Display:

Results

Viewing 61 to 90 of 16140
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2130
Melissa Bravin, J. Walter Strapp, Jeanne Mason
In response to the occurrence of jet engine powerloss and damage events associated with deep convective clouds containing high concentrations of ice crystals, several research efforts are underway. Several flight measurement programs devoted to the collection of in-situ and remote sensing of clouds have been conducted over the past few years. The most recent in Darwin, Australia, from January-March 2014, and its follow-up planned for Cayenne, French Guiana, in May 2015, involve the use of a highly instrumented research aircraft with instrumentation specially designed to make accurate in-situ total water content (TWC) and median mass diameter (MMD) measurements of the high concentration areas of deep convection. The data will be used for atmospheric research related to understanding the microphysics of deep convection, and improving the ability to predict, detect and avoid these clouds.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2141
Markus Widhalm
This paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the motion of regular shaped ice particles and the computation of aerodynamic forces and torques on such particles. The shape of an ice crystal may deviate considerably from a sphere and can occur as thin needles or disk-shaped configurations, referred as regular non-spherical particles, or in irregular form as flakes or agglomerates. Ice crystals can be found at the upper boundary of the troposphere in anvils of cumulonimbus clouds, where strong winds exist and an altitude, where jet aircraft cruise at transonic speed, imposing a high flow Reynolds number. As the particle size grows from a few microns into several 100's of microns a high particle Reynolds number may be expected too.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2140
Emiliano Luliano
The presence of ice crystals in deep convective clouds has become a major threat for aviation safety. As recently highlighted, once inside the engine core, ice crystals encounter a high temperature environment, so that they can either melt by convection with the warm environment or melt upon impact onto hot static components of the low-pressure components. As a consequence, a liquid film may form which, in turn, is able to capture further ice crystals by sticking mechanism. This scenario results in a significant decrease of the local surface temperature and, hence, promotes the accretion of ice. Therefore, it is clear that icing simulation capabilities have to be updated in order to be able to predict such phenomena. The paper proposes an extension of CIRA icing tools to deal with ice crystals along with supercooled water droplets.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2143
Christian Mendig
In the project SuLaDI (Super Large Droplet Icing) research about the icing of airfoils through super large and super cooled droplets is done at the Institute of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems (German Aerospace Center) and at the institute of Adaptronics and Function Integration (Technische Universität Braunschweig). In the framework of the project a deicing facility was built. It consists of a cooling chamber and a wind tunnel of the Eiffel-type therein. The icing of specimen takes place in the test chamber of the wind tunnel at temperatures below 0 °C. Between the flow straightener and the contraction section a spray system is built in, which sprays water droplets into the wind tunnel. The droplets are accelerated by the airstream and supercool on the way to the specimen. That means they cool down below the freezing point temperature, but they stay fluid. When hitting the specimen they freeze on it to rime ice, clear ice or mixed ice.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2137
Daniel R. Adriaansen, Paul Prestopnik, George McCabe, Marcia Politovich
Advancements in numerical weather prediction (NWP) modeling continue to enhance the quality of in-flight icing forecasts and diagnoses. When performing a diagnosis of current in-flight icing conditions, observational datasets can be combined with NWP model output to form a more accurate representation. These diagnoses are traditionally tied to a three-dimensional grid, typically the grid of the NWP model data chosen for use. Surface observations are heavily relied upon when performing in-flight icing diagnoses to identify cloud coverage and cloud base height above observing stations. One of the major challenges of using these point-based or otherwise limited observations of cloud properties is extending the influence of the observation to nearby points on the grid. For example, we seek an improved solution to the problem of combining point-based METARs observations with NWP model grids over the current method.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2142
Colin Hatch, Roger Gent, Richard Moser
