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2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2140
Emiliano Iuliano
Abstract The presence of ice crystals in deep convective clouds has become a major threat for aviation safety. As recently highlighted, once inside the engine core, ice crystals encounter a high temperature environment, so that they can either melt by convection with the warm environment or melt upon impact onto hot static components of the low-pressure components. As a consequence, a liquid film may form which, in turn, is able to capture further ice crystals by sticking mechanism. This scenario results in a significant decrease of the local surface temperature and, hence, promotes the accretion of ice. Therefore, it is clear that icing simulation capabilities have to be updated in order to be able to predict such phenomena. The paper proposes an extension of CIRA icing tools to deal with ice crystals along with supercooled water droplets.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2141
Markus Widhalm
Abstract This paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the motion of regular shaped ice particles under the forces and torques generated by aerodynamic loading. Ice particles can occur during landing and take-off of aircraft at ground level up to the stratosphere at cruising altitude. It may be expected that the particle Reynolds number is high because the flow around the aircraft is in certain regions characterized by strong acceleration and deceleration of the flow. In combination with this flow pattern, the rotation of particles becomes important. Applicable translational and rotational equations of motion combined with a drag correlation taking into account rotation will be derived for a Lagrangian type particle tracking. Orientation is described with quaternions to prevent the singularities associated with the description by Euler angles. The influence of regular shaped particles on collection efficiencies is investigated.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2138
E. Iuliano, E. Montreuil, E. Norde, E.T.A. Van der Weide, H.W.M. Hoeijmakers
Abstract In this study a comparison is made between results from three Eulerian-based computational methods that predict the ice crystal trajectories and impingement on a NACA-0012 airfoil. The computational methods are being developed within CIRA (Imp2D/3D), ONERA (CEDRE/Spiree) and University of Twente (MooseMBIce). Eulerian models describing ice crystal transport are complex because physical phenomena, like drag force, heat transfer and phase change, depend on the particle's sphericity. Few correlations exist for the drag of non-spherical particles and heat transfer of these particles. The effect or non-spherical particles on the collection efficiency will be shown on a 2D airfoil.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2144
James MacLeod, Michael Clarke, Doug Marsh
The Global Aerospace Centre for Icing and Environmental Research Inc. (GLACIER) facility is located in Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. This facility provides icing certification tests for large gas turbine engines, as well as performance, endurance and other gas turbine engine qualification testing. This globally unique outdoor engine test and certification facility was officially opened back in 2010. The prime purpose of this facility is for icing certification of aero gas turbines. As a generic engine test facility, it includes the infrastructure and test systems necessary for the installation of both current and future gas turbine engines. The GLACIER facility completed its commissioning in the winter of 2010/2011, and has now experienced five years of full icing seasons. Rolls-Royce and Pratt and Whitney have both successfully performed certification and engineering icing testing with 5 engines completing their icing certification.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2139
E.J. Grift, E. Norde, E.T.A. Van der Weide, H.W.M. Hoeijmakers
Abstract In this study the characteristics of ice crystals on their trajectory in a single stage of a turbofan engine compressor are determined. The particle trajectories are calculated with a Lagrangian method employing a classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta time integration scheme. The air flow field is provided as input and is a steady flow field solution governed by the Euler equations. The single compressor stage is represented using a cascaded grid. The grid consists of three parts of which the first and the last part are stator parts and the centre part is a rotor. Each particle is modelled as a non-rotating rigid sphere. The remaining model does allow the exchange of heat and mass to and from the particle resulting in a mass, temperature and phase change of the particle. The phase change is based on a perfectly concentric ice core-water film model and it is assumed that the particle is at uniform temperature.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2142
Colin Hatch, Roger Gent, Richard Moser
