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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Satoshi Otsuka, Tasuku Ishigooka, Yukihiko Oishi, Kazuyoshi Sasazawa
Abstract In-vehicle networks are generally used for computerized control and connecting information technology devices in cars. However, increasing connectivity also increases security risks. “Spoofing attacks”, in which an adversary infiltrates the controller area network (CAN) with malicious data and makes the car behave abnormally, have been reported. Therefore, countermeasures against this type of attack are needed. Modifying legacy electronic control units (ECUs) will affect development costs and reliability because in-vehicle networks have already been developed for most vehicles. Current countermeasures, such as authentication, require modification of legacy ECUs. On the other hand, anomaly detection methods may result in misdetection due to the difficulty in setting an appropriate threshold. Evaluating a reception cycle of data can be used to simply detect spoofing attacks. However, this may result in false detection due to fluctuation in the data reception cycle in the CAN. We propose the “delayed-decision cycle detection” method for improving a conventional cycle detection method, which does not require modification of legacy ECUs, detects intrusions with a low misdetection rate, and prevents intrusions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jesse Schneider, Graham Meadows, Steven R. Mathison, Michael J. Veenstra, Jihyun Shim, Rainer Immel, Morten Wistoft-Ibsen, Spencer Quong, Manfred Greisel, Timothy McGuire, Peter Potzel
The worldwide automotive industry is currently preparing for a market introduction of hydrogen-fueled powertrains. These powertrains in fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) offer many advantages: high efficiency, zero tailpipe emissions, reduced greenhouse gas footprint, and use of domestic and renewable energy sources. To realize these benefits, hydrogen vehicles must be competitive with conventional vehicles with regards to fueling time and vehicle range. A key to maximizing the vehicle's driving range is to ensure that the fueling process achieves a complete fill to the rated Compressed Hydrogen Storage System (CHSS) capacity. An optimal process will safely transfer the maximum amount of hydrogen to the vehicle in the shortest amount of time, while staying within the prescribed pressure, temperature, and density limits. The SAE J2601 light duty vehicle fueling standard has been developed to meet these performance objectives under all practical conditions. It defines the fueling protocol and operational fueling parameters that ensure both station and vehicle maintain their safety limits (e.g.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Se Jin Park, Seung Nam Min, Murali Subramaniyam, Heeran Lee, Dong Gyun Kim, Cheol Pyo Hong
Abstract Vibration is both a source of discomfort and a possible risk to human health. There have been numerous studies and knowledge exists regarding the vibrational behavior of vehicle seats on adult human occupants. Children are more and more becoming regular passengers in the vehicle. However, very little knowledge available regarding the vibrational behavior of child safety seats for children. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the vibrations in three different baby car seats and to compare these to the vibrations at the interface between the driver and the automobile seat. The test was performed on the National road at the average speed of 70 km/h and acceleration levels were recorded for about 350 Sec (5.83 min). One male driver considered as an adult occupant and a dummy having a mass of 9 kg was representing one year old baby. Four accelerometers were used to measure the vibration. All measured accelerations were relative to the vertical direction. Vibration Analysis Toolset (VATS) was used for time domain analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Karsten Schmidt, Peter Tröger, Hans-Martin Kroll, Thomas Bünger, Florian Krueger, Christian Neuhaus
Future automotive systems will be connected with other vehicles and information systems for improved road safety, mobility and comfort. This new connectivity establishes data and command channels between the internal automotive system and arbitrary external entities. One significant issue of this paradigm shift is that formerly closed automotive systems now become open systems that can be maliciously influenced through their communication interfaces. This introduces a new class of security challenges for automotive design. It also indirectly impacts the safety mechanisms that rely on a closed-world assumption for the vehicle. We present a new security analysis approach that helps to identify and prioritize security issues in automotive architectures. The methodology incorporates a new threat classification for data flows in connected vehicle systems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Payman Khani, Mehrdad S. Sharbaf
