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Viewing 91 to 120 of 137
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1272
Nick Parson, Jerome Fourmann, Jean-Francois Beland
Abstract One of the main applications for aluminum extrusions in the automotive sector is crash structures including crash rails, crash cans, bumpers and structural body components. The objective is usually to optimize the energy absorption capability for a given structure weight. The ability to extrude thin wall multi-void extrusions contributes to this goal. However, the alloy used also plays a significant role in terms of the ability to produce the required geometry, strength - which to a large extent controls the energy absorption capability and the “ductility” or fracture behavior which controls the strain that can be applied locally during crush deformation before cracking. This paper describes results of a test program to examine the crush behavior of a range of alloys typically supplied for automotive applications as a function of processing parameters including artificial ageing and quench rate.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1301
Deepak A. Patil, Hrishikesh Buddhe
Abstract Frontal collisions account for majority of car accidents. Various measures have been taken by the automotive OEMs’ with regards to passive safety. Honeycomb meso-structural inserts in the front bumper have been suggested to enhance the energy absorption of the front structure which is favorable for passive safety. This paper presents the changes in energy absorption capacity of hexagonal honeycomb structures with varying cellular geometries; under frontal impact simulations. Honeycomb cellular metamaterial structure offers many distinct advantages over homogenous materials since their effective material properties depend on both, their constituent material properties and their cell geometric configurations. The effective static mechanical properties such as; the modulus of elasticity, modulus of rigidity and Poisson’s ratio of the honeycomb cellular meso-structures are controlled by variations in their cellular geometry.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1299
Nagurbabu Noorbhasha, Brendan J. O'Toole
Abstract The objective of this research is to design and analyze a roll cage structure for an off-road vehicle that was used for SAE Baja competition by UNLV SAE Baja team. Baja SAE is an intercollegiate competition to design, fabricate, and race a small, single passenger, off-road vehicle powered by a 10 HP Briggs Stratton 4-Stroke gasoline engine. Since the off-road vehicle is powered by a small capacity engine, the weight of the structure is very critical and must be optimized to improve the performance of the vehicle. In an effort to optimize the structure, a finite element analysis (FEA) was performed and the effects of stress and deformation were studied for a linear static frontal impact analysis on roll cage structure. The frame was further modified for structural rigidity. Additional strengthening gussets were added at the locations of high stresses to reduce the stress concentration.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1307
Puneet Bahri, Praveen Balaj Balakrishnan, Ravi Purnoo Munuswamy
Abstract Automotive industries are emphasizing more and more on occupant safety these days, due to an increase in awareness and demand to achieve high safety standards. They are dependent on simulation tools to predict the performance of subsystems more accurately. The challenges being encountered are designs which are getting more complex and limitations in incorporating all real-life scenarios, such as to include all manufacturing considerations like forming and welding effects. Latest versions of solvers are slowly introducing new options to include these actual scenarios. Ls-Dyna is one of the explicit solvers to introduce these possibilities. The process of including stamping details into crash simulation is already being performed in the automotive industry. However, for seatbelt pull analysis, this has not been explored much.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0041
Shengguang Xiong, Gangfeng Tan, Xuexun Guo, Longjie Xiao
Abstract Automotive Front Lighting System(AFS) can receive the steering signal and the vehicular speed signal to adjust the position of headlamps automatically. AFS will provide drivers more information of front road to protect drivers safe when driving at night. AFS works when there is a steering signal input. However, drivers often need the front road's information before they turn the steering wheel when vehicles are going to go through a sharp corner, AFS will not work in such a situation. This paper studied how to optimize the working time of AFS based on GIS (Geographic Information System) and GPS(Geographic Information System) to solve the problem. This paper analyzed the process of the vehicle is about to go through a corner. Low beams and high beams were discussed respectively.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0050