Summary Initial results from a hybrid electro-thermal electro-mechanical simulation (HETEMS) analysis tool are presented and compared to data measured during a dedicated icing trial. Temperatures and ice shed prediction data are compared with the data measured on a full size wing tested in the CIRA Icing Wind Tunnel (IWT) Additional Test Section (ATS). Background The demand for low power ice protection systems was one of the components of the EU Clean Sky initiative [1]. Under Clean Sky a research programme HETEMS looked at the development of a tool to analyse electro-thermal (ET) and electro-mechanical (EM) ice protection systems (IPS). The tool was intended to analyse independent ET and EM systems or a hybrid system using both technologies combined. The aims and scope of the tool are presented in [2]. The HETEMS software was developed around open source tools for the aerodynamic analysis [3] and mechanical failure analysis [4] in conjunction with in-house software.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2139
E.J. Grift, E. Norde, E. Van der Weide, H.W.M. Hoeijmakers
In this study the characteristics of ice crystals on their trajectory in a single stage of a turbofan engine compressor will be determined. The particle trajectories are calculated with a Lagrangian method employing a classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta time integration scheme. The air flow field is provided as input and is a steady flow field solution governed by the Euler equations. The single compressor stage is represented using a cascaded grid. The grid consists of three parts of which the first and the last part are stator parts and the centre part is a rotor. This grid is linearly cascaded, i.e. repeated infinitely above and below the shown grid, to represent the other blades of this stator-rotor-stator stage. The rotor movement is accomplished by prescribing a relative velocity of the rotor part relative to the stator parts and the interface between rotor and stator is modelled by using a mixing plane assumption allowing a steady-state analysis.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2136
Francisco José Redondo
Due to weight constraints, the engine air intake for the Airbus A400M Transport Airplane will be all made in aluminum. By specification, the intake is protected against ice accretion by a hot air system. In order to assure a fatigue life of the element for the life of the airplane, the temperature of the air supplied must be controlled to a maximum value consistent with aluminum characteristics. A system has been designed wherein hot air is bled and cooled by coolant air from inside the nacelle with a jet pump. While maximum temperature was a constraint for the design of the system, several other constraints appeared during the detailed design of the system; - the tight space allocation inside the nacelle limited the length of the jet pump, - the low temperature provided by the engine bleed in flight idle limited the secondary flow used to cool the engine bleed, and - the complex air distribution needed to supply air to the intake areas. Two variants of the system were developed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2150
Katsuaki Morita, Hirotaka Sakaue, Taro Tanaka, Takeshi Yoshida, Nadine Rehfeld, Andreas Brinkmann, Katrin Lummer, Gerhard Pauly
Anti-icing or deicing of an aircraft is necessary for a safe flight operation. We have started the JEDI-ACE project (Japan-European De-Icing Aircraft Collaborative Exploration) as collaboration between EU nations and Japan since November 2012. This project aims to provide an innovative concept of an integrated ice protection system. An overview of this project will be presented in a separate paper by JEDI-ACE team. In this project, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) develops icephobic coatings as an anti-icing purpose. Coating developments by Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd and Fraunhofer IFAM will be presented in separate papers by those institutions. In this paper, we will include our progress summary of the coating development and evaluation by JAXA. We will include our chemical components of the developed coatings as well as the evaluation of those coating. The developed coating is based on poly-tetra fluoroethylene (PTFE) particle bonded by a polymer.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2138
E. Luliano, E. Montreuil, E. Norde, E. Van der Weide, H.W.M. Hoeijmakers
In this study a comparison will be made between three Eulerian-based solvers that predict the ice crystal trajectories and impingement on a NACA-0012 airfoil. The codes are being developed within CIRA, ONERA and University of Twente, and are improvements to their in-house Eulerian codes called Imp2D/3D, CEDRE/Spiree and MooseMBIce, respectively. This cooperation between CIRA, ONERA and University of Twente was initiated in the framework of European funded project HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals), a large-scale integrated project which aims at enhancing aircraft safety when flying in mixed phase and glaciated icing conditions. The numerical codes differ by the general architecture and implementation of the cloud particle size distribution. Imp2D/3D and MooseMBIce are based on a finite volume approach for multi-block structured grid. CEDRE/Spiree also employs a finite volume approach but handles generalized unstructured grids.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2151
