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2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1311
Suman Mishra, Nagesh Gummadi, Lloyd Bozzi, Neil Vaughn, Rob Higley
Air rush noise is exhaust gas driven flow induced noise in the frequency range of 500-6500 Hz. It is very essential to understand the flow physics of exhaust gases with in the mufflers in order to identify any counter measures that can attenuate this error state. This study is aimed at predicting the flow physics and hence of air rush noise of exhaust mufflers in the aforementioned frequency range at a typical exhaust flow rate and temperature. The study is performed on 2 different muffler designs which show a significant air rush noise level difference when tested on the vehicle. The transient computational study was performed using DES with 2nd order spatial discretization and 2nd order implicit scheme for temporal discretization in StarCCM+. To compare with test data, a special flow test stand is designed so that all high and low frequency contents emanating from the engine are attenuated before the flow enters the test part.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0336
Ganesh Liladhar Yewale, Abhishek Tapkire, D Radhakrishna, Popat Shejwal, Kaushal Singh, Gaurav Panchal
Abstract VRDE has developed Wankel type rotary engine to achieve high power output & fuel efficiency for indigenization programme of UAVs. This engine is meeting all performance parameters needed for intended aerial vehicle. This paper describes the testing methodology followed by development engineers to prove the endurance and reliability of UAV engine for airworthiness certification. This paper gives the brief about testing carried out on the Wankel engine, failures faced during endurance testing and their rectification to enhance the life of the engine to achieve hundred test cycle mark. This paper also briefs about the test set up, endurance test cycles simulating the practical operating conditions.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0006
Ran Amiel, Leonid Tartakovsky
Abstract This paper provides an analysis of the effect of a flight altitude on knock occurrence in reciprocating SI turbocharged engines. It presents results of the computational study aimed at investigating reasons leading to knock occurrence and methods of alleviating the knock tendency of small aircraft engines. Turbochargers are frequently used to improve the performance of aviation platforms at high altitudes. Although a turbocharger provides the benefits of increased power, improved BSFC and a downsized engine, it can result in engine knock because of increasing the intake air temperature, due to a rise in the compression ratios as the air density drops. Aerial platforms experience environmental conditions that can change drastically in a matter of a few minutes. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the combined effects of altitude, initial ground temperature, humidity, flight velocity and fuel octane numbers on the emergence of knock following takeoff.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0078
Mark R. Mataczynski, Paul Litke, Benjamin Naguy, Jacob Baranski
Abstract Aircraft engine power is degraded with increasing altitude according to the resultant reduction in air pressure, temperature, and density. One way to mitigate this problem is through turbo-normalization of the air being supplied to the engine. Supercharger and turbocharger components suffer from a well-recognized loss in efficiency as they are scaled down in order to match the reduced mass flow demands of small-scale Internal Combustion Engines. This is due in large part to problems related to machining tolerance limitations, such as the increase in relative operating clearances, and increased blade thickness relative to the flow area. As Internal Combustion Engines decrease in size, they also suffer from efficiency losses owing primarily to thermal loss. This amplifies the importance of maximizing the efficiency of all sub-systems in order to minimize specific fuel consumption and enhance overall aircraft performance.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1991
Syed J. Khalid
Abstract Aircraft subsystems essential for flight safety and airworthiness, including flight controls, environmental control system (ECS), anti-icing, electricity generation, and starting, require engine bleed and power extraction. Predictions of the resulting impacts on maximum altitude net thrust(>8%), range, and fuel burn, and quantification of turbofan performance sensitivities with compressor bleed, and with both high pressure(HP) rotor power extraction and low pressure(LP) rotor power extraction were obtained from simulation. These sensitivities indicated the judicious extraction options which would result in the least impact. The “No Bleed” system in Boeing 787 was a major step forward toward More Electric Aircraft (MEA) and analysis in this paper substantiates the claimed benefits.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1994
Wei Wu, Yeong-Ren Lin, Louis Chow, Edmund Gyasi, John P. Kizito, Quinn Leland
