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2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2099
Mario Vargas, Charles Ruggeri, Peter Struk, Mike Pereira, Duane Revilock, Richard Kreeger
This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a flat plate made of glass. The experiment was conducted at the Ballistics Impact Laboratory of NASA Glenn Research Center in 2014 and is part of the NASA fundamental research efforts to study physics of ice particles impact on a surface, in order to improve understanding of ice crystal ingestion and ice accretion inside jet engines. The ice particles, which were nominally spherical ranging in initial diameter between 1 and 3.5 millimeters, were accelerated to velocities from 20 to 130 m/s using a pressure gun. High speed cameras captured the pre-impact particle diameter and velocity data as well as the post-impact fragment data. The initial stages of ice particle breakup were captured and studied at 1,000,000 frames per second with a high speed camera imaging at a plane normal to the impact surface.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2098
Stephen T. McClain, Mario Vargas, Richard E. Kreeger, Jenching Tsao
Abstract Many studies have been performed to quantify the formation and evolution of roughness on ice shapes created in Appendix C icing conditions, which exhibits supercooled liquid droplets ranging from 1-50 µm. For example Anderson and Shin (1997), Anderson et al. (1998), and Shin (1994) represent early studies of ice roughness during short-duration icing events measured in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. In the historical literature, image analysis techniques were employed to characterize the roughness. Using multiple images of the roughness elements, these studies of roughness focused on extracting parametric representations of ice roughness elements. While the image analysis approach enabled many insights into icing physics, recent improvements in laser scanning approaches have revolutionized the process of ice accretion shape characterization.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2084
Benedikt König, Ehab Fares, Andy P. Broeren
Abstract A Lattice-Boltzmann approach is used to simulate the aerodynamics of complex three-dimensional ice shapes on a NACA 23012 airfoil. The digitally produced high fidelity geometrical ice shapes were created using a novel laser scanning technique in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel. The geometrically fully resolved unsteady simulations are conducted on two ice shapes representing a roughness type and a horn type icing on the leading edge of the airfoil. Comparisons between simulation and experiment of lift, drag, and pitching moment as well as pressure distributions indicate overall a good qualitative agreement in capturing the aerodynamic degradation. Especially for the horn-type ice shape, the quantitative agreement is also mostly very good. Analysis of the flow structures indicates furthermore a good capturing of the three-dimensional separation behavior of the flow.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2100
Yongsheng Lian, Yisen Guo
Abstract In this paper we numerically investigated the impact of large droplets on smooth solid surfaces to understand the splashing mechanism involved in ice accretion due to supercooled large droplets. A Navier-Stokes solver was used to describe the flow field, the moment-of-fluid (MOF) method was used to capture the droplet interface evolution, and the adaptive mesh refinement technique was employed to refine the mesh near the region of interest. We investigated the effect of air on splashing mechanism and confirmed that a low pressure can suppress the droplet splashing. The size distribution of splashed secondary droplets was studied and showed good agreement with experimental results. The effect of surface curvature on the splashing phenomenon was highlighted. Finally, the droplet impact on a NACA 23012 airfoil was studied and the water collection efficiency was investigated.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2087
Delphine Leroy, Emmanuel Fontaine, Alfons Schwarzenboeck, J. Walter Strapp, Lyle Lilie, Julien Delanoe, Alain Protat, Fabien Dezitter, Alice Grandin
Abstract Despite past research programs focusing on tropical convection, the explicit studies of high ice water content (IWC) regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) are rare, although high IWC conditions are potentially encountered by commercial aircraft during multiple in-service engine powerloss and airdata probe events. To gather quantitative data in high IWC regions, a multi-year international HAIC/HIWC (High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content) field project has been designed including a first field campaign conducted out of Darwin (Australia) in 2014. The airborne instrumentation included a new reference bulk water content measurement probe and optical array probes (OAP) recording 2D images of encountered ice crystals. The study herein focuses on ice crystal size properties in high IWC regions, analyzing in detail the 2D image data from the particle measuring probes.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2091
Ryosuke Hayashi, Makoto Yamamoto
Abstract In a jet engine, ice accreted on a fan rotor can be shed from the blade surface due to centrifugal force, and the shed ice can damage compressor components. This phenomenon, which is referred to as ice shedding, threatens safe flight. However, there have been few studies on ice shedding because ice has numerous unknown physical parameters. Although existing icing models can simulate ice growth, these models do not have the capability to reproduce ice shedding. As such, in a previous study, we developed an icing model that takes into account both ice growth and ice shedding. In the present study, we apply the proposed icing model to a jet engine fan in order to investigate the effect of ice growth and shedding on the flow field. The computational targets of the present study are the engine fan and the fan exit guide vane (FEGV); thus, we simultaneously deal with the rotor-stator interaction problem.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2088