Reinhard F.A. Puffing, Wolfgang Hassler, Andreas Tramposch, Marian Peciar
For studying ice accretion processes experimentally and establishing a valuable validation basis for ice accretion simulation models it is desirable to document experimentally generated ice shapes as accurately as possible. The generated set of data then forms the basis for aerodynamic studies, the improvement of icing test facilities, the development of design criteria, the development of ice accretion simulation tools as well as a number of further applications. In the past, various ice shape documentation methods have been established. These include photography, cross-sectional tracing, molding and casting as well as 3D-scanning. Photography is the easiest and fastest documentation method but provides little quantitative information on the ice accretion process itself. Additional quantitative information can be obtained by using multiple cameras or calibrated camera positions which, however, implicates significant additional time and cost efforts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2148
Erdem Ayan, Serkan Ozgen, Canibek Murat, Erhan Tarhan
Ice crystal ingestion to aircraft engines may cause ice to accrete on internal components, leading to flameout, mechanical damage, rollback, etc. Many incidents occur due to the engine failures especially at high altitude convective weather conditions. Thus, in the framework of HAIC FP7 European project, the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions are investigated. Within the HAIC FP7 European project, TAI will implement models related to the ice crystal accretion calculation to the existing ice accumulation prediction program for droplets, namely TAICE. Considered models include heat transfer & phase change model, drag model and impact model. Moreover, trajectory model and Extended Messinger Model require some modifications to be used for ice crystal accretion predictions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2149
Caroline Laforte, Caroline Blackburn, Jean Perron
Ideally, an icephobic coating applied to ice-exposed surfaces appears to be an interesting solution to prevent ice build-up. Over the last decade, developments of efficient icephobic coatings were multiplied. Some materials that reduce ice adhesion have been developed from which the ice can be more easily shed, possibly even with existing forces such as wind, gravity and vibrations. This paper will depict icephobic coating performances of 262 different coatings and 11 grease type substrates tested over the past 10 years at the Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL). Since 2003, the icephobic performance is evaluated with two main test methods. A first test method was developed in regards to measuring the ice adhesion and its reduction. A second test was then developed to measure the ice accumulation reduction.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2146
Matthew Feulner, Shengfang Liao, Becky Rose, Xuejun Liu
Matt Feulner, Shengfang Liao, Becky Rose and Xuejun Liu Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Corporation A through-flow based Monte Carlo particle trajectory simulation is used to calculate the ice crystal paths in the low pressure compressor of a high bypass ratio turbofan engine. The trajectory model includes a statistical ice particle breakup model due to impact on the engine surfaces. Stage-by-stage ice water content, particle size and particle velocity distributions are generated at multiple flight conditions and engine power conditions. The simulation results prompt the need to properly set up boundary conditions for component or cascade testing.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2147
Sandra Turner, Jean-Marc Gaubert, Remy Gallois, Thibault Dacla, Ingrid Mullie, Aurelien Bourdon, Fabien Dezitter, Alice Grandin, Alain Protat, Rodney Potts, Alfons Schwarzenboeck, J. Walter Strapp
The PLANET (PLAne-NETwork) System was used for real-time satellite data transmission during the HAIC/HIWC Darwin field Campaign (January to March 2014). The basic system was initially providing aircraft tracking, chat and weather text messages (METAR, TAF, NOTAM, etc.) in a standalone application. In the frame of the HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals) project, many improvements were made in order to fulfill requirements of the on-board and ground science teams. The aim of this paper is to present the main improvements of the PLANET System that were implemented for the Darwin field campaign. The goal of the flight tests for high IWC characterization were to collect cloud data in deep convective clouds, provide 99th percentile total water content statistics and other relevant parameters of such clouds as a function of distance scale to industry and regulators.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2144
