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Viewing 1 to 30 of 10565
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0057
Yuji Arai, Makoto Hasegawa, Takeshi Harigae
ISO 26262 was established in 2011 as a functional safety standard for road vehicles. This standard provides safety requirements according to ASIL (Automotive Safety Integrity Levels) in order to avoid unreasonable residual risk caused by malfunctioning behavior of safety-related electrical and/or electronic systems. The ASIL is determined by considering the estimate of three factors including injury severity. While applicable only to passenger cars at present, motorcycles will be included in the scope of application of ISO 26262 in the next revision. Therefore, our previous study focused on severity class evaluation for motorcycles. A method of classifying injury severity according to vehicle speed was developed on the basis of accident data. In addition, a severity table for motorcycles was created using accident data in representative collision configurations involved with motorcycles in Japan.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0058
Makoto Hasegawa, Takanobu Kaneko
ISO 26262, a international functional safety standard of electrical and/or electronic systems for motor vehicles, was published in November 2011. And it is expected that motorcycle will be included in its scope at the next revision scheduled in 2018. Prior to its revision, Publicly Available Specification, ISO/PAS 19695 was published in 2015 and this is the adaptation of ISO 26262 for motorcycles. It is foreseen that the essences of this PAS will be the main potion of the revision of ISO 26262 related to motorcycle inclusion. Exposure is one of the factor that determines Motorcycle Safety Integrity Level (MSIL) defined in the PAS. It indicates the probability of the state of an operational situation that can be hazardous with the E/E system malfunction.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8011
Kevin Grove, Jon Atwood, Myra Blanco, Andrew Krum, Richard Hanowski
Abstract This study evaluated the performance of heavy vehicle crash avoidance systems (CASs) by collecting naturalistic driving data from 150 truck tractors equipped with Meritor WABCO OnGuardTM or Bendix® Wingman® AdvancedTM products. These CASs provide drivers with audio-visual alerts of potential conflicts, and can apply automatic braking to mitigate or prevent a potential collision. Each truck tractor participated for up to one year between 2013 and 2015. Videos of the forward roadway and drivers’ faces were collected along with vehicle network data while drivers performed their normal duties on revenue-producing routes. The study evaluated the performance of CAS activations by classifying them into three categories based on whether a valid object was being tracked and whether drivers needed to react immediately.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8049
Keith Friedman, Khanh Bui, John Hutchinson, Matthew Stephens, Francisco Gonzalez
Abstract Frame rail design advances for the heavy truck industry provide numerous opportunities for enhanced protection of fuel storage systems. One aspect of the advanced frame technology now available is the ability to vary the frame rail separation along the length of the truck, as well as the depth of the frame. In this study, the effect of incorporating the fuel storage system within advanced technology tapered frame rails was evaluated using virtual testing under impact conditions. The impact performance was evaluated under a range of horizontal impacts conditions. The performance observed was quantified and then compared with previous testing of baseline diesel tank systems. Fuel storage system impact performance metrics over the range of crash conditions considered were quantified using virtual testing methods. The results obtained from the application of the impact performance evaluation methodology were then described.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8098
Satish Jaju, Sahil Pandare
Abstract The regulatory requirement in Economic Commission for Europe (ECE R58) regulation applies to the Rear underrun protection devices which are intended to be fitted to commercial vehicles of N categories. The purpose of this regulation is to offer effective protection against underrunning of vehicles. This paper describes Computer aided engineering (CAE) methodology for testing rear underrun protection devices with loading sequences to be decided by Original equipment manufacturer. A sample model is prepared and analyzed to represent actual test conditions. Constraints and boundary conditions are applied as per test of vehicle. Finite element simulation is carried out using LS DYNA solver. Structural strength and integrity of Rear under protection device assembly is observed for different regulatory load requirement.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8114
Massimiliano Ruggeri, Pietro Marani, Michele Selvatici
