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Viewing 1 to 30 of 42276
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1811
Anders Rynell, Gunilla Efraimsson, Mattias Chevalier, Mats Abom
Abstract To obtain realistic noise characteristics from CAA studies of subsonic fans, it is important to prescribe properly constructed turbulent inflow statistics. This is frequently omitted; instead it is assumed that the stochastic characteristics of turbulence, absent at the initial stage, progressively develops as the rotor inflicts the flow field over time and hence that the sound generating mechanism governed by surface pressure fluctuations are asymptotically accounted for. That assumption violates the actual interplay taking place between an ingested flow field and the surface pressure fluctuations exerted by the blades producing noise. The aim of the present study is to examine the coupling effect between synthetically ingested turbulence to sound produced from a subsonic ducted fan. The steady state inflow parameters are mapped from a precursor RANS simulation onto the inflow boundaries of a reduced domain to limit the computational cost.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1814
Maxime Legros, Jean Michel Ville, Solène Moreau, Xavier Carniel, Christophe Lambourg, Guillaume Stempfel
Abstract The new requirements during the first stages of the conception of a HVAC prompt the designer to integrate the acoustic problematic increasingly upstream. The designer needs to select a coherent components’ choice in order to comply with the specifications in terms of aeraulic and acoustic performances. A tool has been created to guide the designer’s choices based on an acoustic synthesis which is a design and/or diagnosis approach used to analyze and predict the acoustic behavior of a complex system. The synthesis is developed in order to propose an approach which considers the integration effects and some interaction effects. The acoustic synthesis results are the starting point of a psycho-acoustic study providing audio samples of the prediction and indications of the HVAC acceptance by the prospective user. Also, one may compare the results of different acoustic synthesis projects to study the influence of the parameters on the acoustic prediction.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1813
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza
Abstract The characteristics of the intake system affect both engine power output and gas-dynamic noise emissions. The latter is particularly true in downsized VVA engines, where a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves is realized, due to the intake line de-throttling at part-load. For this engine architecture, a refined air-box design is hence requested. In this work, the Transmission Loss (TL) of the intake air-box of a commercial VVA engine is numerically computed through a 3D FEM approach. Results are compared with experimental data, showing a very good correlation. The validated model is then coupled to an external optimizer (ModeFRONTIERTM) to increase the TL parameter in a prefixed frequency range. The improvement of the acoustic attenuation is attained through a shape deformation of the inner structure of the base device, taking into account constraints related to the device installation inside the engine bay.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1817
Juergen Veit, Paco Langjahr, Stephan Brandl, Bernhard Graf
Abstract Due to more challenging future emission legislations and the trend towards downsizing, the number of turbocharged (TC) engines, especially petrol engines, is steadily increasing. The usage of TC has high risk to cause different noise phenomena apparent in the vehicle interior which are often perceived as annoying for the passengers. In order to further improve consideration of TC topics in the development, objective judgment and monitoring of TC noise issues is of high importance. Therefore, objective parameters and corresponding tools that are especially focusing on TC noise phenomena have to be developed. One main target of these tools is to deliver an objective TC assessment in an efficient way and with minimum additional effort. Application of the criteria presented in this publication therefore allows acoustic engineers to judge the NVH behavior and annoyance of the TC with respect to its vehicle interior noise contribution.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1819
Antonio J. Torregrosa, Alberto Broatch, Vincent Raimbault, Jerome Migaud
Abstract Intake noise has become one the main concerns in the design of highly-supercharged downsized engines, which are expected to play a significant role in the upcoming years. Apart from the low frequencies associated with engine breathing, in these engines other frequency bands are also relevant which are related to the turbocharger operation, and which may radiate from the high-pressure side from the compressor outlet to the charge air cooler. Medium frequencies may be controlled with the use of different typologies of resonators, but these are not so effective for relatively high frequencies. In this paper, the potential of the use of multi-layer porous materials to control those high frequencies is explored. The material sheets are located in the side chamber of an otherwise conventional resonator, thus providing a compact, lightweight and convenient arrangement.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1818