James MacLeod, Michael Clarke, Doug Marsh
The GLACIER Icing Facility – Lessons Learnt in the first Five Years of Operation J.D. MacLeod M. Clarke National Research Council of Canada Rolls-Royce plc Gas Turbine Laboratory Civil Aerospace Ottawa, ON Derby, UK Abstract The Global Aerospace Centre for Icing and Environmental Research Inc. (GLACIER) facility is located in Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. This facility provides icing certification tests for large gas turbine engines, as well as performance, endurance and other gas turbine engine qualification testing. This globally unique outdoor engine test and certification facility was officially opened back in 2010. The prime purpose of this facility is for icing certification of aero gas turbines. The facility provides the aviation industry with the required environmental conditions (by virtue of its location), and the capability to meet the growing demands for icing certifications and other adverse cold weather conditions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2145
Sara Gonzalez Ruiz, Gertjan Glabeke, Jeroen Vanbeeck
The high number of incidents reported in the last decades from aircrafts flying through convective clouds has raised awareness of the impact that ice crystals have on the safety of airplanes. The mass of ice crystals contained in the flow, and the size of these particles, are important parameters that must be taken into account when dealing with these types of clouds. The icing wind tunnels allow to simulate the atmospheric flight conditions for ground testing, which simplifies the study of the effects that the ice crystals have on different parts of the aircrafts, while it also allows to test different techniques for clouds characterization. They can operate at both glaciated conditions, where the flow is composed only of ice crystals, and mixed phase conditions, where also supercooled liquid water droplets are present in the flow. Nowadays, one of the main issues for wind tunnel testing is the calibration of the wind tunnel itself.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2159
Philipp Grimmer, Jakob Barz, Michael Haupt, Christian Oehr, Thomas Hirth
The formation of ice on surfaces of technical devices or transportation vehicles can lead to several problems, like reduced functionality, reduced energy efficiency or operational safety. As known de-icing methods use a high amount of energy or environmentally harmful chemicals, research has focused lately on passive de-icing by functional surfaces with an improved removal of ice (de-icing) or a reduced formation of it (anti-icing). Inspired by the Lotus plant leaf from nature, a “super-hydrophobic” surface can be produced by the combination of micro-structures and a hydrophobic surface coating. By a hot stamping process we have generated differently shaped microstructures (cylinders, ellipses and lines) on polyurethane films which are afterwards coated by a PECVD process with thin, hydrophobic fluorocarbon or silicone-like films. PU films are suitable for outdoor use, because they are resistant against erosion and UV radiation.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2158
Tatsuma Hyugaji, Shigeo Kimura, Haruka Endo, Mitsugu Hasegawa, Hirotaka Sakaue, Katsuaki Morita, Yoichi Yamagishi, Nadine Rehfeld, Benoit Berton, Francesc Diaz, Tarou Tanaka
Recently coatings have been considered as promising preventive measures for in-cloud icing which may occur at the leading edge area of the lifting surface of aircraft in cold climate. In terms of the wettability, coating reveals hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity depending on its property. At the same time it has high or low values on the ice adhesion strength. It is then required that users should find out which of anti-icing or de-icing coating can apply to in order to make full use of the distinguished characteristics. For all that, coating cannot prevent ice accretion by itself unfortunately, which means that no perfect icephobic coatings have been developed up to the present. Thus, coatings apply to the surfaces with devices such as an electric heating system or a load-applying machine such that they can function with less energy and more effectiveness.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2156
Michael Oliver
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test in the NASA Glenn Research Center’s Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) Facility in February 2013. Honeywell Engines supplied the test article, an obsolete, unmodified Lycoming ALF502-R5 turbofan engine serial number LF01 that experienced an uncommanded loss of thrust event while operating at certain high altitude ice crystal icing conditions. These known conditions were duplicated in PSL for this testing. The data generated during this testing contained three subsets: known event conditions, altitude scaling conditions and a design of experiment (DOE) data set. The key roll back indicating parameter was found to be the reduction of the measured load parameter, the average of two measured load cells mounted on the thrust stand.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2157
