Criteria

Text:
Sector:
Content:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 21 of 21
Standard
2014-05-16
This document provides informational background, rationale and a technical case to allow consideration of the removal of the magnesium alloy restriction in aircraft seat construction as contained in AS8049B. The foundation of this argument is flammability characterization work performed by the FAA at the William J. Hughes Technical Center (FAATC), Fire Safety Branch in Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA. The rationale and detailed testing results are presented along with flammability reports that have concluded that the use of specific types of magnesium alloys in aircraft seat construction does not increase the hazard level potential in the passenger cabin in a post-crash fire scenario. Further, the FAA has developed a lab scale test method, reference DOT/FAA/TC-13/52, to be used as a certification test, or method of compliance (MOC) to allow acceptability of the use of magnesium in the governing TSO-C127 and TSO-C39C. Other flammability studies are also cited in the AIR document to substantiate the FAA findings.
WIP Standard
2012-10-15
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines a means of assessing the credibility of computer models of aircraft seating systems used to simulate dynamic impact conditions set forth in Federal Regulations 14 CFR Part 23.562, 25.562, 27.562, and 29.562. The ARP is applicable to lumped mass and detailed finite element seat models. This includes specifications and performance criteria for aviation specific virtual anthropomorphic test devices (v-ATDs). A methodology to evaluate the degree of correlation between a seat model and dynamic impact tests is recommended. This ARP also provides testing and modeling best practices specific to support the implementation of analytical models of aircraft seat systems. Supporting information within this document includes procedures for the quantitative comparison of test and simulation results, as well as test reports for data generated to support the development of v-ATDs and a sample report. For this revision, Section 4, Seat System Validation is held in reserve.
Standard
2012-10-03
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines a means of assessing the credibility of computer models of aircraft seating systems used to simulate dynamic impact conditions set forth in Federal Regulations 14 CFR Part 23.562, 25.562, 27.562, and 29.562. The ARP is applicable to lumped mass and detailed finite element seat models. This includes specifications and performance criteria for aviation specific virtual anthropomorphic test devices (v-ATDs). A methodology to evaluate the degree of correlation between a seat model and dynamic impact tests is recommended. This ARP also provides testing and modeling best practices specific to support the implementation of analytical models of aircraft seat systems. Supporting information within this document includes procedures for the quantitative comparison of test and simulation results, as well as test reports for data generated to support the development of v-ATDs and a sample report. For this revision, Section 4, Seat System Validation is held in reserve.
Standard
2012-06-06
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides an approach for determining which parts on aircraft seats are non-traditional, large, non-metallic panels that need to meet the test requirements of 14CFR Part 25 Appendix F, Parts IV & V.
WIP Standard
2012-02-17
This Aerospace Standard defines minimum iinstallation performance standards, qualification requirements, and minimum documentation requirements for passenger and crew occupant inflatable restraint and structure-mounted airbag systems in civil rotorcraft transport aircraft and general aviation aircraft. The goal is to define test and evaluation criteria to demonstrate occupant protection of a seat/occupant/airbag system as required by Federal Aviation Regulations 14 CFR parts 23,25, 27, or 29 and applicable special conditions.
Standard
2011-11-28
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidelines for abuse load testing of a deployable Individual Video System (IVS). The abuse load testing defined in this ARP is intended to only address the evaluation of the deployable IVS regarding stowage of the system and injurious projections/protrusions as a result of passenger interaction with the video system. Other aspects of the video system design or qualification may require additional testing or analysis and are outside the scope of this ARP. This ARP is not intended to address customer satisfaction or reliability aspects of individual designs. The deployable IVS includes, for the purpose of this ARP, all video system components from the monitor to the interface at the primary seat structure. It should be shown that the system meets the performance criteria of Section 4 after being subjected to the forces defined in 3.2. This can be demonstrated by the test procedure described in this ARP or by similarity analysis to a system previously shown to comply with this ARP.
Standard
2008-09-12
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies laboratory test procedures and minimum requirements for the manufacturer of restraint systems for use in civil aircraft. It is intended to establish a minimum level of quality which can be called upon by the designer of those systems. However, compliance with this standard alone may not assure adequate performance of the restraint system under normal and emergency conditions. Such performance requires consideration of factors beyond the scope of this standard, and must be demonstrated by a system evaluation procedure which includes the seat, the occupant, the specific restraint installation and the cabin interior configuration. This standard specifies the requirements for Type 1, Type 2, and Type 3 restraint systems. Buckles that release automatically or through any means other than the direct action of the fingers or thumb on the buckle are beyond the scope of this standard.
Standard
2001-03-01
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidelines for abuse load testing of a deployable Individual Video System (IVS). The abuse load testing defined in this ARP is intended to only address the evaluation of the deployable IVS regarding stowage of the system and injurious projections/protrusions as a result of passenger interaction with the video system. Other aspects of the video system design or qualification may require additional testing or analysis and are outside the scope of this ARP. This ARP is not intended to address customer satisfaction or reliability aspects of individual designs. The deployable IVS includes, for the purpose of this ARP, all video system components from the monitor to the interface at the primary seat structure. It should be shown that the system meets the performance criteria of Section 4 after being subjected to the forces defined in 3.2. This can be demonstrated by the test procedure described in this ARP or by similarity analysis to a system previously shown to comply with this ARP.
Standard
2000-08-01
