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2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0373
Fabian Jorg Uwe Koark, Christian Beul
Motivation – Achieving functional safety in mechatronic systems with growing product functionality is a major challenge in systems engineering. Following the current discussion, this challenge is mostly allocated to electronics and software development. For most of the scenarios this focus is feasible. Product design – the construction of the product – defines the properties and the appearance of the product by shape, material and assembly. So, the product design is often not under control of the safety management system. A hazardous deviation of part shape can be easily identified after the parts product or at least at its mounting. A wrong assembly is controlled by assembly documentation or data (e.g. screw torques) and identified at end of assembly line checks. The identification of a hazardous material choice depend on the product material class. Product materials can be separated into two classes: passive or active materials.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0264
Venkatesh Babu, Ravi Thyagarajan, Jaisankar Ramalingam
In this paper, the capability of three methods of modelling detonation of high explosives (HE) buried in soil viz., (1) coupled discrete element & particle gas methods (DEM-PGM) (2) Structured - Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (S-ALE), and (3) Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE),are investigated. The ALE method of modeling the effects of buried charges in soil is well known and widely used in blast simulations today Due to high computational costs, inconsistent robustness and long run times, alternate modeling methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and DEM are gaining more traction. In all these methods, accuracy of the analysis relies not only on the fidelity of the soil and high explosive models but also on the robustness of fluid-structure interaction. These high-fidelity models are also useful in generating fast running models (FRM) useful for rapid generation of blast simulation results of acceptable accuracy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1429
Sung Rae kim, Inju Lee, Hyung joo Kim
In motor-vehicle frontal crashes, occupants often suffer from the abdominal injuries when the lap belt excurses over the pelvic bone, commonly referred to as submarining. Especially, it is well known that the obese occupants frequently get injured caused by submarining due to out-of-position belt fittings. This paper aims to investigate the interaction between the pelvis and the lap belt during a frontal crash event. For this purpose, twelve sled tests on four obese female Post-Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) and four sled tests on the Hybrid III 50th dummy were carried out. In each test, a 3D motion capture system was installed to track the movement of the pelvis and the lap belt. Moreover, the validated subject specific FE model scaled from the 50th percentile male GHBMC model to fit to obese female PMHS in prior study was also simulated.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1414
William Bortles, David Hessel, William Neale
When the steer axle of a vehicle with protruding wheel studs makes contact with another vehicle or object in a sideswipe configuration, the tires and wheel studs of the vehicle can deposit distinct geometrical patterns onto the surfaces it contacts. Prior research has demonstrated how relative speeds between the two vehicles and surfaces can be calculated through analysis of the distinct patterns. This paper presents a methodology for performing this analysis by visually modeling the interaction between wheel studs and various surfaces, and presents a method for automating the calculations of relative speed between vehicles. This methodology also augments prior research by demonstrating how the visual modeling and simulation of the wheel stud contact can extend to almost any surface interaction that may not have any previous prior published tests, or test methods that would be difficult to setup in real life.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1431
Ke Dong, Brian Putala, Kristen Ansel
Out-of-position (OOP) driver tests were designed to address concerns about airbag introduced injury in situations while the occupant is nearer to the airbag module than in a normal seated position. The 5th percentile female has instrumentation for measuring ATD sternum displacement (potentiometer) and acceleration (accelerometers) which can be used to compute compression rate. This paper documents a study investigating the capability of the chest accelerometers to accurately assess non-distributed loading of the chest during this test configuration. The study included ATD mechanical loading and instrumentation review. Finite element analysis was conducted using a Hybrid 3 - 5th percentile female ATD correlated to testing. The correlated restraint model was utilized with a Hybrid 3 – 50th percentile male ATD. A 50th percentile male Global Human Body Model was then applied for enhanced anatomical review.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0377
