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Viewing 151 to 180 of 11100
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0057
Yuji Arai, Makoto Hasegawa, Takeshi Harigae
Abstract ISO 26262 was established in 2011 as a functional safety standard for road vehicles. This standard provides safety requirements according to ASIL (Automotive Safety Integrity Level) in order to avoid unreasonable residual risk caused by malfunctioning behavior of electrical and/or electronic systems. The ASIL is determined by considering the estimate of three factors including injury severity. While applicable only to passenger cars at present, motorcycles will be included in the scope of application of ISO 26262 in the next revision. Therefore, our previous study focused on severity class evaluation for motorcycles. A method of classifying injury severity according to vehicle speed was developed on the basis of accident data. In addition, a severity table for motorcycles was created using accident data in representative collision configurations involved with motorcycles in Japan.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0058
Makoto Hasegawa, Takanobu Kaneko
Abstract ISO 26262, an international functional safety standard of electrical and/or electronic systems (E/E systems) for motor vehicles, was published in November 2011 and it is expected that the scope will be extended to motorcycles in a second edition of ISO 26262 going to be published in 2018. In order to apply ISO 26262 to motorcycle, proper estimation of Exposure, Controllability, and Severity are key factors to determine Motorcycle Safety Integrity Level (MSIL). Exposure is a factor to indicate the probability of the state of an operational situation that can be hazardous with the E/E system malfunction. And it is not easy to estimate the motorcycle Exposure due to less availability of back ground data in actual operational situation compared to motor vehicle. Therefore real traffic situation should be investigated in order to provide rationales for MSIL determination.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0059
Maki Kawakoshi, Takashi Kobayashi, Makoto Hasegawa
Abstract For applying ISO 26262 to motorcycles, controllability classification (C class evaluation) by expert riders is considered an appropriate technique. Expert riders have evaluated commercial product development for years and can appropriately conduct vehicle tests while observing safety restrictions (such as avoiding the risk of falling). Moreover, expert riders can ride safely and can stably evaluate motorcycle performance even if the test conditions are close to the limits of vehicle performance. This study aims to construct a motorcycle C class evaluation method based on an expert rider’s subjective evaluation. On the premise that expert riders can rate the C class, we improved a test procedure that used a subjective evaluation sheet as the concrete C class evaluation method for an actual hazardous event.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0006
John R. Humm, Narayan Yoganandan, Frank A. Pintar, Richard L. DeWeese, David M. Moorcroft, Amanda M. Taylor, Brian Peterson
The objective of the present exploratory study is to understand occupant responses in oblique and side-facing seats in the aviation environment, which are increasingly installed in modern aircrafts. Sled tests were conducted using intact Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) seated in custom seats approximating standard aircraft geometry. End conditions were selected to represent candidate aviation seat and restraint configurations. Three-dimensional head center-of-gravity linear accelerations, head angular velocities, and linear accelerations of the T1, T6, and T12 spinous processes, and sacrum were obtained. Three-dimensional kinematics relative to the seat were obtained from retroreflective targets attached to the head, T1, T6, T12, and sacrum. All specimens sustained spinal injuries, although variations existed by vertebral level.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0007
Yasuhiro Matsui, Shoko Oikawa, Kazuhiro Sorimachi, Akira Imanishi, Takeshi Fujimura
