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Viewing 121 to 150 of 11124
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1581
Jianbo Lu, Hassen Hammoud, Todd Clark, Otto Hofmann, Mohsen Lakehal-ayat, Shweta Farmer, Jason Shomsky, Roland Schaefer
Abstract This paper presents two brake control functions which are initiated when there is an impact force applied to a host vehicle. The impact force is generated due to the host vehicle being collided with or by another vehicle or object. The first function - called the post-impact braking assist - initiates emergency brake assistance if the driver is braking during or right after the collision. The second function - called the post-impact braking - initiates autonomous braking up to the level of the anti-lock-brake system if the driver is not braking during or right after the collision. Both functions intend to enhance the current driver assistance features such as emergency brake assistance, electronic stability control, anti-brake-lock system, collision mitigation system, etc.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1427
Daniel Koch, Gray Beauchamp, David Pentecost
Abstract Tire disablement events can cause a drag force that slows a vehicle. In this study, the magnitude of the deceleration was measured for different phases of 29 high speed tire tread separation and air loss tests. These deceleration rates can assist in reconstructing the speed of a vehicle involved in an accident following a tire disablement.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1413
Nathan A. Rose, Neal Carter, David Pentecost, Alireza Hashemian
Abstract This paper investigates the dynamics of four motorcycle crashes that occurred on or near a curve (Edwards Corner) on a section of the Mulholland Highway called “The Snake.” This section of highway is located in the Santa Monica Mountains of California. All four accidents were captured on video and they each involved a high-side fall of the motorcycle and rider. This article reports a technical description and analysis of these videos in which the motion of the motorcycles and riders is quantified. To aid in the analysis, the authors mapped Edwards Corner using both a Sokkia total station and a Faro laser scanner. This mapping data enabled analysis of the videos to determine the initial speed of the motorcycles, to identify where in the curve particular rider actions occurred, to quantify the motion of the motorcycles and riders, and to characterize the roadway radius and superelevation throughout the curve.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1423
Alan F. Asay, Christopher D. Armstrong, Bradley Higgins, John Steiner
Abstract The rear override crash behavior of full-size and light duty pickup trucks was examined. A series of ten full-scale, front and rear override impact crash tests were conducted involving four full-size pickup trucks, two light duty pickup trucks, and one sport utility vehicle (SUV). The tests were conducted utilizing a fabricated steel rigid barrier mounted on the front of the Massive Moving Barrier (MMB) test device with full overlap of the test vehicle. Crush ranged from 25.0 to 77.9 inches for impact speeds of 21.7 to 36.0 mph. These override tests on pickups were conducted to provide more basis in an area that is underrepresented in the literature. Each test was documented and measured prior to, and following, the crash test. The stiffness parameters were calculated and presented using constant stiffness, force saturation, and the power law damage models.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0058
Dajiang Suo, Sarra Yako, Mathew Boesch, Kyle Post
Abstract Developing requirements for automotive electric/electronic systems is challenging, as those systems become increasingly software-intensive. Designs must account for unintended interactions among software features, combined with unforeseen environmental factors. In addition, engineers have to iteratively make architectural tradeoffs and assign responsibilities to each component in the system to accommodate new safety requirements as they are revealed. ISO 26262 is an industry standard for the functional safety of automotive electric/electronic systems. It specifies various processes and procedures for ensuring functional safety, but does not limit the methods that can be used for hazard and safety analysis. System Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) is a new technique for hazard analysis, in the sense that hazards are caused by unsafe interactions between components (including humans) as well as component failures and faults.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1436
Edward Fatzinger, Jon Landerville