Abstract Stationary (parking) brake is a very important and safety critical function in many classes of machines. The new transmissions and the “by wire” systems increase the criticality of the role of stationary brake, as it is also an emergency (secondary) brake, and it’s often used to hold the vehicle when the transmission is not locking the wheels. As an example, dual clutch and power-shift transmission gear systems, as well as hydrostatic transmissions under certain circumstances, are often unable to hold the vehicle stopped and this function is provided by the stationary brake. Due to the main need of having the brake actuated when vehicle is stopped, without any hydraulic and electric power, the brake configuration is normally a “negative” configuration, usually called “spring applied” because of the actuator configuration, but this configuration causes the brake actuation when de-energized, even in case of system failure.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8155
Devaraj Dasarathan, Jonathan Jilesen, David Croteau, Ray Ayala
Abstract Side window clarity and its effect on side mirror visibility plays a major role in driver comfort. Driving in inclement weather conditions such as rain can be stressful, and having optimal visibility under these conditions is ideal. However, extreme conditions can overwhelm exterior water management devices, resulting in rivulets of water flowing over the a-pillar and onto the vehicle’s side glass. Once on the side glass, these rivulets and the pooling of water they feed, can significantly impair the driver’s ability to see the side mirror and to see outwardly when in situations such as changing lanes. Designing exterior water management features of a vehicle is a challenging exercise, as traditionally, physical testing methods first require a full-scale vehicle for evaluations to be possible. Additionally, common water management devices such as grooves and channels often have undesirable aesthetic, drag, and wind noise implications.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8141
Brian R. McAuliffe
Abstract With increasing use of boat-tails on Canadian roads, a concern had been raised regarding the possibility for ice and snow to accumulate and shed from the cavity of a boat-tail affixed to a dry-van trailer, posing a hazard for other road users. This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of the potential for ice and snow accumulation in the cavity of a boat-tail-equipped heavy-duty vehicle. A transient CFD approach was used and combined with a quasi-static particle-tracking simulation to evaluate, firstly, the tendency of various representative ice or snow particles to be entrained in the vehicle wake, and secondly, the potential of such particles to accumulate on the aft end of a dry-van trailer with and without various boat-tail configurations. Results of the particle tracking analyses showed that the greatest numbers of particles impinge on the base of the trailer for the no-boat-tail case, concentrated on the upper surface of the back face of the trailer.
2016-09-27
Journal Article
2016-01-8142
Jeremy Daily, Rose Gamble, Stephen Moffitt, Connor Raines, Paul Harris, Jannah Miran, Indrakshi Ray, Subhojeet Mukherjee, Hossein Shirazi, James Johnson
Abstract Cyber assurance of heavy trucks is a major concern with new designs as well as with supporting legacy systems. Many cyber security experts and analysts are used to working with traditional information technology (IT) networks and are familiar with a set of technologies that may not be directly useful in the commercial vehicle sector. To help connect security researchers to heavy trucks, a remotely accessible testbed has been prototyped for experimentation with security methodologies and techniques to evaluate and improve on existing technologies, as well as developing domain-specific technologies. The testbed relies on embedded Linux-based node controllers that can simulate the sensor inputs to various heavy vehicle electronic control units (ECUs). The node controller also monitors and affects the flow of network information between the ECUs and the vehicle communications backbone.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2025
Amir Fazeli, Adnan Cepic, Susanne Reber
Abstract Aircraft weight and center of mass are two critical design and operational parameters that have to be within a design envelope to ensure a safe and efficient operation of aircraft. Previous efforts to accurately determine aircraft weight and center of mass before takeoff using landing gear shock strut pressures have failed due to the distortion of measured pressures by shock strut seal friction. Currently, aircraft loading process is controlled with loading sheets and passenger/cargo weight estimation as there are no online measurement systems that can accurately and efficiently estimate aircraft weight and determine the center of mass location before takeoff. However, errors in loading sheets, shifting cargo and errors in weight estimation could lead to incorrect loading of aircraft and, consequently, increase the risk of accidents, particularly in cargo flights.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2040
Satya Swaroop Panda, Uday Kishore Tammiraju