Abstract For aircraft electromechanical actuator (EMA) cooling applications using forced air produced by axial fans, the main objective in fan design is to generate high static pressure head, high volumetric flow rate, and high efficiency over a wide operating range of rotational speed (1x∼3x) and ambient pressure (0.2∼1 atm). In this paper, a fan design based on a fan diameter of 86 mm, fan depth (thickness) of 25.4 mm, and hub diameter of 48 mm is presented. The blade setting angle and the chord lengths at the leading and trailing edges are varied in their suitable ranges to determine the optimal blade profiles. The fan static pressure head, volumetric flow rate, and flow velocity are calculated at various ambient pressures and rotational speeds. The optimal blade design in terms of maximum total-to-total pressure ratio and efficiency at the design point is obtained via CFD simulation.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1997
Wei Wu, Yeong-Ren Lin, Louis Chow, Edmund Gyasi, John P. Kizito, Quinn Leland
Abstract The aircraft electromechanical actuator (EMA) cooling fan is a critical component because an EMA failure caused by overheating could lead to a catastrophic failure in aircraft. Fault tree analysis (FTA) is used to access the failure probability of EMA fans with the goal of improving their mean time to failure (MTTF) from ∼O(5×104) to ∼ O(2.5×109) hours without incurring heavy weight penalty and high cost. The dual-winding and dual-bearing approaches are analyzed and a contra rotating dual-fan design is proposed. Fan motors are assumed to be brushless direct current (BLDC) motors. To have a full understanding of fan reliability, all possible failure mechanisms and failure modes are taken into account.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1998
Michele Trancossi, Jose Pascoa, Carlos Xisto
Abstract Environmental and economic issues related to the aeronautic transport, with particular reference to the high-speed one are opening new perspectives to pulsejets and derived pulse detonation engines. Their importance relates to high thrust to weight ratio and low cost of manufacturing with very low energy efficiency. This papers presents a preliminary evaluation in the direction of a new family of pulsejets which can be coupled with both an air compression system which is currently in pre-patenting study and a more efficient and enduring valve systems with respect to today ones. This new pulsejet has bee specifically studied to reach three objectives: a better thermodynamic efficiency, a substantial reduction of vibrations by a multi-chamber cooled architecture, a much longer operative life by more affordable valves. Another objective of this research connects directly to the possibility of feeding the pulsejet with hydrogen.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2017
Devesh Kumar, Konrad Juethner, Yves Fournier
Abstract In modern complex engine design, it is a common challenge to keep simulation in step with changes to component geometry, environmental conditions, and mission data - and this applies to both actual designs and those that belong to the hypothetical design space as explored in design of experiments (DOE). In this paper, an effective simulation process and data management (SPDM) approach is presented that hinges on a focus on components, their generalized connections and programmatic templating. This simulation approach improves the fidelity of engine analysis, engineering productivity, quality, scalability across the gas turbine engine organization, and HPC utilization. In addition to this new analysis machinery, gas turbine engine modeling fidelity is elevated by surpassing commonly used one-dimensional (1D) models of rotors.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2020
Constanza Ahumada Sanhueza, Andrea Bristot, Shubham Kumar, Nicolas Schneider, Seamus Garvey, Herve Morvan
Abstract This paper proposes an integrated system’s approach towards design of aero-engine subsystems - seals, bearing chamber, generator and power system. In a conventional design approach, the design of the overall system is typically broken-down into subsystems. Therefore, the focus is not on the mutual interaction between different components or subsystems, resulting in a lack of characterization of the overall system performance at the design phase. A systems design approach adopts a much broader outlook, focusing on the overall optimization of the system performance. This paper is divided into two parts. The first part presents an integrated approach for modelling the electrical, mechanical and hydraulic subsystems of aero engines, in order to analyze the fluid dynamics interactions and reduce the transversal shaft vibrations. For this, an in-line starter/generator and an air-riding seal are studied.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2018
Syed J. Khalid
Abstract The key commercial aircraft propulsion requirements toward ensuring flight safety, operational efficiency, reduced CO2 footprint, and community acceptability include high installed thrust, low specific fuel consumption, and reduced noise. The objective of this paper is to highlight the various ways turbofan performance can be enhanced. First the advantage of high bypass ratio (BPR) configurations will be explained with the help of clean sheet cycle designs with the corresponding off-design performance. The achievement of hot day performance and improved durability with high BPR designs, and the benefit from core supercharging has been presented. Next, the use of on-line control effector modulations, including variable bypass exhaust nozzle, for further improvement in cruise SFC (up to an indicated 2.6%) is shown. This is followed by a discussion of medium BPR mixed exhaust designs which have a performance advantage compared to the same BPR separate exhaust configurations.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2050
