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Viewing 1 to 30 of 16230
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2873
Sumit Sharma, Sandeep Sharma, Sanjay Tiwari, Umashanker Gupta
Years ago the main purpose of heavy duty truck is to carrying the loads, in the current scenario cabin comfort and safety is also equally important. With the improved infrastructure quality the average speed of these types of vehicle has also been increased. With the higher average speed, the chances of getting crash have also been increased. In order to provide safety to the driver, all the safety parameters should be considered in advance at the time of design and development of cabin. Sufficient survival space must be present at the time of crash. In order to provide optimum ride comfort, fully suspended cab was designed. The main aim of this study is to develop detailed 3D finite element (FE) model of fully suspended heavy duty truck cabin with detailed suspensions system and simulate crash test scenario presented in regulation ECE-R29 using LS-Dyna explicit solver.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2869
Sumit Sharma, Sandeep Sharma, Umashanker Gupta, Ravi Joshi, Shailesh Pawar
Buses are one of the main and favorite sources of public transit in India. Thousands of people die or injure severely every year due to Bus accidents. Passenger injury in Bus accidents can be due to high stiff seat structures. Most of the occupants seated in the second row or further back were injured by hitting the seat back in the row in front of them. AIS023 (AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY STANDARDS) is one of the several mandatory standards from CMVR (CENTRAL MOTOR VEHICLES RULES) to ensure the safety during crash. As per AIS-023 passenger seat of bus should not cause injury because of high stiffness, on the other hand seat should also be able to carry the passenger force during accidents. With this mechanism AIS023 specifies minimum and maximum range deformations of seat back to minimize the passenger injury. This study includes the FE (Finite Element) analysis and design of Bus seat as per AIS023 test setup with LS-Dyna explicit tool.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2832
Keith Friedman, John Hutchinson, Khahn Bui, Matthew Stephens, Alyssa Schmidt
The incidence of fire in heavy trucks has been shown to be about ten times higher under crash conditions than occurs in passenger vehicles. Fuel tank protection testing defined in J703 was originally issued in 1954. Advanced virtual testing of current and alternative fuel tank designs and locations under example representative impact conditions is reported.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2868
John Woodrooffe, Daniel Blower
This paper examines truck driver injury and loss of life in truck crashes related to cab crashworthiness and investigate regulations and industry trends in relation to truck occupant protection. The paper provides analysis of truck driver casualties in crashes to provide a better understanding of injury mechanisms and to review regulatory and industry initiatives concerned with reducing the number of truck occupant fatalities and the severity of injuries. The commercial vehicle focus is on truck-tractors and single unit vehicles in the NHTSA Class 7 & 8 weight range. The study used UMTRI's Trucks Involved in Fatal Accidents (TIFA) survey file and NHTSA's General Estimates System (GES) file for categorical analysis and the Large Truck Crash Causation Study (LTCCS) for a supplemental clinical review of cab performance in frontal and rollover crash types.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2838
Dharmar Ganesh, Riyaz Mohammed, Hareesh Krishnan, Radakrishnan Rambabu
In-vehicle displays such as an instrument cluster in a vehicle provide vital information to the user. The information in terms of displays and tell-tales needs to be perceived by the user with minimal glance during driving. Drivers must recognize the condition of the vehicle and the state of its surroundings through primarily visual means. Drivers then process this in the brain, draw on their memory to identify problem situations, decide on a plan of action and execute it in order to avoid an accident. There are visual hindrances seen in real world scenario such as obscuration, reflection and glare on the instrument cluster which prevents the vital information flow from vehicle to the driver. In order to ensure safety while driving, the instrument cluster or driver displays should be placed in an optimized location. This paper deals with how to achieve a visual hindrance free cluster position in a vehicle to protect the important information flow from the vehicle to the driver.