Abstract Most of the real world problems pose practical challenges for making decisions primarily due to availability of limited data. Quantification of risk and assessment of structural reliability becomes difficult in such scenarios. Techniques for performing safety analysis for such problems are discussed in this paper. While complete characterization of a system behavior may be difficult with limited data of its response, statistical models based on extreme value theory provide the basis for making decisions with reasonable confidence. The same may not be true, however, for such structures early in their design cycle due to limited experience of their performance. In such cases response surface methodology can be very useful in determination of risk and suitably making modifications to the design to improve the reliability of the component or system. Applications of these methods for some real world scenarios are demonstrated.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2043
Richard C. Millar, Thomas Mazzuchi, Haflidi Jonsson
Abstract The SPA-10 project, sponsored by U.S. National Science Foundation, is to acquire and qualify a replacement for the retired T-28 “storm penetration” aircraft previously used to acquire meteorological data to enable understanding and modelling of mid-continent thunderstorms. The National Science Foundation selected the Fairchild A-10 (bailed from the U.S. Air Force) as the platform to be adapted to perform the storm penetration mission to altitudes of eleven kilometers, and funded Naval Postgraduate School’s Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) as prime contractor. An expert panel conducted a review of the SPA-10 project in 2014 and recommended a risk analysis addressing hazards to the aircraft and pilots, such as icing, hail, turbulence and lightning. This paper presents the results of the risk analysis performed in response to this need, including recommended mitigations.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-1976
Kiran Thupakula, Adishesha Sivaramasastry, Srikanth Gampa
Abstract Aviation safety is one of the key focus areas of the aerospace industry as it involves safety of passengers, crew, assets etc. Due to advancements in technology, aviation safety has reached to safest levels compared to last few decades. In spite of declining trends in in-air accident rate, ground accidents are increasing due to ever increasing air traffic and human factors in the airport. Majority of the accidents occur during initial and final phases of the flight. Rapid increase in air traffic would pose challenge in ensuring safety and best utilization of Airports, Airspace and assets. In current scenario multiple systems like Runway Debris Monitoring System, Runway Incursion Detection System, Obstacle avoidance system and Traffic Collision Avoidance System are used for collision prediction and alerting in airport environment. However these approaches are standalone in nature and have limitations in coverage, performance and are dependent on onboard equipment.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1953
Michael Herbert Putz, Harald Seifert, Maximilian Zach, Jure Peternel
Abstract Since more than eight years Vienna Engineering (VE) is working on an electro-mechanical brake (EMB) actuated by eccentrics and a highly non-linear actuation mechanism. The principle allows full braking in approx. 70 milliseconds (including air gap) and only approx. 3 A RMS actuator current at 12 V for classical ABS with oscillations. This EMB reached an elaborated state. Versions for passenger cars, elevators, railway and commercial vehicles (CVs) were derived. Now, as the EMB is going to road tests, it is necessary to fulfill safety requirements closely. What are these safety requirements and how can they be fulfilled? The properties of the overall system, of the mechanics and electronics of the single brake are discussed in this paper. The overall brake system for EMBs needs a truly redundant power supply, a safe control bus and a safe brake pedal. The mechanics of a single brake can be required to release when power is off and it must not get mechanically stuck.
2016-09-16
Journal Article
2016-01-9017
Janka Cafolla, Derick Smart, Barry Warner
Abstract The lifting and excavating industry are not as advanced as automotive in the use of modern CAE tools in the early stages of design and development of heavy machinery. There is still a lack of confidence in the integrity of the results from FE simulations and optimisation and this becomes a barrier to the adoption of virtual prototyping for vehicle verification. R&D of Tata Steel has performed tests on two forklift truck overhead guards supplied by a major manufacturer. Based on the international standard for Falling Object Protective Structures (FOPS) as an initial input to the method of testing, the main aim of this study was to generate as much test data as possible to correlate the Finite Element (FE) simulations of two tests - a static and a dynamic test. The static test was developed to deform the overhead guard plastically in a slow controlled manner, so it would be easier to correlate the measured data to FE simulation.