Mario Berk, Hans-Martin Kroll, Olaf Schubert, Boris Buschardt, Daniel Straub
Abstract With increasing levels of driving automation, the perception provided by automotive environment sensors becomes highly safety relevant. A correct assessment of the sensors’ perception reliability is therefore crucial for ensuring the safety of the automated driving functionalities. There are currently no standardized procedures or guidelines for demonstrating the perception reliability of the sensors. Engineers therefore face the challenge of setting up test procedures and plan test drive efforts. Null Hypothesis Significance Testing has been employed previously to answer this question. In this contribution, we present an alternative method based on Bayesian parameter inference, which is easy to implement and whose interpretation is more intuitive for engineers without a profound statistical education. We show how to account for different environmental conditions with an influence on sensor performance and for statistical dependence among perception errors.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0045
Guirong Zhuo, Cheng Wu, Fengbo Zhang
Abstract Vehicle active collision avoidance includes collision avoidance by braking and by steering. However, both of these two methods have their limitations. Therefore, it is significant to establish the feasible region of active collision avoidance to choose the optimal way to avoid traffic accidents. This paper focuses on the steering control of an autonomous vehicle to track the planned trajectory and to perform an emergency collision avoidance maneuver. Meanwhile, the collision avoidance effect of steering control is compared with that of braking control. The path tracking controller is designed by hierarchical control structure. The upper controller includes model predictive control allocation and speed controller, and the lower is designed by weighted least-squares control allocation for torque allocation. Besides, seven order polynomial is used for path planning.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0032
Wei Yang, Ling Zheng, Yinong Li, Yue Ren, Yusheng Li
Abstract This paper proposed a two-section trajectory planning algorithm. In this trajectory planning, sigmoid function is adopted to fit two tangent arcs to meet limited parking spaces by reducing the radius of turning. Then the transverse preview model is established and the path tracking errors including distance error and angle error are estimated. The weight coefficient is considered to distribute the impact factor of traverse distance error or traverse angle error in the total error. The fuzzy controller is designed to track the two-section trajectory in autonomous intelligent parking system. The fuzzy controller is developed due to its real-time and robustness in the parking process. Traverse errors and its first-order derivative are selected as input variables and the outer wheel steering angle is selected as the output variable in fuzzy controller. They are also divided into seven fuzzy sets. Finally, forty rules are decided to achieve effective trajectory tracking.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1202
Ben Tabatowski-Bush
Abstract The Battery Monitoring Integrated Circuit (BMIC) is a key technology for Battery Electronics in the electrification of vehicles. Generally speaking, every production hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicle uses some type of BMIC to monitor the voltage of each lithium battery cell. In order to achieve Functional Safety for the traction battery packs for these electrified vehicles, most designs require higher ASIL ratings for the BMIC such as C or D. For the entire market of available BMIC’s, there is a generic feature set that can be found on almost every IC on the market, such as a front end multiplexer, one or more precision references, one or more Analog to Digital (A/D) converters, a power supply, communications circuits, and window comparators. There is also a fairly consistent suite of self-diagnostics, available on just about every available BMIC, to detect failures and enable achievement of the appropriate ASIL rating.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1195
Masahiro Kimoto
Abstract SAE standards require the function of a Manual Service Disconnect (MSD), when open, to remove any voltage between positive and negative Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) output terminals. Another SAE standard specifies that measured voltage across all external battery terminal sets shall be less than 60 VDC within 5 seconds after the manual disconnect is actuated with the automatic disconnect (e.g., contactors) closed. In this paper, the location of the manual service disconnect is reviewed to meet isolation requirement of the battery pack system (i.e., RESS). Battery architectures with manual service disconnect located at the most positive side, most negative side, and center of the array or the pack were studied. Voltage measurement points and single point failure modes were considered. It was found that MSD location for a single contactor pack is most effective in reducing voltage potential at the terminals when placed on the other side of the contactor.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1416
