Display:

Results

Viewing 31 to 60 of 16177
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2112
Thomas Schlegl, Michael Moser, Hubert Zangl
Abstract We present a wireless sensor system for temperature measurement and icing detection for the use on aircraft. The sensors are flexible (i.e. bendable), truly wireless, do not require scheduled maintenance, and can be attached easily to almost any point on the aircraft surface (e.g. wings, fuselage, rudder, elevator, etc.). With a sensor thickness of less than two millimeters at the current state of development, they hardly affect the aero dynamical behavior of the structure. In this paper, we report laboratory and field results for temperature measurement and icing detection.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2117
Miki Shimura, Makoto Yamamoto
Abstract It is well known that SLD (Supercooled Large Droplets) icing is very dangerous because it is more unpredictable than general icing caused by smaller droplets. In SLD conditions, a droplet deforms largely. Vargas et al. (2011) performed the experiments about the droplet deformation and they confirmed that the droplet deforms to an oblate spheroid, as the droplet approaches the leading edge of an airfoil. Therefore, the assumption that a droplet behaves as a sphere might be no longer valid. There are many models to predict the droplet deformation in which the deformation is described with the change of drag coefficient. For example, Hospers (2013) summarized the linear relations between the Reynolds number and the drag coefficient. Wiegand (1987) developed a model which uses a quasi-steady normal mode analysis of droplet deformation. However, the effect of the droplet deformation models on SLD icing simulations has not been completely clarified yet.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2116
Peter Struk, Tadas Bartkus, Jen-Ching Tsao, Tom Currie, Dan Fuleki
Abstract This paper presents measurements of ice accretion shape and surface temperature from ice-crystal icing experiments conducted jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. The data comes from experiments performed at NRC's Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac) in 2012. The measurements are intended to help develop models of the ice-crystal icing phenomenon associated with engine ice-crystal icing. Ice accretion tests were conducted using two different airfoil models (a NACA 0012 and wedge) at different velocities, temperatures, and pressures although only a limited set of permutations were tested. The wedge airfoil had several tests during which its surface was actively cooled. The ice accretion measurements included leading-edge thickness for both airfoils. The wedge and one case from the NACA 0012 model also included 2D cross-section profile shapes.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2118
Sergey Alekseyenko, Michael Sinapius, Martin Schulz, Oleksandr Prykhodko
Abstract The results of experimental investigation of the icing processes of NACA 0015 airfoil are presented. The experiments have been carried out with the help of a high-speed camera at the icing/deicing facility at the Institute of Adaptronic and Functional Integration of the Technical University of Braunschweig. The investigation objective is the study of interaction between supercooled large droplets and the icing airfoil surface as well as physical phenomena occurring during the icing process. Evolution of the initial phase of ice growth process over time is observed, the general structure of ice accretion and its alteration along the airfoil is examined. Experiments have been carried out within a wide temperature range. Photos of the specific moments of the icing process have been analyzed. Splashing events and water movement on the icing surface have been observed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2113
Ismail Gultepe, Michael Pavolonis, Binbin Zhou, Randolph Ware, Robert Rabin, William Burrows, Jason Milbrandt, Louis Garand
Abstract Fog and drizzle observations collected during the arctic weather and SAR (Search and Rescue) operations (SAAWSO) project at sub-freezing temperatures (T) are analyzed in this study to identify icing conditions, improve ground-based in-situ and remote sensing observations, and develop icing parameterizations for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. The SAAWSO project took place during the 2012-2013 winter conditions that occurred over St. John's, NFL, Canada. Observations were obtained by a Droplet Measuring Technologies Fog Measuring Device (FMD), a ground cloud imaging probe (GCIP), a Radiometrics Profiling Microwave Radiometer (PMWR), a Rosemount icing detector, a laser disdrometer, and surface meteorological sensors. Precipitation, wind, and radiation data were also collected. Results suggest that observations obtained from integrated in-situ and remote sensors can be used to characterize icing conditions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2109
Rodrigo Domingos, Daniel Silva
Abstract A 3D computer model named AIPAC (Aircraft Ice Protection Analysis Code) suitable for thermal ice protection system parametric studies has been developed. It was derived from HASPAC, which is a 2D anti-icing model developed at Wichita State University in 2010. AIPAC is based on the finite volumes method and, similarly to HASPAC, combines a commercial Navier-Stokes flow solver with a Messinger model based thermodynamic analysis that applies internal and external flow heat transfer coefficients, pressure distribution, wall shear stress and water catch to compute wing leading edge skin temperatures, thin water flow distribution, and the location, extent and rate of icing. In addition, AIPAC was built using a transient formulation for the airfoil wall and with the capability of extruding a 3D surface grid into a volumetric grid so that a layer of ice can be added to the computational domain.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2119