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Abom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract The concept of IC engine downsizing is a well-adapted industry standard, enabling better fuel conversion efficiency and the reduction of tailpipe emissions. This is achieved by utilizing different type of superchargers. As a consequence, the additional charger noise emission, at the IC engine inlet, can become a problem. In order to address such problem, the authors of this work have recently proposed a novel dissipative silencer for effective and robust noise control of the compressor. Essentially, it realizes an optimal flow channel impedance, referred to as the Cremer impedance. This is achieved by means of a straight flow channel with a locally reacting wall consisting of air cavities covered by an acoustic resistance, e.g., a micro-perforated panel (MPP). In this paper, an improved optimization method of this silencer is presented. The classical Cremer impedance model is modified to account for mean flow dependence of the optimal wave number.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1822
Drasko Masovic, Franz Zotter, Eugene Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Robert Höldrich
Abstract Radiation of sound from an open pipe with a hot mean flow presents one of the classic problems of acoustics in inhomogeneous media. The problem has been especially brought into focus in the last several decades, in the context of noise control of vehicle exhaust systems and jet engines. However, the reports on the measurements of the radiated sound field are still rare and scattered over different values of subsonic and supersonic flow speeds, cold and hot jets, as well as different sound frequency ranges. This paper focuses on low Mach number values of the mean flow speed and low frequencies of the incident (plane) sound waves inside an unflanged cylindrical pipe with a straight cut. It presents the results of the far-field radiation pattern measurements and compares them with an existing analytical model from the literature. The mean flow inside the pipe reached Mach number values up to 0.25 and temperature up to 300°C.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1820
Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson, Mats Abom
Abstract This work explores how fluid driven whistles in complex automotive intake and exhaust systems can be predicted using computationally affordable tools. Whistles associated with unsteady shear layers (created over for example side branches or perforates in resonators) are studied using vortex sound theory; vorticity in the shear layer interacts with the acoustic field while being convected across the orifice. If the travel time of a hydrodynamic disturbance over the orifice reasonably matches a multiple of the acoustic period of an acoustic feedback system, energy is transferred from the flow field to the acoustic field resulting in a whistle. The actual amplitude of the whistle is set by non-linear saturation phenomena and cannot be predicted here, but the frequency and relative strength can be found. For this not only the mean flow and acoustic fields needs to be characterized separately, but also the interaction of the two.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1841
Peter R. Hooper
Powertrain system duplication for hybrid electric vehicles and range-extenders presents serious cost challenges. Cost increase can be mitigated by reducing the number of cylinders but this usually has a negative impact on noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) of the vehicle system. This paper considers a novel form of two-stroke cycle engine offering potential for low emissions, reduced production cost and high potential vehicle efficiency. The engine uses segregated pump charging via the use of stepped pistons offering potential for low emissions. Installation as a power plant for automotive hybrid electric vehicles or as a range-extender for electric vehicles could present a low mass solution addressing the drive for vehicle fleet CO2 reduction. Operation on the two-stroke cycle enables NVH advantages over comparable four-stroke cycle units, however the durability of conventional crankcase scavenged engines can present significant challenges.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1838
Janko Slavic, Matija Javorski, Janez Luznar, Gregor Cepon, Miha Boltezar
Abstract In electric motors the working torque results from the magnetic forces (due to the magnetic field). The magnetic forces are also a direct source of structural excitation; further, the magnetic field is an indirect source of structural excitation in the form of magnetostriction. In the last decade other sources of structural excitation (e.g. mechanical imbalance, natural dynamics of the electric motor) have been widely researched and are well understood. On the other hand, the excitation due to the magnetic forces and magnetostriction is gaining interest in the last period; especially in the field of auto-mobility. Due to the broadband properties of the magnetic field (e.g. Pulse-Width-Modulation(PWM), multi-harmonic excitation), the direct structural excitation in the form of magnetic forces is also broadband.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1843
Jan Krueger, Viktor Koch, Ralf Hoelsch
Abstract Over the past few years, the measurement procedure for the pass-by noise emission of vehicles was changed and new limit values have been set by the European Parliament which will come into force within the next few years. Moreover, also the limits for chemical emissions such as NOx, particulates and CO2 have been lowered dramatically and will continue to be lowered according to a roadmap decided not only in Europe but also in other markets throughout the world. This will have an enormous impact on the design of future passenger cars and in particular on their powertrains. Downsizing, downspeeding, forced induction, and hybridization are among the most common general technology trends to keep up with these challenges. However, most of these fuel saving and cleaner technologies also have negative acoustic side effects.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1852
Ehsan Fatourehchi, Vishak Elisaus, Mahdi Mohammadpour, Stephanos Theodossiades, Homer Rahnejat