Martin Espinosa Sanchez, Mario Pérez Millás
Abstract The effect of air pockets in capillaries in terms of pressure variations is investigated experimentally. Pressure sensors in aircraft are often installed separate to the pipes and connected with capillaries to minimise ignition sources within fuel tanks. Trapped air within these capillaries might distort the measurement. These effects are characterised in this paper. Extensive tests with different capillary configurations, trapped air volumes and pressure transients are studied. The data obtained shows that the main effect of trapped air during pressure transients is a delay in the pressure response against its excitation, causing local pressure oscillations around its source value until the pressure is equal in both places again. These oscillations can turn into high pressure peaks under critical conditions. Greater amounts of air can cause greater delays and viceversa.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2044
Jeffrey J. Joyce, Scott Beecher, Laurent Fabre, Ramesh Rajagopalan
Abstract Over the past few decades, advanced methods have been developed for the analysis of digital systems using mathematical reasoning, i.e., formal logic. These methods are supported by sophisticated software tools that can be used to perform analysis far beyond what is practically achievable using “paper and pencil” analysis. In December 2011, RTCA published RTCA DO-178C [1] along with a set of technical supplements including RTCA DO-333 [2] which provides guidance on the use of formal methods towards the certification of airborne software. Such methods have the potential to reduce the cost of verification by using formal analysis instead of conventional test-based methods to produce a portion of the verification evidence required for certification.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2060
Vijay Jagdale, Jagadeesh Tangudu
Abstract It is desired to reduce stator end winding length and mass to reduce associated resistive losses, increase efficiency and power density of an induction motor. With recent advancements in additive manufacturing technology, it is possible to deposit copper conductive paths and insulation layers in a selective controlled manner. This enables more compact end winding designs. The objective of this paper is to present a topology optimization based approach for design of stator end winding to minimize its overall length, volume and mass. Design approach and parametric study results for a representative stator design are presented in this paper. By reducing length of end winding, efficiency and power density of the induction motor can be increased enabling benefit realization for weight critical aerospace applications, incorporation in electric vehicle market and potentially reducing rare-earth dependency.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2067
Qingchuan Shi, Kartik Lakshminarashimhan, Christopher Noll, Eelco Scholte, Omer Khan
Abstract Modern aircraft systems employ numerous processors to achieve system functionality. In particular, engine controls and power distribution subsystems rely heavily on software to provide safety-critical functionality, and are expected to move towards multicore architectures. The computing hardware-layer of avionic systems must be able to execute many concurrent workloads under tight deterministic execution guarantees to meet the safety standards. Single-chip multicores are attractive for safety-critical embedded systems due to their lightweight form factor. However, multicores aggressively share hardware resources, leading to interference that in turn creates non-deterministic execution for multiple concurrent workloads. We propose an approach to remove on-chip interference via a set of methods to spatio-temporally partition shared multicore resources.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2063
Beata I. Wawrzyniak, Jagadeesh Tangudu
Abstract Induction machines (IM) are considered work horse for industrial applications due to their rugged, reliable and inexpensive nature; however, their low power density restricts their use in volume and weight limited environments such as an aerospace, traction and propulsion applications. Given recent advancements in additive manufacturing technologies, this paper presents opportunity to improve power density of induction machines by taking advantage of higher slot fill factor (SFF) (defined as ratio of bare copper area to slot area) is explored. Increase in SFF is achieved by deposition of copper in much more compact way than conventional manufacturing methods of winding in electrical machines. Thus a design tradeoff study for an induction motor with improved SFF is essential to identify and highlight the potentials of IM for high power density applications and is elaborated in this paper.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2013
Evgeni Ganev, Chiyuan Chiang, Leroy Fizer, Ed Johnson
Abstract This paper addresses the implementation of electric taxiing without the use of main engines by using electric propulsion of the landing gears. Substantial progress in this area has been achieved by Honeywell Aerospace and Safran in a joint initiative for developing an electric green taxiing system (eTaxi). Considerable analysis, design, fabrication, and testing have already been completed, which culminated in a demonstration at the Paris Air Show (PAS) in 2013. The eTaxi system has been installed on an A320 airplane that uses the auxiliary power unit (APU) to generate electric power to provide propulsion to two wheels of the main landing gear. The main advantages of such a system are reduction of fuel consumption and audio noise, reduction of CO2 , carbon and nitrous emissions, reduced engine foreign object damage (FOD) exposure and fast-turn time savings by elimination of the ground tractor for pushback operation.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-1982
