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2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0044
Jeremy Rochussen, Jeff Son, Jeff Yeo, Mahdiar Khosravi, Patrick Kirchen, Gordon McTaggart-Cowan
Alternative fuel injection systems and advanced in-cylinder diagnostics are two important tools for engine development; however, the rapid and simultaneous achievement of these goals is often limited by the space available in the cylinder head. Here, a research-oriented cylinder head is developed for use on a single cylinder 2-litre engine, and permits three simultaneous in-cylinder combustion diagnostic tools (cylinder pressure measurement, infrared (IR) absorption, and multi-color pyrometry). In addition, a modular injector mounting system enables the use of a variety of direct fuel injectors for both gaseous and liquid fuels. The design of the all-new cylinder head was derived from a production cylinder head, which was sectioned and laser scanned to create a parametric model.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0174
Laura Tribioli, Paolo Iora, Raffaello Cozzolino, Daniele Chiappini
Road transportation is proved to be one of the main contributor to pollutant and global greenhouse gas emissions. This, together with the rising of fuel price, is striving the automotive sector research towards innovative solutions. Promising solutions fuel cell vehicles, which generally make use of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with the possibility of further reducing pollutant emissions, giving a satisfactory range without the need of an internal combustion engine. Nonetheless, even being a relatively mature technology, there are still some disadvantages related to the use of fuel cells for vehicles, such as high costs, low power density, and lack of hydrogen infrastructures. The latter issue could be solved by using an on-board fuel processor for hydrogen production.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0159
Davide Di Battista, Marco Di Bartolomeo, Carlo Villante, Roberto Cipollone
Internal combustion engines is actually one of the most important source of pollutants and greenhouse gases emissions. In particular, on-the-road transportation sector has taken this environmental challenge and worldwide governments set up regulations in order to limit the emissions and fuel consumption from vehicles. Among the several technologies under development, an ORC unit bottomed exhaust gas seems to be very promising, but it still has several complications when it is applied on board of a vehicle (weight, encumbrances, backpressure effect on the engine, safety, reliability). In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model of an ORC unit bottomed a heavy duty engine, used for commercial vehicle, has been developed. The model is completed with the sizing of the two exchangers involved in the ORC plant: the heat recovery vapor generator (HRVG) and the condenser.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0152
Mirko Baratta, Daniela Misul, Jiajie Xu, Alois Fuerhapter, Rene Heindl, Cesare Peletto, Jean Preuhs, Patrick Salemi
The present paper is the outcome of the research activity carried out by Centro Ricerche Fiat, Politecnico di Torino, Delphi and AVL within the Gason research project of the EC (H2020 program). The overall goal of the research project is to develop CNG-only SI engines which are able to comply with post-EuroVI emission regulations and 2020+ CO2 emission targets, with reference to the new homologation cycle and real driving conditions. The work presented in this paper aimed at developing a small displacement turbocharged engine, which combines the advanced VVA MultiAir system for the air metering with the direct injection of natural gas. The activity focused on the development and fluid-dynamic characterization of the gaseous-fuel injector. Moreover, the combined use of CFD analysis and optical-access PLIF experimental techniques allowed the design of the combustion chamber to be optimized from the mixture formation point of view.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0151
Matteo De Cesare, Nicolo Cavina, Luigi Paiano
New gasoline engine design is highly influenced by CO2 and emission limits defined by legislations, the demand for real-conditions fuel economy, higher torque, higher specific power and lower costs. Downsizing concepts, including turbocharging in combination with direct injection, have contributed significantly to the recent improvement of gasoline engines. However, other technologies are under evaluation to allow further steps of enhancement for the even more challenging requirements. The main issues of gasoline engines in terms of efficiency and performance are knocking, part-load losses, and thermal stress at high power conditions. This work presents a comparison at concept level between the main technologies that are currently being developed, considering not only the technical benefits, but also their cost-effectiveness.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0147
Marco Chiodi, Andreas Kaechele, Michael Bargende, Donatus Wichelhaus, Christian Poetsch
In the competition for the powertrain of the future the internal combustion engine faces tough challenges. Reduced environmental impact, higher mileage, low cost and new technologies are required to maintain its global position in public and private mobility. For decades researchers have been investigating the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) promising higher efficiency due to the rapid combustion and therefore low exhaust gas temperatures. Consequently there is no need for a rich mixture to cool the turbocharger under high load. As the combustion does not have a distinguished flame front it is able to burn very lean mixtures, reducing HC and CO emissions. However, until recently, HCCI was considered to be only applicable as a part load process. The 3D engine development tool QuickSim which has been developed at the FKFS in Stuttgart is able to simulate the entire flow path of the engine, including conventional and HCCI combustion.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1933