Abstract Efficiency and durability are key areas of research and development in modern racing drivetrains. Stringent regulations necessitate the need for components capable of operating under highly loaded conditions whilst being efficient and reliable. Downsizing, increasing the power-to-weight ratio and modification of gear teeth geometry to reduce friction are some of the actions undertaken to achieve these objectives. These approaches can however result in reduced structural integrity and component durability. Achieving a balance between system reliability and optimal efficiency requires detailed integrated multidisciplinary analyses, with the consideration of system dynamics, contact mechanics/tribology and stress analysis/structural integrity. This paper presents an analytical model to predict quasi-static contact power losses in lubricated spur gear sets operating under the Elastohydrodynamic regime of lubrication.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1855
Alastair Jay, Thomas Deighan, Nozomu Kato, Kiyofumi Sato
Abstract Requirements for reducing powertrain NVH drives the selection of low piston skirt to liner clearances contradicting the requirement to maintain larger skirt clearances for minimizing engine friction. Whilst this clearance trade-off between low friction and low NVH is fundamental, piston design features have a significant effect on where the trade-off curve sits on the friction/NVH map. Design features can therefore be viewed not by either friction or NVH improvement measures but a shift in the friction-NVH trade off curve. Specifically, some piston design features which may be targeted at reducing friction can be viewed as either a friction benefit for similar NVH or an NVH improvement for similar friction levels. The ability to realistically quantify the effect of the design changes on NVH is therefore critical to determining what design changes to recommend, the direction of the piston design being highly sensitive to the process by which the impact on NVH is assessed.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1763
Thierry Bourdon, Rodrigue Bouete
Abstract Either from a legislative point of view or because of OEM demands, the automotive industry is increasingly facing of reducing vibration & noise in the vehicle. More particularly on the engine area, the development of Gasoline and Diesel fuel components based on high pressure pumps, rails, any pipes and injectors are more and more subject of a particular NVH (Noise Vibration and Harshness) attention. The use of modern digital techniques such as 3D FEM vibroacoustic, leads to use virtual prototyping as complementary to traditional real hardware prototypes development. Among interest, number of iterative loops to reach a best design brings an important value to new product development with an optimized cost. Basically the core part of virtual prototyping is about a 3D FEM model definition for each component.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1798
Quentin Buisson, Jean-Louis Guyader, Serge Puvilland, Xavier Carniel, Maximilien Soenen
Abstract The goal of the present study is to provide a simple method to compare structure borne noise sources in order to choose the most efficient one, considering the transmission of dynamic forces. It is well known that mechanical sources are not only dependent of the source itself but also of the receiving structure, in addition real sources cannot be reduced to a transverse force acting on the structure but more complicated effect like moment excitation must be taken into account. The advantage of the reception plate method is to characterize the source globally by the level of vibration of the reception plate whatever the type of excitation, the idea is basically to characterize mechanical sources as it is done for acoustical sources in reverberant rooms. A reception plate test bench has been developed to determine the power injected by mechanical sources. Two prototype plates have been designed in order to have different receiving mobilities.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1792
Aurélien Lonni, Olivier Tanneau
Abstract Nowadays, downsizing and turbochargers are more frequently used, mostly for petrol engines. It can lead to an increase of NVH issues related to the turbos, such as the hiss noise propagation in the air ducts. Hutchinson, among all its activities, supplies rubber and plastic parts for the car industry, especially in fluid management systems. The turbocharger’s airborne noise issue has now been tackled for ten years by implementing acoustic devices in the line and providing solutions to car manufacturers with our hot-side rubber ducts. In this paper, will be first presented the main HP air loop NVH issues, and then explained an approach to design technical solutions. Generally speaking, the noise propagates inside the hot side air hoses, crosses the weakest parts of the system by acoustic emissivity to reach finally the driver and passengers’ ears.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1773
Shanjin Wang
Abstract Currently, new technologies in automotive industry are mainly driven by CO2 regulation and fuel economy. For most of the OEMs, the priority is to optimize internal combustion engines, make light-weighting and develop hybrid vehicles or fully electric vehicles. In this context, it is difficult and expensive trying to reach absolute silence in the cars. A good NVH strategy for non-specialist OEMs will be to keep the noise to an acceptable level and make it as homogenous as possible. This article presents several NVH guidelines for the powertrain in order to achieve homogenous noise in the cars. Firstly, master the level of powertrain vibration and maintain it at a suitable level. Secondly, eliminate abnormal noises which are unpleasant and disturbing, such as transient Diesel clatter noise. Thirdly, reduce the levels of emerging noises from powertrain components, such as turbo charger whistling so that they can be masked by background noise.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1772
Romualdo Ruotolo, Davide Donna, Giuseppe Credo, Michele Belluscio