Abstract Vehicular Network is an emerging and developing technology to improve traffic management and safety issues, and enable a wide range of value-added services such as collision warning/avoidance. Many applications have been designed to provide safety and comfort for passengers. This technology is a prolific area for attackers who will attempt to challenge the network with their malicious or rational attacks. In this paper we elaborate what a vehicular network is, different kinds of communication in this field, main mechanism and related parts and how vehicular networks work then we introduce some of its applications. After primary familiarity with this system we investigate to different type of attacker, more important security issues, How to secure vehicular networks (security requirements and some tools and methods to achieve secure vehicular networks), difficulties and providing viable security solutions, and at the end briefly explanation of related standards.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Armin Wasicek
Intellectual property rights and their protection is a cornerstone of the automotive value chain. The automotive industry is composed by a meshwork of tightly integrated organizations that cooperate and compete in a hierarchical marketplace. Trading know-how and other virtual assets between participants is an essential part of this business. Thereby, software as a medium to transport ideas, innovations, and technologies plays a particular role. Protection of virtual goods and their associated rights is a current issue whose solution will determine how business will be done in the future automotive market. Automotive experts and researchers agree that ICT security technologies are a vital part to implement such a market. In this paper we examine the software life cycle of an automotive Electronic Control Unit (ECU) and discuss potential threats and countermeasures for each stage. In particular, we will look at the following threats: (1) development (leakage of know-how through insiders or industrial espionage), (2) production (leakage through split inventor/producer companies, (3) deployment and service (manipulation of ECUs), and (4) aftersales (combating counterfeit ECUs and spare parts).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dawid Trawczynski, Janusz Zalewski, Janusz Sosnowski
In the paper we discuss how a single node communication interface failure in a time-triggered system can be used to model a DoS-type attack. More so, we present a design approach based on active detection of common DoS characteristics, which can serve as a template for attack detection. This approach is feasible in time-triggered systems because of the periodic and deterministic characteristics either at the fieldbus communication or application level. We support our discussion with an example case study of a vehicle braking system implementing time-triggered messages disturbed by fault injection.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Wade D. Bartlett, Duane Meyers
Abstract The evasive capabilities of motorcycles and riders are often an important consideration when analyzing a motorcycle crash. Specifically, the longitudinal distance or time required for a motorcycle to move laterally some distance can be of critical interest. Previous publications on this topic have not all measured the same thing and have often included limited test data so their results can be difficult to compare or apply. In addition to reviewing some of the literature on the topic, this paper will present the results of a series of tests conducted with four riders on four motorcycles swerving 2 m (6.5 ft) to their left after passing through a gate at speeds of 40 to 88 km/h (25 to 55 mi/h). The most recent testing involved relatively skilled riders who had faster transitions and greater willingness to lean than the “average” rider generally described in the literature. Separating the perception-reaction time from the evaluation of the turn-away maneuver itself simplifies the analysis, though wide individual performance variation still exists.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Matthew Wood, Nicholas Earnhart, Kelly Kennett
Accident reconstructionists and others use airbag non-deployment thresholds as an indicator of severity in minor- to moderate-severity accidents. The National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) has accessed and recorded the data stored in the airbag control modules of nearly 6,300 vehicles since 2000 and has made these data publicly available. The goal of this study is to ascertain thresholds from the data based on delta-V and seatbelt use, studying how they may differ among manufacturers and over time. Other data is also examined, such as seatbelt pre-tensioner fire times and airbag deployment signal times. These data have been analyzed for use in accident reconstruction for vehicles which may or may not be supported by a publicly available module download tool. While manufacturers at one point published deployment data in owner's manuals, this has not been the case for approximately five to ten years. The dataset analysis will compare the published data for deployment thresholds to real world accidents.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection covers papers with an emphasis on, but not limited to, innovative ideas to enhance automotive safety with improved material constitutive modeling, analysis method developments, simulation and pre/post processing tools, optimization techniques, crash code developments, finite element model updating, model validation and verification techniques, dummies and occupants, restraint systems, passive safety as well as lightweight material applications and designs.
