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Viewing 1 to 30 of 10269
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2109
Rodrigo Domingos, Daniel Silva
This paper outlines a three-dimensional computer model named AIPAC suitable for bleed-air ice protection system parametric studies in support of system design and optimization. This 3D simulation code was derived from HASPAC, which is a 2D anti-icing model developed at Wichita State University in 2010. AIPAC is based on the Finite Volumes Method and, similarly to HASPAC, combines a commercial Navier-Stokes flow solver with a Messinger model based thermodynamic analysis that applies internal and external flows heat transfer coefficients, pressure distribution, wall shear stress, etc, to compute wing leading edge skin temperatures, 3D runback flow distribution, and the location, extent and rate of icing. In addition, AIPAC was built using a transient formulation and with the capability of extruding a 3D surface mesh into a volumetric domain, so that “single-shot” ice shapes can be predicted (a more accurate multiple-step ice growth methodology is currently being developed).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2081
Hossein Habibi, Graham Edwards, Liang Cheng, Haitao Zheng, Adam Marks, Vassilios Kappatos, Cem Selcuk, Tat-Hean Gan
Wind turbines mounted on cold climate sites are subject to icing which could significantly influence the performance of turbine blades for harvesting wind energy. To alleviate this problem, a number of techniques have been developed and tested. The currently used methods are surface coating, antifreeze chemicals, electrical resistance heating, hot air circulation, pulse electrothermal de-icing, manual chip-off, etc. Almost all thermal de-ice methods demand a high level of power to operate. Also, the high temperature induced to the blade by the thermal techniques may pose a risk for the integrity of composite blades. A relatively new strategy used for ice protection systems is ultrasonic guided waves (vibrations of very short length wave) on which a few research projects have been recently accomplished. This method is well known for non-destructive testing applications in which the waves typically propagate between 20 kHz and 100 kHz for long-range ultrasonic testing.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2100
Yongsheng Lian, Yisen Guo
This paper investigated impingement of supercooled large droplets onto smooth solid surfaces to understand the mechanism of splashing and secondary droplets formation using a novel moment of fluid (MOF) method. Previous studies have established a splashing threshold, but the effect of ambient gas in liquid droplet splashing is not fully understood. Our numerical results of water droplet splashing with relatively low velocity were consistent with experimental results: splashing occurs at high pressure but not at low pressure. Our simulation revealed that a thin film was formed after the droplet contacted the solid surface. The thin film moved at a lower speed at the contact with the solid due to viscous effect while the film moved at a higher speed away from the solid. As a result, air was trapped under the film, making the film floating on the air. When the pressure was high, the air density was high hence the aerodynamic forces by the air on the thin film.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2129
Andrea Munzing, Stephane Catris
A lot of research work on icing scaling laws has been done during the last decades resulting in a today commonly accepted definition of similarity parameters and scaling laws. Those icing scaling laws have essentially been developed for fixed wing applications because airplane aerodynamic surfaces are too big to be tested in icing wind tunnels. This problem does not exist for helicopter blade profiles. However, the use of icing scaling laws is a very interesting feature in order to be able to predict ice shapes or icing performance penalty for a future helicopter still in development. Thanks to the long experience of Airbus Helicopters with icing tests a database of several real ice shapes on helicopter main and tail rotor blade sections is available. The comparison of the ice shapes obtained at the same icing similarity parameters allows the assessment of 2D icing scaling laws established for fixed wing aircrafts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2128
Enrico Bellussi
This paper describes the AgustaWestland past and present experience in the use of US Army HISS flight test results in support to the civil ice clearance for rotorcrafts. The US Army HISS is a CH47D Chinook fitted with a spray bar system providing a cloud for in flight icing evaluation with large part of the rotor (or the fuselage) of the rotorcraft immersed during the flight. The HISS allows to have flight data with stable and partially selectable ice parameters for prolonged flight time, conditions extremely difficult to encounter during natural ice flights. AgustaWestland obtained for AW139 the clearance for flight into known icing conditions (FIPS) by EASA, FAA and TCCA in 2010 and by IAC in 2011. AW139 also obtained the clearance for flight into limited ice conditions (LIPS) by EASA in 2013. In both cases the results of the US Army HISS artificial icing trials have been successfully used to support the certification process.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2149
Caroline Laforte, Caroline Blackburn, Jean Perron
Ideally, an icephobic coating applied to ice-exposed surfaces appears to be an interesting solution to prevent ice build-up. Over the last decade, developments of efficient icephobic coatings were multiplied. Some materials that reduce ice adhesion have been developed from which the ice can be more easily shed, possibly even with existing forces such as wind, gravity and vibrations. This paper will depict icephobic coating performances of 262 different coatings and 11 grease type substrates tested over the past 10 years at the Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL). Since 2003, the icephobic performance is evaluated with two main test methods. A first test method was developed in regards to measuring the ice adhesion and its reduction. A second test was then developed to measure the ice accumulation reduction.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2076