B. Nicholas Ault, Daniel E. Toomey
Abstract Reconstruction of passenger vehicle accidents involving side impacts with narrow objects has traditionally been approached using side stiffness coefficients derived from moveable deformable barrier tests or regression analysis using the maximum crush in available lateral pole impact testing while accounting for vehicle test weight. Current Lateral Impact New Car Assessment Program (LINCAP) testing includes 20 mph oblique lateral pole impacts. This test program often incorporates an instrumented pole so the force between the vehicle and pole at several elevations along the vehicle - pole interface is measured. Force-Displacement (F-D) characteristics of vehicle structures were determined using the measured impact force and calculated vehicle displacement from on-board vehicle instrumentation. The absorbed vehicle energy was calculated from the F-D curves and related to the closing speed between the vehicle and the pole by the vehicle weight.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1432
Tadasuke Katsuhara, Yoshiki Takahira, Shigeki Hayashi, Yuichi Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract This study used finite element (FE) simulations to analyze the injury mechanisms of driver spine fracture during frontal crashes in the World Endurance Championship (WEC) series and possible countermeasures are suggested to help reduce spine fracture risk. This FE model incorporated the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) scaled to a driver, a model of the detailed racecar cockpit and a model of the seat/restraint systems. A frontal impact deceleration pulse was applied to the cockpit model. In the simulation, the driver chest moved forward under the shoulder belt and the pelvis was restrained by the crotch belt and the leg hump. The simulation predicted spine fracture at T11 and T12. It was found that a combination of axial compression force and bending moment at the spine caused the fractures. The axial compression force and bending moment were generated by the shoulder belt down force as the driver’s chest moved forward.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1445
Kevin Pline, Derek Board, Nirmal Muralidharan, Srinivasan Sundararajan, Eric Eiswerth, Katie Salciccioli, Noelle Baker
Abstract Ford Motor Company introduced the inflatable seatbelt system in 2011 and the system is now available in the second row of several Ford and Lincoln models. An important consideration is the interaction of the inflatable seatbelt system with child restraint systems (CRS). A comprehensive series of frontal impact sled tests, using a standardized test method, was conducted to compare the performance of rear-facing-only CRS installed using an inflatable seatbelt to the same CRS installed using a standard seatbelt. CRS models from several manufacturers in the North American market were tested both with and without their bases. CRABI 12 month old or Hybrid III 3 year old anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) were restrained in the CRS. The assessment included the ability to achieve a satisfactory installation with the inflatable seatbelt, comparisons of ATD and CRS kinematics, CRS system integrity, and comparisons of ATD responses.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1351
Vamshi Korivi, Steven McCormick, Steven Hodges
Abstract The US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) has developed a unique physics based modeling & simulation (M&S) capability using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques to optimize automatic fire extinguishing system (AFES) designs and complement vehicle testing for both occupied and unoccupied spaces of military ground vehicles. The modeling techniques developed are based on reduced global kinetics for computational efficiency and are applicable to fire suppressants that are being used in Army vehicles namely, bromotrifluoromethane (Halon 1301), heptafluoropropane (HFC-227ea, trade name FM200), sodium-bicarbonate (SBC) powder, water + potassium acetate mixture, and pentafluoroethane (HFC-125, trade name, FE-25). These CFD simulations are performed using High Performance Computers (HPC) that enable the Army to assess AFES designs in a virtual world at far less cost than physical-fire tests.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1352
David Gardiner