Abstract Various electronic control units from Kawasaki Ninja 300 motorcycles were tested in-situ in order to heuristically examine the capabilities and behavior of the event data recorders (EDR). The relevant hexadecimal data was downloaded from the ECU and translated using known and historically proven applications. The hexadecimal translations were then confirmed using data acquisition systems as well as the Kawasaki Diagnostic Software (KDS). Numerous tests were performed to establish the algorithms which cause the EDR to record data. It was determined that the EDR recording “trigger” was caused by the activation of the tip-over sensor, which in turn shuts the engine off. In addition, specific conditions must be met with regards to the rear wheel rotation prior to engine shut-down.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0178
Mark Hepokoski, Allen Curran, Sam Gullman, David Jacobsson
Abstract Passive sensor (HVAC) manikins have been developed to obtain high-resolution measurements of environmental conditions across a representative human body form. These manikins incorporate numerous sensors that measure air velocity, air temperature, radiant heat flux, and relative humidity. The effect of a vehicle’s climate control system on occupant comfort can be characterized from the data collected by an HVAC manikin. Equivalent homogeneous temperature (EHT) is often used as a first step in a cabin comfort analysis, particularly since it reduces a large data set to a single intuitive number. However, the applicability of the EHT for thermal comfort assessment is limited since it does not account for human homeostasis, i.e., that the human body actively counter-balances heat flow with the environment to maintain a constant core temperature.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0418
Gregory McCann, Prashant Khapane
Abstract An increase in data measurement and recording within vehicles has allowed Anti-lock Braking Systems (ABS) to monitor a vehicle’s dynamic behavior in far more detail. This increased monitoring helps to improve vehicle response in scenarios such as braking whilst cornering and braking on uneven surfaces. The Durability and Robustness (D&R) CAE department within Jaguar Land Rover discovered that the lack of a complex ABS system in virtual vehicle models was contributing to poor lateral and longitudinal loads correlation throughout the suspension and mounting systems. D&R CAE started a project to incorporate Continental’s ABS system, provided by ‘©Continental AG’ for physical JLR vehicles, into SIMPACK virtual vehicles by means of a co-simulation (2017 n.d.). The work involved collaboration between 3 departments in Jaguar Land Rover and ultimately led to implementation of the ABS into the JLR standard automotive virtual database.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1439
John C. Steiner, Christopher Armstrong, Tyler Kress, Tom Walli, Ralph J. Gallagher, Justin Ngo, Andres Silva
Abstract The use of the United States’ Global Positioning System (GPS) to assist with the management of large commercial fleets using telematics is becoming commonplace. Telematics generally refers to the use of wireless devices to transmit data in real time back to an organization. When tied to the GPS system telematics can be used to track fleet vehicle movements, and other parameters. GPS tracking can assist in developing more efficient and safe operations by refining and streamlining routing and operations. GPS based fleet telematics data is also useful for reducing unnecessary engine idle times and minimizing fuel consumption. Driver performance and policy adherence can be monitored, for example by transmitting data regarding seatbelt usage when there is vehicle movement. Despite the advantages for fleet management, there are limitations in the logged data for position and speed that may affect the utility of the system for analysis and reconstruction of traffic collisions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1438
Felix Lee, Peter Xing, Mike Yang, Janice Lee, Craig Wilkinson, Gunter P. Siegmund
Abstract The repeatability and accuracy of front and rear speed changes reported by Toyota’s Airbag Control Modules (ACMs) have been previously characterized for low-severity collisions simulated on a linear sled. The goals of the present study are (i) to determine the accuracy and repeatability of Toyota ACMs in mid-severity crashes, and (ii) to validate the assumption that ACMs function similarly for idealized sled pulses and full-scale vehicle-to-barrier and vehicle-to-vehicle crashes. We exposed three Toyota Corollas to a series of full-scale aligned frontal and rear-end crash tests with speed changes (ΔV) of 4 to 12 km/h. We then characterized the response of another 16 isolated Toyota ACMs from three vehicle models (Corolla, Prius and Camry) and 3 generations (Gen 1, 2 and 3) using idealized sled pulses and replicated vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-barrier pulses in both frontal and rear-end crashes (ΔV = 9 to 17 km/h).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0268
Venkatesh Babu, Richard Gerth