Alberto Boretti
Abstract The paper captures the recent events in relation with the Volkswagen (VW) Emissions Scandal and addresses the impact of this event on the future of power train development. The paper analyses the impact on the perspectives of the internal combustion engine, the battery based electric car and the hydrogen based technology. The operation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), VW and the United States prosecutor, sparked by the action of the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) is forcing the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) towards everything but rationale immediate transition to the battery based electric mobility. This transition voids the value of any improvement of the internal combustion engine (ICE), especially in the lean burn, compression ignition (CI) technology, and of a better hybridization of powertrains, both options that have much better short term perspectives than the battery based electric car.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1959
Abhishek Taluja, Simson T. Wilson, Santosh Lalasure, K. Rajakumar
The Ride Comfort has always been an important attribute of a vehicle that gets trade-off with handling characteristics of a vehicle. However, to cater the growing customer requirements for better ride comfort in a vehicle without compromising on other attributes, evaluating and achieving optimal ride comfort has become a significant process in the vehicle development. In the current engineering capability and virtual engineering simulations, creating an accurate and real time model to predict ride comfort of a vehicle is a challenging task. The qualitative evaluation of ride attributes has always been the proven conventional method to finalize the requirements of a vehicle. However, quantitative evaluation of vehicle ride characteristics benefits in terms of target setting during vehicle development process and in robust validation of the final intended product against its specifications.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1753
Jack Hall Riddle, Ya-Juan Bemman, Tom Frei, Sihui Wu, Ishang Padalkar
Abstract Demands for engines to operate at low-frequency firing order are increasing in the automotive market. This requirement is driven by consumer and regulatory demand for vehicles which are more efficient in the use of fuel. As a result, engine and transmission technologies have been developed which permit operation of engines with fewer cylinders at increasingly low RPM’s. The resulting low frequency exhaust noise is more difficult to attenuate than in vehicles in years past. At the same time, vehicles often have less packaging space for mufflers, when larger volume would otherwise be needed to attenuate at lower frequencies. A further challenge is the demand for increasingly refined performance sounds from the exhaust systems of premium cars despite the technical obstacles involved in even maintaining sound quality. Finally, legally permissible sound levels are decreasing in some markets. These market and regulatory demands require new solutions.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1777
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Dean Tomazic
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop new technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle level fuel consumption. Powertrain and driveline related technologies will play a key role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Specifically, use of technologies such as downsized engines, idle start-stop systems, aggressive torque converter lock-up schedules, wide-ratio spread transmissions, and electrified propulsion systems are vital towards meeting aggressive fuel economy targets. Judicious combinations of such powertrain and driveline technology packages in conjunction with measures such as the use of low rolling resistance tires and vehicle lightweighting will be required to meet future OEM fleet CO2 targets. Many of the technologies needed for meeting the fuel economy and CO2 targets come with unique NVH challenges. In order to ensure customer acceptance of new vehicles, it is imperative that these NVH challenges be understood and solved.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1869
Glenn Pietila, Gang Yin, Branton Dennis IV
Abstract During the development of an automotive acoustic package, valuable information can be gained by visualizing the acoustic energy flow through the Front-of-Dash (FOD) when a sound source is placed in the engine compartment. Two of the commonly used methods for generating the visual map of the acoustic field include Sound Intensity measurements and array technologies. An alternative method is to use a tracked 3-dimensional acoustic probe to scan and visualize the FOD in real-time when the sound source is injecting noise into the engine compartment. The scan is used to focus the development of the FOD acoustic package on the weakest areas by identifying acoustic leaks and locations with low Transmission Loss. This paper provides a brief discussion of the capabilities of the tracked 3-D acoustic probe, and presents examples of the implementation of the probe during the development of the FOD acoustic package for two mid-sized sedans.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1531
Keiichi Taniguchi, Akiyoshi Shibata, Mikako Murakami, Munehiko Oshima
Abstract This paper describes a study of drag reduction devices for production pick-up trucks with a body-on-frame structure using full-scale wind tunnel testing and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. First, the flow structure around a pick-up truck was investigated and studied, focusing in particular on the flow structure between the cabin and tailgate. It was found that the flow structure around the tailgate was closely related to aerodynamic drag. A low drag flow structure was found by flow analysis, and the separation angle at the roof end was identified as being important to achieve the flow structure. While proceeding with the development of a new production model, a technical issue of the flow structure involving sensitivity to the vehicle velocity was identified in connection with optimization of the roof end shape. (1)A tailgate spoiler was examined for solving this issue.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1522