Richard E. Kreeger, Lakshmi Sankar, Robert Narducci, Robert Kunz
Abstract The formation of ice over lifting surfaces can affect aerodynamic performance. In the case of helicopters, this loss in lift and the increase in sectional drag forces will have a dramatic effect on vehicle performance. The ability to predict ice accumulation and the resulting degradation in rotor performance is essential to determine the limitations of rotorcraft in icing encounters. The consequences of underestimating performance degradation can be serious and so it is important to produce accurate predictions, particularly for severe icing conditions. The simulation of rotorcraft ice accretion is a challenging multidisciplinary problem that until recently has lagged in development over its counterparts in the fixed wing community. But now, several approaches for the robust coupling of a computational fluid dynamics code, a rotorcraft structural dynamics code and an ice accretion code have been demonstrated.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2093
Maxime Henno
Abstract Advanced sizing of the thermal wing ice protection system (WIPS) requires an improved and a robust manner to simulate the system operation in unsteady phases and particularly in de-icing operations. A two dimensional numerical tool has been developed to enable the simulation of unsteady anti-icing and de-icing operations. For example, the WIPS may be activated with delay after entering into the icing conditions. In this case, ice starts to accrete on the leading edge before the WIPS heats up the skin. Another example is the ground activation of the WIPS for several seconds to check its functionality: low external cooling may cause high thermal constraints that must be estimated with accuracy to avoid adverse effects on the structure. Thermal de-icing WIPS integrated in composite structures intrinsically have unsteady behaviors; the tool enables the computation of the skin temperature evolution with the time.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2092
David M. Orchard, Catherine Clark, Myron Oleskiw
Abstract Simulations of supercooled large droplet (SLD) icing environments within the NRC's Altitude Icing Wind Tunnel (AIWT) have been performed in which broad band mass distribution spectra are achieved that include a distinct pattern of liquid water content (LWC) over a range of droplet sizes (i.e., bi-modal distribution). The mass distribution is achieved through modification of the existing spray system of the AIWT to allow two spray profiles with differing LWC and median volumetric diameter (MVD) to be simultaneously injected into the flow. Results of spray profile distributions measured in the test section have demonstrated that freezing drizzle conditions, where MVD is either less than or greater than 40 μm, can be achieved.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2115
Antonio Criscione, Suad Jakirlic, Zeljko Tukovic, Ilia Roisman, Cameron Tropea
Abstract Numerical experiments have been presently conducted aiming at studying the influence of the surface energy on the crystallization process of supercooled water in terms of the supercooling degrees. The mathematical model consists primarily of the equation governing the thermal energy field solved independently in both phases in accordance with the two-scalar approach by utilizing the Stefan condition at the interface to couple both temperature fields. The computational algorithm relying on the level-set method for solid-liquid interface capturing has been appropriately upgraded aiming at accuracy level increase with respect to the discretization of the thermal energy equation and the normal-to-interface derivative of the temperature field. The model describes the freezing mechanism under supercooled conditions, relying on the physical and mathematical description of the two-phase moving-boundary approach.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2113
Ismail Gultepe, Michael Pavolonis, Binbin Zhou, Randolph Ware, Robert Rabin, William Burrows, Jason Milbrandt, Louis Garand
Abstract Fog and drizzle observations collected during the arctic weather and SAR (Search and Rescue) operations (SAAWSO) project at sub-freezing temperatures (T) are analyzed in this study to identify icing conditions, improve ground-based in-situ and remote sensing observations, and develop icing parameterizations for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. The SAAWSO project took place during the 2012-2013 winter conditions that occurred over St. John's, NFL, Canada. Observations were obtained by a Droplet Measuring Technologies Fog Measuring Device (FMD), a ground cloud imaging probe (GCIP), a Radiometrics Profiling Microwave Radiometer (PMWR), a Rosemount icing detector, a laser disdrometer, and surface meteorological sensors. Precipitation, wind, and radiation data were also collected. Results suggest that observations obtained from integrated in-situ and remote sensors can be used to characterize icing conditions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2117
Miki Shimura, Makoto Yamamoto
Abstract It is well known that SLD (Supercooled Large Droplets) icing is very dangerous because it is more unpredictable than general icing caused by smaller droplets. In SLD conditions, a droplet deforms largely. Vargas et al. (2011) performed the experiments about the droplet deformation and they confirmed that the droplet deforms to an oblate spheroid, as the droplet approaches the leading edge of an airfoil. Therefore, the assumption that a droplet behaves as a sphere might be no longer valid. There are many models to predict the droplet deformation in which the deformation is described with the change of drag coefficient. For example, Hospers (2013) summarized the linear relations between the Reynolds number and the drag coefficient. Wiegand (1987) developed a model which uses a quasi-steady normal mode analysis of droplet deformation. However, the effect of the droplet deformation models on SLD icing simulations has not been completely clarified yet.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2119