This study aimed to clarify the relationship between truck-pedestrian crash impact velocity and the risks of serious injury and fatality to pedestrians. We used micro and macro truck-pedestrian accident data from the Japanese Institute for Traffic Accident Research and Data Analysis (ITARDA) database. We classified vehicle type into five categories: heavy-duty trucks (gross vehicle weight [GVW] ≥11 × 103 kg [11 tons (t)], medium-duty trucks (5 × 103 kg [5 t] ≤ GVW < 11 × 103 kg [11 t]), light-duty trucks (GVW <5 × 103 kg [5 t]), box vans, and sedans. The fatality risk was ≤5% for light-duty trucks, box vans, and sedans at impact velocities ≤ 30 km/h and for medium-duty trucks at impact velocities ≤20 km/h. The fatality risk was ≤10% for heavy-duty trucks at impact velocities ≤10 km/h. Thus, fatality risk appears strongly associated with vehicle class.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0001
Harold J. Mertz, Priya Prasad, Dainius J. Dalmotas, Annette L. Irwin
Injury Risk Curves are developed from cadaver data for sternal deflections produced by anterior, distributed chest loads for a 25, 45, 55, 65 and 75 year-old Small Female, Mid-Size Male and Large Male based on the variations of bone strengths with age. These curves show that the risk of AIS ≥ 3 thoracic injury increases with the age of the person. This observation is consistent with NASS data of frontal accidents which shows that older unbelted drivers have a higher risk of AIS ≥ 3 chest injury than younger drivers.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0002
Sven A. Holcombe, Stewart C. Wang, James B. Grotberg
This study investigates the isolated effect of rib shape on the mechanical characteristics of ribs subjected to multiple forms of loading. It aims to measure the variation in stiffness due to shape that is seen throughout the population and, in particular, provide a tool for researchers to better understand the influence of shape on resulting stiffness. A previously published six-parameter shape model of the central axis of human ribs was used. It has been shown to accurately model the overall rib path using intrinsic geometric properties such as size, aspect ratio, and skewness, through shapes based on logarithmic spirals with high curvature continuity. In this study the model was fitted to 19,500 ribs from 989 adult female and male CT scans having demographic distributions matching the US adult population. Mechanical loading was simulated through a simplified finite element model aimed at isolating rib shape from other factors influencing mechanical response.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0003
Anicet Le Ruyet, Fabien Berthet, Frédéric Rongiéras, Philippe Beillas
A protocol based on ultrafast ultrasound imaging was applied to study the in situ motion of the liver while the abdomen was subjected to compressive loading at 3 m/s by a hemispherical impactor or a seatbelt. The loading was applied to various locations between the lower abdomen and the mid thorax while feature points inside the liver were followed on the ultrasound movie (2000 frames per second). Based on tests performed on five post mortem human surrogates (including four tested in the current study), trends were found between the loading location and feature point trajectory parameters such as the initial angle of motion or the peak displacement in the direction of impact. The impactor tests were then simulated using the GHBMC M50 human body model that was globally scaled to the dimensions of each surrogate. Some of the experimental trends observed could be reproduced in the simulations (e.g. initial angle) while others differed more widely (e.g. final caudal motion).
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0004
Rakshit Ramachandra, Yun-Seok Kang, John H. Bolte, Alena Hagedorn, Rodney Herriott, Jason A. Stammen, Kevin Moorhouse
Past studies have found that a pressure based injury risk function was the best predictor of liver injuries due to blunt impacts. In an effort to expand upon these findings, this study investigated the biomechanical responses of the abdomen of post mortem human surrogates (PMHS) to high-speed seatbelt loading and developed external response targets in conjunction with proposing an abdominal injury criterion. A total of seven unembalmed PMHS, with an average mass and stature of 71 kg and 174 cm respectively were subjected to belt loading using a seatbelt pull mechanism, with the PMHS seated upright in a free-back configuration. A pneumatic piston pulled a seatbelt into the abdomen at the level of the umbilicus with a nominal peak penetration speed of 4.0 m/s. Pressure transducers were placed in the re-pressurized abdominal vasculature, including the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abdominal aorta, to measure internal pressure variation during the event.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0005