Abstract Low power ice protection systems are an important research area that is highlighted in the EU Clean Sky programme. In this paper an icing wind tunnel test of a full-scale wing incorporating both an electro-thermal and a hybrid electro-thermal electro-mechanical system is described. A description of a software tool to analyse both systems as full 3D models is also given. Preliminary comparisons of test data and prediction are shown both for the electro-thermal system and the hybrid system. Initial comparisons show a reasonable correlation in the main with recommendations for a structure tear-down to identify exact internal transducer locations. Recommendations are also made with regard to undertaking tests to determine a more consistent set of mechanical failure properties of ice. Future work in the development of the tool is also discussed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2143
Christian Mendig
Abstract In the project SuLaDI (Supercooled Large Droplet Icing) research about the icing of aerofoils through large and super cooled droplets is done at the Institute of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems (German Aerospace Center-DLR) and at the Institute of Adaptronics and Function Integration (Technische Universität Braunschweig). In the framework of the project an icing wind tunnel was built. It consists of a cooling chamber and a wind tunnel of the Eiffel-type therein. The icing of model takes place in the test section of the wind tunnel at temperatures below 0 °C. Between the flow straightener and the contraction section a spray system is built in, which sprays water droplets into the wind tunnel. The droplets are accelerated by the airstream and supercool on their way to the model. When hitting the model they freeze on it to rime ice, clear ice or mixed ice. At the model research about a structure integrated ice detection is done.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2160
Alidad Amirfazli
Abstract The surfaces that shed drops helps with mitigation of icing. Shedding of drop depends on surface hydrophobicity, which becomes affected when exposed to water and/or UV. The hydrophobicity degradation of six (Spray SHS, Etched Al SHS, Hydrobead, Neverwet, Waterbeader, and WX2100) different super-hydrophobic surfaces (SHS), exposed to water or UV, were studied from the drop shedding perspective. Two methods were adopted for the hydrophobicity analysis. Among them, one is to study the contact angles (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) change at static state (i.e., no airflow) compared to the untreated surface. The other one is to analyze the change in critical air velocity (Uc) for a given drop exposed to airflow, on water/UV treated surfaces at room temperature (22 °C) and icing conditions (−1 and −7 °C).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2161
Kazem Hasanzadeh, Dorian Pena, Yannick Hoarau, Eric Laurendeau
Abstract The paper presents the framework of fully automated two/three dimensional ice accretion simulation package, with emphasis on the remeshing step. The NSMB3D-ICE Navier-Stokes code, coupled to an Eulerian droplet module and iterative Messinger thermodynamic model, can perform multi time-steps ice accretion simulations via an automated multi-block elliptic/parabolic grid generation code (NSGRID3D). Attention is paid to the efficiency and robustness of the numerical calculations especially for complex 3D glaze ice simulation. The new automated multi time-step icing code NSMB3D-ICE/NSGRID3D is used to compute several icing studies on the GLC305 wing for rime and glaze ice cases.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2162
Krzysztof Szilder, Edward Lozowski
Abstract We have developed an original, three-dimensional icing modelling capability, called the “morphogenetic” approach, based on a discrete formulation and simulation of ice formation physics. Morphogenetic icing modelling improves on existing ice accretion models, in that it is capable of predicting simultaneous rime and glaze ice accretions and ice accretions with variable density and complex geometries. The objective of this paper is to show preliminary results of simulating complex three-dimensional features such as lobster tails and rime feathers forming on a swept wing. The results are encouraging. They show that the morphogenetic approach can predict realistically both the overall size and detailed structure of the ice accretion forming on a swept wing. Under cold ambient conditions, when drops freeze instantly upon impingement, the numerical ice structure has voids, which reduce its density.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2163
Caio Fuzaro Rafael, Diogo Mendes Pio, Guilherme A. Lima da Silva
Abstract The present paper presents a validation of momentum boundary-layer integral solution and finite-volume Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results for skin friction around airfoils NACA 8H12 and MMB-V2 as well as heat transfer around an isothermal cylinder with rough surface. The objective is to propose a two-equation integral model and compare its predictions to results from a robust CFD tool, to experimental data and to results from a one-equation integral solution. The latter is the mathematical model used by classic 2D icing codes. All proposed model predictions are compared to CFD results for verification and, whenever possible, to experimental data for validation. The code-to-code verification brings reliability to both the proposed code and the CFD tool when there is no test data available.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2157
Mengyao Leng, Shinan Chang, Yuanyuan Zhao