2015-09-29
Journal Article
2015-01-2817
Matthew Goertz, Lloyd Tull, Davis Moravec
Abstract The winter of 2013-2014 provided an opportunity to operate off-road vehicles in cold weather for extended time as part of a vehicle/tier 4 diesel engine validation program. An unexpected area of study was the performance of high efficiency, on engine, fuel filters during continuous vehicle operation in cold weather. During the program we observed unexpected premature fuel filter plugging as indicated by an increase in pressure drop across the filter while in service. Field and laboratory testing was completed at John Deere and Donaldson to understand the cause of filter plugging. Although conditions were found where winter fuel additives could cause plugging of high efficiency filters, premature filter plugging occurred even when testing with #1 diesel fuel. This fuel contained no additives and was used at temperatures well above its cloud point.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2456
Roberto Sabatini, Terry Moore, Chris Hill
The integration of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) integrity augmentation functionalities in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) architectures has the potential to provide an integrity-augmented DAA solution suitable for cooperative and non-cooperative scenarios. In this paper, we evaluate the opportunities offered by this integration, proposing a novel approach that maximizes the synergies between Avionics Based Integrity Augmentation (ABIA) and UAV cooperative/non-cooperative DAA architectures. In the proposed architecture, the risk of collision is evaluated by setting a threshold on the Probability Density Function (PDF) of a Near Mid-Air Collision (NMAC) event over the separation area in both cooperative and non-cooperative cases.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2536
Rinky Babul Prasad, Vinukonda Siddartha
Abstract Recent years have seen a rise in the number of air crashes and on board fatalities. Statistics reveal that human error constitutes upto 56% of these incidents. This can be attributed to the ever growing air traffic and technological advancements in the field of aviation, leading to an increase in the electronic and mechanical controls in the cockpit. Accidents occur when pilots misinterpret gauges, weather conditions, fail to spot mechanical faults or carry out inappropriate actions. Currently, pilots rely on flight manuals (hard copies or an electronic tablet) to respond to an emergency. This is prone to human error or misinterpretation. Also, a considerable amount of time is spent in seeking, reading, interpreting and implementing the corrective action. The proposed augmented head mount virtual assist for the pilot eliminates flight manuals, by virtually guiding the pilot in responding to in-flight necessities.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2429
Rickard Olsen, Kerstin Johansen, Magnus Engstrom
The diffusion of human and robotics in manufacturing system is one of the next steps in robotics. Since the computer power gets more and more powerful there is more and more possible to achieve safer working environment. This could lead to a possibility to work closer and more direct with a robot. In an EU FW7 funded project called LOCOMACHs (Low Cost Manufacturing and Assembly of Composite and Hybrid Structures) there are studies and tests to support a future higher TRL-leveled HMI-cell (Human Machine Interaction). The main object in this paper is to present how different safety system could help the HMI-cell to work properly in an industrial context, this when the operator enters the robot working area and working with a task that needs two hand. Safety defines as when its risk is judged to be acceptable.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2435
Ramakrishnan Murthy
One major problem that any product (say Motor, engines etc) which converts electrical energy into a mechanical energy would have is resonance. It has tendency to damage any material when the products operating frequency matches the resonant frequency. The major consequences of this resonant frequency in Flight at run-time could be catostrophic. Generally it is a practice to avoid running at the resonant frequency. This is done as a fixed method where the systems are designed not to run on resonant frequency, i.e. a subsystem in a system is now being designed for that system alone which will not match the resonant frequency. But the same subsystem may not be suitable for some other system. Hence this requires multiple designs. However this idea is to make a design generic where any subsystem can be used in any system irrespective of its resonant frequency. The technique uses the PID algorithm. This method will be helpful is having a single design for different systems.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2436
Anapathur V. Ramesh
Fault-tolerance in commercial aircraft applications is typically achieved by redundancy. Dual or triple redundancy is common, and higher redundancy aircraft systems exist. This is also true for the Military, Defense and Space vehicles. In many cases the backups are provided for safety, and are used only to provide functionality when the primary fails. In such systems the primary component is checked before the start of a flight to see if it operates correctly. The aircraft will not take off unless the primary is functioning. Usually backup components are checked at intervals that span multiple flights. The first backup may be checked more frequently than the second or higher levels. This leads to flights where the system could have latent faults in the backup components. The probability of failure in such cases varies from flight to flight due to the different exposure times for components in the system.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2441