Matthieu Lebarbé, Pascal Baudrit, Pascal Potier, Philippe Petit, Xavier Trosseille, Sabine Compigne, Mitsutoshi Masuda, Takumi Fujii, Richard Douard
The aim of this study was to investigate the sacroiliac joint injury mechanism. Two test configurations were selected from full scale car crashes conducted with the WorldSID 50th dummy resulting in high sacroiliac joint loads and low pubic symphysis force, i.e. severe conditions for the sacroiliac joint. The two test conditions were reproduced in laboratory using a 150-155 kg guided probe propelled respectively at 8 m/s and 7.5 m/s and with different shapes and orientations for the plate impacting the pelvis. Nine Post Mortem Human Subject (PMHS) were tested in each of the two configurations (eighteen PMHS in total). In order to get information on the time of fracture, eleven strain gauges were glued on the pelvic bone of each PMHS. Results - In the first configuration, five PMHS out of nine sustained AIS2+ pelvic injuries. All five presented sacroiliac joint injuries associated with pubic area injuries.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0008
Shoko Oikawa, Toshiya Hirose, Shigeru Aomura, Yasuhiro Matsui
The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism of traffic accidents involving cyclists. The focus is on the characteristics of cyclist accidents and scenarios, because the number of traffic accidents involving cyclists in Tokyo is the highest in Japan. First, dangerous situations in traffic incidents were investigated by collecting data from 304 cyclists in one city in Tokyo using a questionnaire survey. The survey indicated that cyclists used their bicycles generally while commuting to work or school in the morning. Second, the study investigated the characteristics of 250 accident situations involving cyclists that happened in the city using real-world bicycle accident data. The results revealed that the traffic accidents occurred at intersections of local streets, where cyclists collided most often with vehicles during commute time in the morning. Third, cyclists’ behavior was observed at a local street intersection in the morning in the city using video pictures.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0009
Hollie A. Pietsch, Kelly E. Bosch, David R. Weyland, E. Meade Spratley, Kyvory A. Henderson, Robert S. Salzar, Terrance A. Smith, Brandon M. Sagara, Constantine K. Demetropoulos, Christopher J. Dooley, Andrew C. Merkle
Three laboratory simulated sub-injurious under-body blast (UBB) test conditions were conducted with whole-body Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) and the Warrior Assessment Injury Manikin (WIAMan) Technology Demonstrator (TD) to establish and assess UBB biofidelity of the WIAMan TD. Test conditions included a rigid floor and rigid seat with independently varied pulses. On the floor, peak velocities of 4 m/s and 6 m/s were applied with a 5 ms time to peak (TTP). The seat peak velocity was 4 m/s with varied TTP of 5 and 10 ms. Tests were conducted with and without personal protective equipment (PPE). PMHS response data was compiled into preliminary biofidelity response corridors (BRCs), which served as evaluation metrics for the WIAMan TD. Each WIAMan TD response was evaluated against the PMHS preliminary BRC for the loading and unloading phase of the signal time history using Correlation Analysis (CORA) software to assign a numerical score between 0 and 1.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0011
David Gorman, Ebram Handy, Sikui Wang, Annette L. Irwin
Previous studies of frontal crash databases reported that ankle fractures are among the most common lower extremity fractures. While not generally life threatening, these injuries can be debilitating. Laboratory research into the mechanisms of ankle fractures has linked dorsiflexion with an increased risk of tibia and fibula malleolus fractures. However, talus fractures were not produced in the laboratory tests and appear to be caused by more complex loading of the joint. In this study, an analysis of the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the years 2004-2013 was conducted to investigate foot-ankle injury rates in front seat occupants involved in frontal impact crashes. A logistic regression model was developed indicating occupant weight, impact delta velocity and gender to be significant predictors of talus fracture (p<0.05).