Abstract The aim of this analysis was to model the effect of adding stiffening ribs in structural aluminum components by friction stir processing (FSP) Nano material into the aluminum matrix. These stiffening ribs could dampen, redirect, or otherwise alter the transmission of energy waves created from automotive, ballistic, or blast shocks to improve noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) and structural integrity (reduced joint stress) response. Since the ribs are not created by geometry changes they can be space efficient and deflect blast / ballistic energy better than geometry ribbing, resulting in a lighter weight solution. The blast and ballistic performance of different FSP rib patterns in AL 5182 and AL 7075 were simulated and compared to the performance of an equivalent weight of RHA plate FSP helps to increase localized strength and stiffness of the base metal, while achieving light weighting of the base metal.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1412
Christopher H. Goddard, David Price
Abstract Various mechanisms have been used to drive speedometers and other instrument gauges. This paper reviews the mechanisms used; in particular investigates the ability of stepper motors which have become the most common instrument motor in the last decade to freeze at the apparent reading prior to impact. Stepper motors require power to drive the needle to any indicated position, including having to return it to zero. Hence if power to the instrument is lost as a result of a collision, there is no power to move the needle and it should be left at the reading shown at the moment the power was lost. However, not all stepper motor instruments are the same and before accepting the reading, a number of criteria need to be considered to give a level of confidence in the result. As part of recent ITAI (Institute of Traffic Accident Investigators) crash test events in the UK, a number of instrument clusters were installed in vehicles to simulate both frontal and side impacts.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1433
Enrique Bonugli, Joseph Cormier, Matthew Reilly, Lars Reinhart
The purpose of this study was to determine the frictional properties between the exterior surface of a motorcycle helmet and ‘typical’ roadway surfaces. Motorcycle helmet impacts into asphalt and concrete surfaces were compared to abrasive papers currently recommended by government helmet safety standards and widely used by researchers in the field of oblique motorcycle helmet impact testing. A guided freefall test fixture was utilized to obtain nominal impact velocities of 5, 7 and 9 m/s. The impacting surfaces were mounted to an angled anvil to simulate an off-centered oblique collision. Helmeted Hybrid III ATD head accelerations and impact forces were measured for each test. The study was limited to a single helmet model and impact angle (30 degrees). Analysis of the normal and tangential forces imparted to the contact surface indicated that the frictional properties of abrasive papers differ from asphalt and concrete in magnitude, duration and onset.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1424
Mark Fabbroni, Jennifer Rovt, Mark Paquette
Abstract Collision reconstruction often involves calculations and computer simulations, which require an estimation of the weights of the involved vehicles. Although weight data is readily available for automobiles and light trucks, there is limited data for heavy vehicles, such as tractor-semitrailers, straight trucks, and the wide variety of trailers and combinations that may be encountered on North American roads. Although manufacturers always provide the gross vehicle weight ratings (GVWR) for these vehicles, tare weights are often more difficult to find, and in-service loading levels are often unknown. The resulting large uncertainty in the weight of a given truck can often affect reconstruction results. In Canada, the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario conducted a Commercial Vehicle Survey in 2012 that consisted of weight sampling over 45,000 heavy vehicles of various configurations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1475
Saeed Barbat, Xiaowei Li
Abstract On December 2015, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published its proposal to implement U.S New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) changes covering three categories of crashworthiness, crash avoidance and pedestrian protection, beginning with the 2019 model year. The crashworthiness category included a new frontal oblique impact (OI) test protocol. The test compromises of a new Oblique Moving Deformable Barrier (OMDB), new THOR 50th percentile male (THOR-50M) anthropomorphic test device (ATD), and a new test configuration. An OMDB of 2,486 kg (5,480 lb) impacts a stationary target vehicle at a speed of 90 kph (56 mph) at an angle of 15 degrees with a 35% barrier overlap with the front end of the target vehicle. In vehicle-to-vehicle collisions, the lighter weight vehicle experience higher velocity change and higher acceleration levels, thereby, occupants in the lighter vehicle experience higher injury risk.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1437
William Bortles, Sean McDonough, Connor Smith, Michael Stogsdill