Ahmet Oztekin
Air Traffic Control System (ATCS) provides organizational, operational, and technical infrastructure necessary to maintain air traffic separation and prevent collision between aircraft operating within civil airspace. Current aviation safety research focuses mainly on aircraft and human vs. machine interactions. There is a gap in literature regarding research that explores ATCS’s potential impact on aviation safety. For complex systems, such as ATCS, safety is primarily a product of potential interactions among its various sub-systems. For example, over the phases of flight, separation of air traffic is maintained by different types of air traffic control (ATC) facilities. This paper outlines an analytical framework to perform a data-driven, risk-based assessment of ATC facilities. Safety associated with an ATC facility is modeled as an influence network using a set of risk factors.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2443
Nivedita Chanda
Aircrafts use Transponder for transmitting data to Air Traffic Control. Transponders automatically transmit a unique four-digit code when they receive a radio signal sent by radar. Code gives the plane's identity and radar stations establish speed and direction by monitoring successive transmissions. This data is then relayed to air traffic controllers. However, the aircraft mishaps have risen alarmingly in the past few decades resulting in unpredictable losses of human lives, nature, economically along with commotion of systems. This has necessitated active research work to fundamentally design better and effective systems. At present, there is no evident redundant system to transponder unlike in case of Power-Plants, three-fold reliable, safety cum redundant power supply system are present.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2458
Giuseppe Sirigu, Manuela Battipede, Piero Gili, Mario Cassaro
Abstract The future revolution of the air traffic system imposes the development of a new class of Flight Management Systems (FMS), capable of providing the aircraft with real-time reference flight parameters, necessary to fly the aircraft through a predefined sequence of waypoints, while minimizing fuel consumption, noise and pollution emissions. The main goal is to guarantee safety operations while reducing the aircraft environmental impact, according to the main international research programs. This policy is expected to affect also the Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs), as soon as they will be allowed to fly beyond the restricted portions of the aerospace where they are currently confined. In the future, in fact, UASs are expected to fly within the whole civilian airspace, under the same requirements deriving from the adoption of the Performance Based Navigation (PBN).
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2461
Enrico Troiani, Maria Pia Falaschetti, Sara Taddia, Alessandro Ceruti
Abstract The high number of hull losses is a main concern in the UAV field, mostly due to the high cost of on-board equipment. A crashworthiness design can be helpful to control the extent and position of crash impact damage, minimizing equipment losses. However, the wide use of composite materials has recently put the accent on the lack of data about the behavior of these structures under operative loads, such as the crash conditions. This paper presents the outcome of a set of tests carried out to achieve a controlled crush of UAV structures, and to maximize the Specific Energy Absorption. In this work, a small-scale experimental test able to characterize the energy absorption of a Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under compression was developed introducing self-supporting sinusoidal shape specimens, which avoid the need for complex anti-buckling devices.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2471
Alessandro Ceruti, Simone Curatolo, Alessandro Bevilacqua, Piergiovanni Marzocca
Abstract The maturity reached in the development of Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) systems is making them more and more attractive for a vast number of civil missions. Clearly, the introduction of UAVs in the civil airspace requiring practical and effective regulation is one of the most critical issues being currently discussed. As several civil air authorities report in their regulations “Sense and Avoid” or “Detect and Avoid” capabilities are critical to the successful integration of UAV into the civil airspace. One possible approach to achieve this capability, specifically for operations beyond the Line-of-Sight, would be to equip air vehicles with a vision-based system using cameras to monitor the surrounding air space and to classify other air vehicles flying in close proximity. This paper presents an image-based application for the supervised classification of air vehicles.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2478
Tobias Kreitz, Riko Bornholdt, Matthias Krings, Karsten Henning, Frank Thielecke
Abstract The paradigm shift to focus on an enhancement of existing aircraft systems raises the question which of the many possible incremental improvements results in an advantageous solution still considering all existing requirements. Hence, new methodologies for aircraft system design are a prerequisite to cope with such huge and complex design spaces. In the case of flight control system optimization, major design variables are the control surface configuration and actuation as well as their functional allocation. Possible architecture topologies have to be verified inter alia with respect to system safety requirements. In this context, flight dynamic characteristics and handling qualities of the fully operational as well as of several degraded system states of each topology have to be evaluated and checked against common specifications. A model-based verification of the requirements is favorable, resulting in a rapid reduction of the design space.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2475