2016-09-14
Journal Article
2016-01-1877
Jun Hu, Wei Liu, Shuai Cheng, Huan Tian, Huai Yuan, Hong Zhao
Abstract The convolutional neural network (CNN) has achieved extraordinary performance in image classification. However, the implementation of such architecture on embedded platforms is a big challenge task due to the computing resource constraint issue. This paper concentrates on optimization of CNN on embedded platforms with a case study of pedestrian detection in ADAS. The main contribution of this proposed CNN is its ability to run pedestrian classification task in real time with high accuracy based on a platform with ARM embedded. The CNN model has been trained with GPU locally and then transformed into an efficient implementation on embedded platforms. The efficient implementation uses dramatically small network scale and a lightweight CNN is obtained. Specifically, parameters of the network are compressed by adopting integer weights to reduce computational complexity. Meanwhile, other optimizations have also been proposed to adapt the general ARM processor architecture.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1839
Emar Vegt
Abstract The quiet nature of hybrid and electric vehicles has triggered developments in research, vehicle manufacturing and legal requirements. Currently, three countries require fitting an Approaching Vehicle Alerting System (AVAS) to every new car capable of driving without a combustion engine. Various other geographical areas and groups are in the process of specifying new legal requirements. In this paper, the design challenges in the on-going process of designing the sound for quiet cars are discussed. A proposal is issued on how to achieve the optimum combination of safety, environmental noise, subjective sound character and technical realisation in an iterative sound design process. The proposed sound consists of two layers: the first layer contains tonal components with their pitch rising along with vehicle speed in order to ensure recognisability and an indication of speed.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1784
Alessandro Fortino, Lutz Eckstein, Jens Viehöfer, Jürgen Pampel
Abstract Vehicles powered by electric machines offer the advantage to be more silent than vehicles equipped with an internal combustion engine. On the one hand, the reduced noise levels enable an improvement of the inner-city noise pollution. On the other hand, quiet vehicles entail risks not to be acoustically detected by surrounding pedestrians and cyclists in the lower speed range. The emitted noise can easily be masked by the urban background noise. Therefore, the UNECE has founded an informal working group which is currently developing guidelines in terms of an exterior noise required for detecting Quiet Road Transport Vehicles (QRTV). With the introduction of an Acoustic Vehicle Alerting System (AVAS), not only the exterior noise but also the perceived interior noise for an enhanced driving experience can be considered. Nevertheless, car manufactures have a big interest in maintaining their perceived brand identity.
2016-04-15
Journal Article
2015-01-9020
Emre Sert, Pinar Boyraz
Abstract Studies have shown that the number of road accidents caused by rollover both in Europe and in Turkey is increasing [1]. Therefore, rollover related accidents became the new target of the studies in the field of vehicle dynamics research aiming for both active and passive safety systems. This paper presents a method for optimizing the rear suspension geometry using design of experiment and multibody simulation in order to reduce the risk of rollover. One of the major differences of this study from previous work is that it includes statistical Taguchi method in order to increase the safety margin. Other difference of this study from literature is that it includes all design tools such as model validation, optimization and full vehicle handling and ride comfort tests. Rollover angle of the vehicle was selected as the cost function in the optimization algorithm that also contains roll stiffness and height of the roll center.