Abstract This paper presents an experimental study of the vapour space flammability of Fuel Ethanol (a high-ethanol fuel for Flexible Fuel Vehicles, commonly known as “E85”) and gasoline containing up to 10% ethanol (commonly known as “E10”). The seasonal minimum vapour pressure limits in specifications for automotive spark ignition fuels are intended, in part, to minimize the formation of flammable mixtures in the headspace of vehicle fuel tanks. This is particularly important at subzero temperatures, where the headspace mixture may not be rich enough to prevent combustion in the presence of an ignition source such as a faulty electrical fuel pump. In the current study, the upper temperature limits of flammability were measured for field samples of “E85” and “E10”, and a series of laboratory-prepared blends of denatured ethanol, Before Oxygenate Blending (BOB) gasoline, and n-butane.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1450
Daniel Perez-Rapela, Jason Forman, Haeyoung Jeon, Jeff Crandall
Abstract Current state-of-the-art vehicles implement pedestrian protection features that rely on pedestrian detection sensors and algorithms to trigger when impacting a pedestrian. During the development phase, the vehicle must “learn” to discriminate pedestrians from the rest of potential impacting objects. Part of the training data used in this process is often obtained in physical tests utilizing legform impactors whose external biofidelity is still to be evaluated. This study uses THUMS as a reference to assess the external biofidelity of the most commonly used impactors (Flex-PLI, PDI-1 and PDI-2). This biofidelity assessment was performed by finite element simulation measuring the bumper beam forces exerted by each surrogate on a sedan and a SUV. The bumper beam was divided in 50 mm sections to capture the force distribution in both vehicles. This study, unlike most of the pedestrian-related literature, examines different impact locations and velocities.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1463
Xianping Du, Feng Zhu, Clifford C. Chou
Abstract A new design methodology based on data mining theory has been proposed and used in the vehicle crashworthiness design. The method allows exploring the big dataset of crash simulations to discover the underlying complicated relationships between response and design variables, and derive design rules based on the structural response to make decisions towards the component design. An S-shaped beam is used as an example to demonstrate the performance of this method. A large amount of simulations are conducted and the results form a big dataset. The dataset is then mined to build a decision tree. Based on the decision tree, the interrelationship among the geometric design variables are revealed, and then the design rules are derived to produce the design cases with good energy absorbing capacity. The accuracy of this method is verified by comparing the data mining model prediction and simulation data.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1472
Niels Pasligh, Robert Schilling, Marian Bulla
Abstract Rivets, especially self-piercing rivets (SPR), are a primary joining technology used in aluminum bodied vehicles. SPR are mechanical joining elements used to connect sheets to create a body in white (BiW) structure. To ensure the structural performance of a vehicle in crash load cases it is necessary to describe physical occurring failure modes under overloading conditions in simulations. One failure mode which needs to be predicted precisely by a crash simulation is joint separation. Within crash simulations a detailed analysis of a SPR joint would require a very high computational effort. The conflict between a detailed SPR joint and a macroscopic vehicle model needs to be solved by developing an approach that can handle an accurate macroscopic prediction of SPR behavior with a defined strength level with less computational effort. One approach is using a cohesive material model for a SPR connection.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1465
William R. Bussone, Joseph Olberding, Michael Prange
Abstract SAE J211 provides no definitive specification as to the appropriate procedures for filtering angular rate sensor data prior to differentiation into angular acceleration data, especially for impact data. Accordingly, a 3-2-2-2 array (nine-accelerometer-package or NAP) of linear accelerometers and a triaxial angular rate sensor were mounted into a Hybrid III 50th-percentile-male ATD headform and compared in a variety of impact events and multibody simulations. Appropriate low-pass digital filter cutoff frequencies for differentiating the angular rate sensor data into angular accelerations were sought via residual analysis in accordance with current SAE J211 guidelines.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0116
Ankit Goila, Ambarish Desai, Feng Dang, Jian Dong, Rahul Shetty, Rakesh Babu Kailasa, Mahdi Heydari, Yang Wang, Yue Sun, Manikanta Jonnalagadda, Mohammed Alhasan, Hanlong Yang, Katherine R. Lastoskie