Peter Shery, William Altenhof, Ryan Smith, Elmar Beeh, Philipp Strassburger, Thomas Gruenheid
Cylindrical extrusions of magnesium AZ31B were subjected to quasi-static axial cutting and compression modes of deformation to study this alloy’s effectiveness as an energy absorber. For comparison, the tests were repeated using extrusions of AA6061-T6 aluminum of the same geometry. Axial cutting of AA6061-T6 extrusions has been shown to be an effective, ductile mode of energy dissipation, yielding a repeatable, nearly constant load/deflection response with a crush force efficiency (CFE) up to 96%. In the present tests, the quasi-static cutting deformation of AZ31B extrusions achieved a respectable CFE of 80%, but revealed a load/deflection response with sharp, minute, rapid fluctuations, indicating an undesirable fracturing failure. Additionally, the average specific energy absorption (SEA) of AZ31B was 11 kJ/kg, which is less than half that seen for AA6061-T6 extrusions of the same geometry (24 kJ/kg).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1299
Nagurbabu Noorbhasha, Brendan J. O'Toole
The objective of this research is to optimize the structure of a roll cage for an off-road vehicle that was used for SAE Baja competition by UNLV SAE Baja team. Baja SAE is an intercollegiate competition to design, fabricate, and race a small, single passenger, off-road vehicle powered by a 10 HP Briggs & Stratton 4-Stroke gasoline engine. Since the off-road vehicle is powered by a small capacity engine, the weight of the structure is very critical and must be optimized to improve the performance of the vehicle. In an effort to optimize the structure, a roll cage model was generated using CAD and a finite element (FE) analysis was performed on the structure. A grid independence study was carried out on the FE model to reduce the analysis computation time and space. The effects of stress and deformation of the structure were studied for a linear static frontal impact analysis on roll cage for various mesh sizes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1433
Enrique Bonugli, Joseph Cormier, Matthew Reilly, Lars Reinhart
The purpose of this study was to determine the frictional properties between the exterior surface of a motorcycle helmet and ‘typical’ roadway surfaces. These values were compared to abrasive papers currently recommended by government helmet safety standards and widely used by researchers in the field of oblique motorcycle helmet impacts. A guided freefall test fixture was utilized to obtain nominal impact velocities of 5, 7 and 9 m/s. The impacting surfaces were mounted to an angled anvil to simulate off-centered oblique collision. Head accelerations and impact forces were measured for each test. Analysis of the normal and tangential forces imparted to the contact surface indicated that the frictional properties of abrasive papers differ from asphalt and cement in magnitude, duration and onset. Reduction in head acceleration, both linear and angular, were observed when asphalt and cement were used as the impacting surface.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1456
Shailesh Pawar, Sandeep Sharma, Manoj Sharma
The heavy and light commercial vehicles are equipped with protection devices to enhance the safety of occupants in small vehicles in the event of under run and to reduce the degree of intrusions. These protection devices are SUPD (side under run protection devices), RUPD (rear under run protection devices), FUPD (front under run protection devices). Any passenger vehicles can impact with the heavy vehicles either from rear, front or side and meet the sever accident. During these types of impacts, there is a possibility that the passenger vehicle will go under the front, rear or side part of the truck and bus and cause serious injuries to the occupants. Side underrun protection device is one of the important system implemented in Vehicles as a regulatory requirement (as per IS 14682: 1999) for passive safety of N2 and N3 category vehicles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0361
Amar Marpu, George Garfinkel, Patrick Maguire
Modeling of high voltage (HV) wires is an important aspect of vehicle safety simulations of electrified powertrains, in order to understand the potential tearing of the wire sheath or pinching of high voltage wiring. The behavior of these wires needs to be reviewed in safety simulations to identify potential hazards associated with a high voltage wire being exposed, severed or coming in contact with ground planes during a crash event. Modeling high voltage wire is challenging due to the complexity of the physical composition of the wire, which is usually comprised of multiple strands bundled and often twisted together to form the high voltage electrical conductor. This is further complicated by the existence of external insulating sheathing materials to prevent high voltage exposure during normal operating conditions. This paper describes a proposed method to model and characterize different types of high voltage wires for usage in component and vehicle level safety models.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1446
