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2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0057
Yuji Arai, Makoto Hasegawa, Takeshi Harigae
ISO 26262 was established in 2011 as a functional safety standard for road vehicles. This standard provides safety requirements according to ASIL (Automotive Safety Integrity Levels) in order to avoid unreasonable residual risk caused by malfunctioning behavior of safety-related electrical and/or electronic systems. The ASIL is determined by considering the estimate of three factors including injury severity. While applicable only to passenger cars at present, motorcycles will be included in the scope of application of ISO 26262 in the next revision. Therefore, our previous study focused on severity class evaluation for motorcycles. A method of classifying injury severity according to vehicle speed was developed on the basis of accident data. In addition, a severity table for motorcycles was created using accident data in representative collision configurations involved with motorcycles in Japan.
2016-07-22
Book
2016-06-30
Standard
J3069_201606
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test procedures, performance requirements, and design guidelines for adaptive driving beam (ADB) and associated equipment.
2016-06-22
Standard
AIR1389B
This report presents, paraphrased in tabular format, an overview of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) for aircraft oxygen systems. It is intended as a ready reference for those considering the use of oxygen in aircraft and those wishing to familiarize themselves with the systems requirements for existing aircraft. This document is not intended to replace the oxygen related FAR but rather to index them in some order. For detailed information, the user is referred to the current issue of the relevant FAR paragraph referenced in this report.
2016-06-07
WIP Standard
AIR6908
This document provides informational background, rationale, and data (both physical testing and computer simulations) used in defining the component test methods and acceptance criteria described in SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) 6330. ARP 6330 defines multiple test methods uses to assess the effect of seat back mounted IFE monitor changes on head blunt trauma.
2016-05-13
Standard
ARP6316
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) documents a common understanding of terms, compliance issues, and occupant injury criteria to facilitate the design and certification of oblique facing passenger seat installations specific to Part 25 aircraft. The applicability of the criteria listed in this current release is limited to seats with an occupant facing direction greater than 18 and no greater than 30 degrees relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis. Later revisions are intended to provide criteria for other facing directions. Performance criteria for side facing seats installed with the occupant facing direction at 90 degrees relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis are provided in AS8049/1. Seats installed at angles greater than 30 degrees relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis must have an energy absorbing rest or shoulder harness. However, this document does not provide the criteria for oblique facing seats incorporating such rests.
2016-05-05
Magazine
New dawn at Honda R&D President Yoshiyuki Matsumoto aims to invigorate Honda's technology and product-development organization with 'full soul.' Automated driving meets regulation: NHTSA and the next 50 years The challenges and opportunities on the road to 'zero deaths' demand a new level of federal automotive safety technical standards, and a new safety-defect reporting and recall system. NHTSA and the U.S. Congress must act boldly and quickly to make it happen. Autonomous driving meets regulation: Hands off, eyes off, brain off Euro NCAP'S president warns that without coherent policies, the growing availability of automated technologies may result in piecemeal technology development-and unintentional consequences. Designer yin meets engineer yang Efficient and effective vehicle development means even closer collaboration between the two former sparring partners.
2016-04-12
Technical Paper
2016-01-7000
Daniel P. Malone, John F. Creamer
In 1966, Congress boldly reshaped the American approach to road safety and thereby established the United States as the worldwide leader in vehicle safety. Congressional action led to the establishment of the Department of Transportation, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, and the motor-vehicle safety defects and recall system. However, the safety environment that gave rise to these responses has evolved substantially. Fifty years later, the United States is unable to properly regulate rapidly advancing safety technologies, and the recall system is wholly unsuited to ensuring the safety of software-driven systems. Congress must act to update the road safety system in order to enable the United States to meet the challenges and seize the opportunities of the new transportation era.