ADAS features development involves multidisciplinary technical fields, as well as extensive variety of different sensors and actuators, therefore the early design process requires much more resources and time to collaborate and implement. This paper will demonstrate an alternative way of developing prototype ADAS concept features by using remote control car with low cost hobby type of controllers, such as Arduino Due and Raspberry Pi. Camera and a one-beam type Lidar are implemented together with Raspberry Pi. OpenCV free open source software is also used for developing lane detection and object recognition. In this paper, we demonstrate that low cost frame work can be used for the high level concept algorithm architecture, development, and potential operation, as well as high level base testing of various features and functionalities. The developed RC vehicle can be used as a prototype of the early design phase as well as a functional safety testing bench.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0058
Dajiang Suo, Sarra Yako, Mathew Boesch, Kyle Post
Abstract Developing requirements for automotive electric/electronic systems is challenging, as those systems become increasingly software-intensive. Designs must account for unintended interactions among software features, combined with unforeseen environmental factors. In addition, engineers have to iteratively make architectural tradeoffs and assign responsibilities to each component in the system to accommodate new safety requirements as they are revealed. ISO 26262 is an industry standard for the functional safety of automotive electric/electronic systems. It specifies various processes and procedures for ensuring functional safety, but does not limit the methods that can be used for hazard and safety analysis. System Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) is a new technique for hazard analysis, in the sense that hazards are caused by unsafe interactions between components (including humans) as well as component failures and faults.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1420
Kirsten White, Raymond Merala
Abstract This study presents a method to characterize the accuracy and precision of video-acceleration-position (VAP) devices, and presents results from testing of one such vehicle camera (“dashcam”) with global positioning system (GPS) used by taxi companies nationwide. Tests were performed in which vehicle kinematic data were recorded in a variety of real world conditions simultaneously by the VAP device, accelerometers, and a proven GPS-based speed sensing and data acquisition system. Data from the VAP device was compared to data collected by the reference instruments to assess timing, precision, and accuracy of reported parameters. Still images from the VAP video recording were compared with three dimensional laser scan data in order to analyze field of view. Several case studies are discussed, and some guidelines and cautions are provided for use of VAP data in accident reconstruction applications.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0107
Arvind Jayaraman, Ashley Micks, Ethan Gross
Abstract Recreating traffic scenarios for testing autonomous driving in the real world requires significant time, resources and expense, and can present a safety risk if hazardous scenarios are tested. Using a 3D virtual environment to enable testing of many of these traffic scenarios on the desktop or cluster significantly reduces the amount of required road tests. In order to facilitate the development of perception and control algorithms for level 4 autonomy, a shared memory interface between MATLAB, Simulink, and Unreal Engine 4 can send information (such as vehicle control signals) back to the virtual environment. The shared memory interface conveys arbitrary numerical data, RGB image data, and point cloud data for the simulation of LiDAR sensors.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1369
Abtine Tavassoli, Sam Perlmutter, Dung Bui, James Todd, Laurene Milan, David Krauss
Abstract Vision plays a key role in the safe and proper operation of vehicles. To safely navigate, drivers constantly scan their environments, which includes attending to the outside environment as well as the inside of the driver compartment. For example, a driver may monitor various instruments and road signage to ensure that they are traveling at an appropriate speed. Although there has been work done on naturalistic driver gaze behavior, little is known about what information drivers glean while driving. Here, we present a methodology that has been used to build a database that seeks to provide a framework to supply answers to various ongoing questions regarding gaze and driver behavior. We discuss the simultaneous recording of eye-tracking, head rotation kinematics, and vehicle dynamics during naturalistic driving in order to examine driver behavior with a particular focus on how this correlates with gaze behavior.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1446
Allen Charles Bosio, Paul Marable, Marcus Ward, Bradley Staines
Abstract A dual-chambered passenger airbag was developed for the 2011 USNCAP to minimize neck loading for the belted 5th female dummy while restraining the unbelted 50th dummy for FMVSS208. This unique, patented design adaptively controlled venting between chambers based on occupant stature. A patented pressure-responsive vent on the second chamber permitted aspiration into the second chamber before a delayed outflow to the environment. The delayed flow through the pressure-responsive vent from the second chamber acted like a pressure-limiting membrane vent to advantageously reduce the injury assessment values for the HIC and the Nij for the 5th female dummy.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1475