Mengyao Leng, Shinan Chang, Yuanyuan Zhao
Aircraft icing causes a great threaten to flight safety. With the development of anti/de-icing systems for aeronautics, some attention is paid on coating strategies for reducing the total amount of water present on the surface. By application of hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic coatings, characterized by low surface wettability, shedding of liquid from the surface can be enhanced. The motivation behind this work is to identify the way that wettability affects the motion of runback water, and establish an empirical formula of critical departure diameter. In order to contain the effect of surface wettability, it is necessary to obtain an accurate model for calculating dynamic contact angle (DCA). Instead of average static contact angle or empirical equation, the formula used in this work is derived theoretically, as a function of the capillary number, advancing and receding contact angle, and the roughness of the solid surface.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2155
Tadas P. Bartkus, Peter Struk, Jen-Ching Tsao
This paper describes a numerical model that simulates the thermal interaction between ice particles, water droplets, and the flowing air applicable during icing wind tunnel tests where there is significant phase-change of the cloud. The model is compared to measurements taken during wind tunnel tests simulating ice-crystal and mixed-phase icing that relate to ice accretions within turbofan engines. This model, written in MATLAB, is based on fundamental conservation laws and empirical correlations. Due to numerous power-loss events in aircraft engines, potential ice accretion within the engine due to the ingestion of ice crystals is being investigated. To better understand this phenomenon and determining the physical mechanism of engine ice accretion, fundamental tests have been collaboratively conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center and the National Research Council of Canada (NRC).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2154
Franck Hervy, Severine Maguis, François Virion, Biagio Esposito, Hugo Pervier
In 2010, DGA Aero-engine Testing decided to develop a capability to reproduce glaciated icing conditions in one of its altitude test facilities able to simulate low temperature and high altitude conditions. The facility selected for this purpose, named A06, originally developed for relight and flame out testing of combustors has been modified to integrate a small experimental test cell instead of a combustor. A specific converging nozzle has been implemented to reach Mach number up to 0.85 allowing tests in free jet configuration on small test articles like probes. In addition, for ice crystals generation, spray bars have been inserted upstream the test cell. Tests have been performed to define the operating envelope in terms of temperature, altitude, Mach number, humidity and ice water content but also where the ice crystals generation system can operate continuously.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2153
David Serke, Michael King, Andrew Reehorst
In early 2015, the NASA Glenn Research Center will conduct a field campaign based out of Cleveland, Ohio with 60 flight hours on the Twin Otter icing research aircraft. The purpose of the field campaign is to test several prototype algorithms meant to detect the location and severity of in-flight icing within the terminal airspace. The terminal airspace is currently defined as within 25 kilometers horizontal distance of the terminal, which in this case was Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland. Two new and improved algorithms have been developed and will be operated during the field campaign. The first is the 'NASA Icing Remote Sensing System', or NIRSS. NASA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research have developed this icing remote sensing technology which has demonstrated skill at detecting and classifying icing hazards in a vertical column above an instrumented ground station1,2.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2152
Earle Williams, Michael Donovan, David J. Smalley, Robert G. Hallowell, Elaine P. Griffin, Kenta T. Hood, Betty J. Bennett
MIT Lincoln Laboratory is tasked by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to investigate the use of the NEXRAD polarimetric radars for the remote sensing of icing conditions hazardous to aircraft. A critical aspect of the investigation concerns validation that has relied upon commercial airline icing pilot reports and a dedicated campaign of in situ flights in winter storms. During the month of February in 2012 and 2013, the CONVAIR 580 aircraft operated by the National Research Council of Canada was used for in situ validation of snowstorm characteristics under simultaneous observation by NEXRAD radars in Cleveland, Ohio and Buffalo, New York. The most anisotropic and easily distinguished winter targets to dual pol radar are ice crystals.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2160
