumper - automatic seat-belt package made with 3600 and 6000 lb. automotive vehicles is presented to show the forces of impact on passengers in small cars, buses, trucks and semis for a series of accident conditions. The structural protection required for a safer crash of one vehicle into the side of another and into barricades with this package is prescribed. It has been found that small cars, given additional rigidity, and head room for the passenger, have nearly the equivalent safety characteristics of larger cars, and heavy transports may incorporate greater safety for drivers.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670908
Samuel W. Alderson
The anthropomorphic test dummies developed originally for testing aircraft ejection seats have been found to give test results that do not agree satisfactorily with operational results because of their lack of capability for reproducing and measuring human stresses. Such measurements are essential in automotive safety research and require that dummies be matched to humans with respect to their anthropometry, to such interfaces with the environment as shoulders, chest, abdomen, buttocks, etc., and with respect to dynamic response. Current developments of such dummies are described in the paper.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670907
G. Rodloff, G. Breitenburger
The subject of this report is a study of the problem of external safety of windshields under impact from flying stones. Laminated safety glass is resistant to stone impact; tempered glass (for which no road experience is available in the U.S. because it is not used) can only be classified as offering limited safety. More than 1000 road driving trials were made to determine some of the limits of safety offered by the various types of “safety” glass: 1. tempered glass; 2. chemically-strengthened glass; 3. laminated construction with chemically-strengthened glass; 4. laminated safety glass with different thicknesses of the interlayer. It was found that windshields made of tempered glass could suddenly break during the study, and this can be considered a potential cause of an accident, The visibility along the stopping distance is not guaranteed. This also applies to laminates made with strengthened glass -- a development which is being pressed in the United States.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670906
A. K. Ommaya, P. Yarnell, A. E. Hirsch, E. H. Harris
A method of extending the results of experiments on concussion-producing head rotations on lower primate subjects to predict the rotations required to produce concussions in man is presented. A rational scheme of development of the overall investigation is outlined. Theoretical scaling factors are derived and discussed and the results of concussion-producing tests on the Rhesus monkey are presented in chart form. A chart of angular acceleration required to produce concussion in the Rhesus monkey indicates that an acceleration of 40,000 radians per second2 will have a >99% probability of producing concussion. The scaling factors presented herein tentatively indicate that an acceleration of 7,500 radians per second2 will have the same probability of producing concussion in man.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670913
L. M. Patrick, H. J. Mertz, C. K. Kroell
Human tolerance to knee, chest, and head impacts based upon skeletal fracture of cadavers is reported. The results are based upon unrestrained cadaver impacts in a normal seated position in simulated frontal force accidents at velocities between 10 and 20 mph and stopping distances of 6-8 in. The head target was covered with 15/16 in. of padding. No skull or facial fractures were observed at loads up to 2640 lb. Extensive facial fractures and a linear skull fracture occurred during the application of the maximum head force of 4350 lb. The chest target was 6 in. in diameter with 15/16 in.of padding. The padding was rolled over the edge of the target to minimize localized high force areas on the ribs. A 1/8 in. diameter rod was inserted through the chest and fastened through a ball joint and flange to the soft tissue at the sternum.
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