Abstract Aircraft icing causes a great threaten to flight safety. With the development of anti-icing or de-icing systems for aircraft, some attention has been paid on coating strategies for an efficient way to prevent water remaining on the surface. By application of hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic coatings, characterized by low surface adhesion, shedding of liquid from the surface can be enhanced. The motivation behind this work is to identify the way that wettability affects the motion of runback water, and establish an empirical formula of critical departure diameter. The surface property is characterized by the equilibrium contact angle and the hysteresis angle. The relationship between the air speed and the droplet shedding diameter is studied, corresponding to different surfaces.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2146
Matthew Feulner, Shengfang Liao, Becky Rose, Xuejun Liu
Abstract A through-flow based Monte Carlo particle trajectory simulation is used to calculate the ice crystal paths in the low pressure compressor of a high bypass ratio turbofan engine. The simulation includes a statistical ice particle breakup model due to impact on the engine surfaces. Stage-by-stage ice water content, particle size and particle velocity distributions are generated at multiple flight conditions and engine power conditions. The majority of the ice particle breakup occurs in the fan and first LPC stage. The local ice water content (IWC) within LPC is much higher than the ambient conditions due to scoop effects, centrifuging and flow-path curvature. Also the ice particles approach the stators at lower incidence angles than the air flow. The simulation results prompt the need to revisit the approach for properly setting up boundary conditions for component or cascade testing.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2149
Caroline Laforte, Caroline Blackburn, Jean Perron
Abstract This paper depicts icephobic coating performances of 274 different coatings, including 11 grease-type coatings, which were tested over the past 10 years in various research projects at the Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL). Icephobic performance is evaluated using two comparative test methods. The first method, the ice Centrifuge Adhesion Test (CAT), measures the force required to separate the accreted ice from the coating (e.g. adhesive failure). The test involves simultaneously icing, under supercooled precipitation, the extremity of bare reference and freshly coated aluminum samples. The ice adhesion shear stress is calculated from the ice detachment rotation speed. The results are reported as Adhesion Reduction Factor (ARF), which is the ice adhesion stress on the bare aluminum reference samples divided by the ice adhesion stress on the coated samples.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2127
Andrea Munzing, Franck Hervy, Stephane Catris
Abstract A helicopter blade profile was tested in the DGA Aero-engine Testing's icing altitude test facility S1 in Saclay, France during the winter of 2013/2014. The airfoil was a helicopter main rotor OA312 blade profile made out of composite material and with a metallic erosion shield. Dry air and ice accretion tests have been performed in order to assess the iced airfoil's aerodynamic behaviour. Several icing conditions were tested up through Mach numbers around 0.6. This paper presents the test setup, the test model and some of the test results. The test results presented in this paper include the ice shapes generated as well as dry air and iced airfoil lift and drag curves (polars) which were obtained with the real ice shapes on the airfoil.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2133
Joseph P. Veres, Scott M. Jones, Philip C. E. Jorgenson
Abstract The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center, has been used to test a full scale Honeywell turbofan engine at simulated altitude operating conditions. The PSL has spray bars to create a continuous cloud of fully glaciated ice crystals. The tests successfully duplicated the icing events that were experienced by the Honeywell engine (ALF502R-5) during flight through ice crystal clouds. After the ice cloud was turned on key engine performance parameters such as the fan speed, air flow rate, fuel flow rate, and compressor exit pressure and temperature responded immediately to the ingestion of the ice crystals.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2136
Francisco José Redondo
A system has been designed for the A400M wherein engine air intake ice protection is provided by hot air bled from the engine cooled by air from inside the nacelle with a jet pump. Two variants of the system were developed. The first had an active temperature and pressure control downstream of the jet pump, and the second was without temperature control. Maximum temperature was a constraint for the design of the system since the engine air intake is manufactured in aluminum. In addition, several other constraints appeared during the detailed design of the system; the tight space allocation inside the nacelle limited the length of the jet pump, the low temperature provided by the engine bleed in flight idle limited the secondary flow used to cool the engine bleed, and the complex air distribution needed to supply air to the intake areas.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2083
Daniel Silva, Thais Bortholin, J Allan Lyrio, Luis Santos