Abstract The data obtained from event data recorders found in airbag control modules, powertrain control modules and rollover sensors in passenger vehicles has been validated and used to reconstruct crashes for years. Recently, a third-party system has been introduced that allows crash investigators and reconstructionists to access, preserve and analyze data from infotainment and telematics systems found in passenger vehicles. The infotainment and telematics systems in select vehicles retain information and event data from cellular telephones and other devices connected to the vehicle, vehicle events and navigation data in the form of tracklogs. These tracklogs provide a time history of a vehicle’s geolocation that may be useful in investigating an incident involving an automobile or reconstructing a crash. This paper presents an introduction to the type of data that may be retained and the methods for performing data acquisitions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1417
Enrique Bonugli, Richard Watson, Mark Freund, Jeffrey Wirth
Abstract This paper reports on seventy additional tests conducted using a mechanical device described by Bonugli et al. [4]. The method utilized quasi-static loading of bumper systems and other vehicle components to measure their force-deflection properties. Corridors on the force-deflection plots, for various vehicle combinations, were determined in order to define the system stiffness of the combined vehicle components. Loading path and peak force measurements can then be used to evaluate the impact severity for low speed collisions in terms of delta-v and acceleration. The additional tests refine the stiffness corridors, previously published, which cover a wide range of vehicle types and impact configurations. The compression phase of a low speed collision can be modeled as a spring that is defined by the force-deflection corridors. This is followed by a linear rebound phase based on published restitution values [1,5].
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1516
Daniel B. Honeycutt, Mesbah Uddin
Abstract Although, the implementation of lift-off prevention devices such as the NASCAR roof flaps have greatly reduced the frequency and severity of race vehicle aerodynamic lift-off incidents, airborne incidents still occur occasionally in motorsports. The effectiveness of existing lift-off prevention measures and future trends in lift-off prevention are addressed in this paper. The results and analysis presented in this paper will be of paramount interest to race vehicle designers and sanctioning bodies because the effects of aerodynamics on vehicle lift-off need to be comprehended, but there exists a scarcity of reliable data in this area.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1432
Tadasuke Katsuhara, Yoshiki Takahira, Shigeki Hayashi, Yuichi Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract This study used finite element (FE) simulations to analyze the injury mechanisms of driver spine fracture during frontal crashes in the World Endurance Championship (WEC) series and possible countermeasures are suggested to help reduce spine fracture risk. This FE model incorporated the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) scaled to a driver, a model of the detailed racecar cockpit and a model of the seat/restraint systems. A frontal impact deceleration pulse was applied to the cockpit model. In the simulation, the driver chest moved forward under the shoulder belt and the pelvis was restrained by the crotch belt and the leg hump. The simulation predicted spine fracture at T11 and T12. It was found that a combination of axial compression force and bending moment at the spine caused the fractures. The axial compression force and bending moment were generated by the shoulder belt down force as the driver’s chest moved forward.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0107
Arvind Jayaraman, Ashley Micks, Ethan Gross
Abstract Recreating traffic scenarios for testing autonomous driving in the real world requires significant time, resources and expense, and can present a safety risk if hazardous scenarios are tested. Using a 3D virtual environment to enable testing of many of these traffic scenarios on the desktop or cluster significantly reduces the amount of required road tests. In order to facilitate the development of perception and control algorithms for level 4 autonomy, a shared memory interface between MATLAB, Simulink, and Unreal Engine 4 can send information (such as vehicle control signals) back to the virtual environment. The shared memory interface conveys arbitrary numerical data, RGB image data, and point cloud data for the simulation of LiDAR sensors.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0716
Randy Hessel, Zongyu Yue, Rolf Reitz, Mark Musculus, Jacqueline O'Connor