Caroline Laforte, Neal Wesley, Marc Mario Tremblay
In North America, about ten million kilograms of runway deicers are applied on airport runways to ensure safe takeoffs and landings of aircraft in adverse conditions. Although some of the chemicals are recovered, much of them are dispersed through aviation operations to airport’s surrounding environment. Little focus has been given into assessing and determining optimal quantities of deicers to be used on runways, that at the same time retain a high degree of safety, while reducing risks to the environment and improving airport efficiencies. Improved deicer performance tests would allow for the development of more environmentally sustainable deicers, through their improved performance. A better assessment of their deicing and anti-icing performance along with their degree of skid resistance on runway pavement, will help in the development of the next generation of runway de/anti-icing chemicals to ensure improved sustainable and safe aircraft takeoffs and landings.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2078
Alric Rothmayer, Hui Hu
A strong air/water interaction theory is used to develop a fast simplified model for the trapping of water in a film that flows over sub-grid surface roughness. The sub-grid model is used to compute correction factors that can alter mass transport within the film. This sub-grid model is integrated into a covariant film mass transport model for film flow past three-dimensional surfaces of a form suitable for aircraft icing codes. Sample calculations are presented to illustrate the application of the model. Aircraft icing codes usually consist of an aerodynamic solver, a droplet trajectory solver and a mechanism to grow the ice surface. Recently, icing codes have also made use of simple models for surface water transport, typically through a film lubrication model.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2127
Andrea Munzing, Franck Hervy, Stephane Catris
A helicopter blade profile was tested in the DGA Aero-engine’s S1 icing wind tunnel in Saclay, France in winter 2013/2014. The 2D airfoil was a helicopter main rotor blade profile. Ice accretion tests have been performed to assess the profile’s time dependant aerodynamic behaviour during ice accretion. Real ice shapes were collected after each icing test. Moreover, iced profile polars were realized over a large range of angle of attack until stall. This paper presents the test set up, the test model and the test results. The test results presented in this paper are dry air and iced profile polars as well as ice shapes. The complete iced profile polars and the aerodynamic behaviour in time of the iced blade profile during ice accretion will be used for adjusting and validating prediction tools like Airbus Helicopter’s analytical iced rotor performance degradation model and they will aid to appraise the rotor loads evolution in icing conditions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2156
Michael Oliver
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test in the NASA Glenn Research Center’s Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) Facility in February 2013. Honeywell Engines supplied the test article, an obsolete, unmodified Lycoming ALF502-R5 turbofan engine serial number LF01 that experienced an uncommanded loss of thrust event while operating at certain high altitude ice crystal icing conditions. These known conditions were duplicated in PSL for this testing. The data generated during this testing contained three subsets: known event conditions, altitude scaling conditions and a design of experiment (DOE) data set. The key roll back indicating parameter was found to be the reduction of the measured load parameter, the average of two measured load cells mounted on the thrust stand.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2106
Mark Ray, Kaare Anderson
Cloud phase discrimination, with measurements of liquid water content (LWC) and ice water content (IWC) as well as the detection and discrimination of supercooled large droplets (SLD), are of primary importance due to several high-profile incidents over the past two decades. The UTC Aerospace Systems Optical Ice Detector (OID) is a prototype laser sensor intended to discriminate cloud phase, to quantify LWC and IWC, and to detect SLD and differentiate SLD conditions from Appendix C conditions. Phase discrimination is achieved through depolarization scattering measurements of a circularly polarized laser beam transmitted into the cloud. Optical extinction measurements indicate the liquid and ice water contents, while the differential backscatter from two distinct probe laser wavelengths infers an effective droplet size. The OID is designed to be flush-mounted with the aircraft skin and to sample the air stream beyond the boundary layer of the aircraft.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2141
Markus Widhalm
This paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the motion of regular shaped ice particles and the computation of aerodynamic forces and torques on such particles. The shape of an ice crystal may deviate considerably from a sphere and can occur as thin needles or disk-shaped configurations, referred as regular non-spherical particles, or in irregular form as flakes or agglomerates. Ice crystals can be found at the upper boundary of the troposphere in anvils of cumulonimbus clouds, where strong winds exist and an altitude, where jet aircraft cruise at transonic speed, imposing a high flow Reynolds number. As the particle size grows from a few microns into several 100's of microns a high particle Reynolds number may be expected too.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2079