Francesco Cappello, Roberto Sabatini, Subramanian Ramasamy
Abstract Accurate and robust tracking of objects is of growing interest amongst the computer vision scientific community. The ability of a multi-sensor system to detect and track objects, and accurately predict their future trajectory is critical in the context of mission- and safety-critical applications. Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) are currently not equipped to routinely access all classes of airspace since certified Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) systems are yet to be developed. Such capabilities can be achieved by incorporating both cooperative and non-cooperative DAA functions, as well as providing enhanced communications, navigation and surveillance (CNS) services. DAA is highly dependent on the performance of CNS systems for Detection, Tacking and avoiding (DTA) tasks and maneuvers.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2469
Reece Clothier, Brendan Williams, Achim Washington
Abstract One of the primary hazards associated with the operation of Unmanned Aircraft (UA) is the controlled or uncontrolled impact of the UA with terrain or objects on the terrain (e.g., people or structures). National Aviation Authorities (NAAs) have the responsibility of ensuring that the risks associated with this hazard are managed to an acceptable level. The NAA can mandate a range of technical (e.g., design standards) and operational (e.g., restrictions on flight) regulatory requirements. However, work to develop these regulations for UA is ongoing. Underpinning this rule-making process is a safety case showing how the regulatory requirements put in place ensure that the UA operation is acceptably safe for the given application and environment.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2474
Christopher W. Lum, Alexander Summers, Brian Carpenter, Angel Rodriguez, Matthew Dunbabin
Abstract In many parts of the world, uncontrolled fires in sparsely populated areas are a major concern as they can quickly grow into large and destructive conflagrations in short time spans. Detecting these fires has traditionally been a job for trained humans on the ground, or in the air. In many cases, these manned solutions are simply not able to survey the amount of area necessary to maintain sufficient vigilance and coverage. This paper investigates the use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) for automated wildfire detection. The proposed system uses low-cost, consumer-grade electronics and sensors combined with various airframes to create a system suitable for automatic detection of wildfires. The system employs automatic image processing techniques to analyze captured images and autonomously detect fire-related features such as fire lines, burnt regions, and flammable material.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2520
Thabet Kacem, Jeronymo Carvalho, Duminda Wijesekera, Paulo Costa, Márcio Monteiro, Alexandre Barreto
Abstract Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) [1] is a technology that can be viewed either as a complement or as an alternative to current radar-based surveillance techniques. Despite its many benefits, this technology suffers from the security flaw of having its messages sent as clear text broadcasts, which makes it vulnerable to several kinds of attacks affecting the authenticity and integrity of ADS-b messages - a problem we addressed with a security framework presented in previous work [2]. In this paper, we propose to enhance that initial work by using keyed-hash message authentication code [3] (HMAC) to ensure the authenticity and integrity of ADS-B messages. The proposed improvements include changing the structure of the security-related data and, more importantly, adding a cognitive risk adaptive module. These improvements resulted in four main contributions.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2385
Richard C. Millar
Abstract Unmanned aviation systems (UAS) acquired for US Navy for military roles are developed in the context of NAVAIR's rigorous and well-established policies, procedures and processes employed in the acquisition and development of manned aircraft. A key process is the preparation and approval of interim flight clearances (IFC) prior to flight test to ensure the aircraft is airworthy and thus safe to operate. Due to the perceived risks of UAS experimental flight test, the use of this process has been mandated for all Navy organizations, including use of commercially available UAS in research projects. This policy has proved to be a challenge, impeding and discouraging the use of UAS in research and experimental projects. Currently, the cost of compliance is unaffordable and IFC preparation and approval time are inconsistent with research cycle time expectations.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2440
Robert Moehle, Jason Clauss