2016-04-07
WIP Standard
ARP6199A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides an approach for determining which parts on aircraft seats are non-traditional, large, non-metallic panels that need to meet the test requirements of 14CFR Part 25 Appendix F, Parts IV & V.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1520
Gunti R. Srinivas, Anindya Deb, Clifford C. Chou
Abstract The present work is concerned with the objective of design optimization of an automotive front end structure meeting both occupant and pedestrian safety requirements. The main goal adopted here is minimizing the mass of the front end structure meeting the safety requirements without sacrificing the performance targets. The front end structure should be sufficiently stiff to protect the occupant by absorbing the impact energy generated during a high speed frontal collision and at the same time it should not induce unduly high impact loads during a low speed pedestrian collision. These two requirements are potentially in conflict with each other; however, there may exist an optimum design solution, in terms of mass of front end structure, that meets both the requirements.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1473
Orion P. Keifer, Bradley Reckamp, Charles Moody, Anthony Timpanaro
Abstract Evaluation of the severity of low speed motor vehicle crashes has been the subject of significant research for more than 25 years. These crashes typically result in little if any damage to the vehicles involved and therefore the ability to determine the threshold of damage would be very useful in analysis of such cases. One such threshold, which has been used by accident reconstructionists, is the manufacturer’s published bumper rating in compliance with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) for vehicle bumpers. The rationale is that if there is any damage to the bumper system of the vehicle in question, the impact must have had a severity greater than the rated bumper speed. This paper examines the FMVSS bumper standards upon which the published bumper ratings are reportedly in compliance, historical low speed testing damage results, and engineering considerations of bumper damage in low speed impacts.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1495
Motomi Iyoda, Tom Trisdale, Rini Sherony, Daniel Mikat, William Rose
Abstract An event data recorder (EDR) records the vehicle status at the timing of an accident. Toyota Motor Corporation began the sequential introduction of EDRs onto its vehicles from August 2000. Currently, about 70% of all Toyota’s vehicles in North America are equipped with an EDR, which is more than the average rate of EDR installation in vehicles in North America (around 50%). The U.S. has introduced regulations for EDRs. Toyota regards these as minimum requirements and also records additional data for accident analysis, including the following: (1) pre-crash data, (2) side crash data, (3) rollover data, (4) pedestrian protection pop-up hood (PUH) data, and (5) vehicle control history (VCH) data from a non-crash triggered recording system. The regulations stipulate that EDR data retrieval must be possible using a commercially available tool. The developed system uses the Crash Data Retrieval (CDR) tool manufactured by Bosch.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0050
Huafeng Yu, Chung-Wei Lin, BaekGyu Kim
Abstract Modern vehicles can have millions of lines of software, for vehicle control, infotainment, etc. The correctness and quality of the software play a key role in the safety of whole vehicles. In order to assure the safety, engineers give an effort to prove correctness of individual subsystems or their integration using testing or verification methods. One needs to eventually certify that the developed vehicle as a whole is indeed safe using the artifacts and evidences produced throughout the development cycle. Such a certification process helps to increase the safety confidence of the developed software and reduce OEM’s liability. However, software certification in automotive domain is not yet well established, compared to other safety-critical domains, such as avionics and medical devices. At the same time, safety-relevant standards and techniques, including ISO 26262 and assurance cases, have been well adopted.
2016-04-01
Magazine
Electronic Warfare Next Generation FPGAs for Electronic Warfare Systems Materials: Composites Managing the Impact of Nanomaterials in Aerospace Manufacturing Aerospace Materials/Manufacturing Turbine Flow Meters Alternative Power Sources Designing a Power Generation System for a More-Electric Aircraft
2016-03-04
Book
This valuable resource lists all Aerospace Standards (AS), Aerospace Recommended Practices (ARP), Aerospace Information Reports (AIR), and Aerospace Resource Documents (ARD) published by SAE. Each listing includes title, subject, document number, key words, new and revised documents, and DODISS-adopted documents. AMS Index - Now Available!