Collection
2014-04-01
Active Safety & Advanced Driver Assistance Systems help prevent accidents or mitigate accident severity. Some of these safety systems provide alerts to the driver in critical situations, while others respond to threats by automatically braking and steering the vehicle to avoid crashes. This technical paper collection covers the latest technologies in active safety and driver assistance systems.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focuses on cybersecurity for cyber-physical vehicle systems. Topics include: design, development and implementation of security-critical cyber-physical vehicle systems, cybersecurity design, development, and implementation strategies, analysis methodologies, process and life-cycle management, comparisons of system safety and cybersecurity, etc. Application areas include: security-critical automotive systems as well as other security-critical ground vehicle and aviation systems.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focuses on current developments in the fields of vehicle fire science, statistics, risks, assessment and mitigation. Papers addressing vehicle design, live-fire tests and fire investigation issues applicable to traditional, electric and alternatively fueled vehicles are included.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Grant Hankins, Kenneth Krajnik, Bradley Galedrige, Shahab Sakha, Peter Hylton, Wendy Otoupal
Abstract A number of performance and safety related aspects of motorsports have begun to receive increased attention in recent years, using the types of engineering analysis common to other industries such as aerospace engineering. As these new engineering approaches have begun to play a larger role in the motorsports industry, there has been an increase in the use of engineering tools in motorsports design and an increase in the inclusion of motorsports in the engineering education process. The design, modeling, and analysis aspects of a recent project examining the design of roll cages for American short-track open-wheel racing cars will be discussed in this paper. Roll cage structures were initially integrated into cars of this type in the 1960s. Countless lives have been saved and serious injuries prevented since the introduction of cages into these types of cars. However, the general configuration of these cages has not seen significant change or improvement in the four decades since their introduction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
June-Young Song, Kangwook Lee, Byung-Jae Ahn
Abstract Requirements of side curtain airbag have continued to increase. The revised SINCAP, FMVSS-226 ejection mitigation and small overlap of IIHS had added these requirements. To meet all the requirements, high inflator energy and complex cushion shape became necessary. Such situations increased possibility of cushion failure while deploying. Unfortunately, all the design verification tests are usually completed in a relatively latter stage of development and repetitive testing is needed to consider large dispersion of failure probability distribution. Therefore, verification and design improvement by numerical simulation in an early stage are desirable. A simulation method which can verify CAB deployment was developed in this study. The developed method has three distinct features. Firstly, nonlinear fabric materials and membrane finite elements are used to consider fracture of cushion fabric. Secondly, a pre-simulation procedure had been established. An initial state for an accurate analysis can be obtained through the procedure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shotaro Odate, Naotoshi Takemura, William Seaman
Abstract Currently, a number of automobile OEMs have been equipped motorized seatbelt systems with volume-production vehicles. Since the current systems are generally initiated by the activation of the automatic collision brakes, or the brake assist systems; the benefit of those systems is limited solely in pre-crash phase. To enhance the effectiveness of the system, we attempted to develop a motorized seatbelt system which enables to control retracing force according to various situations during driving. The present system enables to accomplish both the occupants' comfort and protection performance throughout their driving from when it is buckled to when unbuckled and stored, or during both routine and sport driving, as well as pre-crash phase. Moreover, it was confirmed that lateral occupants' excursion during driving was reduced by up to 50% with the present system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Brian Gilbert, Ron Jadischke, Joseph McCarthy
Abstract The analysis and modeling of vehicle crush in accident reconstruction has traditionally been based upon the use of linear crush-based, stiffness coefficients. Engineering Dynamics Corporation (EDC) created the accident reconstruction software Human-Vehicle-Environment (HVE) which contains the collision algorithm called DyMESH (DYnamic MEchanical SHell) which is capable of utilizing a non-linear stiffness coefficient model. The objective of this research was to develop an improved methodology for the calculation of non-linear stiffness coefficients. Stiffness coefficients are used to represent the relationship between the impact force on a vehicle and the resulting vehicle crush. The method explored in the present research was focused on developing vehicle specific, non-linear stiffness coefficients (Pressure Model) based upon frontal crash tests into a fixed, rigid barrier equipped with load cells. The load cell data from the barrier and the accelerometer data from the vehicles were used to establish a force per unit area (pressure) versus vehicle displacement (deflection) relationship.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
James K. Sprague, Peggy Shibata, Jack L. Auflick