Shinan Chang, Chao Wang, Mengyao Leng
Abstract Droplet deformation and breakup is an important issue that involved in the aircraft and engine icing field especially in the case of the Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD). In this paper, the modes of SLD breakup were discussed in detail based upon the classical theories of droplet breakup and typical icing conditions. It was found that the breakup modes involved in SLD are mainly vibration breakup, bag-type breakup, multimode breakup and shear breakup. A breakup model composed of the typical SLD breakup types was proposed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2120
Yong Han Yeong, Eric Loth, Jack Sokhey, Alexis Lambourne
Researchers have recently focused on superhydrophobic coatings as an ice-mitigation tool. These surfaces have a high degree of water-repellency and were shown in previous low-speed droplet studies to reduce surface ice adhesion strength. However, there is little research regarding testing in aerospace icing conditions, i.e. high-speed super-cooled droplet impact (> 50 m/s) on a freezing substrate and air temperature. A detailed set of experiments were conducted in an icing wind tunnel to measure the ice adhesion strength of various superhydrophobic coatings by subjecting the surfaces to a super-cooled icing cloud consisting of 20 μm droplets and at a constant LWC of 0.4 g/m3. Test conditions include air speeds of 50 m/s and 70 m/s and in glaze (−5°C) and rime ice regimes (−15°C). The accreted ice was then removed by pressurized nitrogen in a mode 1 (tensile) adhesion test.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2121
Yong Chen, Liang Fu
Abstract In helicopter, the icing rotor blades will decrease the effectiveness of the helicopter and endanger the lives of the pilots. The asymmetrical ice break-up and shedding could also lead to severe vibrations of the rotor blade. Ice break-up from the main rotor may strike the fuselage and tail rotor, even worse, find its way into the engine, which may cause serious aircraft accidents. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for ice shedding process is necessary in order to optimize the helicopter rotor blade design and de-icing system to avoid hazardous ice shedding. In this paper, the ice shedding model is improved by introducing a bilinear cohesive zone model (CZM) to simulate the initiation and propagation of ice/blade interface crack. A maximum stress criterion is used to describe the failure occurred in the ice.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2124
Amanda Gounou, Jean-Marc Moisselin, Frédéric Autones, Dominique Levaillant, Jean-Louis Brenguier, Eric Défer, Michael Faivre, Alice Grandin, Fabien Dezitter, Sandra Turner
Abstract Glaciated icing conditions potentially leading to in-service event are often encountered in the vicinity of deep convective clouds. Nowcasting of these conditions with space-borne observations would be of a great help for improving flight safety and air-traffic management but still remains challenging. In the framework of the HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals) project, methods to detect and track regions of high ice water content from space-based geostationary and low orbit mission are investigated. A first HAIC/HIWC field campaign has been carried out in Australia in January-March 2014 to sample meteorological conditions potentially leading to glaciated icing conditions. During the campaign, several nowcasting tools were successfully operated such as the Rapid Development Thunderstorm (RDT) product that detects the convective areas from infrared geostationary imagery.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2130
Melissa Bravin, J. Walter Strapp, Jeanne Mason
Abstract In the last several years, the aviation industry has improved its understanding of jet engine events related to the ingestion of ice crystal particles. Ice crystal icing has caused powerloss and compressor damage events (henceforth referred to as “engine events”) during flights of large transport aircraft, commuter aircraft and business jets. A database has been created at Boeing to aid in analysis and study of these engine events. This paper will examine trends in the engine event database to better understand the weather which is associated with events. The event database will be evaluated for a number of criteria, such as the global location of the event, at what time of day the event occurred, in what season the event occurred, and whether there were local meteorological influences at play. A large proportion of the engine events occur in tropical convection over the ocean.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2138
E. Iuliano, E. Montreuil, E. Norde, E.T.A. Van der Weide, H.W.M. Hoeijmakers
Abstract In this study a comparison is made between results from three Eulerian-based computational methods that predict the ice crystal trajectories and impingement on a NACA-0012 airfoil. The computational methods are being developed within CIRA (Imp2D/3D), ONERA (CEDRE/Spiree) and University of Twente (MooseMBIce). Eulerian models describing ice crystal transport are complex because physical phenomena, like drag force, heat transfer and phase change, depend on the particle's sphericity. Few correlations exist for the drag of non-spherical particles and heat transfer of these particles. The effect or non-spherical particles on the collection efficiency will be shown on a 2D airfoil.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2140
