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Viewing 11071 to 11100 of 11126
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420047
A. L. Morse
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410067
J. VERNE SAVAGE
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410065
Wm. B. Stout
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400061
J. L. S. Snead
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400053
L. Ponton de Arce
ABSTRACT
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390074
Sidney J. Williams
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390143
Jerome Lederer
THIS paper distinguishes between losses and accidents as the latter word is used commonly. The loss of an airplane by hangar fire, for example, usually is not considered an accident. Although such losses may not involve safety of life, they affect aviation economics and are therefore important to the aviation industry. Fire and windstorm loss prevention are discussed, and an analysis of light-airplane accidents by type of flying, by type of pilot, by cause, and by nature also is presented. The paper also stresses the importance of education in achieving greater safety. It brings out the need for more careful instruction of student pilots and especially the desirability of establishing an agency for the training and coaching of flying instructors. The need for an airplane that will not stall or spin also is brought out.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380013
J. A. Herlihy
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380166
Stanwood W. Sparrow
MR. SPARROW'S paper emphasizes the importance of the question: “What is the minimum safe viscosity for an engine oil?” Although he does not attempt to solve the problem, he presents material “accumulated as a by-product of routine engine tests and development,” which, he says, indicates that rather low viscosities may be safe for bearings if and when we can be sure that the amount of lubricant which reaches the bearings will be adequate. He adds that it also indicates the extent to which safe lubrication of the cylinder bores depends upon the ability to produce and maintain smooth surfaces on pistons, piston-rings, and cylinder walls. He illustrates how a low viscosity is effective in increasing cranking speed and in reducing friction -thereby producing a gain in horsepower and fuel economy. He also cites examples to show the extent to which low viscosity is detrimental as regards oil consumption, blowby, and the protection which the oil film affords to the rubbing surfaces.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380092
A. E. Lombard
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380048
EARL F. WARD
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380020
Gaylord W. Newton
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370164
John H. Hunt
PRESENTING a cross-section of the constructive thought of Society members on motor-vehicle design from the standpoint of highway safety, this paper deals with progress that is being made in present-day cars and offers pertinent suggestions regarding possible improvements for the future.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370012
Howard D. Brown
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370078
Clarence P. Taylor
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370077
Wallace L. Braun
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370099
J. W. Lord
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360076
Eric Ogden
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360074
Victor W. Killick
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360095
Harold E. Hartney
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360093
J. VERNE SAVAGE
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360128
J. M. Orr
PROGRESS that has been made in the study of industrial accidents, covering factors that are involved in accident prevention in the operation of small cars and trucks and auxiliary equipment, is discussed in this paper. This paper also deals with the driver viewpoint, giving statistical data and methods for determining responsibility, driver qualifications, and the like. The problem also is approached from the viewpoint of safety as affected by vehicle design, operation (without respect to the driver), and maintenance. In collaboration with Mr. Orr, Mr. Newton discusses the problem from the points of view of traffic direction, educational campaigns, driving practices, and highway conditions. He touches on the right types of advertising propaganda and vehicle-design factors; he also gives interesting statistical data resulting from vehicular inspections in various states.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360041
J. S. Marriott
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350080
J. M. Orr
SOUND transportation and safety engineering are being successfully applied to accident control, Mr. Orr states, which involves human engineering to a greater degree than in any other phase of fleet management and operation. After stating accident facts and costs, Mr. Orr presents selected quotations from representative fleet operators and other authorities regarding operating practices, relations with the general public, accident control, future design of highways, driver evaluation, accident-proneness and the like, together with an illustrated description of a portable testing-laboratory for making tests of drivers. Accident trends in commercial fleets are analyzed, as well as accident aspects in various types of fleets. Other authorities are quoted on various matters relating to training, methods and practices.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350031
James Reed
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350002
Kalman J. DeJuhasz
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350008
John H. Geisse
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350061
James J. Shanley
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340054
Clarence P. Taylor
ABSTRACT
Viewing 11071 to 11100 of 11126