Abstract One way to develop an understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes that occur during direct injection and combustion in an internal combustion engine is to image the natural luminosity from soot over time. Imaging is possible when there is optical access to the combustion chamber. After the images are acquired, the next challenge is to properly interpret the luminous distributions that have been captured on the images. A major focus of this paper is to provide guidance on interpretation of experimental images of soot luminosity by explaining how radiation from soot is predicted to change as it is transmitted through the combustion chamber and to the imaging. The interpretations are only limited by the scope of the models that have been developed for this purpose. The end-goal of imaging radiation from soot is to estimate the amount of soot that is present.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0293
Tina Hull
Abstract Recent advances in technology allow machine safeguarding to shift from a system that completely shuts down the hazardous part of a machine, regardless of the action, to one with a controlled response. This intelligent robotics safeguarding can be based on conditions such as the type of task, how it is performed, entry and exit locations, and the operator’s movement within the hazard zone. Such a strategy could increase production rates by allowing robots to operate at higher speeds within dynamic environments. When used as part of a preventative maintenance program, reliability data can predict component failure rates and reduce the probability that operators will access the hazard zone. Programming techniques, such as function blocks to monitor component usage, can be used to evaluate trends. SQL (Structured Query Language) databases can track access and frequency trends, which can lead to design improvements and indicate changes affecting the system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0367
Yueqian Jia, Yu-wei Wang, Yuanli Bai
Abstract A fully modularized framework was established to combine isotropic, kinematic, and cross hardening behaviors under non-monotonic loading conditions for advanced high strength steels. Experiments under the following types of non-proportional loading conditions were conducted, 1) uniaxial tension-compression-tension/compression-tension-compression full cycle reversal loading, 2) uniaxial reversal loading with multiple cycles, and 3) reversal shear. The calibrated new model is decoupled between isotropic and kinematic hardening behaviors, and independent on both anisotropic yield criterion and fracture model. Nine materials were calibrated using the model, include: DP590, DP600, DP780, TRIP780, DP980LY, QP980, AK Steel DP980, TBF1180, and AK Steel DP1180. Good correlation was observed between experimental and modeled results.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0365
Kentaro Sato, Takayuki Futatsuka, Jiro Hiramoto, Kei Nagasaka, Akira Akita, Takeshi Kashiyama
Abstract A simple testing method is proposed in order to investigate ductile fracture in crashed automotive components made from advanced high strength steels. This type of fracture is prone to occur at spot-welded joints and flange edges. It is well known that the heat affected zone (HAZ) is a weak point in high strength steel due to the formation of annealed material around the spot-welded nugget, and the flange edge also has low ductility due to the damage caused by shearing. The proposed method is designed to simulate a ductile fracture which initiates from a spot-welded portion or a sheared edge in automotive components which are deformed in a crash event. Automotive steel sheets with a wide range of tensile strengths from 590MPa to 1470MPa are examined in order to investigate the effect of material strength on fracture behavior. The effects of material cutting methods, namely, machining and shearing, are also investigated.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0378
Yuta Imanami, Kunikazu Tomita, Kazuaki Fukuoka, Kimihiro Nishimura
Abstract In order to develop a new carburizing steel material that realizes an intermediate heat treatment-free process in parts manufacturing, the cold forgeability of the as-rolled steel and suppression of abnormal grain growth of austenite were studied. It was shown that adjustment of addition amount of Si, Mn and Cr, suppression of dynamic strain aging during cold forging, and an increase of ferrite fraction by controlled rolling contribute to the reduction of deformation resistance. However, Nb precipitation control by fully utilizing mill manufacturing processes was also necessary for suppression of abnormal grain growth of austenite. A new steel for carburizing was developed by integrating these technologies, making it possible to eliminate annealing before cold forging and normalizing before carburizing simultaneously. Thus, the developed steel is an important innovation in the parts manufacturing process.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0379
Tau Tyan, Leonard Shaner, Matt Niesluchowski, Nand Kochhar, Dilip Bhalsod, Jason Wang