Abstract Current Diesel engines development is facing challenging vibro-acoustic requirements and at the same time is struggling with the need to reduce as much as possible the cost and the weight of the engine. The latter obviously has become a key player for fuel consumption reduction. Large covers are commonly used in the base engine design and their noise contribution to total radiated noise is not negligible. Typical covers architecture shows thick cast and ribbed plates, meaning heavy and expensive covers. An interesting option is represented by using thin stamped covers either in aluminum or in steel, that have to show a low vibrational response. The current paper focuses on the structural optimization of such a peculiar design, trying to mitigate as much as possible its noise radiation with the intent to avoid any additional acoustic enabler (e.g. wrapping by means of acoustic foams) that will increase the final cost of the component.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1775
Thomas Resch, Oliver Knaus, Siegmund Thomann, Stephan Brandl
Abstract Modern powertrain noise investigation in the development process and during trouble shooting is a combination of experiment and simulation. In simulation in recent years main focus was set on model completeness, consideration of all excitation mechanisms and efficient and stabile numerical algorithms. By that the total response of the virtual powertrain is already comparable to the overall noise level of the real powertrain. Actual challenge is to trace back the overall response to its main excitation and noise generating mechanism as well as to their main driving parameters to support the engineer not only in reaching absolute values, but also to derive the root cause of a response or potential problem and to get hints on how to improve the specific behavior. Approaches by parameter sensitivity studies are time consuming and not unambiguous.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1774
Gert Herold, Thomas Geyer, Philipp Markus, Ennes Sarradj
Abstract The sound power level is the most important quantity that characterizes the noise emission of machinery. Following standardized procedures, it is usually calculated from sound pressure levels measured at a number of reference positions on a surface enveloping the object. The resulting value does not hold any direct information on the noise contributions of subcomponents. However, effective noise reduction necessitates a prior identification of acoustic sources and their characteristics. Combining the enveloping-surface method with microphone array measurements facilitates the evaluation of synchronously noise-emitting subcomponents. The application of this technique on a water pump with a four-stroke engine as power source is presented in this paper. The microphones are arranged on a cuboid surface surrounding the setup. The measured data is processed so as to yield sound power levels in a defined 3D focus region.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1766
Thomas Deighan, Nozomu Kato, Kiyofumi Sato
Abstract An engine configuration has a significant influence on the sound quality from the powertrain. Whilst the fundamental order content can be readily apparent from the firing order over the engine, or bank of a V engine, some characteristics and how the engine design can influence them requires some more specific investigation. Understanding, on a fundamental level, the aspects of the engine design which influence these characteristics is critical to allow more detailed analysis and development work to be focused appropriately. The configuration of a Boxer engine gives a distinctive sound characteristic producing a unique sound compared to an In-Line configuration. Depending on the application it may be desirable to enhance or subdue some of these characteristics.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1770
Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Dongchul Lee, Seunghyun Lee, Seungwook Yang, Kyoungdoug Min
Abstract This paper presents two closed-loop control methods for monitoring and improving the combustion behavior and the combustion noise on two 4-cylinder diesel engines, in which an in-cylinder pressure and an accelerometer transducer are used to monitor and control them. Combustion processes are developed to satisfy the stricter and stricter regulations on emissions and fuel consumption. These combustion processes are influenced by the factors such as engine durability, driving conditions, environmental influences and fuel properties. Combustion noise could be increased by these factors and is detrimental to interior sound quality. Therefore, it is necessary to develop robust combustion behaviors and combustion noise. For this situation, we have developed two closed-loop control methods. Firstly, a method using in-cylinder pressure data was developed for monitoring and improving the combustion noise of a 1.7L engine.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1768
He Changming, Xu Sichuan
For an in-line diesel engine with four cylinder operating in four-stroke mode, the second-order reciprocating inertia forces generally cannot be well balanced with direct approach. The unbalanced second-order inertia forces are the main reason to cause vibration and noise in a diesel engine within low frequency range. The more superior tone quality for modern diesel engine has been expected even for bus application all the time, and there are tougher requirements for truck noise in developed countries, i.e. in Europe and USA. In present research a unique crankshaft system configuration was proposed, which including opposed piston, inner and outer connecting rod, and crankshaft but running in two-stroke mode, to eliminate the second-order inertia force considerably rather than by adding an extra balance shaft mechanism.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1784
Alessandro Fortino, Lutz Eckstein, Jens Viehöfer, Jürgen Pampel