Colin Hatch, Jason Moller, Eleftherios Kalochristianakis, Ian Roberts
Summary The size and shed time of ice shed from a propeller is predicted using a process that determines ice shape, ice growth rate and both internal and ice-structure interface stresses. A brittle failure damage model is used to predict the onset of local failure and to propagate damage in the ice until local ice shedding is obtained. Background Research into suitable ice-phobic coatings as a potential approach in an integrated aircraft ice protection system (IPS) has been ongoing for many years. Durability of these coatings has been an issue; however future research programmes such as the EU programmes AEROMUCO [1] and STORM [2] are looking to improve the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the application of these types of coatings. The introduction of ice-phobic coatings may make it possible to provide ice protection on rotating surfaces without the need for specialist ice protection systems.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2142
Colin Hatch, Roger Gent, Richard Moser
Summary Initial results from a hybrid electro-thermal electro-mechanical simulation (HETEMS) analysis tool are presented and compared to data measured during a dedicated icing trial. Temperatures and ice shed prediction data are compared with the data measured on a full size wing tested in the CIRA Icing Wind Tunnel (IWT) Additional Test Section (ATS). Background The demand for low power ice protection systems was one of the components of the EU Clean Sky initiative [1]. Under Clean Sky a research programme HETEMS looked at the development of a tool to analyse electro-thermal (ET) and electro-mechanical (EM) ice protection systems (IPS). The tool was intended to analyse independent ET and EM systems or a hybrid system using both technologies combined. The aims and scope of the tool are presented in [2]. The HETEMS software was developed around open source tools for the aerodynamic analysis [3] and mechanical failure analysis [4] in conjunction with in-house software.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2151
Reinhard F.A. Puffing, Wolfgang Hassler, Andreas Tramposch, Marian Peciar
For studying ice accretion processes experimentally and establishing a valuable validation basis for ice accretion simulation models it is desirable to document experimentally generated ice shapes as accurately as possible. The generated set of data then forms the basis for aerodynamic studies, the improvement of icing test facilities, the development of design criteria, the development of ice accretion simulation tools as well as a number of further applications. In the past, various ice shape documentation methods have been established. These include photography, cross-sectional tracing, molding and casting as well as 3D-scanning. Photography is the easiest and fastest documentation method but provides little quantitative information on the ice accretion process itself. Additional quantitative information can be obtained by using multiple cameras or calibrated camera positions which, however, implicates significant additional time and cost efforts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2095
Wolfgang Hassler, Reinhard F.A. Puffing, Andreas Tramposch
Recent research on thermal ice protection of electrically heated restraining grids designed for applications in the environmental control system (ECS) of passenger aircraft is presented. The restraining grids consist of interlaced, electrically insulated wire (the topology of the grids is similar to that of tennis rackets) and are – in certain operation modes of the ECS – exposed to an airstream containing supercooled water droplets and/or ice particles. Heat is generated in the wire by an electric current, and the temperature of the wire is controlled with the aid of an electronic control system.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2093
Maxime Henno
A numerical tool has been developed for predicting the unsteady behavior of the thermal wing ice protection systems (WIPS). The code was developed to account for a multi-layer composite structure. The performance predictions of a WIPS integrated into a metallic or into a composite structure can thus be achieved. The tool enables the simulation of unsteady anti-icing operations, for example, the WIPS may be activated with delay after entering into the icing conditions. In this case, ice starts to accrete on the leading edge before the WIPS heats up the skin. Another example is the ground activation of the WIPS for several seconds to check its functionality: low external cooling may cause high thermal constraints that must be estimated with accuracy to avoid adverse effects on the structure. The simulations give further opportunities compared to the current practice.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2087
Delphine Leroy, Emmanuel Fontaine, Alfons Schwarzenboeck, J. Walter Strapp, Lyle Lilie, Julien Delanoe, Alain Protat, Fabien Dezitter, Alice Grandin
Title: HAIC/HIWC field campaign - specific findings on PSD microphysics in high IWC regions from in situ measurements: crystal size distribution characteristics, ice density, and median mass diameters Authors: Delphine Leroy (CNRS-LaMP), Emmanuel Fontaine (CNRS-LaMP), Alfons Schwarzenboeck (CNRS-LaMP), J.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2097
Timothy A. Shannon, Stephen T. McClain