2016-04-12
Technical Paper
2016-01-7000
Daniel P. Malone, John F. Creamer
In 1966, Congress boldly reshaped the American approach to road safety and thereby established the United States as the worldwide leader in vehicle safety. Congressional action led to the establishment of the Department of Transportation, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, and the motor-vehicle safety defects and recall system. However, the safety environment that gave rise to these responses has evolved substantially. Fifty years later, the United States is unable to properly regulate rapidly advancing safety technologies, and the recall system is wholly unsuited to ensuring the safety of software-driven systems. Congress must act to update the road safety system in order to enable the United States to meet the challenges and seize the opportunities of the new transportation era.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1370
Vali Farahani, Salamah Maaita, Aditya Jayanthi
Abstract During the course of automobile Instrument Panel (IP) design development, the occupant head impact CAE simulation on IP are routinely performed to validate FMVSS201 requirements. Based on FMVSS201 requirements, the potential head impact zones on the IP are first identified. Then, the head impact zones are used to locate the various target points that must be impacted on IP. Once the critical target locations on IP are chosen, there are several computational steps that are required to calculate impact angles and head form (HF) center of rotation in reference to target points. Then, CAE engineer performs a repetitive process that involves positioning each individual HF with proper impact angle, assigning initial velocity to HF, and defining surface contacts within the finite element model (FEM). To simplify these lengthy manual steps, a commercially available software HyperMesh® CAE software tool is used to automate these steps.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1529
Gunti R. Srinivas, Anindya Deb, Clifford C. Chou, Malhar Kumar
Abstract Periprosthetic fractures refer to the fractures that occur in the vicinity of the implants of joint replacement arthroplasty. Most of the fractures during an automotive frontal collision involve the long bones of the lower limbs (femur and tibia). Since the prevalence of persons living with lower limb joint prostheses is increasing, periprosthetic fractures that occur during vehicular accidents are likely to become a considerable burden on health care systems. It is estimated that approximately 4.0 million adults in the U.S. currently live with Total Knee Replacement (TKR) implants. Therefore, it is essential to study the injury patterns that occur in the long bone of a lower limb containing a total knee prosthesis. The aim of the present study is to develop an advanced finite element model that simulates the possible fracture patterns that are likely during vehicular accidents involving occupants who have knee joint prostheses in situ.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1525
Anil Kalra, Kartik Somasundram, Ming Shen, Vishal Gupta, Clifford C. Chou, Feng Zhu
Abstract Numerical models of Hybrid III had been widely used to study the effect of underbody blast loading on lower extremities. These models had been primarily validated for automotive loading conditions of shorter magnitude in longer time span which are different than typical blast loading conditions of higher magnitude of shorter duration. Therefore, additional strain rate dependent material models were used to validate lower extremity of LSTC Hybrid III model for such loading conditions. Current study focuses on analyzing the mitigating effect of combat boots in injury responses with the help of validated LSTC Hybrid III model. Numerical simulations were run for various impactor speeds using validated LSTC Hybrid III model without any boot (bare foot) and with combat boot.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1524
Feng Zhu, Binhui Jiang, Clifford C. Chou
Abstract This paper represents the development of a new design methodology based on data mining theory for decision making in vehicle crashworthy components (or parts) development. The new methodology allows exploring the big crash simulation dataset to discover the underlying complicated relationships between vehicle crash responses and design variables at multi-levels, and deriving design rules based on the whole vehicle safety requirements to make decisions towards the component and sub-component level design. The method to be developed will resolve the issue of existing design approaches for vehicle crashworthiness, i.e. limited information exploring capability from big datasets, which may hamper the decision making and lead to a nonoptimal design. A preliminary design case study is presented to demonstrate the performance of the new method. This method will have direct impacts on improving vehicle safety design and can readily be applied to other complex systems.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1612
Francesco Mariani, Francesco Risi, Nicola Bartolini, Francesco Castellani, Lorenzo Scappaticci