Abstract Labor costs rank second only to fuel in expenses for commercial air transports. Labor issues are a growing concern in the airline industry, with an impending worldwide pilot shortage. One solution proposed and requested by some of the industry leaders is to allow a single flight crew member to operate the aircraft. Safety concerns represent the dominant barrier to single-pilot Part 121 operations. The FAA and Congress consistently demonstrate a bias toward conservatism in their regulation of airlines and commercial aircraft. Bureaucrats and the general public fall prey to isolated news stories that highlight pilot error and anchor their viewpoint on further regulating a two-person crew. Yet, in an alarming spate of recent airline accidents, the presence of multiple crewmembers did nothing to prevent, and actually may have contributed to, the crash. Technology is not the problem.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2445
Hartmut Hintze, Ralf God
Abstract The increasing functionality associated with the rising complexity of aircraft cabin systems which are used by cabin crew, passengers, maintenance staff and other stakeholders, requires a reconsideration of the methods for the development of aircraft cabin systems. This paper deals with a model-based security engineering approach based on the so called Three-V-Model as an appropriate process model, which represents the governing system engineering process (SEP) associated with the safety engineering process (SafEP) and the security engineering process (SecEP). All three processes are pursued concurrently and are interacting reciprocally by working within the same system model on each development level. We describe in detail the involved model-based security engineering activities of the SecEP and the integration of the CORAS risk analysis method in a consistent System Modeling Language (SysML) approach.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2539
Alessandro Gardi, Roberto Sabatini, Subramanian Ramasamy, Matthew Marino, Trevor Kistan
Abstract As part of the current initiatives aimed at enhancing safety, efficiency and environmental sustainability of aviation, a significant improvement in the efficiency of aircraft operations is currently pursued. Innovative Communication, Navigation, Surveillance and Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) technologies and operational concepts are being developed to achieve the ambitious goals for efficiency and environmental sustainability set by national and international aviation organizations. These technological and operational innovations will be ultimately enabled by the introduction of novel CNS/ATM and Avionics (CNS+A) systems, featuring higher levels of automation. A core feature of such systems consists in the real-time multi-objective optimization of flight trajectories, incorporating all the operational, economic and environmental aspects of the aircraft mission.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2538
Yixiang Lim, Alessandro Gardi, Roberto Sabatini
Abstract Contrails and aircraft-induced cirrus clouds are reputed being the largest components of aviation-induced global warming, even greater than carbon dioxide (CO2) exhaust emissions by aircraft. This article presents a contrail model algorithm specifically developed to be integrated within a multi-objective flight trajectory optimization software framework. The purpose of the algorithm is to supply to the optimizer a measure of the estimated radiative forcing from the contrails generated by the aircraft while flying a specific trajectory. In order to determine the precise measure, a comprehensive model is employed exploiting the Schmidt-Appleman criterion and ice-supersaturation regions. Additional parameters such as the solar zenith angle, contrail lifetime and spread are also considered.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2544
Subramanian Ramasamy, Roberto Sabatini
Abstract Avionic system developers are currently working on innovative technologies that are required in view of the rapid expansion of global air transport and growing concerns for environmental sustainability of aviation sector. Novel Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) system designs are being developed in the CNS/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) and Avionics (CNS+A) context for mission-and safety-critical applications. The introduction of dedicated software modules in Next Generation Flight Management Systems (NG-FMS), which are the primary providers of automated navigation and guidance services in manned aircraft and Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), has the potential to enable the significant advances brought in by time and trajectory based operations. High-integrity, high-reliability and all-weather services are required in the context of four dimensional Trajectory Based Operations / Intent Based Operations (TBO/IBO).
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2621
Douglas Leicht
Abstract Aviation regulations requires that engine mounts, and other flight structures located in designated fire zones must be constructed of fireproof material so that they are capable of withstanding the effects of fire. Historically, steel is defined as being inherently fireproof, however, titanium was not. Therefore, a fireproof test was conducted using 6AL-4V titanium structure for the attachment of the propulsion system on a mid-size business jet to satisfy FAA Federal Aviation Requirement 25.865. To determine if the titanium structure would be able to support normal operating loads during the fire event, finite element analysis was performed on the titanium structure simulating the fire test. The fire test simulates a fire on the aircraft from the propulsion system by using a burner with jet fuel exposing the component to a 2000 °F (1093°C) flame. The 2000 °F (1093°C) Flame is calibrated based on FAA Advisory Circular AC20-135.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 16230

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