As ice begins to accrete on an aircraft in flight, the stochastic nature of the droplet impingement process dictates that the accreted ice is uneven along the surface resulting in roughness. Because of the varying convection along the surface and local shear rates along the surface, the resulting roughness statistical characteristics on an unswept wing are not constant along the streamwise direction. However, historical studies of roughness on iced airfoils performed in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Glenn Research Center employed image analysis approaches to create parametric representations of ice roughness element development over time. Because of the parametric descriptions and the limitations of the surface characterizations, ice roughness is often treated in analytical approaches and computational models as having constant parametric properties over the entire ice accretion area.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2094
William B. Wright, Peter Struk, Tadas Bartkus, Gene Addy
This paper will describe two recent modifications to the GlennICE software. First, a capability for modeling ice crystals and mixed phase icing has been modified based on recent experimental data. Modifications have been made to the ice particle bouncing and erosion model. This capability has been added as part of a larger effort to model ice crystal ingestion in aircraft engines. Comparisons have been made to ice crystal ice accretions performed in the NRC Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). Second, modifications were made to the runback model based on data and observations from thermal scaling tests performed in the NRC Altitude Icing Tunnel. Introduction Mason[1] describes a situation where an aircraft engine can encounter rollbacks and flameouts at high altitude conditions due to ice crystal ingestion. Numerous in-fight encounters had been observed. It was hypothesized that the cause of the incidents was the ingestion of a high volume of ice crystals into the engine.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2157
Mengyao Leng, Shinan Chang, Yuanyuan Zhao
Aircraft icing causes a great threaten to flight safety. With the development of anti/de-icing systems for aeronautics, some attention is paid on coating strategies for reducing the total amount of water present on the surface. By application of hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic coatings, characterized by low surface wettability, shedding of liquid from the surface can be enhanced. The motivation behind this work is to identify the way that wettability affects the motion of runback water, and establish an empirical formula of critical departure diameter. In order to contain the effect of surface wettability, it is necessary to obtain an accurate model for calculating dynamic contact angle (DCA). Instead of average static contact angle or empirical equation, the formula used in this work is derived theoretically, as a function of the capillary number, advancing and receding contact angle, and the roughness of the solid surface.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2091
Ryosuke Hayashi, Makoto Yamamoto
Icing phenomena have been studied since the middle of 1990s, and the numerical procedure for typical icing has been established. Recently, there are new problems of icing, which are SLD icing, ice crystal icing, and ice shedding phenomenon. The SLD and the ICI has been studied since 1990s. However, there are few researches on the ice shedding since the ice has many unknown physical parameters which are the density in atmosphere, the adhesion force between the wall and the accreted ice, the contact force between ice pieces and so on. Although existing icing models can simulate ice growth, these models do not have the capability to reproduce ice shedding. In the previous study, we developed an icing model that takes into account both ice growth and ice shedding. Furthermore, we validated the proposed ice shedding model through the comparison of numerical results and experimental data, which includes the flow rate loss due to ice growth and the flow rate recovery due to ice shedding.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2117
Miki Shimura, Makoto Yamamoto
It is well known that SLD icing is very dangerous because it is more unpredictable than general icing caused by smaller droplets. In SLD conditions, extraordinary phenomenon occurs. For example, SLD largely deforms. Vargas et al. (2010) performed the experiments about the droplet deformation. In their experiments, it was confirmed that the droplet height increases and the droplet width decreases, as the droplets approach the leading edge of an airfoil Therefore, the assumption that a droplet behaves as a sphere is no longer valid. To predict the deformation and the breakup of a droplet, several mathematical models have been proposed. For example, Ibrahim et al. (1993) proposed a model for the droplet deformation and breakup (DDB) model. However, the DDB model has not found wide acceptance. Other models exist, in which the deformation is described with the change of drag coefficient.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2099
Mario Vargas, Charles Ruggeri, Peter Struk, Mike Pereira, Duane Revilock, Richard Kreeger
Ice Particle Impacts on a Flat Plate Mario Vargas, Peter M. Struk, Richard E. Kreeger, Charles Ruggeri, Mike Pereira, Duane Revilock National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center An experimental study was conducted at the Ballistic Laboratory of NASA Glenn Research Center to study the impact of ice particles on a stationary flat surface target set at 45 degrees with respect to the direction of motion of the impinging particle (Figure 1). The experiment is part of NASA efforts to study the physics involved in engine power-loss events due to ice-crystal ingestion and ice accretion formation inside engines. These events can occur when aircraft encounter high-altitude convective weather. The experiment was conducted to gain understanding of the physics involved when ice particles impact on a flat surface. Previous studies conducted by industry in the 1990s on the ingestion of ice particles in turbine engines were for hailstones.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2110
Jozef Brzeczek, Janusz Pietruszka, Robert J. Flemming, Ben C. Bernstein
