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Viewing 1621 to 1650 of 1650
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560100
G. L. GETLINE
The reliability of airborne equipment is related to the thoroughness of the environmental test program. The importance of being able to rationalize the environmental tests in terms of the actual flight environment is stressed. Present environmental vibration test procedures, which are based for the most part on flight data obtained in propeller driven aircraft, are reviewed. It is shown that such procedures cannot be applied to turbojet aircraft. An environmental test procedure is proposed which utilizes the latest type laboratory shaker and control equipment to provide a vibration and noise analogue of an aircraft. The penalties of “over-testing” are pointed out. In conclusion, an environmental test specification is compared to an insurance policy, and it is urged that its implications be fully understood.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540033
W. H. SEACORD, F. L. HELMEL
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540071
EDWARD N. COLE, EDWARD H. KELLEY
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540206
PAUL E. ALLEN
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540201
T. R. SMITH
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520050
Frank Watson
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510130
W. S. SAVILLE
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500089
E. J. YOUNG
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490155
H. C. SMITH, C. A. BURKHALTER, C. L. ALTENBURGER, V. M. DARSEY, J. F. RANDALL, T. F. OLT, N. E. ROTHENTHALER
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490014
DORIAN SHAININ
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490143
R. S. Saddoris
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480054
R. H. McCARROLL
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450115
H. A. Mullen, L. Boelter
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440183
R. H. McCARROLL, J. L. McCLOUD
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440188
JOHN GAILLARD
THE number of rejections can be reduced or, in many cases, trouble can be spotted in the production process before rejections occur, so that production can be increased - these are some of the advantages to be obtained when a control chart is used to control the quality of manufactured products. The quality control chart here introduced by Mr. Gaillard is based on the statistical method. It is applicable particularly to highly repetitive operations, and its use presents opportunities for getting a better grip on quality control in regard to physical and chemical properties of raw materials or the dimensional accuracy of interchangeable parts.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440032
W. B. Flanders, H. E. Francis
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430166
O. J. SNIDER
TODAY'S inspection procedures are much more rigorous, as well as more rapid, than those of 25 years ago. The development of improved standards, refinements in old methods of inspecting parts, and the application of entirely new principles and tests to the science of precision have all contributed to this progress. To contrast the highly scientific and systematic inspection procedures of World War II with the crude and slow inspections of World War I, Mr. Snider compares the methods applied to the crankshaft of the 1918 Liberty engine with those applied to the 1943 Allison crankshaft - an aircraft crankshaft being used because it covers almost all types of measurements employed in checking machined parts. During the period under consideration, steel composition has not changed appreciably, and yet, results obtained have improved tremendously.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410033
George H. Brett
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410064
J. W. Dunn
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400041
Val Cronstedt
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380119
Kent R. Van Horn, Howard J. Heath
ARTICLES of a wide variety of sizes and shapes can be produced easily by the sand-casting process. The advantage of simplicity and low cost offered by the sand-casting process for small numbers of identical parts is offset by certain inherent limitations which must be recognized clearly if it is to yield optimum results. The various methods of inspecting and controlling structural variations that affect the strength and serviceability of aircraft castings are described. It is recognized that the user of castings must rely to a considerable extent on the foundryman for careful inspection. Several direct tests worthy of consideration as final acceptance tests of quality, such as the proof test, radiography (X-ray examination), and the static breakdown test, are described. However, this discussion leads to the conclusion that there is not yet available a satisfactory direct method of predicting the normal life of an aircraft casting.
1926-01-01
Technical Paper
260057
A. H. FRAUENTHAL
Although production has been increased greatly during the last decade by the use of special automatic machinery, conveyors and improved methods, plans for the application of wage incentives to indirect labor have not been widely adopted. Inasmuch as time-studies of some sort of wage-incentive system have served to keep the individual output of direct labor close to its assignment, the assumption is made that the labor of the indirect workers might also be so measured to a standard that the compensation would be governed by the quantity and the quality of the ultimate output. The advantages and functions of inspection are discussed and a method is suggested for establishing a quality-bonus incentive-plan based on the amount of rejected and scrap material per car and the number of inspectors employed per unit of production.
1923-01-01
Technical Paper
230020
S O BJORNBERG
Detroit Section Paper - Since a gear is a product of the cutting tool, the gear-cutting machine and the operator, it can be no more accurate than the combined accuracy of these fundamental factors. All gear manufacturers aim to eliminate split bearings, high and low bearings, flats and other inaccuracies in tooth contour, because a gear having teeth the contours of which comply with the geometrical laws underlying its construction is by far the most satisfactory. Illustrations are presented to convey an understanding of the geometrical principles involved, together with other illustrations of testing instruments and comments thereon. The application of these instruments is termed quality control, which is discussed in some detail under the headings of hob control, machine control and gear control.
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150018
H. A. ELLIOTT
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130028
E. F. ROBERTS
Viewing 1621 to 1650 of 1650