Allen Charles Bosio, Paul Marable, Marcus Ward, Bradley Staines
With the introduction of the new USNCAP protocols, which incorporated assessment of a 5th percentile occupant in the passenger seat, a variety of solutions were introduced to achieve 5 star accreditation using additional restraint solutions such as, but not exclusively, knee airbags, dual pretensioning and adaptive venting . The engineering challenge was to understand and design a passenger airbag system that recognized and adapted itself to the smaller, belted, 5th percentile female, while adequately restraining the larger, unbelted, 50th percentile male. In this paper we describe the development of an airbag restraint which achieves 5 star performance levels, where the design focus from the outset was to achieve minimal head, neck & chest injury risk. This was achieved without the need for active adaptive features. The CAE tools Madymo and Radioss were critical to the design of a new patented airbag which repeatedly demonstrated USNCAP RRS <=0.66.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1474
Raed E. El-Jawahri, Agnes Kim, Dean Jaradi, Rich Ruthinowski, Kevin Siasoco, Cortney Stancato, Para Weerappuli
Sled testing simulating a full-frontal rigid barrier impacts were conducted using the Hybrid III 5th female and the 50th male anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). The ATDs were positioned in the outboard rear seat of a generic small car environment. Two belt configurations were used: 1) a standard belt with no load limiter or pre-tensioner and 2) a seatbelt with a 4.5 kN load-limiting retractor with a stop function and a retractor pre-tensioner (LL-PT). In the current study, the LL-PT belt system reduced the peak responses of both ATDs. Probabilities of serious-to-fatal injuries (AIS3+), based on the ATDs peak responses, were calculated using the risk curves in NHTSA’s December 2015 Request for Comments (RFC) proposing changes to the United States New Car Assessment Program (US-NCAP). Those probabilities were compared to the injury rates (IRs) observed in the field on aggregate and point estimate bases.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1423
Alan F. Asay, Christopher D. Armstrong, Bradley Higgins, John Steiner
Traditional accident reconstruction analysis methodologies include the study of the crush-energy relationship of vehicles. The process of estimating crush-energy and delta-v in real world collisions is primarily based upon a comparison of structural crush between a vehicle involved in a real world collision with that of a test vehicle. This process is well known and documented in the scientific literature. However, this process is limited to both the availability of the crash test data and the proximity of the structure engaged on the vehicle in the test. The largest source of publically available crash tests is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) crash tests database. NHTSA has conducted numerous Federal Motor Safety Vehicle Standard (FMVSS) compliance and New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) crash tests of many passenger cars and pickup trucks sold in the United States.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1307
Puneet Bahri, Praveen Balaj Balakrishnan, Ravi Purnoo Munuswamy
The change in thickness and work hardening that arise during the forming process are generally ignored in quasi-static analysis for Seat belt pull when performed on vehicle body. However, it is a well-known effect that the physical properties of steel can alter significantly during the manufacturing process. This comprises an increase of material stiffness due to plastic deformation as well as gage changes. Generally, these changes are of very local nature and in the past, crash software tools didn't support the introduction of these local effects, so that they couldn't be taken into account. In the meanwhile LS-DYNA has the capability to import information provided by stamping tools. Thereby a very important part of the material properties can be introduced into the quasi-static simulation models, leading to a significantly increased correlation to test results.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0365
Kentaro Sato, Takayuki Futatsuka, Jiro Hiramoto, Kei Nagasaka, Akira Akita, Takeshi Kashiyama
A simple testing method is proposed in order to investigate the ductile fracture in crashed automotive components using advanced and ultra-high strength steels. The fracture is often prone to occur at spot-weld joint and sheet edge. It is well known that the heat affected zone is weak point in ultra-high strength steel due to the annealed material around the nugget, and sheet edge is low ductility due to the damage of shearing. The proposed method is designed to simulate the ductile fracture started from spot weld point and sheared edge in deformed automotive components in crash event. Automotive steel sheets with a wide range of tensile strengths from 270 MPa to 1470 MPa, shown in Table 1, were examined to investigate the effect of material strength on the fracture behavior. Effect of cutting method including machining and laser cutting also investigated.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0368