Shinan Chang, Chao Wang, Mengyao Leng
Abstract Droplet deformation and breakup is an important issue that involved in the aircraft and engine icing field especially in the case of the Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD). In this paper, the modes of SLD breakup were discussed in detail based upon the classical theories of droplet breakup and typical icing conditions. It was found that the breakup modes involved in SLD are mainly vibration breakup, bag-type breakup, multimode breakup and shear breakup. A breakup model composed of the typical SLD breakup types was proposed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2118
Sergey Alekseyenko, Michael Sinapius, Martin Schulz, Oleksandr Prykhodko
Abstract The results of experimental investigation of the icing processes of NACA 0015 airfoil are presented. The experiments have been carried out with the help of a high-speed camera at the icing/deicing facility at the Institute of Adaptronic and Functional Integration of the Technical University of Braunschweig. The investigation objective is the study of interaction between supercooled large droplets and the icing airfoil surface as well as physical phenomena occurring during the icing process. Evolution of the initial phase of ice growth process over time is observed, the general structure of ice accretion and its alteration along the airfoil is examined. Experiments have been carried out within a wide temperature range. Photos of the specific moments of the icing process have been analyzed. Splashing events and water movement on the icing surface have been observed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2120
Yong Han Yeong, Eric Loth, Jack Sokhey, Alexis Lambourne
Researchers have recently focused on superhydrophobic coatings as an ice-mitigation tool. These surfaces have a high degree of water-repellency and were shown in previous low-speed droplet studies to reduce surface ice adhesion strength. However, there is little research regarding testing in aerospace icing conditions, i.e. high-speed super-cooled droplet impact (> 50 m/s) on a freezing substrate and air temperature. A detailed set of experiments were conducted in an icing wind tunnel to measure the ice adhesion strength of various superhydrophobic coatings by subjecting the surfaces to a super-cooled icing cloud consisting of 20 μm droplets and at a constant LWC of 0.4 g/m3. Test conditions include air speeds of 50 m/s and 70 m/s and in glaze (−5°C) and rime ice regimes (−15°C). The accreted ice was then removed by pressurized nitrogen in a mode 1 (tensile) adhesion test.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2103
Christian Bartels, Julien Cliquet, Carlos Bautista
Abstract In order to comply with applicable certification regulations, airframers have to demonstrate safe operation of their aircraft in icing conditions. Part of this demonstration is often a numerical prediction of the potential ice accretion on unprotected surfaces. The software ONICE2D, originally developed at the Office National d'Études et de Recherche Aérospatial (ONERA), is used at Airbus for predicting ice accretions on wing-like geometries. The original version of the software uses a flow solution of the 2D full-potential equation on a structured C-grid as basis for an ice accretion prediction. Because of known limitations of this approach, an interface was added between ONICE2D and TAU [6], a hybrid flow solver for the Navier-Stokes equations. The paper first details the approach selected to implement the interface to the hybrid flow solver TAU.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2110
Jozef Brzeczek, Janusz Pietruszka, Robert J. Flemming, Ben C. Bernstein
Abstract In 2014 PZL Mielec obtained an EASA Type Certificate extension for the PZL M28 05 airplane for flight into icing conditions and this has been validated by the FAA. Thus, a project that lasted four years was finished successfully. During this period, activities consisted of icing analyses, wind tunnel tests in the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel, and natural icing flight tests, artificial icing flight tests, flight tests with simulated ice shapes, and calibration tests. Flights in measured natural icing conditions began during the spring of 2009 and certification flight tests were performed in 2012. The natural icing test flights, apart one flight in the USA, were performed in Poland in the Mielec area. The final test campaign can be divided into two phases: (1) March -April flight tests campaign; and (2) November - December flight test campaign, the latter after introducing some design changes in airframe ice protection system.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2109
Rodrigo Domingos, Daniel Silva
Abstract A 3D computer model named AIPAC (Aircraft Ice Protection Analysis Code) suitable for thermal ice protection system parametric studies has been developed. It was derived from HASPAC, which is a 2D anti-icing model developed at Wichita State University in 2010. AIPAC is based on the finite volumes method and, similarly to HASPAC, combines a commercial Navier-Stokes flow solver with a Messinger model based thermodynamic analysis that applies internal and external flow heat transfer coefficients, pressure distribution, wall shear stress and water catch to compute wing leading edge skin temperatures, thin water flow distribution, and the location, extent and rate of icing. In addition, AIPAC was built using a transient formulation for the airfoil wall and with the capability of extruding a 3D surface grid into a volumetric grid so that a layer of ice can be added to the computational domain.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2111