Abstract Vehicles powered by electric machines offer the advantage to be more silent than vehicles equipped with an internal combustion engine. On the one hand, the reduced noise levels enable an improvement of the inner-city noise pollution. On the other hand, quiet vehicles entail risks not to be acoustically detected by surrounding pedestrians and cyclists in the lower speed range. The emitted noise can easily be masked by the urban background noise. Therefore, the UNECE has founded an informal working group which is currently developing guidelines in terms of an exterior noise required for detecting Quiet Road Transport Vehicles (QRTV). With the introduction of an Acoustic Vehicle Alerting System (AVAS), not only the exterior noise but also the perceived interior noise for an enhanced driving experience can be considered. Nevertheless, car manufactures have a big interest in maintaining their perceived brand identity.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1786
Per Alenius, Magnus Olsson, Thomas Lindbom
Abstract Highly refined NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) is a key attribute for premium segment passenger cars. All noise sources such as powertrain, tires, wind, climate unit and etc. must be well balanced and at such a low level that the customer expectations are met or exceeded. However, not only are the NVH levels of importance but the character of the noise must also meet the high demands from premium car customers. This is especially true for diesel engines which historically have been more prone to have a less refined engine noise character than petrol engines. This paper will describe an investigation of what is defined as “engine presence” in four-cylinder diesel engine cars. The scope is to define a method for consistent subjective assessment of engine presence and to find the relationship and investigate the correlation between the “perceived loudness”, “perceived harshness” and the overall engine presence interior of the car.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1781
Matthew Maunder, Phil Grant, Duncan Mawdsley
Abstract Engine sound quality is a key attribute for sporty cars - it powerfully conveys the brand image to the driver/passengers and onlookers, and provides driver involvement by giving instant feedback about how a car is operating. Providing this has become more difficult with tighter pass-by noise regulations and the near-universal adoption of turbocharging. In the last two decades, sporty sound inside the cabin has been regained using intake sound generator systems that transfer sound more directly to the vehicle interior. The high cost of these systems is more recently driving a move towards electronic Active Sound Design with systems delivering synthetic sound through loudspeakers. However, the purist sports car market perceives this approach to be fake or artificial. An alternative approach is provided by a system for Realistic Augmented Sound by Ricardo (RAS-R) that offers a choice of two realistic engine sound sources.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1783
Oliver Engler
Mercedes-AMG GmbH specializes in unique, high-performance vehicles. The image of AMG as the successful performance brand of Mercedes-Benz is reflected in its impressive successes in the world of motorsport and its unique vehicles. One of these vehicles is the SLS AMG Coupé Electric Drive. After an elaborate series of tests as well as numerous test drives, we have created the SLS eSound which captures the exceptional dynamism of this unique super sports car with electric drive. Starting with a characteristic start-up sound, which rings out on pressing the "Power" button on the AMG DRIVE UNIT, the occupants can experience a tailor-made driving sound for each driving situation: incredibly dynamic when accelerating, subdued when cruising and as equally characteristic during recuperation. The sound is not only dependent on road speed, engine speed and load conditions, but also reflects the driving situation and the vehicle's operating state with a suitable driving noise.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1802
Mehdi Mehrgou, Franz Zieher, Christoph Priestner
Abstract Recently, hybrid and fully electric drives have been developing widely in variety, power and range. The new reliable simulation approaches are needed, in order to meet the defined NVH targets of these systems and implementing CAE methods for front loading, Design Validation Process (DVP). This paper introduces the application of a novel NVH analysis workflow on an electric vehicle driveline including both electromagnetic and mechanical excitations for an absolute evaluation of the NVH performance. At first, the electromagnetic field is simulated using FEM method to extract the excitations on the stator, rotor bearings as well as the drive torque. Then, the multibody dynamic model of the driveline is built-up, driven by this torque. The effect of eccentricity and skew angle of rotor in electromagnetic excitations are shown.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1771
Manish Chhabra
Abstract By reducing overall noise emanating from Engine at design phase, permits to reduce both time-to-market and the cost for developing new engines. In order to reduce vibration and radiated noise in engine assembly, oil pan is one of the most critical components. This study explains the key-steps that are executed to optimize the oil pan design for 4-cylinder diesel engine by improving Normal Modes, modified Topology, reduced Forced Frequency Response and ATV analysis for reducing its noise radiation. Using Multi-body tool crankshaft forces were generated and the FE model of Base Design was analysed for its noise radiation and panel contribution was done for finding the most radiating panels using Boundary Element Method approach. A series of iterative optimization were carried out with commercial software.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 42276