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0244
Kumaraswamy Udugu, Viswanatha Reddy Saddala, Sridhar Lingan
Abstract Traffic injuries are an important public health issue. To prevent these injuries, safety systems in a vehicle are recognized as valuable tools. These safety systems are active before and during a crash event. Passive safety is one such safety tool which comprises of occupant restraint systems to prevent fatal injuries during an event of a crash. To improve the real life safety further, active safety systems plays an important role in mitigating the real world accidents. Moreover, effective integration of active and passive safety systems has a potential to further reduce car occupant fatalities. However, in the recent developments in India towards road safety, vehicle safety standards are oriented more towards passive safety. In the present work, road accidents data from India between 2005 and 2014 are studied, to estimate the major mode of accidents and factors influencing the fatal injuries.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0251
Kantilal Patil, Siva Reddy, Nadeem Zafar
Abstract In the event of a frontal car crash, occupant sitting in a car meets various types of injuries like Head injury, Chest compression, Neck injury etc. These injuries may lead to the death of an occupant if exceeded beyond biomechanical limits. Seat belt is a primary restraint system, which when worn controls the motion of occupant sitting inside the car during the event of a car crash. An Anchorage location of three point seat belt system has significant effect on occupant injuries during the crash event. By changing the mount locations of a seat belt anchor points i.e. D-ring, Anchor & Buckle, performance of seatbelt system can be enhanced further thereby reducing occupant injuries to certain extent. As per regulation AIS015, locations of safety belt anchorage points should be within prescribed zone.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0250
Kamlesh Yadav, Ruhi Thakur
Abstract Hood is the closure provided in the frontal portion of the vehicle for covering the engine room. Any component disposed in the frontal portion of the vehicle becomes important because of aesthetic as well as regulatory requirements. Introduction of new regulations like pedestrian protection brings new challenges for the original equipment manufacturers and the governing authorities. Introduction of Pedestrian Protection regulation, a recent development in the automotive industry, has thrown several questions in front of original equipment manufacturers. This work explains the procedure to address such question and the learning associated with it.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0210
Abhishek Sinha, Kamlesh Yadav, Rajdeep Singh Khurana
Abstract The biggest challenge in vehicle BIW design today is to make a light, cost effective and energy absorbing structure. With the increasing competition as well as increasing customer awareness, today’s vehicle has to satisfy several aesthetic and functional requirements besides the mandatory regulatory requirements. While working on global platform, it is challenging to comply with both pedestrian protection and low speed bumper impact (ECE-R42) and at the same time meeting the styling intent of reducing the front overhang. Pedestrian lower leg compliance demands space between bumper member and bumper, a condition that reduces the space available for energy absorption during low speed impact (ECE-R42). Therefore, reduction in front overhang poses a problem in meeting both the requirements with limited space.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0166
SriRamaChandraMurthy Batchu
Primary function of the inverter in an Electric or Hybrid Electric vehicle (EV/HEV) is to generate required AC voltage from high voltage battery to drive Electrical machine (EM). Being part of power-train of the vehicle, inverters (or hybrid control units (HCU)) are safety related electronic control units (ECU) due to the severity of the accidents/incidents that could result if the ECU is not functional as intended. Therefore it is necessary to develop the inverter in accordance with applicable safety standards. The standard ISO 26262 in particular addresses the complete development cycle of safety related automotive products. OEMs now mandate the strict adherence to ISO26262 standard for such ECUs. This paper describes how safety principles are realized in the hardware modules of inverter, which are responsible for the functional safety adherence.
2015-12-01
Magazine
Uncertainty quantification The technique is a must for next-generation simulation tools. Oil-pump sizing Researchers from Hinduja Tech investigate options for low friction and power consumption. The future of Indian commercial aviation The growth in traffic that airport modernization has supported has also made a significant contribution to the local and national economies, while the improved infrastructure has been positive for the perception of India in the global market. Driving EVs toward lower cost The race ison to reduce battery and electric-drive systems cost while improving efficiency. Powering on Rolls-Royce's Chief Engineer discusses new technologies that inspire current R&D design and evaluation work as part of its strategic roadmap for future big commercial programs. HMIs extend beyond the cab Telematic functions are being integrated into multi-function user interfaces.