Abstract An important issue regarding landing performance is the reference speed which determines the approved fields lengths in which a landing can take place. A critical scenario is the accumulation of ice during the holding phase followed by descent, approach and landing. The effect of icing in the landing configuration, with the high-lift devices deployed, is relevant and should be anticipated during the early design phases by simulation. Due to the complex behaviour of the flowfield, 3D CFD methods has been used by several manufacturers but that leads to a high computational cost which might be too intensive for the preliminary design phase.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2101
Hai Li, Ilia Roisman, Cameron Tropea
Abstract Airframe icing caused by supercooled large droplets (SLD) has been identified as a severe hazard in aviation. This study presents an investigation of impact of a supercooled drop onto superhydrophobic and partially wettable substrates. Drop impact, spreading and rebound were observed using a high-speed video system. The maximum spreading diameter of an impacting drop on partially wettable surfaces was measured. The temperature effect on this parameter was only minor for a wide range of the drop and substrate temperatures. However solidification hindered receding when both the drop and substrate temperatures were below 0°C. The minimum receding diameter and the speed of ice accretion on the substrate were measured for various wall and drop temperatures. The two parameters increased almost linearly with the decrease of the wall temperature, but eventually leveled off beyond a certain substrate temperature.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2130
Melissa Bravin, J. Walter Strapp, Jeanne Mason
Abstract In the last several years, the aviation industry has improved its understanding of jet engine events related to the ingestion of ice crystal particles. Ice crystal icing has caused powerloss and compressor damage events (henceforth referred to as “engine events”) during flights of large transport aircraft, commuter aircraft and business jets. A database has been created at Boeing to aid in analysis and study of these engine events. This paper will examine trends in the engine event database to better understand the weather which is associated with events. The event database will be evaluated for a number of criteria, such as the global location of the event, at what time of day the event occurred, in what season the event occurred, and whether there were local meteorological influences at play. A large proportion of the engine events occur in tropical convection over the ocean.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2086
Matthew Grzych, Terrance Tritz, Jeanne Mason, Melissa Bravin, Anna Sharpsten
Abstract The significant problem of engine power-loss and damage associated with ice crystal icing (ICI) was first formally recognized by the industry in a 2006 publication [1]. Engine events described by the study included: engine surge, stall, flameout, rollback, and compressor damage; which were triggered by the ingestion of ice crystals in high concentrations generated by deep, moist convection. Since 2003, when ICI engine events were first identified, Boeing has carefully analyzed event conditions documenting detailed pilot reports and compiling weather analyses into a database. The database provides valuable information to characterize environments associated with engine events. It provides boundary conditions, exposure times, and severity to researchers investigating the ICI phenomenon. Ultimately, this research will aid in the development of engine tests and ICI detection/avoidance devices or techniques.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2116
Peter Struk, Tadas Bartkus, Jen-Ching Tsao, Tom Currie, Dan Fuleki
Abstract This paper presents measurements of ice accretion shape and surface temperature from ice-crystal icing experiments conducted jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. The data comes from experiments performed at NRC's Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac) in 2012. The measurements are intended to help develop models of the ice-crystal icing phenomenon associated with engine ice-crystal icing. Ice accretion tests were conducted using two different airfoil models (a NACA 0012 and wedge) at different velocities, temperatures, and pressures although only a limited set of permutations were tested. The wedge airfoil had several tests during which its surface was actively cooled. The ice accretion measurements included leading-edge thickness for both airfoils. The wedge and one case from the NACA 0012 model also included 2D cross-section profile shapes.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2107
Tom Currie, Dan Fuleki, Craig Davison
Abstract Ice crystals ingested by a jet engine at high altitude can partially melt and then accrete within the compressor, potentially causing performance loss, damage and/or flameout. Several studies of this ice crystal icing (ICI) phenomenon conducted in the RATFac (Research Altitude Test Facility) altitude chamber at the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) have shown that liquid water is required for accretion. CFD-based tools for ICI must therefore be capable of predicting particle melting due to heat transfer from the air warmed by compression and possibly also due to impact with warm surfaces. This paper describes CFD simulations of particle melting and evaporation in the RATFac icing tunnel for the former mechanism, conducted using a Lagrangian particle tracking model combined with a stochastic random walk approach to simulate turbulent dispersion. Inter-phase coupling of heat and mass transfer is achieved with the particle source-in-cell method.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2105