Emiliano Iuliano
Abstract The presence of ice crystals in deep convective clouds has become a major threat for aviation safety. As recently highlighted, once inside the engine core, ice crystals encounter a high temperature environment, so that they can either melt by convection with the warm environment or melt upon impact onto hot static components of the low-pressure components. As a consequence, a liquid film may form which, in turn, is able to capture further ice crystals by sticking mechanism. This scenario results in a significant decrease of the local surface temperature and, hence, promotes the accretion of ice. Therefore, it is clear that icing simulation capabilities have to be updated in order to be able to predict such phenomena. The paper proposes an extension of CIRA icing tools to deal with ice crystals along with supercooled water droplets.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2139
E.J. Grift, E. Norde, E.T.A. Van der Weide, H.W.M. Hoeijmakers
Abstract In this study the characteristics of ice crystals on their trajectory in a single stage of a turbofan engine compressor are determined. The particle trajectories are calculated with a Lagrangian method employing a classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta time integration scheme. The air flow field is provided as input and is a steady flow field solution governed by the Euler equations. The single compressor stage is represented using a cascaded grid. The grid consists of three parts of which the first and the last part are stator parts and the centre part is a rotor. Each particle is modelled as a non-rotating rigid sphere. The remaining model does allow the exchange of heat and mass to and from the particle resulting in a mass, temperature and phase change of the particle. The phase change is based on a perfectly concentric ice core-water film model and it is assumed that the particle is at uniform temperature.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2141
Markus Widhalm
Abstract This paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the motion of regular shaped ice particles under the forces and torques generated by aerodynamic loading. Ice particles can occur during landing and take-off of aircraft at ground level up to the stratosphere at cruising altitude. It may be expected that the particle Reynolds number is high because the flow around the aircraft is in certain regions characterized by strong acceleration and deceleration of the flow. In combination with this flow pattern, the rotation of particles becomes important. Applicable translational and rotational equations of motion combined with a drag correlation taking into account rotation will be derived for a Lagrangian type particle tracking. Orientation is described with quaternions to prevent the singularities associated with the description by Euler angles. The influence of regular shaped particles on collection efficiencies is investigated.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2142
Colin Hatch, Roger Gent, Richard Moser
Abstract Low power ice protection systems are an important research area that is highlighted in the EU Clean Sky programme. In this paper an icing wind tunnel test of a full-scale wing incorporating both an electro-thermal and a hybrid electro-thermal electro-mechanical system is described. A description of a software tool to analyse both systems as full 3D models is also given. Preliminary comparisons of test data and prediction are shown both for the electro-thermal system and the hybrid system. Initial comparisons show a reasonable correlation in the main with recommendations for a structure tear-down to identify exact internal transducer locations. Recommendations are also made with regard to undertaking tests to determine a more consistent set of mechanical failure properties of ice. Future work in the development of the tool is also discussed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2143
Christian Mendig
Abstract In the project SuLaDI (Supercooled Large Droplet Icing) research about the icing of aerofoils through large and super cooled droplets is done at the Institute of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems (German Aerospace Center-DLR) and at the Institute of Adaptronics and Function Integration (Technische Universität Braunschweig). In the framework of the project an icing wind tunnel was built. It consists of a cooling chamber and a wind tunnel of the Eiffel-type therein. The icing of model takes place in the test section of the wind tunnel at temperatures below 0 °C. Between the flow straightener and the contraction section a spray system is built in, which sprays water droplets into the wind tunnel. The droplets are accelerated by the airstream and supercool on their way to the model. When hitting the model they freeze on it to rime ice, clear ice or mixed ice. At the model research about a structure integrated ice detection is done.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2146
Matthew Feulner, Shengfang Liao, Becky Rose, Xuejun Liu
