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Viewing 11071 to 11100 of 11117
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380020
Gaylord W. Newton
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380166
Stanwood W. Sparrow
MR. SPARROW'S paper emphasizes the importance of the question: “What is the minimum safe viscosity for an engine oil?” Although he does not attempt to solve the problem, he presents material “accumulated as a by-product of routine engine tests and development,” which, he says, indicates that rather low viscosities may be safe for bearings if and when we can be sure that the amount of lubricant which reaches the bearings will be adequate. He adds that it also indicates the extent to which safe lubrication of the cylinder bores depends upon the ability to produce and maintain smooth surfaces on pistons, piston-rings, and cylinder walls. He illustrates how a low viscosity is effective in increasing cranking speed and in reducing friction -thereby producing a gain in horsepower and fuel economy. He also cites examples to show the extent to which low viscosity is detrimental as regards oil consumption, blowby, and the protection which the oil film affords to the rubbing surfaces.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380092
A. E. Lombard
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380048
EARL F. WARD
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370164
John H. Hunt
PRESENTING a cross-section of the constructive thought of Society members on motor-vehicle design from the standpoint of highway safety, this paper deals with progress that is being made in present-day cars and offers pertinent suggestions regarding possible improvements for the future.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370012
Howard D. Brown
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370078
Clarence P. Taylor
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370077
Wallace L. Braun
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370099
J. W. Lord
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360041
J. S. Marriott
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360076
Eric Ogden
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360074
Victor W. Killick
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360095
Harold E. Hartney
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360093
J. VERNE SAVAGE
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360128
J. M. Orr
PROGRESS that has been made in the study of industrial accidents, covering factors that are involved in accident prevention in the operation of small cars and trucks and auxiliary equipment, is discussed in this paper. This paper also deals with the driver viewpoint, giving statistical data and methods for determining responsibility, driver qualifications, and the like. The problem also is approached from the viewpoint of safety as affected by vehicle design, operation (without respect to the driver), and maintenance. In collaboration with Mr. Orr, Mr. Newton discusses the problem from the points of view of traffic direction, educational campaigns, driving practices, and highway conditions. He touches on the right types of advertising propaganda and vehicle-design factors; he also gives interesting statistical data resulting from vehicular inspections in various states.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350080
J. M. Orr
SOUND transportation and safety engineering are being successfully applied to accident control, Mr. Orr states, which involves human engineering to a greater degree than in any other phase of fleet management and operation. After stating accident facts and costs, Mr. Orr presents selected quotations from representative fleet operators and other authorities regarding operating practices, relations with the general public, accident control, future design of highways, driver evaluation, accident-proneness and the like, together with an illustrated description of a portable testing-laboratory for making tests of drivers. Accident trends in commercial fleets are analyzed, as well as accident aspects in various types of fleets. Other authorities are quoted on various matters relating to training, methods and practices.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350031
James Reed
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350002
Kalman J. DeJuhasz
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350008
John H. Geisse
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350061
James J. Shanley
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340054
Clarence P. Taylor
ABSTRACT
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340082
Walter A. Olen
AFTER submitting evidence to show the number and character of highway accidents involving motor vehicles, Mr. Olen points out that there are many factors that affect the front-axle stability of a vehicle and goes on to discuss the relation of these factors to public safety on the highways. He presents the results of tests comparing the effort required on a four-wheel-drive and a two-wheel-drive truck to hold the steering wheel at a given angle when turning circles on a smooth, dry pavement, as well as test data bearing on various other phases of front-axle stability.
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340069
Wm. K. Creson
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320056
Maxwell N. Halsey
DISPARITY between the factors of automobile and highway design that are far advanced and the factors that lag far behind constitutes the cause of many of our transportation difficulties, according to the author. The paper therefore aims to show the demand for safety and its economic advantage to the automotive industry and to indicate some of the principles necessary for its accomplishment. After stating that the automobile manufacturers should take a far-sighted view of the situation, take positive steps toward safety and cash in on the demand that is growing and that cannot be stopped by denying its existence, the author considers and comments upon some of the characteristics of automobiles that undoubtedly are partly responsible for accident potentialities. Visibility from the driver's seat is considered in detail, together with devices that assist visibility. The other driver's viewpoint also is considered.
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320052
Hubert Walker
REASONS for designing an engine with 12 cylinders for fire apparatus, motor-trucks and motor-coaches are set forth by the author. Among them were the requirement for 225 hp., a speed range of 200 to 3000 r.p.m. with little torsional vibration and torque-reaction effect, and economy of space. The design adopted has its cylinders in two rows of six each, disposed at an included angle of 30 deg. The statement is made that it can be installed in the space occupied by a 150-hp. six-cylinder engine. Advantages claimed for setting the cylinders at this angle are that the engine can be made narrow, so that all cylinders and the crankcase can be cast in one block; that the accessories can conveniently be placed outside; and that the synchronism of impulses that causes torsional vibration can be avoided. Vertical valves are operated from a central over-head camshaft by rocker arms that carry rollers at one end and are split horizontally at the other end.
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320061
James Craig
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320004
H. C. Dickinson, H. H. Allen
1930-01-01
Technical Paper
300030
T. P. Wright
ABSTRACT
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290051
HERACLIO ALFARO
WHAT can be done to increase safety, efficiency and comfort in flight of aircraft now in use? In answer, the author describes several devices designed to bring about this result and supplements this with the results of wind-tunnel research. Detailed descriptions of the particular devices mentioned are not included, the object of this paper being to show the great possibilities of their use and the resulting improvement in performance.
1927-01-01
Technical Paper
270055
H. L. Miner
Viewing 11071 to 11100 of 11117