The PZL M28 05 airplane is an unpressurized twin-engine high-wing strut-braced monoplane of all-metal structure, with twin vertical tails and a tricycle non-retractable landing gear. It is certified to European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. Airplane is certified to flight into known icing conditions in accordance with 14 CFR 23.1419 requirements, including flight in the icing conditions of Appendix C of 14 CFR 25. The PZL M28 05 airplane has characteristics that include short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability, high useful load, mission versatility and easy access through the rear cargo door. Depending on the equipment installed, the airplane can be operated with up to 19 passengers, as a cargo transport, in a mixed configuration, or in patrol version. The M28 is certificated in the Part 23 commuter category. The M28 05 maximum take off gross weight is 7500 kg (16534 lb) and the maximum operational airspeed (VMO) is 192 KIAS.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2119
Shinan Chang, Chao Wang, Mengyao Leng
Drop deformation and breakup is an important issue that involved in the aircraft and engine icing field especially in the case of the supercooled large droplets (SLD). In this paper, the breakup modes of SLD are discussed in detail based upon the classical theories of the drop breakup and typical icing conditions. It is found that the breakup modes of SLD are mainly vibration breakup, bag-type breakup, multimode breakup and shear breakup. As the vibration breakup mode is rare, focuses are put on the bag-type breakup, multimode breakup and shear breakup. Because the drop Weber number is increasing gradually when the drops are approaching the leading edge of the airfoil and the drop Weber number differs in different locations of the airfoil surface, two or three breakup modes may appear simultaneously in a given environmental condition.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2111
Marie-Laure Toulouse, Richard Lewis
The intent of this paper is to provide a general overview of the main engineering and test activities conducted in order to support A350XWB Ice and Rain Protection Systems certification. Several means of compliance have been used to demonstrate compliance with applicable Certification Basis (CS 25 at Amendment 8 + CS 25.795 at Amendment 9, FAR 25 up to Amendment 129) and Environmental protection requirements. The EASA Type Certificate for the A350XWB was received the 30th September 2014 after 7 years of development and verification that the design performs as required, with five A350 XWB test aircraft accumulating more than 2600 flight test hours and over 600 flights. The flight tests have been carried out in dry air and measured natural icing conditions to demonstrate the performance of all ice and rain protection systems and to support the compliance demonstration with CS25.1419.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2121
Yong Chen, Liang Fu
In helicopter, the icing rotor blades will decrease the effectiveness of the helicopter and endanger the lives of the pilots. The asymmetrical ice break-up and shedding could also lead to severe vibrations of the rotor blade. Ice break-up from the main rotor may strike the fuselage and tail rotor, even worse, find its way into the engine, which may cause serious aircraft accidents. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for ice shedding process is necessary in order to optimize the helicopter rotor blade design and de-icing system to avoid hazardous ice shedding. In previous study, the ice shedding criteria was established by comparing the centrifugal force and the adhesion force. In most cases, part of the ice will shed before the centrifugal force equals to the adhesion force, because the adhesion stress between the ice and the blade is not uniform.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2118
Sergey Alekseyenko, Michael Sinapius, Martin Schulz, Oleksandr Prykhodko
In spite of wide theoretical and experimental studies of icing problem that have been held up to recent times, nevertheless, the most dangerous flights regimes as in the presence of supercooled large droplets or in supercooled rain remain studied not enough. Also the range of parameters that corresponds to the exploitation modes of aircrafts with relatively small heights and speeds of flight like airplanes of small aviation, helicopters, UAV etc. because of the complexity of the icing processes are still not covered. The aim of this work is to answer the next question: which an actual process of interaction of supercooled large water droplets with growing ice surface at small speeds of flight and which physics of falling moisture freezing process on the icing surface is. Thus, the work presents the results of experiments conducted in order to obtain the photographic data on how the interaction between the supercooled water droplets and the icing aerodynamic surface occurs.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2103
Christian Bartels, Julien Cliquet, Carlos Bautista
Icing is a phenomenon observed on aircraft airframes while flying through clouds of supercooled droplets. The phenomenon only occurs for ambient air temperatures below the freezing point. The droplets impinge on the aircraft surfaces and freeze, leading to ice accretion. The resulting change in aircraft geometry and surface roughness can modify the aircraft’s aerodynamic characteristics (lift loss, drag increase), it may affect air data probe measurements, and can even damage the engines by ice ingestion. In order to comply with certification regulations, airframers have to demonstrate safe operation of their aircraft in icing conditions. However, due to associated cost and time, it is prohibitive to cover the whole icing envelope by flight-testing or icing-tunnel testing. Therefore, aircraft manufacturers have developed, with support from research institutes, numerical prediction methods and tools to cover their prediction needs.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 10269