Abstract A through-flow based Monte Carlo particle trajectory simulation is used to calculate the ice crystal paths in the low pressure compressor of a high bypass ratio turbofan engine. The simulation includes a statistical ice particle breakup model due to impact on the engine surfaces. Stage-by-stage ice water content, particle size and particle velocity distributions are generated at multiple flight conditions and engine power conditions. The majority of the ice particle breakup occurs in the fan and first LPC stage. The local ice water content (IWC) within LPC is much higher than the ambient conditions due to scoop effects, centrifuging and flow-path curvature. Also the ice particles approach the stators at lower incidence angles than the air flow. The simulation results prompt the need to revisit the approach for properly setting up boundary conditions for component or cascade testing.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2147
Sandra Turner, Jean-Marc Gaubert, Remy Gallois, Thibault Dacla, Ingrid Mullie, Aurelien Bourdon, Fabien Dezitter, Alice Grandin, Alain Protat, Rodney Potts, Alfons Schwarzenboeck, J. Walter Strapp
Abstract The PLANET System was used for real-time satellite data transmission during the HAIC-HIWC Darwin field campaign (January to March 2014). The basic system was initially providing aircraft tracking, chat, weather text messages (METAR, TAF, etc.), and aeronautical information (NOTAMs) in a standalone application. In the framework of the HAIC project, many improvements were made in order to fulfill requirements of the onboard and ground science teams for the field campaign. The aim of this paper is to present the main improvements of the system that were implemented for the Darwin field campaign. New features of the system are related to the hardware component, the communication protocol, weather and tracking display, geomarkers on the map, and image processing and compression before onboard transfer.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2149
Caroline Laforte, Caroline Blackburn, Jean Perron
Abstract This paper depicts icephobic coating performances of 274 different coatings, including 11 grease-type coatings, which were tested over the past 10 years in various research projects at the Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL). Icephobic performance is evaluated using two comparative test methods. The first method, the ice Centrifuge Adhesion Test (CAT), measures the force required to separate the accreted ice from the coating (e.g. adhesive failure). The test involves simultaneously icing, under supercooled precipitation, the extremity of bare reference and freshly coated aluminum samples. The ice adhesion shear stress is calculated from the ice detachment rotation speed. The results are reported as Adhesion Reduction Factor (ARF), which is the ice adhesion stress on the bare aluminum reference samples divided by the ice adhesion stress on the coated samples.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2148
Erdem Ayan, Serkan Ozgen, Canibek Murat, Erhan Tarhan
Abstract Ice crystal ingestion to aircraft engines may cause ice to accrete on internal components, leading to flameout, mechanical damage, rollback, etc. Many in-flight incidents have occurred in the last decades due to engine failures especially at high altitude convective weather conditions [1]. Thus, in the framework of HAIC FP7 European project, the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystals and mixed-phase conditions are investigated. Within the HAIC FP7 European project, TAI will implement models related to the ice crystal accretion calculation to the existing ice accumulation prediction program for droplets, namely TAICE. Considered models include heat transfer & phase change model, drag model and impact model. Moreover, trajectory model and Extended Messinger Model require some modifications to be used for ice crystal accretion predictions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2153
David Serke, Michael King, Andrew Reehorst
In early 2015, a field campaign was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. The purpose of the campaign is to test several prototype algorithms meant to detect the location and severity of in-flight icing (or icing aloft, as opposed to ground icing) within the terminal airspace. Terminal airspace for this project is currently defined as within 25 kilometers horizontal distance of the terminal, which in this instance is Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland. Two new and improved algorithms that utilize ground-based remote sensing instrumentation have been developed and were operated during the field campaign. The first is the ‘NASA Icing Remote Sensing System’, or NIRSS. The second algorithm is the ‘Radar Icing Algorithm’, or RadIA.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2151
Reinhard F.A. Puffing, Wolfgang Hassler, Andreas Tramposch, Marian Peciar
Abstract When studying ice accretion processes experimentally it is desirable to document the generated ice shapes as accurately as possible. The obtained set of data can then be used for aerodynamic studies, the improvement of icing test facilities, the development of design criteria, the validation of ice accretion simulation tools as well as other applications. In the past, various ice shape documentation methods have been established including photography, cross-sectional tracing, molding and casting as well as 3D-scanning. This work introduces a new ice shape documentation technique based on active 3D-scanning in combination with fluorescent dyes and an optimized set of optical filters. The new approach allows recording the time-resolved three dimensional growth of an arbitrary ice shape. Based on this concept a so-called 4D-scanning system is developed, which allows a detailed evaluation of icing experiments and hence a better understanding of the ice accretion process itself.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2155
Tadas P. Bartkus, Peter Struk, Jen-Ching Tsao