Ying Zhao, Fangwu Ma, Longfan Yang, Yueqiang Wang, Hongyu Liang
The conventional hood with single material and stiffener structural form conceals some limitations on pedestrian protection and lightweight, not satisfying the requirements of structural strength, pedestrian protection and lightweight contradictory with each other at the same time. In this paper, a novel type hood is proposed to develop sandwich structure using architected cellular material with negative Poisson's ratio (NPR) configuration based on the decoupling thought of structural strength and energy absorption. Core-layer aluminum alloy material with NPR is used to meet the requirement of impact energy absorption, inner and outer skin using carbon fiber is selected to achieve high structural stiffness needed. This paper starts from the relations between geometric parameters of core-layer architected cellular material and mechanical properties, on this basis, the optimal geometric parameters can be expected using the multiobjective optimization method.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1468
Do Hoi KIm
Previous studies have dealt with the relationship between the injury criteria of dummies and vehicle drop during high-speed head on collisions. Ultimately, vehicle drops are found to worsen the injury criteria of dummies when exceeding 60mm during high-speed crashes. Also, vehicle drops affected the front side member of the vehicle body the most. The present study dealt with methods of improving vehicle drops by enhancing the connective structure of the front side member, the short gun, and the A pillar. Analyses on various vehicles confirm that arch-shaped front side members are an extremely important factor. Furthermore, if the short gun and A pillar are properly connected at the top of the arch shape on the front side member during crashes, the deformation energy of the vehicle could be converted to energy for lifting the A pillar lower. With a so-called body lift structure, BLS has been applied to the B/C segment vehicles of Hyundai and KIA.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1413
Nathan A. Rose, Neal Carter, David Pentecost, Alireza Hashemian
Abstract This paper investigates the dynamics of four motorcycle crashes that occurred on or near a curve (Edwards Corner) on a section of the Mulholland Highway called “The Snake.” This section of highway is located in the Santa Monica Mountains of California. All four accidents were captured on video and they each involved a high-side fall of the motorcycle and rider. This article reports a technical description and analysis of these videos in which the motion of the motorcycles and riders is quantified. To aid in the analysis, the authors mapped Edwards Corner using both a Sokkia total station and a Faro laser scanner. This mapping data enabled analysis of the videos to determine the initial speed of the motorcycles, to identify where in the curve particular rider actions occurred, to quantify the motion of the motorcycles and riders, and to characterize the roadway radius and superelevation throughout the curve.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1447
Pardeep K. Jindal, Rahul Makwana, Djamal Midoun, Edward Abramoski, Matthew Makowski, Ravi Kodwani
In 2012, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) added a new frontal impact test to its vehicle crashworthiness rating protocol, often referred to as the “Small Overlap Rigid Barrier” (SORB) test. The objective of the present numerical study was to develop an innovative driver knee airbag (KAB) to address anthropomorphic test device (ATD) Knee-Thigh-Hip (KTH) response relative to the IIHS’s rating system of “Good, Acceptable, Marginal or Poor”. The approach used in this study utilized advanced morphing techniques in a sophisticated finite element (FE) model of a vehicle with an ATD and a restraint system. The key challenge in the study was to manage vehicle deformation with minimal changes to the KAB inflator and volume. Several KAB designs in terms of (width, height and depth) were simulated until a design resulted in changing the KTH rating from “Poor” to “Good”.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1420
Kirsten White, Raymond Merala
Abstract This study presents a method to characterize the accuracy and precision of video-acceleration-position (VAP) devices, and presents results from testing of one such vehicle camera (“dashcam”) with global positioning system (GPS) used by taxi companies nationwide. Tests were performed in which vehicle kinematic data were recorded in a variety of real world conditions simultaneously by the VAP device, accelerometers, and a proven GPS-based speed sensing and data acquisition system. Data from the VAP device was compared to data collected by the reference instruments to assess timing, precision, and accuracy of reported parameters. Still images from the VAP video recording were compared with three dimensional laser scan data in order to analyze field of view. Several case studies are discussed, and some guidelines and cautions are provided for use of VAP data in accident reconstruction applications.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1418