Abstract Aerodynamics is one of the most important factors in the development of racing cars. At the speeds of formula cars reach the formula cars, the driver's neck can be subjected to stresses resulting from the aerodynamic forces acting on the helmet; developing an aerodynamic project that takes into account the comfort of the driver without affecting performance is certainly considered a challenging activity. The aim of the present work is to develop a low-pitching-momenthelmet for formula racing cars optimizing the shape and location, applying some aerodynamic appendices. This goal is pursued by adopting an approach based on both experimental and numerical activities. First, the aerodynamic configuration of an existing helmet was examined; through a testing campaign in the wind tunnel facilities of Perugia University, pressures acting on the helmet were scanned at various speeds and data about aerodynamic drag were collected.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1534
Rudolf Reichert, Pradeep Mohan, Dhafer Marzougui, Cing-Dao Kan, Daniel Brown
Abstract A detailed finite element model of a 2012 Toyota Camry was developed by reverse engineering. The model consists of 2.25M elements representing the geometry, thicknesses, material characteristics, and connections of relevant structural, suspension, and interior components of the mid-size sedan. This paper describes the level of detail of the simulation model, the validation process, and how it performs in various crash configurations, when compared to full scale test results. Under contract with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Center for Collision Safety and Analysis (CCSA) team at the George Mason University has developed a fleet of vehicle models which has been made publicly available. The updated model presented is the latest finite element vehicle model with a high level of detail using state of the art modeling techniques.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1530
Yury Chudnovsky, Justin Stocks-Smith, Jeya Padmanaban, Joe Marsh
Abstract NASS/CDS data (1993-2013) was used to examine serious injury rates and injury sources for belted drivers in near- and far-side impacts. Frequency and severity of near- and far-side impacts by crash severity (delta-V) were compared for older (1994-2007 MY) and newer (2008-2013 MY) vehicles. For 2008-2013 MY, individual cases were examined for serious thorax injury in far-side impacts. Results show that, for newer passenger cars, about 92% of side impacts have a delta-V under 15 mph and, for older cars, the percentage is about 86%. The rate of serious injury is higher for nearside compared to far-side crashes for both older and newer models, and the near-side injury rate is much lower for newer models. Safety features, including side airbags, are effective in reducing injuries to near-side belted drivers in newer models. The serious injury rate for near-side belted drivers in older cars is 5.5% for near-side crashes and 1.2% for far-side crashes.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1539
Do Hoi KIm
Abstract Given the importance of vehicle safety, OEMs are focused on ensuring the safety of passengers during car accidents. Injury is related to the passenger’s kinematics and interaction with airbag, seatbelt, and vehicle drop. However, the correlation between vehicle drop (vehicle pitch) and passengers’ injury is the main issue recently being discussed. This paper presents the definition of vehicle drop and analyzes the relationship through a dynamic sled test. This study defines the relationship between individual vehicle systems (body, chassis, tire, etc.) and vehicle drop, and how to control the amount of vehicle drop to minimize the injury of passengers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1538
Vaibhav V. Gokhale, Carl Marko, Tanjimul Alam, Prathamesh Chaudhari, Andres Tovar
Abstract This work introduces a new Advanced Layered Composite (ALC) design that redirects impact load through the action of a lattice of 3D printed micro-compliant mechanisms. The first layer directly comes in contact with the impacting body and its function is to prevent an intrusion of the impacting body and uniformly distribute the impact forces over a large area. This layer can be made from fiber woven composites imbibed in the polymer matrix or from metals. The third layer is to serve a purpose of establishing contact between the protective structure and body to be protected. It can be a cushioning material or a hard metal depending on the application. The second layer is a compliant buffer zone (CBZ) which is sandwiched between two other layers and it is responsible for the dampening of most of the impact energy.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1541
Zuolong Wei, Hamid Reza Karimi, Kjell Gunnar Robbersmyr
Abstract The analysis of the vehicle crash performance is of great meaning in the vehicle design process. Due to the complexity of vehicle structures and uncertainty of crashes, the analysis of vehicle crashworthiness is generally depending on the researchers' experiences. In this paper, different deformation modes of energy absorption components are studied. More specifically, the bumper, crash box, the front longitudinal beam and the engine/firewall have different frequency characteristics in the deformation process. According to these characteristics, it is possible to identify the performance of each component in the crash process of assembled structures. To achieve this goal, the crash response of the passenger cabin is decomposed by the time-frequency transformation. Different frequency components exist mainly in a specified period of the crash process.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 10565