Three computational gas and fluid dynamic methods, CV/UP (Control Volume/Uniform Pressure), CPM (Corpuscular Particle Method), and ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian and Eulerian), were investigated in this research in an attempt to predict the responses of side crash pressure sensors. Acceleration-based crash sensors have been used extensively in the automotive industry to determine the restraint system firing time in the event of a vehicle crash. The prediction of acceleration-based crash pulses by using computer simulations has been very challenging due to the high frequency and noisy responses obtained from the sensors, especially those installed in crush zones. As a result, the sensor algorithm developments for acceleration-based sensors are largely based on prototype testing. With the latest advancement in the crash sensor technology, side crash pressure sensors have emerged recently and are gradually replacing acceleration-based sensor for side crash applications.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0368
Ying Zhao, Fangwu Ma, Longfan Yang, Yueqiang Wang, Hongyu Liang
Abstract The conventional hood with single material and stiffener structural form conceals some limitations on pedestrian protection and lightweight, not satisfying the requirements of structural strength, pedestrian protection and lightweight contradictory with each other at the same time. In this paper, a novel type hood is proposed to develop sandwich structure using architected cellular material with negative Poisson's ratio (NPR) configuration based on the decoupling thought of structural strength and energy absorption. Core-layer aluminum alloy material with NPR is used to meet the requirement of impact energy absorption, inner and outer skin using carbon fiber is selected to achieve high structural stiffness needed. This paper starts from the relations between geometric parameters of core-layer architected cellular material and mechanical properties, on this basis, the optimal geometric parameters can be expected using the multiobjective optimization method.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1462
Haiyan Li, Xin Jin, Hongfei Zhao, Shihai Cui, Binhui Jiang, King H. Yang
Abstract Computational human body models, especially detailed finite element models are suitable for investigation of human body kinematic responses and injury mechanism. A real-world lateral vehicle-tree impact accident was reconstructed by using finite element method according to the accident description in the CIREN database. At first, a baseline vehicle FE model was modified and validated according to the NCAP lateral impact test. The interaction between the car and the tree in the accident was simulated using LS-Dyna software. Parameters that affect the simulation results, such as the initial pre-crash speed, impact direction, and the initial impact location on the vehicle, were analyzed. The parameters were determined by matching the simulated vehicle body deformations and kinematics to the accident reports.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1380
Richard Young
Abstract Dingus and colleagues recently estimated the crash odds ratios (ORs) for secondary tasks in the Strategic Highway Research Program Phase 2 (SHRP 2) naturalistic driving study. Their OR estimate for hand-held cell phone conversation (Talk) was 2.2, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) from 1.6 to 3.1. This Talk OR estimate is above 1, contrary to previous estimates below 1. A replication discovered two upward biases in their analysis methods. First, for video clips with exposure to a particular secondary task, Dingus and colleagues selected clips not only with exposure to that task, but often with concurrent exposure to other secondary tasks. However, for video clips without exposure to that task, Dingus and colleagues selected video clips without other secondary tasks. Hence, the OR estimate was elevated simply because of an imbalanced selection of video clips, not because of risk from a particular secondary task.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0118
Yang Wang, Ankit Goila, Rahul Shetty, Mahdi Heydari, Ambarish Desai, Hanlong Yang
Regarding safety, obstacle avoidance has been considered as one of the most important features among ADAS systems for ground vehicles. However, the implementation of obstacle avoidance functions to commercial vehicles are still under progress. In this paper, we demonstrate a complete process of obstacle avoidance strategy for unmanned ground vehicle and implement the strategy on the self-developed Arduino based RC Car. In this process, the sensor LIDAR was used to detect the obstacles on the fore-path. Based on the measured LIDAR data, an optimized path is automatically generated with accommodation of current car position, obstacle locations, car operation capability and global environmental restrictions. The path planning is updated in real time while new or changing obstacles being detected. This algorithm is validated by the simulation results with the RC car. The comparison will be discussed at the end of this paper.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 11124