Marie-Laure Toulouse, Richard Lewis
Abstract The intent of this paper is to provide a general overview of the main engineering and test activities conducted in order to support A350XWB Ice and Rain Protection Systems certification. Several means of compliance have been used to demonstrate compliance with applicable Certification Basis (CS 25 at Amendment 8 + CS 25.795 at Amendment 9, FAR 25 up to Amendment 129) and Environmental protection requirements. The EASA Type Certificate for the A350XWB was received the 30th September 2014 after 7 years of development and verification that the design performs as required, with five A350XWB test aircraft accumulating more than 2600 flight test hours and over 600 flights. The flight tests were performed in dry air and measured natural icing conditions to demonstrate the performance of all ice and rain protection systems and to support the compliance demonstration with CS 25.1419 and CS25.21g.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2132
David L. Rigby, Joseph Veres, Colin Bidwell
Abstract Three-dimensional simulations of the Honeywell ALF502 low pressure compressor (sometimes called a booster) using the NASA Glenn code GlennHT have been carried out. A total of eight operating points were investigated. These operating points are at, or near, points where engine icing has been determined to be likely. The results of this study were used, in a companion paper, for further analysis such as predicting collection efficiency of ice particles and ice growth rates at various locations in the compressor. In an effort to minimize computational effort, inviscid solutions with slip walls are produced. A mixing plane boundary condition is used between each blade row, resulting in convergence to steady state within each blade row. Comparisons of the results are made to other simplified analysis. An additional modification to the simulation process is also presented.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2131
Colin Bidwell, David Rigby
Abstract A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell ALF502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced an icing event and another which did not during testing of the ALF502 engine in the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.63 ice accretion software. The inflow conditions for the two conditions were similar with the main differences being that the condition that produced the icing event was 6.8 K colder than the non-icing event case and the inflow ice water content (IWC) for the non-icing event case was 50% less than for the icing event case.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2137
Daniel R. Adriaansen, Paul Prestopnik, George McCabe, Marcia Politovich
Abstract Advancements in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models continue to enhance the quality of in-flight icing forecasts and diagnoses. When diagnosing current in-flight icing conditions, observational datasets are combined with NWP model output to form a more accurate representation of those conditions. Surface observations are heavily relied upon to identify cloud coverage and cloud base height above observing stations. One of the major challenges of using these point-based or otherwise limited observations of cloud properties is extending the influence of the observation to nearby points on the model grid. An alternate solution to the current method for incorporating these point-based observations into the in-flight icing diagnoses was developed. The basis for the new method is rooted in a concept borrowed from signal and image processing known as dithering.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2135
Martin Schulz, Michael Sinapius
Abstract A designer of a new mechanical ice protection system for airplanes needs to know how much and in which way he has to deform the surface to break off the ice. The ice adhesion strength is often used as a design value. Several methods have been published to measure the adhesive strength of ice. This paper analyzes the interface stresses created by those methods and discusses the way the adhesion strength is derived. A finite element method tool is used to provide insight into the stress state for different load cases. The implication of these illustrations is that equations which use only ultimate force and total interfacial area to calculate adhesion strength miss local stress concentrations and crack nucleation. Hence, the derived adhesion strength may not be comparable within different testing methods, because each testing procedure neglects different parameters like specimen size, substrate thickness and stiffness.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2134
Tom Currie, Dan Fuleki
Abstract Ice crystals ingested by a jet engine at high altitude can partially melt and then accrete within the forward stages of the compressor, potentially causing performance loss, damage and/or flameout. Recent research into this ice crystal icing (ICI) phenomenon conducted at the National Research Council of Canada suggests that the liquid water content vliq of an accretion significantly affects the accretion's susceptibility to erosion by ice crystals, and therefore accretion growth. This paper describes the development and application of an instrument for measuring vliq, potentially providing a method for correlating erosion behavior (e.g. as ductile or brittle) and properties. The instrument measures the complex admittance Y* of a mixed-phase deposit bridging a pair of electrodes, which is modeled as a resistor and capacitor in parallel, and calculates the deposit's relative permittivity εr from the capacitance.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2124
Amanda Gounou, Jean-Marc Moisselin, Frédéric Autones, Dominique Levaillant, Jean-Louis Brenguier, Eric Défer, Michael Faivre, Alice Grandin, Fabien Dezitter, Sandra Turner