Michelle Bash, Steven Pekarek, Jon Zumberge
Abstract The cost and complexity of aircraft power systems limit the number of integrated system evaluations that can be performed in hardware. As a result, evaluations are often performed using emulators to mimic components or subsystems. As an example, aircraft generation systems are often tested using an emulator that consists of a bank of resistors that are switched to represent the power draw of one or more actuators. In this research, consideration is given to modern wide bandwidth emulators (WBEs) that use power electronics and digital controls to obtain wide bandwidth control of power, current, or voltage. Specifically, this paper first looks at how well a WBE can emulate the impedance of a load when coupled to a real-time model. Capturing the impedance of loads and sources is important for accurately assessing the small-signal stability of a system.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-1981
Luis C. Herrera, Bang-Hung Tsao
One of the main challenges in the power systems of future aircraft is the capability to support pulsed power loads. The high rise and fall times of these loads along with their high power and negative impedance effects will have an undesirable impact on the stability and dc bus voltage quality of the power system. For this reason, studying ways to mitigate these adverse effects are needed for the possible adoption of these type of loads. One of the technologies which can provide benefits to the stability and bus power quality is Energy Storage (ES). This ES is designed with the capability to supply high power at a fast rate. In this paper, the management of the ES to mitigate the effects of pulsed power loads in an aircraft power system is presented. First, the detailed nonlinear model of the power network with pulsed power loads is derived. Due to the large size of this model, a model order reduction is performed using a balanced truncation and a second order approximation.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1822
Drasko Masovic, Franz Zotter, Eugene Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Robert Höldrich
Abstract Radiation of sound from an open pipe with a hot mean flow presents one of the classic problems of acoustics in inhomogeneous media. The problem has been especially brought into focus in the last several decades, in the context of noise control of vehicle exhaust systems and jet engines. However, the reports on the measurements of the radiated sound field are still rare and scattered over different values of subsonic and supersonic flow speeds, cold and hot jets, as well as different sound frequency ranges. This paper focuses on low Mach number values of the mean flow speed and low frequencies of the incident (plane) sound waves inside an unflanged cylindrical pipe with a straight cut. It presents the results of the far-field radiation pattern measurements and compares them with an existing analytical model from the literature. The mean flow inside the pipe reached Mach number values up to 0.25 and temperature up to 300°C.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0742
Michael Szedlmayer, Chol-Bum M. Kweon
Abstract The objective of the study is to characterize combustion and performance of a multi-cylinder turbocharged direct-injection (DI) diesel engine at altitude conditions according to the International Standard Atmosphere (ISA). Experiments were performed on the 6.6-liter turbocharged DI diesel engine, a model similar to that of the Army’s Joint Light Tactical Vehicle. The engine was installed in the US Army Research Laboratory Small Engine Altitude Research Facility. Outside air temperature (OAT) and outside air pressure were independently controlled to match the ISA-OAT at selected altitude conditions: sea level, 1524, 3048, and 4572 m. The test engine is equipped with a single-stage variable nozzle turbocharger and Bosch CRIN 3 common-rail injection system. Three load conditions (i.e., low, mid, and high) were selected at 1400 rpm to investigate combustion and performance of the engine using Jet Propellant-8 (JP-8) fuel.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0610
Enrico Mattarelli, Carlo Alberto Rinaldini, Tommaso Savioli
Abstract Interest in 2-stroke engines has been recently renewed by several prototypes, developed for the automotive and/or the aircraft field. Loop scavenging, with piston controlled ports is particularly attractive, but the configurations successfully developed in the past for motorbike racing (in particular, the 125cc unit displacement, crankcase pump engines), are not suitable for automotive applications. Therefore, new criteria are necessary to address the scavenging system design of the new generation of 2-stroke automobile/aircraft engines. The paper reviews the transfer ports optimization of a loop scavenged 2-stroke cylinder, whose main parameters were defined in a previous study. The optimization has been carried by means of a parametric grid, considering 3 parameters (2 tilt angles, and the focus distance), and 3 different engine speeds (2000-3000-4000 rpm, assuming a Diesel engine).