Wesley D. Grimes, Thomas Vadnais, Gregory A. Wilcoxson
Abstract The time/distance relationship for a heavy truck accelerating from a stop is often needed to accurately assess the events leading up to a collision. Several series of tests were conducted to document the low speed acceleration performance of a 2016 Kenworth T680 truck tractor equipped with a ten-speed overdrive automated manual transmission in Auto Mode. Throughout the testing, the driver never manually shifted gears. This testing included three trailer load configurations and two different acceleration rates. Data were gathered with a VBOX and the Cummins INSITE software.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0268
Venkatesh Babu, Richard Gerth
Friction Stir Processing (FSP) has been used to refine grain structure in sheet metals, and is based on friction stir welding (FSW) principles developed and patented by TWI Ltd, Cambridge, UK in 1991. In Friction Stir Processing (FSP) a tool generates heat from friction and pressure causing a material to become plastic without melting. The tool then mixes the base material in a circular motion as it traverses laterally through the material . It is possible to add 2D or 3D Nano particles to locally alter the material’s stiffness (young’s modulus). For example in, friction stirred TiB2 particles in cast iron resulted in over 2x hardness and wear resistance (by ASTM G35). Since FSP is not a forming process, the pattern of the ribs can be any 2D pattern (linear, circular, spiral, etc.). The main focus of the Nano-reinforced FSP is to achieve increased localized stiffness with minimal increase in density of the local material to achieve light weighting.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1471
Xiao Luo, Wenjing Du, Hao Li, Peiyu LI, Chunsheng Ma, Shucai Xu, Jinhuan Zhang
Occupant restraint systems are developed based on some baseline experiments, while these experiments can only represent a small part of various accidents, so the current design of occupant restraint systems cannot provide the optimum protection effects for occupants during the majority of accidents. This study presents an approach to predict occupant injury before the collision happens, so that the occupant restraint system can be adjusted to the optimum parameters aiming at the imminent vehicle-to-vehicle frontal crash. The approach in this study takes advantages of the information from pre-crash systems, such as the time to collision, the relative velocity, the frontal overlap of the ego vehicle during the collision, the size of the vehicle in the front and so on. The information acquired and the basic crash test results can be integrated to predict a simplified crash pulse, and the injury of the occupant in the ego vehicle can thus be predicted using this crash pulse.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1448
Kevin Pline, Derek Board, Nirmal Muralidharan, Srinivasan Sundararajan, Eric Eiswerth, Katie Salciccioli
Abstract Ford Motor Company introduced the automotive industry’s first second row inflatable seatbelt system in 2011. The system is currently available in the outboard seating positions of the second row of several Ford and Lincoln models. An important consideration for this system is the interaction with child restraint systems (CRS) when it is used to install a CRS or used in conjunction with belt position booster. A novel test methodology to assess the interaction of CRS with Ford and Lincoln inflatable seatbelts through frontal impact sled tests is explained. Details of test methods including construction of additional fixtures and hardware are highlighted. This procedure is designed to enable test labs capable of running Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 213 testing to adapt this test method, with minimal fabrication, by utilizing existing test benches.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1445
Kevin Pline, Derek Board, Nirmal Muralidharan, Srinivasan Sundararajan, Eric Eiswerth, Katie Salciccioli, Noelle Baker
Abstract Ford Motor Company introduced the inflatable seatbelt system in 2011 and the system is now available in the second row of several Ford and Lincoln models. An important consideration is the interaction of the inflatable seatbelt system with child restraint systems (CRS). A comprehensive series of frontal impact sled tests, using a standardized test method, was conducted to compare the performance of rear-facing-only CRS installed using an inflatable seatbelt to the same CRS installed using a standard seatbelt. CRS models from several manufacturers in the North American market were tested both with and without their bases. CRABI 12 month old or Hybrid III 3 year old anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) were restrained in the CRS. The assessment included the ability to achieve a satisfactory installation with the inflatable seatbelt, comparisons of ATD and CRS kinematics, CRS system integrity, and comparisons of ATD responses.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1457