Saeed Barbat, Xiaowei Li
Abstract On December 2015, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published its proposal to implement U.S New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) changes covering three categories of crashworthiness, crash avoidance and pedestrian protection, beginning with the 2019 model year. The crashworthiness category included a new frontal oblique impact (OI) test protocol. The test compromises of a new Oblique Moving Deformable Barrier (OMDB), new THOR 50th percentile male (THOR-50M) anthropomorphic test device (ATD), and a new test configuration. An OMDB of 2,486 kg (5,480 lb) impacts a stationary target vehicle at a speed of 90 kph (56 mph) at an angle of 15 degrees with a 35% barrier overlap with the front end of the target vehicle. In vehicle-to-vehicle collisions, the lighter weight vehicle experience higher velocity change and higher acceleration levels, thereby, occupants in the lighter vehicle experience higher injury risk.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1423
Alan F. Asay, Christopher D. Armstrong, Bradley Higgins, John Steiner
Abstract The rear override crash behavior of full-size and light duty pickup trucks was examined. A series of ten full-scale, front and rear override impact crash tests were conducted involving four full-size pickup trucks, two light duty pickup trucks, and one sport utility vehicle (SUV). The tests were conducted utilizing a fabricated steel rigid barrier mounted on the front of the Massive Moving Barrier (MMB) test device with full overlap of the test vehicle. Crush ranged from 25.0 to 77.9 inches for impact speeds of 21.7 to 36.0 mph. These override tests on pickups were conducted to provide more basis in an area that is underrepresented in the literature. Each test was documented and measured prior to, and following, the crash test. The stiffness parameters were calculated and presented using constant stiffness, force saturation, and the power law damage models.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1417
Enrique Bonugli, Richard Watson, Mark Freund, Jeffrey Wirth
Abstract This paper reports on seventy additional tests conducted using a mechanical device described by Bonugli et al. [4]. The method utilized quasi-static loading of bumper systems and other vehicle components to measure their force-deflection properties. Corridors on the force-deflection plots, for various vehicle combinations, were determined in order to define the system stiffness of the combined vehicle components. Loading path and peak force measurements can then be used to evaluate the impact severity for low speed collisions in terms of delta-v and acceleration. The additional tests refine the stiffness corridors, previously published, which cover a wide range of vehicle types and impact configurations. The compression phase of a low speed collision can be modeled as a spring that is defined by the force-deflection corridors. This is followed by a linear rebound phase based on published restitution values [1,5].
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1410
Richard F Lambourn, James Manning
Abstract It can happen, following a collision between a car and a pedestrian or in a deliberate assault with a motor vehicle, that the pedestrian comes to be caught or wedged beneath the car, and that the driver then travels on for a considerable distance, afterwards claiming to have been unaware of the presence of the person. However, police, lawyers and jurors are often incredulous that the driver should not have been able to “feel” that there was something underneath his car. The authors have investigated the matter by carrying out practical tests with suitable cars and dummies. This paper describes instrumented tests performed by the authors following one such incident, and gives accounts of two previous incidents investigated in a more subjective fashion. The general conclusion is that the effect on the behavior of the car is very small and that a driver might indeed be unaware that there was a person trapped beneath them.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1418
Wesley D. Grimes, Thomas Vadnais, Gregory A. Wilcoxson
Abstract The time/distance relationship for a heavy truck accelerating from a stop is often needed to accurately assess the events leading up to a collision. Several series of tests were conducted to document the low speed acceleration performance of a 2016 Kenworth T680 truck tractor equipped with a ten-speed overdrive automated manual transmission in Auto Mode. Throughout the testing, the driver never manually shifted gears. This testing included three trailer load configurations and two different acceleration rates. Data were gathered with a VBOX and the Cummins INSITE software.
Viewing 91 to 120 of 137