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0010
Frank A. Pintar, Michael B. Schlick, Narayan Yoganandan, Liming Voo, Andrew C. Merkle, Michael Kleinberger
A new anthropomorphic test device (ATD) is being developed by the US Army to be responsive to vertical loading during a vehicle underbody blast event. To obtain design parameters for the new ATD, a series of non-injurious tests were conducted to derive biofidelity response corridors for the foot-ankle complex under vertical loading. Isolated post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) lower leg specimens were tested with and without military boot and in different initial foot-ankle positions. Instrumentation included a six-axis load cell at the proximal end, three-axis accelerometers at proximal and distal tibia, and calcaneus, and strain gages. Average proximal tibia axial forces for a neutral-positioned foot were about 2 kN for a 4 m/s test, 4 kN for 6 m/s test and 6 kN for an 8 m/s test. The force time-to-peak values were from 3 to 5 msec and calcaneus acceleration rise times were 2 to 8 msec.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0013
Chiara Giordano, Svein Kleiven
This study describes a method to identify laboratory test procedures and impact response requirements suitable for assessing the biofidelity of finite element head models used in prediction of traumatic brain injury. The selection of the experimental data and the response requirements were result of a critical evaluation based on the accuracy, reproducibility and relevance of the available experimental data. A weighted averaging procedure was chosen in order to consider different contributions from the various test conditions and target measurements based on experimental error. According to the quality criteria, 40 experimental cases were selected to be a representative dataset for validation. Based on the evaluation of response curves from four head finite element models, CORA was chosen as a quantitative method to compare the predicted time history response to the measured data.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0015
Matthew L. Davis, Bharath Koya, Jeremy M. Schap, F. Scott Gayzik
To mitigate the societal impact of vehicle crash, researchers are using a variety of tools, including finite element models (FEMs). As part of the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) project, comprehensive medical image and anthropometrical data of the 5th percentile female (F05) were acquired for the explicit purpose of FEM development. The F05-O (occupant) FEM model consists of 981 parts, 2.6 million elements, 1.4 million nodes, and has a mass of 51.1 kg. The model was compared to experimental data in 10 validation cases ranging from localized rigid hub impacts to full body sled cases. In order to make direct comparisons to experimental data, which represent the mass of an average male, the model was compared to experimental corridors using two methods: 1) post-hoc scaling the outputs from the baseline F05-O model and 2) geometrically morphing the model to the body habitus of the average male to allow direct comparisons.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0014
Eunjoo Hwang, Jingwen Hu, Cong Chen, Katelyn F. Klein, Carl S. Miller, Matthew P. Reed, Jonathan D. Rupp, Jason J. Hallman
Occupant stature and body shape may have significant effects on injury risks in motor vehicle crashes, but the current finite element (FE) human body models (HBMs) only represent occupants with a few sizes and shapes. Our recent studies have demonstrated that, by using a mesh morphing method, parametric FE HBMs can be rapidly developed for representing a diverse population. However, the biofidelity of those models across a wide range of human attributes has not been established. Therefore, the objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the accuracy of HBMs considering subject-specific geometry information, and 2) to apply the parametric HBMs in a sensitivity analysis for identifying the specific parameters affecting body responses in side impact conditions. Four side-impact tests with two male post-mortem human subjects (PMHSs) were selected to evaluate the accuracy of the geometry and impact responses of the morphed HBMs.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0017
Jason Stammen, Kevin Moorhouse, Brian Suntay, Michael Carlson, Yun-Seok Kang
When the Hybrid III 10-year old (HIII-10C) anthropomorphic test device (ATD) was adopted into Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 49 Part 572 as the best available tool for evaluating large belt-positioning booster seats in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 213, NHTSA stated that research activities would continue to improve the performance of the HIII-10C to address biofidelity concerns. A significant part of this effort has been NHTSA’s in-house development of the Large Omnidirectional Child (LODC) ATD. This prototype ATD is comprised of (1) a head with pediatric mass properties, (2) a neck that produces head lag with Z-axis rotation at the atlanto-occipital joint, (3) a flexible thoracic spine, (4) multi-point thoracic deflection measurement capability, (5) skeletal anthropometry representative of a seated child, and (6) an abdomen that can directly measure belt loading.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0016
Annette L. Irwin, Greg Crawford, David Gorman, Sikui Wang, Harold J. Mertz