2015-11-17
Technical Paper
2015-32-0746
Maki Kawakoshi, Takashi Kobayashi, Makoto Hasegawa
Controllability (C class) represents the level of the ability to avoid harm and is one of the parameters that determine the Automotive Safety Integrity Level in the ISO 26262 functional safety standard, which applies to the electrical and/or electronic systems. This study aimed to consider an appropriate C class evaluation technique for expert riders in applying ISO 26262 to motorcycles. This study attempted to show a C class evaluation method without deviation by the riders and presented examples of the evaluation of three hazardous events in actual vehicle tests. In addition, riders' comments regarding their understanding of the circumstances that resulted in the evaluation were collected, and the correspondence of these comments was examined. We selected “unintended acceleration” or “unintended deceleration” due to the malfunction of the electronic throttle control system as hazard examples and conducted tests to reproduce hazardous events.
2015-11-17
Journal Article
2015-32-0794
Sei Takahashi, Hideo Nakamura, Makoto Hasegawa
ISO 26262, a functional safety standard for motor vehicles, was published in November 2011. Although motorcycles are not included in the scope of application of the current edition of ISO 26262, it is expected that motorcycles will be included in the next revision. However, it is not appropriate to directly apply automotive safety integrity levels (ASILs) to motorcycles because the situation of usage in practice presumably differs between motorcycles and motor vehicles. In our previous study, we newly defined safety integrity levels for motorcycles (MSILs) and proposed that the levels of MSILs should correspond to levels one step lower than those of ASILs; however, we did not investigate the validity of their connections. Accordingly, in this research, we validated the connections. We defined the difference of levels of SILs between motorcycles and motor vehicles as the difference of target values of random hardware failure rates specified in ISO 26262-5.
2015-10-28
Standard
J1373_201510
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test procedures, requirements, and guidelines for rear cornering lamps for use on vehicles less than 9.1 m in overall length.
2015-10-07
Magazine
HMIs extend beyond the cab Telematics functions are being integrated into multi-function user interfaces. Standards step forward in design of off-highway electronics Functional safety standards are starting to impact many development projects, while the auto industry's AUTOSAR standard is being deployed to help enable software reuse and simplify designs. Leveraging automotive lightweighting techniques to improve off-highway emissions Where systems engineers can gain efficiencies in off-highway equipment is agnostic, they'll take it anywhere, and so they should, but one of the ways, often underestimated, is through the use of strong and lightweight advanced materials. Waste heat recovery for the long haul A WHR system based on an organic Rankine cycle has been developed for a long-haul Iveco Stralis truck.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2832
Keith Friedman, John Hutchinson, Khahn Bui, Matthew Stephens, Alyssa Schmidt
Abstract The incidence of fire in heavy trucks has been shown to be about ten times higher under crash conditions than occurs in passenger vehicles. Fuel tank protection testing defined in SAE standard J703 was originally issued in 1954 and presently echoes federal regulations codified in 49 CFR 393. These tests do not reflect dynamic impact conditions representative of those that can be expected by heavy trucks on the road today. Advanced virtual testing of current and alternative fuel tank designs and locations under example impact conditions is reported. Virtual testing methods can model vehicle to vehicle and vehicle to fixed object impacts. These results can then be utilized to evaluate and refine fuel tank protection system design approaches.
2015-07-08
Standard
J1133_201507
This document provides design guidelines, test procedure references, and performance requirements for stop arm lamp devices on school bus vehicles which are used to alert traffic to stop when passengers are loading and unloading
2015-07-08
Standard
J887_201507
This document provides design guidelines, test procedure references, and performance requirements for red and yellow overhead warning devices on school bus vehicles which are used to alert traffic to stop when passengers are loading and unloading.
2015-06-12
Standard
AS9014A
These requirements are applicable to IAQG sector schemes when making use of ABs, CRBs and their auditors, for the assessment and certification/registration of supplier quality systems in accordance with the requirements of this document. The quality management system standard used by the CRB shall be 9100/9110/9120, as appropriate to the supplier’s activities. It shall be applied to the supplier’s complete Quality System that covers aerospace products. Sectors may use these requirements for other standards. IAQG members have committed to recognize the equivalence of certification/registration of a suppliers quality management system to either of the AS, EN or JISQ/SJAC standards. This AS provides the approval process for Auditor Authentication Bodies (AAB), training course providers, trainers and auditors who meet the requirements of AIR5493 and outlines the America’s sector specific process to implement AS9104. This document is created to be in conformance with AS9104.
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