Abstract Glaciated icing conditions potentially leading to in-service event are often encountered in the vicinity of deep convective clouds. Nowcasting of these conditions with space-borne observations would be of a great help for improving flight safety and air-traffic management but still remains challenging. In the framework of the HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals) project, methods to detect and track regions of high ice water content from space-based geostationary and low orbit mission are investigated. A first HAIC/HIWC field campaign has been carried out in Australia in January-March 2014 to sample meteorological conditions potentially leading to glaciated icing conditions. During the campaign, several nowcasting tools were successfully operated such as the Rapid Development Thunderstorm (RDT) product that detects the convective areas from infrared geostationary imagery.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2123
Eric Defer, Jean-Louis Brenguier, Jos De Laat, Julien Delanoe, Fabien Dezitter, Michael Faivre, Amanda Gounou, Alice Grandin, Anthony Guignard, Jan Fokke Meirink, Jean-Marc Moisselin, Frederic Parol, Alain Protat, Claudine Vanbauce
Abstract The High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) Sub-Project 3 (SP3) focuses on the detection of cloud regions with high ice water content (IWC) from current available remote sensing observations of space-based geostationary and low-orbit missions. The SP3 activities are aimed at supporting operationally the two up-coming HAIC flight campaigns (the first one in May 2015 in Cayenne, French Guyana; the second one in January 2016 in Darwin, Australia) and ultimately provide near real-time cloud monitoring to Air Traffic Management. More in detail the SP3 activities focus on the detection of high IWC from space-borne geostationary Meteosat daytime imagery, explore the synergy of concurrent multi-spectral multiple-technique observations from the low-orbit A-Train mission to identify specific signatures in high IWC cloud regions, and finally develop a satellite-based nowcasting tool to track and monitor convective systems over the Tropical Atlantic.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2122
Cameron Butler, Eric Loth
Abstract In recent years, there has been a growing desire to incorporate computational methods into aircraft icing certification practices. To improve understanding of ice shapes, a new experimental program in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) will investigate swept hybrid models which are very large relative to the test section and are intended to operate at high lift coefficients. The present computations were conducted to help plan the experiments and to ascertain any effects of flow separation and unsteady forces. As they can be useful in robustly and accurately predicting large separation regions and capturing flow unsteadiness, a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) approach has been adopted for simulating the flow over these large high-lift wing sections. The DES methodology was first validated using experimental data from an unswept NACA 0012 airfoil with leading-edge ice accretion, showing reasonable performance.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2129
Andrea Munzing, Stephane Catris
Abstract Different Airbus Helicopters main rotor blade profiles were tested in different icing wind tunnels and for different icing conditions. One of the objectives of the accretion tests was to validate the use of 2D icing scaling laws established for fixed wing aircraft on helicopter blade profiles. Therefore, ice shapes resulting from tests with the same icing similarity parameters are compared to each other allowing the assessment of icing scaling laws for helicopter applications. This paper presents the icing scaling laws used at Airbus Helicopters on blade profiles, the different test set ups and test models and it presents the comparison of the ice shapes collected during the icing wind tunnel test campaigns.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2121
Yong Chen, Liang Fu
Abstract In helicopter, the icing rotor blades will decrease the effectiveness of the helicopter and endanger the lives of the pilots. The asymmetrical ice break-up and shedding could also lead to severe vibrations of the rotor blade. Ice break-up from the main rotor may strike the fuselage and tail rotor, even worse, find its way into the engine, which may cause serious aircraft accidents. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for ice shedding process is necessary in order to optimize the helicopter rotor blade design and de-icing system to avoid hazardous ice shedding. In this paper, the ice shedding model is improved by introducing a bilinear cohesive zone model (CZM) to simulate the initiation and propagation of ice/blade interface crack. A maximum stress criterion is used to describe the failure occurred in the ice.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2128
Enrico Bellussi
Abstract This paper describes the AgustaWestland (AW) experience in the use of the results obtained with the HISS flight tests to support the civil ice clearance for rotorcraft. The use of the HISS, a US Army CH-47D Chinook fitted with a spray bar system providing a cloud where the helicopter can fly in icing conditions, allows stable and prolonged flight data, conditions extremely difficult to encounter during natural ice flights. The paper analyses the definition of the HISS test matrix, to optimize the points needed for system development and the points possibly usable during certification, in both normal and failure mode conditions. It is also shown how the HISS ice campaigns results can be assessed, and how they can be compared to the natural ice flights to validate them. Finally it is explained how the HISS results can be used, in addition to natural ice flights results, to support the certification.
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