Jingwen Hu, Nichole Ritchie Orton, Rebekah Gruber, Ryan Hoover, Kevin Tribbett, Jonathan Rupp, Dave Clark, Risa Scherer, Matthew Reed
Abstract Among all the vehicle rollover test procedures, the SAE J2114 dolly rollover test is the most widely used. However, it requires the test vehicle to be seated on a dolly with a 23° initial angle, which makes it difficult to test a vehicle over 5,000 kg without a dolly design change, and repeatability is often a concern. In the current study, we developed and implemented a new dynamic rollover test methodology that can be used for evaluating crashworthiness and occupant protection without requiring an initial vehicle angle. To do that, a custom cart was designed to carry the test vehicle laterally down a track. The cart incorporates two ramps under the testing vehicle’s trailing-side tires. In a test, the cart with the vehicle travels at the desired test speed and is stopped by a track-mounted curb.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1459
HangMook Kim, Jae Kyu Lee, Jin Sang CHUNG
Abstract During a new vehicle development process, there are several requirements for side impact test that should be confirmed. One of the requirements is the prevention of door opening during side impact test. Even though there are many causes for door opening problem, this study deals with inertia effect by impact energy. Until now, there have been two classical methods to prevent car door from opening in side impact. One is the increment of the inertia resistance by increasing the mass of the balance weight and the spring force. The other is the application of the blocking lever. Unfortunately, in spite of our efforts, the door opening problem occurs occasionally. Therefore, to improve the problem fundamentally, this paper proposes a new blocking lever mechanism that work similar to ball-point pen structure. The proposed mechanism fixes the blocking lever when the opening directional inertia force is applied to the door outside handle during side crash.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1460
Nitesh Jadhav, Linda Zhao, Senthilkumar Mahadevan, Bill Sherwood, Krishnakanth Aekbote, Dilip Bhalsod
Abstract The Pelvis-Thorax Side Air Bag (PTSAB) is a typical restraint countermeasure offered for protection of occupants in the vehicle during side impact tests. Currently, the dynamic performance of PTSAB for occupant injury assessment in side impact is limited to full-vehicle evaluation and sled testing, with limited capability in computer aided engineering (CAE). The widely used CAE method for PTSAB is a flat bag with uniform pressure. The flat PTSAB model with uniform pressure has limitations because of its inability to capture airbag deployment during gap closure which results in reduced accuracy while predicting occupant responses. Hence there is a need to develop CAE capability to enhance the accuracy of prediction of occupant responses to meet performance targets in regulatory and public domain side impact tests. This paper describes a new CAE methodology for assessment of PTSAB in side impact.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1436
Edward Fatzinger, Jon Landerville
Abstract Various electronic control units from Kawasaki Ninja 300 motorcycles were tested in-situ in order to heuristically examine the capabilities and behavior of the event data recorders (EDR). The relevant hexadecimal data was downloaded from the ECU and translated using known and historically proven applications. The hexadecimal translations were then confirmed using data acquisition systems as well as the Kawasaki Diagnostic Software (KDS). Numerous tests were performed to establish the algorithms which cause the EDR to record data. It was determined that the EDR recording “trigger” was caused by the activation of the tip-over sensor, which in turn shuts the engine off. In addition, specific conditions must be met with regards to the rear wheel rotation prior to engine shut-down.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0367
Yueqian Jia, Yu-wei Wang, Yuanli Bai
A fully modularized framework was established to combine isotropic, kinematic, and cross hardening behaviors under non-monotonic loading conditions for advanced high strength steels. Experiments under two types of non-proportional loading conditions were conducted along different orientations, 1) uniaxial compression-tension reversal loading, and 2) two-step uniaxial tension, known as cross-loading conditions, with different pre-strains. The calibrated new model using AK Steel DP980 is decoupled between isotropic and kinematic hardening behaviors, and independent on both anisotropic yield criterion and fracture model. Good correlation was observed between experimental and modeled results. KEYWORDS: Constitutive Modeling, Advanced High Strength Steel, Isotropic Hardening, Kinematic Hardening, Cross Hardening, Non-linear Strain Path
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