Thomas Blacha, Moni Islam
Abstract The aerodynamic development of the new Audi Q5 (released in 2017) is described. In the course of the optimization process a number of different tools has been applied depending on the chronological progress in the project. During the early design phase, wind tunnel experiments at 1:4 scale were performed accompanied by transient DES and stationary adjoint simulations. At this stage the model contained a detailed underbody but no detailed engine bay for underhood flow. Later, a full scale Q5 model was built up for the aerodynamic optimization in the 1:1 wind tunnel at Audi AG. The model featured a detailed underbody and engine bay including original parts for radiators, engine, axles and brakes from similar vehicles. Also the 1:1 experiments were accompanied by transient DES and stationary adjoint simulations in order to predict optimization potential and to better understand the governing flow.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1383
Satheesh Kumar Chandran, James Forbes, Carrie Bittick, Kathleen Allanson, Fnu Brinda
Abstract There is a strong business case for automotive interfaces to undergo usability testing throughout their product development lifecycle. System Usability Scale (SUS) is a simple and standard measure of usability. To meet the timing needs for product development, usability testing needs to be performed in a quick, cost effective manner. Hence the required sample size of participants for a usability study is one of the critical factors. To determine an acceptable sample size, a Monte Carlo simulation using SUS scores from eleven different in-vehicle automotive interface usability studies was used to create 500,000 subsamples of different sample sizes. The percentage of subsamples with mean scores within the confidence interval of the population mean was calculated. At a subsample size of thirty-five, 95% of the subsamples have a mean SUS score within the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0651
Yaodong Hu, Siyuan Feng, Changsheng Yao, Wenbo Shao, Lubing Xu, Xieyuan Zhang, Li Lin, Jinyu Zhang, Fuyuan Yang, Rusheng Yan
Abstract This paper conducts an investigation on the operating cycle of Bus No. 306, which is equipped with wireless charging system, in Changsha, Hunan Province, China. The wireless charging system and electric buses are manufactured by ZTE Corporation (Zhongxing Telecommunication Equipment Corporation) and BYD Company Limited, respectively. In this paper, the operating cycle is quantified and modeled based on experimental data. The real-time bus route and SOC (state of charge) during daytime operation are recorded with the help of GPS (global position system) and BMS (battery management system). The wireless charging process is tested with a power analyzer and its charging efficiency is compared with a plug-in system. Besides, the radiation level while charging is also taken into consideration. Currently, the buses are designed to operate in daytime and get charged at night.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0650
Xinyu Li, Xinyu Ge, Ying Wang
Abstract The automotive industry is dramatically changing. Many automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) proposed new prototype models or concept vehicles to promote a green vehicle image. Non-traditional players bring many latest technologies in the Information Technology (IT) industry to the automotive industry. Typical vehicle’s characteristics became wider compared to those of vehicles a decade ago, and they include not only a driving range, mileage per gallon and acceleration rating, but also many features adopted in the IT industry, such as usability, connectivity, vehicle software upgrade capability and backward compatibility. Consumers expect the latest technology features in vehicles as they enjoy in using digital applications in laptops and mobile phones. These features create a huge challenge for a design of a new vehicle, especially for a human-machine-interface (HMI) system.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0325
Samer Abbas, John Joyce
Abstract Severity-mitigating mechanisms (typically software-based) detect failures in a system and perform functions in order to reduce the severities of failures. Various approaches to FMEA analysis of severity-mitigating mechanisms exist within the industry. Three are compared and contrasted. Each method is compared against its ability to capture the three fundamental failures of a system that has severity-mitigating mechanisms: 1 a failure occurs and mitigating action is taken,2 a failure occurs and mitigating action is not taken,3 no failure occurs but mitigating action is taken. One method is advocated over the others because it: uses existing FMEA formatting; addresses all three cases; supports consistent linkage between FMEAs in a hierarchy of systems with any number of layers.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0348
Mani Shankar, I V N Sri Harsha, K V Sunil, Ramsai Ramachandran
Abstract In an automobile, road loads due to tire-road interaction are transferred to vehicle body through suspension. This makes suspension a critical component from the body durability perspective. During vehicle design and development, optimization of suspension parameters to suit ride and handling performance is a continuous and iterative process. These changes on suspension can affect vehicle body durability performance. This paper tries to establish a process to evaluate the effect of changes in suspension parameters on body durability, thus helping in understanding the impact of these changes. The process starts with virtual model building in Multi Body Dynamics software. The base line model is correlated with testing using fatigue at some critical locations on Body in White (BIW).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0322