Injury risk curves for SID-IIs thorax and abdomen rib deflections proposed for future NCAP side impact evaluations were developed from tests conducted with the SID-IIs FRG. Since the floating rib guide is known to reduce the magnitude of the peak rib deflections, injury risk curves developed from SID-IIs FRG data are not appropriate for use with SID-IIs build level D. PMHS injury data from three series of sled tests and one series of whole-body drop tests are paired with thoracic rib deflections from equivalent tests with SID-IIs build level D. Where possible, the rib deflections of SID-IIs build level D were scaled to adjust for differences in impact velocity between the PMHS and SID-IIs tests. Injury risk curves developed by the Mertz-Weber modified median rank method are presented and compared to risk curves developed by other parametric and non-parametric methods.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0018
Harold J. Mertz, Annette L. Irwin, Priya Prasad
In 1983, General Motors Corporation (GM) petitioned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to allow the use of the biofidelic Hybrid III midsize adult male dummy as an alternate test device for FMVSS 208 compliance testing of frontal impact, passive restraint systems. To support their petition, GM made public to the international automotive community the limit values that they imposed on the Hybrid III measurements, which were called Injury Assessment Reference Values (IARVs). During the past 20 years, these IARVs have been updated based on relevant biomechanical studies that have been published and scaled to provide IARVs for the Hybrid III and CRABI families of frontal impact dummies. Limit values have also been developed for the biofidelic side impact dummies, BioSID, ES-2 and SID-IIs.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0012
Tony R. Laituri, Scott Henry, Kevin Pline, Guosong Li, Michael Frankstein, Para Weerappuli
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recently published a Request for Comments regarding a potential upgrade to the US New Car Assessment Program (US NCAP) - a star-rating program pertaining to vehicle crashworthiness. Therein, NHTSA (a) cited two metrics for assessing head risk: Head Injury Criterion (HIC15) and Brain Injury Criterion (BrIC), and (b) proposed to conduct risk assessment via its risk curves for those metrics, but did not prescribe a specific method for applying them. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the NHTSA risk curves for BrIC significantly overstate field-based head injury rates. Therefore, in the present three-part study, a new set of BrIC-based risk curves was derived, an overarching head risk equation involving risk curves for both BrIC and HIC15 was assessed, and some additional candidate-predictor-variable assessments were conducted. Part 1 pertained to the derivation.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0227
Ivan R. Begosso, Alex F. Lima, Bruno S. Silva, Danilo M. Lessio, Gilvan P. Rossi, Klemer Santiago
Abstract The trailer hitch is an accessory which has been widely applied to vehicles as a protection device for low speed rear impact, aiming the integrity of the rear fascia. Its installation is commonly made at accessories shops without the orientation of the OEM’s and its project normally does not pursue the integration with vehicle structure. Using Finite Element Method, this work has as objective to study the influence of the trailer hitch in the body structure of small hatchback passenger vehicle during rear impact.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0128
Jacob Sanchez, Melcior Malivern, Núria Parera, Alba Fornells
Abstract In order to obtain more information from the side impact tests, a pole was fully instrumented with triaxle load cells. Also, a sled modification was carried out providing a sub-frame view of the vehicle during the entire test and making possible to compare the structure and element deformations with the obtained data. An in-depth analysis of vehicle structural behavior focused on the forces received by the vehicle during the pole side impact test was made. A crash test was set to validate the acquisition system of the instrumented pole. The obtained data like the forces and the deformations were analyzed in depth and used for a structural study of the vehicle. The data acquired by the acquisition system was used to obtain a force diagram from the pole and a comparison was made with the vehicle absorption mechanisms and structural elements involved. Moreover, the force data was compared with the sub-frame view and with the structural element’s deformation.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0188
Cássio Silva Fischer Chamone, Danilo Mudadu Teixeira, Marco Túlio Silva, Pedro Américo Almeida Magalhães Júnior
Abstract Children and animals have constantly been forgotten locked inside vehicles and subjected to extreme temperature conditions, which by dozens of times, led them to death. According to statistics compiled by "Kids and Cars", an organization dedicated to prevent child deaths, there were 724 cases of deaths of children caused by asphyxia or by high temperatures in a locked car between 1991 and 2013. This is a worrisome scenario and currently has generated discussion around solutions to the problem. Currently there are ideas and projects seeking for that solution, however they have proved ineffective. This study aims to propose a solution, implementing a system that can assist to the safety of children and animals forgotten in a car. To this end, the system employs a low cost presence sensor, which is ready for reading when the vehicle is turned-off and locked, detecting the presence of a person or animal by an infrared receiver.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0280
Marcelo F. Gomes, Eduardo Catalani, Daniel Rodrigues, Klemer Santiago