Abstract A complete analysis of any vehicular collision needs to consider certain aspects of human factors. However, this is especially true of nighttime collisions, in which a more specialized approach is required. Classical collision investigation (frequently referred to as accident reconstruction) is comprised of kinetic and kinematic considerations including skid analysis, momentum techniques and other methods. While analysis based on these concepts is typically unaffected by low visibility conditions, the opposite is true of the perceptual and cognitive aspects of a “humans-in-the-loop” analysis, which can be enormously impacted by low visibility. Only by applying appropriate human factors techniques can the analyst make a defensible determination of how and why a nighttime collision occurred. Topics of special importance for nighttime analysis include perception-reaction time (PRT), sensation, attention, distraction, and expectation, all of which are strongly influenced by limited levels of lighting.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Rudolf Mortimer, Errol Hoffmann, Aaron Kiefer
Abstract Relative velocity detection thresholds of drivers are one factor that determines their ability to avoid rear-end crashes. Laboratory, simulator and driving studies show that drivers could scale relative velocity when it exceeded the threshold of about 0.003 rad/sec. Studies using accident reconstruction have suggested that the threshold may be about ten times larger. This paper discusses this divergence and suggests reasons for it and concludes that the lower value should be used as a true measure of the psychological threshold for detection of relative velocity.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael E. Zabala, Nicholas Yang, Stacy Imler, Ke Zhao, Rose Ray
Abstract Three years of data from the Large Truck Crash Causation Study (LTCCS) were analyzed to identify accidents involving heavy trucks (GVWR >10,000 lbs.). Risk of rollover and ejection was determined as well as belt usage rates. Risk of ejection was also analyzed based on rollover status and belt use. The Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) was used as an injury rating system for the involved vehicle occupants. These data were further analyzed to determine injury distribution based on factors such as crash type, ejection, and restraint system use. The maximum AIS score (MAIS) was analyzed and each body region (head, face, spine, thorax, abdomen, upper extremity, and lower extremity) was considered for an AIS score of three or greater (AIS 3+). The majority of heavy truck occupants in this study were belted (71%), only 2.5% of occupants were completely or partially ejected, and 28% experienced a rollover event. In the analyzed data set, none of the belted occupants experienced a complete ejection while 4.4% of unbelted occupants did experience a complete ejection.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focuses on the latest research related to methods and techniques for reconstructing vehicular crashes involving wheeled and tracked vehicles, pedestrians, and roadside features. Emphasis is placed on experimental data and theoretical methods that will enable reconstructionists to identify, interpret and analyze physical evidence from vehicular crashes.
Standard
2014-03-31
This Information Report contains a definition of road vehicle hands-free operation. This definition applies to driver inputs to a wireless communications device used for person-to-person wireless communications while driving. This report applies to both original equipment manufacturers’ and aftermarket devices. The definition does not apply to outputs, e.g., visual or haptic feedback, from a communication system or device, regardless of the modality of human-machine interface. It also does not apply to parallel or redundant manual control operating modes.
Standard
2014-03-31
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test procedures, performance requirements, and guidelines for cargo lamps intended for use on vehicles under 5443 kg (12000 lb) GVWR.
Standard
2014-03-31
This document provides design guidelines, test procedure references, and performance requirements for directional, single color, flashing optical warning devices used on authorized emergency, maintenance and service vehicles. It is intended to apply to, but not limited to, surface land vehicles.
Standard
2014-03-31
This recommended practice outlines a series of performance recommendations, which concern the whole data channel. These recommendations are not subject to any variation and all of them shall be adhered to by any agency conducting tests to this practice. However, the method of demonstrating compliance with the recommendations is flexible and can be adapted to suit the needs of the particular equipment the agency is using. It is not intended that each recommendation be taken in a literal sense, as necessitating a single test to demonstrate that the recommendation is met. Rather, it is intended that any agency proposing to conduct tests to this practice shall be able to demonstrate that if such a single test could be and were carried out, then their equipment would meet the recommendations. This demonstration shall be undertaken on the basis of reasonable deductions from evidence in their possession, such as the results of partial tests. In some systems it may be necessary to divide the whole channel into subsystems, for calibration and checking purposes.
Article
2014-03-25
The company is continuing to develop foundation tools for future autonomous driving by advancing the fundamentals of sensing, planning, and then acting to guide vehicle response. Mimicking a human-like response is requiring new algorithm and systems engineering that better exploits existing sensors.
Standard
2014-03-25
The methodology for maximum package size loading is bsed on a mathematical method allowing the calculation of maximum package size tables. This method does not in principal differentiate between bulk loading and cargo system loading. However, some restrictions have to be considered: - Some cargo systems generate pre-determined pallet trajectories. Envelope curves depending on the pallet size and the possible trajectories have to be determined first. - Door geometric limitations (with or without cargo loading system) - Turning limitations due to weight, load geometry and conveyance capability - Securing requirements This document is not intended for airline operational use. It should be used by engineers performing calculations or developing computer programs to produce Maximum Package Size tables specified in AS1825.
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