This ARP is intended to make recommendations for flight crew and cabin attendant restraint systems in aircraft. A properly designed crew restraint system will avoid injury or debilitation during a survivable crash and enable post crash assistance to occupants and escape from the aircraft. Consideration is given to existing requirements of the FAA and to the recommendations of aircraft operators and those involved in the manufacture or use of restraining devices. Crew member safety is the primary objective, with appropriate provisions for crew comfort taken into consideration. The criteria established herein are designed to standardize restraining systems without hindering the development of new, improved systems.
Standard
2000-03-01
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies laboratory test procedures and minimum requirements for the manufacturer of restraint systems for use in civil aircraft. It is intended to establish a minimum level of quality which can be called upon by the designer of those systems. However, compliance with this standard alone may not assure adequate performance of the restraint system under normal and emergency conditions. Such performance requires consideration of factors beyond the scope of this standard, and must be demonstrated by a system evaluation procedure which includes the seat, the occupant, the specific restraint installation and the cabin interior configuration. This standard specifies the requirements for Type 1, Type 2 and Type 3 restraint systems.
Standard
1993-03-16
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides criteria for the development and standardization of placards containing easily understood signs, symbols and/or instructions for locating and operating exits and emergency equipment which might be used or operated by cabin occupants and rescue personnel under emergency conditions. In addition, this ARP gives guidance in the selection and development of warning labels. The placards are intended to be seen and understood by occupants within and, in the case of external exit placards, by persons outside the airplane.
Standard
1986-03-01
This Aerospace Standard specifies laboratory test procedures and minimal requirements for the manufacturer of torso restraint systems for use in small fixed wing aircraft and rotorcraft. It is intended to establish a minimum level of quality which can be called upon by the designer of those systems. However, compliance with this standard alone may not assure adequate performance for the restraint system under normal and emergency conditions. Such performance requires consideration of factors beyond the scope of this standard, and must be demonstrated by a system evaluation procedure which includes the seat, the occupant, the specific restraint installation and the cabin interior configuration.
Standard
1984-08-01
This document presents paraphrased in tabulated form, the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR's) for aircraft oxygen systems. It is intended as a ready reference for those considering the use of oxygen in aircraft and those wishing to familiarize themselves with the systems requirements for existing aircraft. This document is not intended to replace the oxygen related FAR's but rather to index them in some order. For detailed information the user is referred to the current issue of the relevant FAR paragraph referenced in the report.
Standard
1982-03-15
The purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to provide design recommendations for passenger cabin entry doors, service doors, and emergency exits. The objective is to have a reliable system standardized to make operation of the exits simple, quick and obvious to all occupants under normal and emergency conditions and facilitate qualification of cabin attendants for different airplanes. NOTE: It is not the purpose of this ARP to specify the design method or specific mechanism to accomplish the objectives.
Standard
1978-01-31
This ARP provides design guidelines based on currently available information for the impact safety design of the cabin occupant environment.
Standard
1976-02-15
This ARP is intended to make recommendations for flight crew and cabin attendant restraint systems in aircraft. A properly designed crew restraint system will avoid injury or debilitation during a survivable crash and enable post crash assistance to occupants and escape from the aircraft. Consideration is given to existing requirements of the FAA and to the recommendations of aircraft operators and those involved in the manufacture or use of restraining devices. Crew member safety is the primary objective, with appropriate provisions for crew comfort taken into consideration. The criteria established herein are designed to standardize restraining systems without hindering the development of new, improved systems.
Standard
1967-11-01
This ARP is intended to make recommendations for flight crew and cabin attendant restraint systems in aircraft. A properly designed crew restraint system will avoid injury or debilitation during a survivable crash and enable post crash assistance to occupants and escape from the aircraft. Consideration is given to existing requirements of the FAA and to the recommendations of aircraft operators and those involved in the manufacture or use of restraining devices. Crew member safety is the primary objective, with appropriate provisions for crew comfort taken into consideration. The criteria established herein are designed to standardize restraining systems without hindering the development of new, improved systems.
Standard
1967-10-31
This ARP provides design guidelines based on currently available information for the impact safety design of the cabin occupant environment.
Standard
1967-08-01
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to establish criteria for the installation of emergency equipment that shall permit its efficient use and encourage standardization, thereby reducing reorientation of crewmembers to equipment accessibility while working on differing types, models, and series of transport-category aircraft. This does not preclude the requirement to pre-flight check all emergency equipment relative to its location, availability, and operational status.
Standard
1967-05-15
null, null
The purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to provide design recommendations for passenger cabin entry doors, service doors, and emergency exits. The objective is to have a reliable system standardized to make operation of the exits simple, quick and obvious to all occupants under normal and emergency conditions and facilitate qualification of cabin attendants for different airplanes. NOTE: It is not the purpose of this ARP to specify the design method or specific mechanism to accomplish the objectives.
Standard
1965-04-20
The purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to provide design criteria that will lead to seat designs which provide maximum safety for air transportation passengers. It is not the purpose of this ARP to specify design methods or specific designs to be followed in the accomplishment of the stated objectives.
Viewing 1 to 21 of 21

    Filter

    • Aerospace
      21
    • Standard
      21

    Subtopics