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2406
Hendrik Strummel, Frank Thielecke
Abstract Fuel cell technology will play a decisive role in the process of achieving the ambitious ecological goals of the aviation industry. However, apart from its obvious environmental advantages, the integration of fuel cell technology into commercial aircraft represents a challenging task in terms of operational and economical aspects. Since fuel cell systems are currently exposed to an intense competition with well-established power sources onboard an aircraft, engineers are in pursuit of highly efficient and particularly lightweight fuel cell systems. Supported by model-based design in conjunction with elaborate optimization techniques this pursuit has led to highly specialized systems. These systems tend to use their components to full capacity, which typically implies marginal system robustness.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2414
Carsten Dunker, Riko Bornholdt, Frank Thielecke, Robert Behr
Abstract The All-Electric-Engine with only electrical power offtake is a main goal in aircraft system development. The use of electric-motor pumps instead of engine-driven pumps for powering the central hydraulic systems could be a part of this objective. Additionally, the concept would meet the incremental development strategy performed by the aerospace industry today and saves costs by using state-of-the-art hydraulic actuation technology. This paper describes a process for optimizing such systems regarding their architecture and design parameters. For this task a methodology for the hydraulic consumer allocation called OPAL is used and extended by an automatic power system sizing. Feasible allocations, called permutations, are determined on the basis of preliminary system safety assessments regarding multiple top failure events. In the next step an automated sizing of the permutations is performed based on simplified hydraulic load analyses.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2422
Michele Trancossi, Antonio Dumas, Mauro Madonia, Maharshi Subhash, Jose Pascoa, Shyam Das, Francesco Grimaccia, Chris Bingham, Tim Smith, Dean Vucinic, Anna Sunol
Abstract One of the best airplanes ever realized by the European Aircraft industry was the Dornier Do 28D Skyservant, an extraordinary STOL light utility aircraft with the capability to carry up to 13 passengers. It has been a simple and rugged aircraft capable also of operating under arduous conditions and very easy and simple maintenance. The architecture of this airplane, which has operated actively for more than 20 years, is very interesting analyzing the implementation of a new propulsion system because of the unusual incorporation of two engines, as well as the two main landing gear shock struts of the faired main landing gear attached to short pylons on either side of the forward fuselage. This unconventional design allows an easy implementation of different propulsion units, such as the history of different experimental versions allowed.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2423
Samarth Jain, Soumya Roy, Dhruv Gupta, Vasu Kumar, Naveen Kumar
Abstract The art and science of thrust vectoring technology has seen a gradual shift towards fluidic thrust vectoring techniques owing to the potential they have to greatly influence the aircraft propulsion systems. The prime motive of developing a fluidic thrust vectoring system has been to reduce the weight of the mechanical thrust vectoring system and to further simplify the configuration. Aircrafts using vectored thrust rely to a lesser extent on aerodynamic control surfaces such as ailerons or elevator to perform various maneuvers and turns than conventional-engine aircrafts and thus have a greater advantage in combat situations. Fluidic thrust vectoring systems manipulate the primary exhaust flow with a secondary air stream which is typically bled from the engine compressor or fan. This causes the compressor operating curve to shift from the optimum condition, allowing the optimization of engine performance. These systems make both pitch and yaw vectoring possible.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2424
Alberto Boretti, Shuheng Jiang
Abstract Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) require simple and reliable engines of high power to weight ratio. Wankel and two stroke engines offer many advantages over four stroke engines. A two stroke engines featuring crank case scavenging, precise oiling, direct injection and jet ignition is analyzed here by using CAD, CFD and CAE tools. Results of simulations of engine performances are shown in details. The CFD analysis is used to study fuel injection, mixing and combustion. The CAE model then returns the engine performances over the full range of loads and speeds with the combustion parameters given as an input. The use of asymmetric rather than symmetric port timing and supercharging scavenging is finally suggested as the best avenue to further improve power density and fuel conversion efficiency.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2486
Greg Kilchenstein, F. Matthew Juarez
Abstract The USAF T56 engine Program Office has adopted a unique maintenance approach which utilizes the concept of complete system reliability in order to optimize their cost of workscoping aircraft gas turbine engines. While classical Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) focuses on the actual reliability and failure modes representative of a particular system, its benefits are limited since it only describes individual system components9. The workscope cost optimization program provides the user with recommended optimal repair workscopes based on the underlying reliability and cost of repair options. This maintenance concept is based upon the methodology documented in SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) JA6097, which is a “Best Practices Guide” established to provide direction in objectively determining which other maintenance to perform on a system when that system requires corrective action, with the goal of improving overall system reliability at the lowest possible cost.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2449
Solange Baena, Joseph K-W Lam, Craig Lawson
Abstract This paper focuses on the investigation of the nature, process and effects of ice accretion on different feed pump strainers upstream of the aircraft feeding system. A suitable test rig was designed to circulate Jet A-1 containing water/ice contaminants at cold temperatures through the strainers. Following an extensive literature review, a number of screening tests were performed. These provided a strong base for an exhaustive study of fuel icing in the dynamic environment offered by the test rig. The effects of the rate of fuel cooling on the nature of ice were examined. As expected, it was observed that the yield of ice generated on the mesh screen increased with the water concentration in the fuel. It was also revealed that at higher cooling rates, a crust of snow formed on top of softer ice on the mesh screen.
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