Darren Glenn Jackson
Aircraft icing has been a focus of the aviation industry for many years. While regulations existed for the certification of aircraft and engine ice protection systems (IPS), no FAA or EASA regulations pertaining to certification of ice detection systems existed for much of this time. Interim policy on ice detection systems has been issued through the form of AC 20-73A as well as FAA Issue Papers and EASA Certification Review Items to deal mainly with Primary Ice Detection Systems. A few years ago, the FAA released an update to 14 CFR 25.1419 through Amendment 25-129 which provided the framework for the usage of ice detection systems on aircraft. As a result of the ATR-72 crash in Roselawn, Indiana due to Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD) along with the Air France Flight 447 accident and numerous engine flame-outs due to ice crystals, both the FAA and EASA have developed new regulations to address these concerns.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2158
Tatsuma Hyugaji, Shigeo Kimura, Haruka Endo, Mitsugu Hasegawa, Hirotaka Sakaue, Katsuaki Morita, Yoichi Yamagishi, Nadine Rehfeld, Benoit Berton, Francesc Diaz, Tarou Tanaka
Coating has been recently considered as having good potential for use in preventing in-cloud icing on the leading edge of the lifting surfaces of an aircraft in cold climates. In terms of wettability, a coat may exhibit hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity depending on its specific properties. The same applies to the ice adhesion strength, which may be either high or low. It is thus necessary to determine which type of anti-icing or de-icing coat would be appropriate for a particular application in order to fully utilize its specific properties. Notwithstanding, a coat is incapable of preventing ice accretion by itself, and a perfect icephobic coat is yet to be developed. Coating is also sometimes applied to the surfaces of electrical heaters and load-applying machines to enable them to function more effectively and use less energy. The coating used for an electric heater, for instance, should be hydrophobic because of the need for rapid removal of molten water from the surface.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2106
Mark Ray, Kaare Anderson
Abstract Cloud phase discrimination, coupled with measurements of liquid water content (LWC) and ice water content (IWC) as well as the detection and discrimination of supercooled large droplets (SLD), are of primary importance in aviation safety due to several high-profile incidents over the past two decades. The UTC Aerospace Systems Optical Ice Detector (OID) is a prototype laser sensor intended to discriminate cloud phase, to quantify LWC and IWC, and to detect SLD and differentiate SLD conditions from those of Appendix C. Phase discrimination is achieved through depolarization scattering measurements of a circularly polarized laser beam transmitted into the cloud. Optical extinction measurements indicate the liquid and ice water contents, while the differential backscatter from two distinct probe laser wavelengths implies an effective droplet size.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2154
Franck Hervy, Severine Maguis, François Virion, Biagio Esposito, Hugo Pervier
Abstract The A06 test facility designed for combustor testing in altitude has been modified to be converted in an icing facility for probe testing. The objective was to be able to simulate ice crystals conditions at high altitude, high Mach number and low temperature. This facility has been upgraded in several steps extending the median size of the ice crystals produced and the ice water content range. The aero-thermal and icing capabilities have been assessed during commissioning tests. Finally, in order to prepare the calibration of the facility, some measurement techniques for cloud characterization have been selected or developed, especially for cloud uniformity measurement.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2155
Tadas P. Bartkus, Peter Struk, Jen-Ching Tsao
Abstract This paper describes a numerical model that simulates the thermal interaction between ice particles, water droplets, and the flowing air applicable during icing wind tunnel tests where there is significant phase-change of the cloud. It has been previously observed that test conditions, most notably temperature and humidity, change when the icing cloud is activated. It is hypothesized that the ice particles and water droplets thermally interact with the flowing air causing the air temperature and humidity to change by the time it reaches the test section. Unlike previous models where the air and particles are uncoupled, this model attempts to explain the observed changes in test conditions by coupling the conservation of mass and energy equations. The model is compared to measurements taken during wind tunnel tests simulating ice-crystal and mixed-phase icing that relate to ice accretions within turbofan engines.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2156
Michael Oliver
Abstract The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested.
2015-06-12
Article
Small, electrically driven propellers spaced along wing leading-edges could benefit both small and medium-size aircraft
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