Samer Abbas, John Joyce
Abstract When analyzing the failure rate (or occurrence) of a system failure cause, the typical approach is to obtain an occurrence rating from the results of testing. However, in many cases, the occurrence of a system failure cause can be derived from a combination of occurrences of failure causes of the element (sub-system) failure mode coinciding with the system failure cause being assessed. This paper explores a few approaches for deriving occurrences from element FMEAs over a majority of cases before settling on a probabilistic approach that converts occurrences to worst-case failure rates to achieve the most fine-tuned combined occurrence rating. Finally, a “complex analysis” worksheet, where the logical combination of occurrences and failure rates is custom defined by the engineer, is introduced for handling special cases.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0064
Agish George, Jody Nelson
Abstract The ISO 26262 standard for functional safety was first released in 2011 and has been widely incorporated by most OEMs and Tier1 suppliers. The design and conformance of the product to functional safety standards is strongly intertwined with the product development cycle and needs to be carefully managed. The consideration for functional safety needs to begin right from the product’s concept phase through engineering and production and finally decommissioning. The application of the standard in a project can bring significant challenges especially to managers who are relatively new to the standard. This paper provides some guidelines on the key tasks involved in managing ISO26262 in projects and some ways to approach them. The paper is expected to help managers manage ISO26262 compliant projects. The paper also tries to come up with a metric that can be used for resource estimation for implementing ISO26262 in projects.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0278
John Kelly Villota Pismag, Hisham Alawneh, Cristian Adam, Samir A. Rawashdeh, Pramita Mitra, Yifan Chen, Gary Strumolo
Abstract The potential for Augmented Reality (AR) spans many domains. Among other applications, AR can improve the discovery and learning experience for users inspecting a particular item. This paper discusses the use of AR in the automotive context; particularly, on improving the user experience in a dealership show room. Visual augmentation, through a tablet computer or glasses allows users to take part in a self-guided tour in learning about the various features, details, and options associated with a vehicle. The same approach can be applied to other learning scenarios, such as training and maintenance assistance. We evaluated a set of AR Glasses and a general purpose tablet. A table-top showroom was developed demonstrating what the actual user experience would be like for a self-guided dealership tour using natural markers and three-dimensional content spatially registered to physical objects in the user’s field of view.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0241
Thiago B. Murari, Paulo Ungaretti, Marcelo A. Moret
Abstract Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing is used to describe the allowed feature variations regarding the product design. Tolerance specification is important in many stages of all phases on product development. The product development engineering need to define the symbols to use on the Feature Control Frame of every component. Since the component function has an increment on its complexity year over year, it is not trivial to define those symbols anymore. The determination of dimensional tolerance shall be preceded by careful specification of the types of tolerance and symbols that will be applied in controlled features. Poor tolerance specifications can increase the production cost, require late product changes or lead to legal issues.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0404
Anatoliy Dubrovskiy, Sergei Aliukov, Sergei Dubrovskiy, Alexander Alyukov
Abstract Currently, a group of scientists consisting of six doctors of technical sciences, professors of South Ural State University (Chelyabinsk, Russia) has completed a cycle of scientific research for creation of adaptive suspensions of vehicles. We have developed design solutions of the suspensions. These solutions allow us to adjust the performance of the suspensions directly during movement of a vehicle, depending on road conditions - either in automatic mode or in manual mode. We have developed, researched, designed, manufactured, and tested experimentally the following main components of the adaptive suspensions of vehicles: 1) blocked adaptive dampers and 2) elastic elements with nonlinear characteristic and with improved performance.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0375
Ligong Pan, Seung Hyun Jung, Sushanth Ramavath, Mohamed El-Essawi, Randall Frank, Jiawei Qin, Ramarajan Ilankamban, Yuan Yao, Homa Torab, Yuzhao Song, Jim Alanoly
Abstract Over the past decades, Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) based assessment of vehicle durability, NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) and crash performance has become very essential in vehicle development and verification process. CAE activity is often organized as different groups based on the specific attributes (durability, NVH and crash). Main reasons for this are the expertise required and the difference in the finite element software technologies (explicit vs implicit) used to perform and interpret various CAE analyses in each of the attributes. This leads to individual attribute team creating its own model of the vehicle and there is not much exchange of the CAE models between the attribute teams. Different model requirements for each attribute make model sharing challenging. However, CAE analyses for all attributes start with common CAD and follow the same sub-process in vehicle development cycle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1669