Abstract Vehicles sold in many countries around the globe must comply with ECE R14 or FMVSS 210 regulation in order to ensure proper function of the safety belt system when submitted to high loads. In these regulations, the procedure requests to apply high forces on the safety belts by using proper devices. All components of the system such as seats, safety belts, anchorage points and vehicle body have to resist the specified loads with no damages. The loads are applied slowly and sustained over a long period of time, characterizing a quasi-static test. The present work was developed to understand the energy distribution among all components during seat anchorage test and determine any potential failure, including cases in which components are changed. The system was optimized considering the energy dispersed by each component and their material plastic strength limit.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0140
Rodrigo Luiz de Campos
Abstract This work aims to summarize in a single form all legal requirements that dictates the minimum safety compliance required by government edicts to any wheel manufacture to have their products available for passenger or light truck vehicle in any country around the world in the year of 2016. It is not intention of this paper compare or discuss the different requirement among the countries but indicate to the manufactures of wheels what legal edicts they need to meet in case they are willing to go overseas to explore the wheel market of other country. Before start designing wheels for passenger or light truck application, any manufacture should be sure about what the government of the new market demands for wheels when installed on vehicle axis or just available as temporary spare.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8114
Massimiliano Ruggeri, Pietro Marani, Michele Selvatici
Abstract Stationary (parking) brake is a very important and safety critical function in many classes of machines. The new transmissions and the “by wire” systems increase the criticality of the role of stationary brake, as it is also an emergency (secondary) brake, and it’s often used to hold the vehicle when the transmission is not locking the wheels. As an example, dual clutch and power-shift transmission gear systems, as well as hydrostatic transmissions under certain circumstances, are often unable to hold the vehicle stopped and this function is provided by the stationary brake. Due to the main need of having the brake actuated when vehicle is stopped, without any hydraulic and electric power, the brake configuration is normally a “negative” configuration, usually called “spring applied” because of the actuator configuration, but this configuration causes the brake actuation when de-energized, even in case of system failure.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8155
Devaraj Dasarathan, Jonathan Jilesen, David Croteau, Ray Ayala
Abstract Side window clarity and its effect on side mirror visibility plays a major role in driver comfort. Driving in inclement weather conditions such as rain can be stressful, and having optimal visibility under these conditions is ideal. However, extreme conditions can overwhelm exterior water management devices, resulting in rivulets of water flowing over the a-pillar and onto the vehicle’s side glass. Once on the side glass, these rivulets and the pooling of water they feed, can significantly impair the driver’s ability to see the side mirror and to see outwardly when in situations such as changing lanes. Designing exterior water management features of a vehicle is a challenging exercise, as traditionally, physical testing methods first require a full-scale vehicle for evaluations to be possible. Additionally, common water management devices such as grooves and channels often have undesirable aesthetic, drag, and wind noise implications.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8141
Brian R. McAuliffe
Abstract With increasing use of boat-tails on Canadian roads, a concern had been raised regarding the possibility for ice and snow to accumulate and shed from the cavity of a boat-tail affixed to a dry-van trailer, posing a hazard for other road users. This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of the potential for ice and snow accumulation in the cavity of a boat-tail-equipped heavy-duty vehicle. A transient CFD approach was used and combined with a quasi-static particle-tracking simulation to evaluate, firstly, the tendency of various representative ice or snow particles to be entrained in the vehicle wake, and secondly, the potential of such particles to accumulate on the aft end of a dry-van trailer with and without various boat-tail configurations. Results of the particle tracking analyses showed that the greatest numbers of particles impinge on the base of the trailer for the no-boat-tail case, concentrated on the upper surface of the back face of the trailer.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8098
Satish Jaju, Sahil Pandare
Abstract The regulatory requirement in Economic Commission for Europe (ECE R58) regulation applies to the Rear underrun protection devices which are intended to be fitted to commercial vehicles of N categories. The purpose of this regulation is to offer effective protection against underrunning of vehicles. This paper describes Computer aided engineering (CAE) methodology for testing rear underrun protection devices with loading sequences to be decided by Original equipment manufacturer. A sample model is prepared and analyzed to represent actual test conditions. Constraints and boundary conditions are applied as per test of vehicle. Finite element simulation is carried out using LS DYNA solver. Structural strength and integrity of Rear under protection device assembly is observed for different regulatory load requirement.
Viewing 151 to 180 of 11100