Abstract This paper describes a numerical model that simulates the thermal interaction between ice particles, water droplets, and the flowing air applicable during icing wind tunnel tests where there is significant phase-change of the cloud. It has been previously observed that test conditions, most notably temperature and humidity, change when the icing cloud is activated. It is hypothesized that the ice particles and water droplets thermally interact with the flowing air causing the air temperature and humidity to change by the time it reaches the test section. Unlike previous models where the air and particles are uncoupled, this model attempts to explain the observed changes in test conditions by coupling the conservation of mass and energy equations. The model is compared to measurements taken during wind tunnel tests simulating ice-crystal and mixed-phase icing that relate to ice accretions within turbofan engines.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2154
Franck Hervy, Severine Maguis, François Virion, Biagio Esposito, Hugo Pervier
Abstract The A06 test facility designed for combustor testing in altitude has been modified to be converted in an icing facility for probe testing. The objective was to be able to simulate ice crystals conditions at high altitude, high Mach number and low temperature. This facility has been upgraded in several steps extending the median size of the ice crystals produced and the ice water content range. The aero-thermal and icing capabilities have been assessed during commissioning tests. Finally, in order to prepare the calibration of the facility, some measurement techniques for cloud characterization have been selected or developed, especially for cloud uniformity measurement.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2157
Mengyao Leng, Shinan Chang, Yuanyuan Zhao
Abstract Aircraft icing causes a great threaten to flight safety. With the development of anti-icing or de-icing systems for aircraft, some attention has been paid on coating strategies for an efficient way to prevent water remaining on the surface. By application of hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic coatings, characterized by low surface adhesion, shedding of liquid from the surface can be enhanced. The motivation behind this work is to identify the way that wettability affects the motion of runback water, and establish an empirical formula of critical departure diameter. The surface property is characterized by the equilibrium contact angle and the hysteresis angle. The relationship between the air speed and the droplet shedding diameter is studied, corresponding to different surfaces.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2156
Michael Oliver
Abstract The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2158
Tatsuma Hyugaji, Shigeo Kimura, Haruka Endo, Mitsugu Hasegawa, Hirotaka Sakaue, Katsuaki Morita, Yoichi Yamagishi, Nadine Rehfeld, Benoit Berton, Francesc Diaz, Tarou Tanaka
Coating has been recently considered as having good potential for use in preventing in-cloud icing on the leading edge of the lifting surfaces of an aircraft in cold climates. In terms of wettability, a coat may exhibit hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity depending on its specific properties. The same applies to the ice adhesion strength, which may be either high or low. It is thus necessary to determine which type of anti-icing or de-icing coat would be appropriate for a particular application in order to fully utilize its specific properties. Notwithstanding, a coat is incapable of preventing ice accretion by itself, and a perfect icephobic coat is yet to be developed. Coating is also sometimes applied to the surfaces of electrical heaters and load-applying machines to enable them to function more effectively and use less energy. The coating used for an electric heater, for instance, should be hydrophobic because of the need for rapid removal of molten water from the surface.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2161
Kazem Hasanzadeh, Dorian Pena, Yannick Hoarau, Eric Laurendeau
Abstract The paper presents the framework of fully automated two/three dimensional ice accretion simulation package, with emphasis on the remeshing step. The NSMB3D-ICE Navier-Stokes code, coupled to an Eulerian droplet module and iterative Messinger thermodynamic model, can perform multi time-steps ice accretion simulations via an automated multi-block elliptic/parabolic grid generation code (NSGRID3D). Attention is paid to the efficiency and robustness of the numerical calculations especially for complex 3D glaze ice simulation. The new automated multi time-step icing code NSMB3D-ICE/NSGRID3D is used to compute several icing studies on the GLC305 wing for rime and glaze ice cases.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2160
Alidad Amirfazli
Abstract The surfaces that shed drops helps with mitigation of icing. Shedding of drop depends on surface hydrophobicity, which becomes affected when exposed to water and/or UV. The hydrophobicity degradation of six (Spray SHS, Etched Al SHS, Hydrobead, Neverwet, Waterbeader, and WX2100) different super-hydrophobic surfaces (SHS), exposed to water or UV, were studied from the drop shedding perspective. Two methods were adopted for the hydrophobicity analysis. Among them, one is to study the contact angles (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) change at static state (i.e., no airflow) compared to the untreated surface. The other one is to analyze the change in critical air velocity (Uc) for a given drop exposed to airflow, on water/UV treated surfaces at room temperature (22 °C) and icing conditions (−1 and −7 °C).
Viewing 31 to 60 of 16177

Filter