Alidad Amirfazli
Coatings that shed drops can help with icing mitigation. Shedding of a drop depends on surface wettability. To characterize the shedding of a drop, in an aerodynamic context, the minimum air velocity to displace the drop is measured, i.e., the critical air velocity. Recently, superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) with their ability to shed drops have gained much attention to combat icing. However, questions remain about their performance when exposed to UV, or water for long periods. In this study of its first kind, the effect prolonged UV and water exposure on shedding of drops from 6 different SHS (four commercially available coatings (C1 to C4), and two developed in-house, S1 and S2) was investigated in an icing wind tunnel. Critical air velocity, and contact angle values show that UV-treatment has a stronger adverse effect for S1 and C1 surfaces, compared to other coatings. Water treatment adversely affects S1, C1 and C2 samples more than other samples.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2161
Kazem Hasanzadeh, Dorian Pena, Yannick Hoarau, Eric Laurendeau
The paper will present the framework of fully automated two/three dimensional ice accretion simulation package NSMB3D-ICE, with emphasis on the remeshing step. The NSMB3D-ICE Navier-Stokes code, coupled to an Eulerian droplet module and iterative Messinger thermodynamic model, can perform multi time-steps ice accretion simulations via an automated multi-block elliptic/parabolic grid generation code (NSGRID3D). Attention is paid to the efficiency and robustness of the numerical procedure especially for complex 3D glaze ice simulation. The new automated multi time-step icing code NSMB3D-ICE/NSGRID3D is validated and verified using several icing case studies such as the GLC305-3D rime and glaze ice cases. The Navier-Stokes flow solver NSMB3D is a finite volume three-dimensional multi-block Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver developed by J. Vos et al. [1-3].
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2162
Krzysztof Szilder, Edward Lozowski
Atmospheric icing resulting from freezing rain, freezing drizzle and freezing cloud droplets occurs when airborne supercooled water drops freeze on objects they encounter. This process is especially hazardous to aircraft, when the build-up of ice changes the stability and control characteristics of the aerodynamic surfaces. Ice can also be shed with disastrous consequences, if it is ingested into engines, strikes the aircraft or leads to unbalanced aerodynamics forces. Ice accretion is a complex phenomenon involving 3-D multi-phase flow, heat transfer, and gravitational, viscous, surface tension and shear forces. An ability to predict how ice accretes on engineering structures is essential to the prediction of its associated aerodynamic penalties. We have developed an original icing modelling capability, called the “morphogenetic” approach, based on a discrete formulation and emulation of ice formation physics.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2163
Caio Fuzaro Rafael, Diogo Mendes Pio, Guilherme A. Lima da Silva
The present paper shows integral boundary-layer solutions and finite-volume Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results for flow around three airfoils: NACA 8H12, MMB-V2 and NACA0012. The objective of the present paper is to verify and compare results of a proposed two-equation integral model to those of a traditional one-equation integral model used by classic 2D icing codes and previous anti-ice works. In addition, the present paper compares the results of both proposed and traditional integral codes to CFD results and, whenever possible - validate with experimental data. A numerical code that solves integral equations of boundary layer - with transition onset and length predictions as well as the intermittency evolution - is implemented based on different literature models.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2164
Dorian Pena, Yannick Hoarau, Eric Laurendeau
To increase the flight safety by reducing the number of accident related to icing effects any aircraft must be able to fly in all weather conditions. Ice accretion results in severe aircraft performance degradation and is one of the major causes of flight accident. Ice forms on different surfaces of the aircraft such as: wings, engine intakes, control surface. Icing occurs when aircraft flies in weather conditions with temperature lower than freezing point and with supercooled droplets impacting on the aircraft surfaces. By impacting the surface droplets freeze or flow as water film on the surface. Based on the surface temperature, the entire impacting droplet can freeze at the impact point or a portion freezes and the rest flow as runback water on the surface and freezes downstream of the airfoil. In the design process, the prediction of precise complex Ice accretion is one of the challenges for the aeronautic community.
Viewing 61 to 90 of 16140

Filter