Keiichiro Numakura, Kenta Emori, Akinori Okubo, Taku Shimomura, Tetsuya Hayashi
Abstract This paper presents the technologies incorporated in an electric vehicle (EV)/hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) inverter built with power semiconductors of silicon carbide (SiC) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) instead of conventional silicon (Si) insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). A SiC inverter prototype of 2.9 L in size for driving an 80-kW motor was fabricated and evaluated on a motor test bench. The SiC inverter prototype attained average efficiency of 98.5% in the Worldwide harmonized Light-duty Test Cycle (WLTC) driving mode. The two main technologies achieved with this SiC inverter prototype are described. The first one is a new direct-cooled power module with a thick copper (Cu) heat spreader located under the semiconductors that improves thermal resistance by 34% compared with a conventional direct-cooled power module.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1678
Joseph Antony John Selvaraj, Sivapalan Balanayagam
Modern Instrument Panel Clusters (IPC) are equipped with thin film transistor (TFT) based displays. Contrary to conventional IPCs with hard gauges and liquid crystal diode (LCD) displays, TFT displays offer versatile usage of display area with soft gauges, reconfigurable menus, tell tales, graphics and warning messages etc., At the same time, the number of possible screen combinations, multicolor images validation and different screen arbitration become significantly complex. Thereby display validation turns out to be a complex and time consuming task in IPC validation. The task becomes even more complex when change requests are to be incorporated during final phases of development stage. This paper provides a novel solution that helps to validate any graphical and behavioral changes with minimum effort and maximum accuracy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1671
Johannes Bach, Marc Holzäpfel, Stefan Otten, Eric Sax
Abstract Enhanced technological capabilities render the application of various, increasingly complex, functional concepts for automated driving possible. In the process, the significance of automotive software for a satisfactory driving experience is growing. To benefit from these new opportunities, thorough assessment in early development stages is highly important. It enables manufacturers to focus resources on the most promising concepts. For early assessment, a common approach is to set up vehicles with additional prototyping hardware and perform real world testing. While this approach is essential to assess the look-and-feel of newly developed concepts, its drawbacks are reduced reproducibility and high expenses to achieve a sufficient and balanced sample. To overcome these drawbacks, new flexible, realistic and preferably automated virtual test methods to complement real world verification and validation are especially required during early development phases.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1674
Wenxu NIU, Ke Song, Tong Zhang
Abstract X-in-the-loop (XiL) framework is a validation concept for vehicle product development, which integrates different virtual and physical components to improve the development efficiency. In order to develop and validate an extended validation method based on XiL, Tongji University in Shanghai, China and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Karlsruhe, Germany co- performed a feasibility study about an X-in-the-distance-loop demonstration platform. The X-in-the-distance-loop demonstration platform includes a MATLAB/Simulink software platform and geographically distributed equipment (driver simulator, driving electric motor and dynamometer test stand), which are used to conduct bidirectional experiments to test communication of powertrain data between China and Germany.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1607
Munther Hermez, Badih Jawad, Liping Liu, Eli Oklejas
Abstract This paper presents an experimental investigation of flow field instabilities in a centrifugal pump impeller at low flow rates. The measurements of pump hydraulic performance and flow field in the impeller passages were made with a hydraulic test rig. Analysis of Q-ΔP-η data and flow structures in the impeller passages were performed. In the present work, the effect of various flowrates on centrifugal pump impeller performance was analyzed based on pump measured parameters. The impeller’s geometry was modified, with positioning the curved spacer at the impeller suction side. This research investigates the effect of each inlet curved spacer model on pump performance improvement. The hydraulic performance and cavitation performance of the pump have been tested experimentally. The flow field inside a centrifugal pump is known to be fully turbulent, three dimensional and unsteady with recirculation flows and separation at its inlet and exit.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1604
Christina Michael, Badih Jawad, Liping Liu, Vernon Fernandez, Sabah Abro, Craig Zinser, Dave Guidos
Abstract The objective of this research is to develop a component based enhanced production process after End of Line (EOL) testing. This process will add more quality validation evaluations, but will not require any disassembling of the parts or damage to them. It will help the suppliers to avoid scrap and rework parts as well as General Motors (GM) to reduce warranty and recalls. An Enhanced Production Process was implemented in March, 2016 at a supplier in Mexico. The Enhanced Audit Station implementation is to ensure that the supplier is satisfying the Production Part Approval Process (PPAP) requirements. The most important four components are: Touch Appearance Lighting and Color (TALC), Appearance Approval Report (AAR), Dimensional Checks, and Function Testing. Through statistics, a pilot study was conducted to correlate the selected variables to reduce warranty.
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